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  • 1.
    Babic, Ankica
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik
    Oskarshamns sjukhus .
    Åhlfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Franzén, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Wigertz, Ove
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Machine learning to support diagnostics in the domain of asymptomatic liver disease1995In: MEDINFO95,1995, Edmonton: HC & CC , 1995, p. 809-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Babic, Ankica
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Hedin, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik
    Oskarshamns sjukhus .
    Franzén, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Frydén, Aril
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Wigertz, Ove
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Decision support for monitoring of chronic Hepatitis C: can blood laboratory tests help?1996In: Medical Informatics Europe 96,1996, Amsterdam: IOS Press , 1996, p. 551-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Borch, Kurt
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Skarsgard, J
    Franzén, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Mårdh, Sven
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology.
    Rehfeld, JF
    Benign gastric polyps - Morphological and functional origin2003In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568, Vol. 48, no 7, p. 1292-1297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most common types of benign gastric polyps are fundic gland polyps, hyperplastic polyps, and adenomas. The aim of this study was to determine on which morphological and functional background benign gastric polyps develop. The study includes 85 consecutive patients with gastric polyps and sex and age-matched controls without polyps selected at random from a general population sample. The type of polyp was hyperplastic in 52 (61%), fundic gland in 18 (21%), adenoma in 10 (12%), carcinoid in 2 (2%), hamartoma in 2 ( 2%), and inflammatory fibroid in 1 (1%) of the cases. Routine biopsies from the gastric corpus and antrum were examined for presence of gastritis and H. pylori. Blood samples were analyzed for H. pylori antibodies, H+, K+-ATPase antibodies, gastrin, and pepsinogen I. Patients with hyperplastic polyps had increased P-gastrin concentrations and S-H+, K+-ATPase antibody titers and decreased S-pepsinogen I concentrations with a high prevalence of atrophic corpus gastritis or pangastritis. A similar pattern was observed among patients with adenomas, whereas patients with fundic gland polyps had normal serology and a lower prevalence of gastritis and H. pylori infection than controls. In conclusion, hyperplastic polyps and adenomas are generally associated with atrophic gastritis. Patients with fundic gland polyps seem to have a sounder mucosa than controls. Whereas the risk of malignant gastric neoplasia is increased in patients with hyperplastic polyps or adenomas, this does not seem to be the case in patients with fundic gland polyps.

  • 4.
    Chowdhury, Shamsul
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik
    Oskarshamns sjukhus .
    Krusinska, Ewa
    Technical University of Wroclaw, Poland .
    Franzén, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Wigertz, Ove
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Design and delivery of information resources and knowledge bases for the diagnosis and managementof liver disorders1994In: ANZIIS-94,1994, Brisbane: IEEE , 1994Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Franzén, Lennart E
    Department of Histopathology and Cytology, Aleris Medilab, Täby, Sweden.
    Holmqvist, Marika
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik L
    Department of Internal Medicine, County Hospital, Oskarshamn, Sweden.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Alcohol consumption is associated with progression of hepatic fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 366-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Moderate alcohol consumption has been reported to be inversely associated with cardiovascular disease and total mortality. The importance of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasing and many NAFLD patients suffer from cardiovascular disease. In these patients, moderate alcohol consumption could be beneficial. The aim of this study was to investigate whether low alcohol intake, consistent with the diagnosis of NAFLD, is associated with fibrosis progression in established NAFLD.

    Material and methods: Seventy-one patients originally referred because of chronically elevated liver enzymes and diagnosed with biopsy-proven NAFLD were re-evaluated. A validated questionnaire combined with an oral interview was used to assess weekly alcohol consumption and the frequency of episodic drinking. Significant fibrosis progression in NAFLD was defined as progression of more than one fibrosis stage or development of endstage liver disease during follow-up.

    Results: Mean follow-up (SD) was 13.8 (1.2) years between liver biopsies. At follow-up, 17 patients (24%) fulfilled the criteria for significant fibrosis progression. The proportion of patients reporting heavy episodic drinking at least once a month was higher among those with significant fibrosis progression (p=0.003) and a trend towards higher weekly alcohol consumption was also seen (p=0.061). In a multivariate binary logistic regression analysis, heavy episodic drinking (p0.001) and insulin resistance (p0.01) were independently associated with significant fibrosis progression.

    Conclusions: Moderate alcohol consumption, consistent with the diagnosis of NAFLD to be set, is associated with fibrosis progression in NAFLD. These patients should be advised to refrain from heavy episodic drinking.

  • 6.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Franzén, Lennart E.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik L.
    Department of Internal Medicine, County Hospital, Oskarshamn, Sweden.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    The clinical relevance of the Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Activity Score (NAS) in predicting fibrosis progression2008Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The NAFLD activity score (NAS) is a newly proposed system to grade the necroinflammatory activity in liver biopsies of NAFLD patients. This study evaluates the usefulness of the NAS in predicting clinical deterioration and fibrosis progression in NAFLD.

    Methods: One hundred and twenty-nine patients with biopsy proven NAFLD were included in a long-term histological follow-up study. Clinical and histological course were compared between NASH, “borderline NASH”, and “not NASH” patients. Significant fibrosis progression in NAFLD was defined as progression of more than one fibrosis stage or development of end-stage liver disease during follow-up.

    Results: Eighty-eight patients accepted re-evaluation and 68 underwent repeat liver biopsy. Mean time between biopsies was 13.8 ± 1.2 years (range 10.3-16.3). At baseline, NASH was diagnosed in 2 (1.6%) patients, and at follow-up, in 1 (1.5%) patient. A trend towards higher baseline NAS was seen in patients (n = 7) that developed end-stage liver disease (3.1 ± 0.9 vs. 2.4 ± 1.0; P = 0.062). Baseline NAS was significantly higher in patients with progressive fibrosis (2.9 ± 0.9 vs. 2.2 ± 0.9; P = 0.017), and NAS was independently associated with significant fibrosis progression tested in a multivariate analysis (P = 0.023). However, 18% of patients without NASH progressed significantly in fibrosis stage.

    Conclusion: Although the NAS is independently associated with future risk of progressive fibrosis in NAFLD, the clinical usefulness of the score is limited due to the significant overlap in clinical development between NAS-score groups.

  • 7.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Franzén, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik L
    Department of Internal Medicine, County Hospital, Oskarshamn, Sweden.
    Holmqvist, Marika
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Statins in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and chronically elevated liver enzymes: a histopathological follow-up study.2007In: Journal of Hepatology, ISSN 0168-8278, E-ISSN 1600-0641, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 135-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims: The effect of statins on hepatic histology in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is not known. This study explores hepatic histology in NAFLD patients before and after initiation of statin therapy and compares histological outcome with NAFLD patients who had not been prescribed statins.

    Methods: Sixty-eight NAFLD patients were re-evaluated. Follow-up ranged from 10.3 to 16.3 years. Subjects were clinically investigated and a repeat liver biopsy was obtained. No patient was taking statins at baseline while 17 patients were treated with statins at follow-up.

    Results: At baseline, patients that later were prescribed statins had significantly higher BMI and more pronounced hepatic steatosis. At follow-up patients on medication with statins continued to have significantly higher BMI. Diabetes was significantly more common among patients on medication with statins and they had significantly more pronounced insulin resistance. However, they exhibited a significant reduction of liver steatosis at follow-up as opposed to patients not taking statins. Despite exhibiting a high risk profile for progression of liver fibrosis, only four patients on statin treatment progressed in fibrosis stage.

    Conclusions: Statins can be prescribed in patients with elevated liver enzymes because of NAFLD.

  • 8.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Franzén, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik L
    Department of Internal Medicine, County Hospital, Oskarshamn, Sweden;.
    Thorelius, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holmqvist, Marika
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Long-term follow-up of patients with NAFLD and elevated liver enzymes.2006In: Hepatology, ISSN 0270-9139, E-ISSN 1527-3350, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 865-873Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of elevated liver enzymes in patients of developed countries. We determined the long-term clinical and histological courses of such patients. In a cohort study, 129 consecutively enrolled patients diagnosed with biopsy-proven NAFLD were reevaluated. Survival and causes of death were compared with a matched reference population. Living NAFLD patients were offered repeat liver biopsy and clinical and biochemical investigation. Mean follow-up (SD) was 13.7 (1.3) years. Mortality was not increased in patients with steatosis. Survival of patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) was reduced (P = .01). These subjects more often died from cardiovascular (P = .04) and liver-related (P = .04) causes. Seven patients (5.4%) developed end-stage liver disease, including 3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. The absence of periportal fibrosis at baseline had a negative predictive value of 100% in predicting liver-related complications. At follow-up, 69 of 88 patients had diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance. Progression of liver fibrosis occurred in 41%. These subjects more often had a weight gain exceeding 5 kg (P = .02), they were more insulin resistant (P = .04), and they exhibited more pronounced hepatic fatty infiltration (P = .03) at follow-up. In conclusion, NAFLD with elevated liver enzymes is associated with a clinically significant risk of developing end-stage liver disease. Survival is lower in patients with NASH. Most NAFLD patients will develop diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance in the long term. Progression of liver fibrosis is associated with more pronounced insulin resistance and significant weight gain.

  • 9.
    Franzén, Lennart E
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Unit of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Clinical Research Centre, University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Semiquantitative evaluation overestimates the degree of steatosis in liver biopsies: a comparison to stereological point counting.2005In: Modern Pathology, ISSN 0893-3952, E-ISSN 1530-0285, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 912-916Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The degree of steatosis in liver biopsies is usually assessed by a morphological semiquantitative approach in which the histopathologist uses a four-graded scale: 0-3 or none, slight, moderate and severe. Scores 1-3 are considered to correspond to fat deposition in <33, 33-66 and >66% of the hepatocytes. There is a considerable inter- and intra-individual variation in such scoring methods and a more standardized and quantitative approach is preferable. In the present study, we compare the semiquantitative technique with the stereological point counting method in the assessment of hepatic steatosis. A total of 75 archived liver needle biopsies were used. They were selected according to the original routine diagnosis of slight, moderate or severe steatosis. In all, 10 randomly selected images from each biopsy were digitized into a computer, a point grid lattice was superimposed and the number of hits on fat globules was counted. A pathologist scored the specimens in a four-graded scale as described above. The mean liver biopsy area (volume) with fat in hepatocytes was 2.2% for grade 1, 9.2% for grade 2 and 23.1% for grade 3. The kappa value for the semiquantitative estimates was 0.71 for the unweigthed kappa and 0.87 for weighted kappa. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.99 for images counted twice and 0.95 when two sets of images were captured from the same biopsy. These ICCs indicate excellent agreement and above that of the semiquantitative estimates. In conclusion, the area/volume of fat content of the hepatocytes is greatly overemphasized in semiquantitative estimation. Furthermore, the point counting technique has a better reproducibility than visual evaluation and should be preferred in estimates of liver steatosis in scientific studies and in clinical contexts when the amount of steatosis is important for treatment and prognosis, such as liver transplantation.

  • 10.
    Franzén, Lennart
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Ghassemifar, M.R.
    Salerud, Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Tarpila, Erkki
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Actin fiber orientation in connective tissue contraction. A quantitative study using the perforated rat mesentery model.1996In: Wound Repair and Regeneration, ISSN 1067-1927, E-ISSN 1524-475X, Vol. 4, p. 454-460Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11. Ghassemifar, M.R.
    et al.
    Tarnuzzer, R.W.
    Salerud, Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Schultz, G.S.
    Franzén, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Alpha-smooth muscle actin expression in rat and mouse mesenteric wounds after TGF-ß1 treatment1997In: Wound Repair and Regeneration, ISSN 1067-1927, E-ISSN 1524-475X, Vol. 5, p. 339-347Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Krusinska, Ewa
    et al.
    Dept of Mathemtics and iInformatics Paris.
    Babic, Ankica
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik
    Oskarshamns hospital .
    Chowdhury, Shamsul
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Wigertz, Ove
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Franzén, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    A statistically rule-based decision support system for the management of patients with suspected liver disease1993In: Vol. 18, no 2, p. 113-130Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Krusinska, Ewa
    et al.
    University of Wroclaw Poland.
    Babic, Ankica
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik
    Oskarshamn Hospital .
    Franzén, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Foberg, Ulla
    Dept of Infectious diseases Linköping.
    Frydén, Aril
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Wigertz, Ove
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Empirical modelling versus commonly applied data analysis techniques as used for decision support in liver diseases1992In: MEDINFO92,1992, Amsterdam: Elsevier Science Publ , 1992, p. 949-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik
    et al.
    Oskarshamn Hospital .
    Krusinska, Ewa
    Technical University of Wroclaw, Poland .
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Chowdhury, Shamsul
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Babic, Ankica
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Franzén, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Frydén, Aril
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Wigertz, Ove
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Investigation and follow-up of patients with raised levels of liver transaminases. Computerised support for high quality and cost-effetiveness1994In: Medical Informatics in Europe MIE94,1994, 1994, p. 196-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Norberg, U.
    et al.
    Dept. of Transplant. and Liver Surg., Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Soderlind, K.
    Franzén, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Loven, C.
    Strandelius, E.
    Wolfbrandt, A.
    Backman, L.
    A modified 'Spanish model' for organ donation in the southeast region of Sweden2000In: Transplantation Proceedings, ISSN 0041-1345, E-ISSN 1873-2623, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 72-74Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 16.
    Petersson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Pathology Research Department, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden and Department of Pathology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Franzén, Lennart E
    Department of Pathology, Medical Centre Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Borch, Kurt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Characterization of the gastric cardia in volunteers from the general population: type of mucosa, helicobacter pylori infection, inflammation, mucosal proliferative activity, p53 and p21 expression, and relations to gastritis2010In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 46-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this research was to characterize the mucosa of the gastric cardia in relation to infection with Helicobacter pylori and the occurrence of chronic gastritis in other parts of the stomach in a sample of the general population. In this study, 80 adult volunteers underwent esophagogastroscopy with biopsies from the gastric cardia, corpus, and antrum. Gastritis was classified according to the Sydney system. Chronic gastritis (cardia excepted) was diagnosed in 35 subjects, 30 with Hpylori infection. Epithelial proliferative activity (Ki-67), p53- and p21 expression were examined quantitatively with cell counting after immunohistochemical stainings. Esophagitis was diagnosed macroscopically. Fourty eight subjects had cardia-type and 32 corpus-type mucosa in the anatomical cardia. The prevalence of esophagitis (nine cases) did not differ between these groups. Carditis was more prevalent among subjects with cardia-type mucosa (73 vs. 28%, P < 0.0001). Hpylori was present in 48% of those with cardia-type and 25% of those with corpus-type mucosa (P = 0.06). Of the 44 subjects with carditis, 31 had Hpylori in this location. The group with Hpylori infection had significantly higher mucosal proliferative activity when compared to uninfected subjects. Among the subjects with H. pylori-associated carditis, more p53-positive epithelial cells were detected compared to both the non-infected group (P = 0.0004) and to subjects with non-Hpylori-associated carditis (P = 0.03). In subjects with cardia-type mucosa, and both carditis and gastritis, the degree of chronic inflammation was higher in the cardia compared to the corpus and antrum and the p53 expression was significantly higher in the cardia compared to the corpus, but similar to that in the antrum. The proliferative activity was significantly higher in the antrum compared to the cardia and corpus, respectively. In conclusion, H. pylori infection, carditis, and increased p53 expression are more common in subjects with cardia- than corpus-type mucosa in the gastric cardia. Carditis is mainly related to Hpylori infection. There are some differences regarding inflammation, proliferative activity, and p53 expression between the cardia and other regions of the stomach, yet the significance of these differences remains to be clarified.

  • 17.
    Sjöstedt, Camilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Hannestad, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry.
    Franzén, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Söderholm, Johan D
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Borch, Kurt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Atrophic gastritis is associated with increased sucrose permeability related to chronic inflammation2005In: Digestion, ISSN 0012-2823, E-ISSN 1421-9867, Vol. 72, no 4, p. 201-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Different theories have been presented to explain how atrophic gastritis may lead to gastric cancer development. One contributing factor could be impaired function of the gastric mucosal barrier. The aim of this study was to investigate if there are changes in gastric mucosal permeability to sucrose in atrophic gastritis. Methods: The study comprised 22 patients with atrophic gastritis and 21 normal controls. Gastritis was classified according to the Sydney system from endoscopic biopsies of the gastric corpus and antrum. All subjects were exposed to oral sucrose load (100 g), and the fraction of sucrose excreted in urine was measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results: The fraction of sucrose excreted in urine after oral load was significantly increased in atrophic gastritis compared with controls (median 0.08 vs. 0.04%, p = 0.003). Sucrose excretion was positively related to the degree of chronic inflammation (median fraction excreted: mild inflammation 0.06%, moderate inflammation 0.08%, severe inflammation 0.18%, p = 0.04) rather than to the degree of atrophy in the gastric mucosa. Occurrence of intestinal metaplasia was also associated with significantly higher sucrose excretion. However, in multivariate analysis, including intestinal metaplasia, only the degree of inflammation was positively related to sucrose excretion. Conclusion: Atrophic gastritis is associated with increased sucrose permeability, suggesting paracellular leakage of the gastric mucosa. This leakage seems to be related to the degree of inflammation rather than the degree of atrophy. The findings may have implications for the diseases and complications associated with atrophic gastritis. Copyright © 2005 S. Karger AG.

  • 18.
    Söderholm, Johan D
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Wiren, M
    Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden McMaster Univ, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Franzén, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Perdue, MH
    Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden McMaster Univ, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Olaison, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    "Topical" phase effects of acetysalicylic acid on human small bowel epithelium: Inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation and increased tight junction permeability.2000In: Gastroenterology, ISSN 0016-5085, E-ISSN 1528-0012, Vol. 118, no 4, p. 4298-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Tillander, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Franzén, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Karlsson, Maria H.
    Norlin, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Effect of steroid injections on the rotator cuff: An experimental study in rats1999In: Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery, ISSN 1058-2746, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 271-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of repeated steroid injections into the subacromial space. Thirty rats were injected either 3 or 5 times with triamcinolone in a dosage equivalent to that given to human beings or 3 or 5 times with saline into the subacromial space. One rat received no injection. The supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons were evaluated macroscopically and microscopically. Two different staining methods were used on each sample including hematoxylin eosin and Miller's elastin/van Gieson's solution. After 5 steroid injections, we found focal inflammation, necrosis, and fragmentation of collagen bundles in the tendon in 4 of 7 rats. The tendons of the controls showed a normal structure (P < .05). There were no pathologic changes among the rats that were injected with triamcinolone 3 times. These results show that repeated subacromial injections of triamcinolone may cause damage to the rotator cuff of the rat. This finding may indicate cautious use of subacromial steroid injections in human beings.

  • 20.
    Tillander, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Franzén, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Nilsson, Elise
    Department of Pathology, University Hospital of Malmö, Malmö, Sweden.
    Norlin, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Carrageenan-induced subacromial bursitis caused changes in the rat's rotator cuff2001In: Journal of Orthopaedic Research, ISSN 0736-0266, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 441-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was designed to investigate the histologic expression of the rat's supra- and infraspinatus tendons in carrageenan-induced subacromial bursitis. Thirty-two rats received subacromial injections with carrageenan (n = 28) or saline (n = 4). The tendons were analysed microscopically after staining with hematoxyline eosin, Van Giesons hematoxyline and immunofluorescent staining of fibronectin and fibrinogen. In the controls (saline × 10) and group A (carrageenan × 5) there were no changes in the tendons. In group B (carrageenan × 10) 3/8 rats showed macrophages between the collagen fibres and an increased staining of fibronectin. In group C (double dosis carrageenan) all rats had signs of fibrocartilaginous metaplasia in the supraspinatus tendon. In eight of these specimens even bony metaplasia was seen. The infraspinatus tendon showed fibrosis but no fibro-cartilaginous metaplasia. The results showed that iatrogenic bursitis after carrageenan subacromial injections was associated with marked changes of the supraspinatus tendon.

  • 21.
    Tillander, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Franzén, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Nilsson, Elise
    Department of Pathology, University Hospital of Malmö, Malmö, Sweden.
    Norlin, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Human biopsies in the rotator cuff diseaseManuscript (preprint) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22. Veress, B
    et al.
    Franzén, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Bodin, L
    Borch, Kurt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Duodenal intraepithelial lymphocyte-count revisited2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 138-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The number of intraepithelial lymphocytes in the duodenum was determined 30 years ago, the suggested normal upper limit being 40 lymphocytes per 100 epithelial cells. Methods: Duodenal mucosa was analysed from 18 healthy individuals and 56 consecutive patients biopsied because of epigastralgia (17 cases), diarrhoea (10 cases), oesophagitis (10 cases), iron-deficiency (9 cases) and B12-deficiency (10 cases) showing normal histology, along with 10 cases of active coeliac disease. The biopsies were fixed in 4% formalin overnight and embedded in paraffin. Three micrometre thick sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin and CD3. At least 300 epithelial cells were counted, the number of intraepithelial lymphocytes was given as the mean/100 epithelial cells. Extensive statistical analyses were performed. Results: In the healthy individuals the mean number (s) of intraepithelial lymphocytes/100 epithelial cells was 10.8 (2.6) and 13.2 (3.8) in H&E and CD3 stained sections, respectively. The upper limit of the confidence interval for CD3 staining was 29. There was no significant difference between normal individuals and the clinical groups, with the exception of coeliac disease. Conclusion: Two-step analysis of intraepithelial lymphocyte-determination is suggested: (a) semi-quantitative estimate on H&E-stained sections (normal ratio of 1:5 between lymphocytes and enterocytes, upper normal limit 20 lymphocytes) and (b) CD3-staining and counting if intraepithelial lymphocytosis is suspected. The upper normal range of intraepithelial lymphocytes is set at 25 CD3+ lymphocytes/100 epithelial cells. Values between 25 and 29 are regarded as 'borderline' and 30 or more represent pathologic intraepithelial lymphocytosis in the duodenum.

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