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  • 1.
    Ericson, Iréne
    et al.
    Nässjö.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Geriatrics.
    Lundh, Ulla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Nolan, Mike
    Sheffield.
    What constitutes good care for people with dementia?2001In: British journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing), ISSN 0966-0461, Vol. 10, no 11, p. 710-714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Person-centred care for people with dementia is an aspiration of both family and professional carers, but what constitutes person-centred care and how it can be achieved is less clear. This article describes a Swedish study in which in-depth interviews were completed with both family and professional carers of people with dementia with the purpose of exploring what they considered to be "best care". Important areas of similarity and difference were identified and the results suggest that both groups of carers need to work closely together if person-centred care is to become a reality.

  • 2. Guberman, N
    et al.
    Nickolas, E
    Nolan, M
    Rembicki, D
    Lundh, Ulla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Science in Nursing.
    Keefe, J
    Impactson practitioners of using research-based carer assessment tools: experiences from UK, Canada and Sweden with insights from Australia2003In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 11, p. 345-355Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Guberman, Nancy
    et al.
    Université du Québec à Montréal.
    Nicholas, Elinor
    University of York.
    Nolan, Mike
    University of Sheffield.
    Rembicki, Doris
    Eastern Domiciliary Care Service, Hampstead, Australia.
    Lundh, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Keefe, Janice
    Mount Saint Vincent University, Halifax.
    Impacts on practitioners of using research-based carer assessment tools: experiences from the UK, Canada and Sweden, with insights from Australia2003In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 345-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers and practitioners in several Western countries have recently developed tools for assessing the situation of the carers of adults who are ill, elderly or have disabilities. The present article describes the impact of three such assessment tools, from Canada, the UK and Sweden, on the professional practice of assessors. All tools were tested in agency-based studies. Focus groups, workshops and interviews with assessors were employed to understand the impact on professionals and their practice. An Australian researcher and case manager comments on these experiences from her unique perspective. The results reveal that the use of carer assessments can lead to changes in the appropriateness of intervention by informing practitioners of issues which are given little attention, but which impact on the adequacy of interventions to the service user. Across the projects, most workers found that the tools facilitated a more comprehensive, in-depth and carer-focused assessment. Experience across all the projects suggests that, used sensitively, such tools and approaches can play a key role in transforming the relationship between carers, and the health and social care system. Giving carers a legitimate voice, acknowledging their perspective and expertise, and making them central to assessment processes accords them status both as active partners, and as individuals with their own needs and aspirations, rather than seeing them primarily as resources. As a result of their experiences, many workers and administrators concluded that home-care programmes must change their mandate to include carers among their clients, raising the issue of available monetary and human resources to meet the needs of this group. In addition, as our Australian colleague points out, time, efficiency, relevance, benefit and minimal intrusiveness are important factors for practitioners which influence their use of assessment tools.

  • 4.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nolan, Mike
    University of Sheffield, UK.
    Lundh, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sustaining 'couplehood': Spouses' strategies for living positively with dementia2007In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 383-409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the strategies that spouses use in order to live positively when one partner has dementia. Data were collected from 152 interviews with 20 couples conducted over a period of five years. Using a constructivist grounded theory methodology, data were analysed to capture the main processes involved and charted how these changed over time. Three main phases were identified termed: `sustaining couplehood'; `maintaining involvement'; and `moving on', that operated in an iterative rather than linear fashion. The data highlight the very active role played by both partners, especially in the early stages of the disease, as they strive to maintain the quality and closeness of their relationship by creating what we term a `nurturative relational context'. The diverse strategies that the couples adopt are presented, and the gradual way in which the person with dementia `hands over' or `let's go' of responsibility to their partner is described. The article provides several new insights into the nature of spousal relationships in dementia and the ways in which they seek to maximize their quality of life, and, wherever possible, sustain couplehood.

  • 5.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nolan, Mike
    University of Sheffield, UK.
    Lundh, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    We do things together: A case study of couplehood2005In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 7-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The value of the single case study is well established in dementiacare with the seminal contributions of Alzheimerand Kitwood being based on the study of individuals.This article presents a case study of an elderly married coupleliving with dementia and explores how theirrelationship has continued to flourish. In drawingon their story we highlight ways in which both partners seekto ‘maintain involvement’ of theperson with dementia (PWD) (Keady, 1999), andconsider the various types of ‘work’ that is required. We suggest that whilst the ‘personhood’of the PWD as an individual has received muchrecent attention, a consideration of ‘couplehood’is also essential to a full understanding of how spouses live with and respond to the impact of dementia.

  • 6.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nolan, Mike
    University of Sheffield, UK .
    Nordenfelt, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lundh, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ethical and methodological issues in interviewing persons with dementia2007In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 608-619Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People with dementia have previously not been active participants in research, with ethical difficulties often being cited as the reason for this. A wider inclusion of people with dementia in research raises several ethical and methodological challenges. This article adds to the emerging debate by reflecting on the ethical and methodological issues raised during an interview study involving people with dementia and their spouses. The study sought to explore the impact of living with dementia. We argue that there is support for the inclusion of people with dementia in research and that the benefits of participation usually far outweigh the risks, particularly when a ;safe context' has been created. The role of gatekeepers as potentially responsible for excluding people with dementia needs further consideration, with particular reference to the appropriateness of viewing consent as a primarily cognitive, universalistic and exclusionary event as opposed to a more particularistic, inclusive and context relevant process.

  • 7.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nolan, Mike
    University of Sheffield, UK.
    Ulla, Lundh
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Awareness context theory and the dynamics of dementia: Improving understanding using emergent fit2005In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 269-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the initial results of an ongoing constructivistgrounded theory study (Charmaz, 2000) exploringthe impact of dementia on the everyday life and relationships of older spousal couples. Using a processof ‘emergent fit’ (Glaser, 1978)and drawing upon data from 74 interviews with 20 spouse couples living with dementia, it considers the relevanceof ‘awareness context theory’ (Glaser& Strauss, 1965) and the ‘dynamicsof dementia’ (Keady, 1999) to an understanding of interpersonal relationships among spouses. The combinationof existing literature and new data providefurther insights into how couples actively work to ‘construct’ awareness in a way that, forthe majority, maintains both a sense of ‘self’for the person with dementia (PWD) and the integrityof the relationship between couples. It is suggested that a‘mutual acknowledgement’ of thediagnosis and a subsequent focus on maintaininga meaningful life in the present combine to create a ‘nurturative relational context’ in whichliving with dementia unfolds.

  • 8.
    Krantz, Ann-Margret
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Lundh, Ulla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV).
    Schmidt, Andrea
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment.
    Äldres hälsa : en studie av befolkningen i Östergötlands och Kalmar län 2000Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Lundh, Ulla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV).
    Att vara närstående till person med demens.2004In: Närståendes behov: omvårdnad som akademiskt ämne III / [ed] Gerthrud Östlinder, Bromma: Svensk Sjuksköterskeförening , 2004, p. 37-48Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Lundh, Ulla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Family carere 2: sources of satisfaction among Swedish carers.1999In: British journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing), ISSN 0966-0461, Vol. 8, p. 647-652Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Lundh, Ulla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Family carers 1: difficulties and levels of support in Sweden.1999In: British journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing), ISSN 0966-0461, Vol. 8, p. 582-588Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Lundh, Ulla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Family carers 3: coping strategies among family carers in Sweden.1999In: British journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing), ISSN 0966-0461, Vol. 8, p. 735-740Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Lundh, Ulla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Family carers 4: designing services to support family carers in Sweden.1999In: British journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing), ISSN 0966-0461, Vol. 8, p. 787-790Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Lundh, Ulla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Impact on professional carers of structured interviews with families.2001In: British journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing), ISSN 0966-0461, Vol. 10, no 10, p. 677-681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes a Swedish study exploring the impact of a structured assessment process on both family and professional carers. A total of 20 professional carers conducted in-depth assessments with 245 family carers and were later interviewed about their experiences. The interviews indicated that the assessment process had provided valuable new insights and had challenged many existing preconceptions. They also afforded carers the opportunity to explore difficult emotional issues, suggesting the need to develop services to help carers deal with their feelings.

  • 15.
    Lundh, Ulla
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Vård och omsorg i eget boende på äldre dar1992Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish policy conseming the care of the elderly is based on the ideologically motivated ambitions of independent living and community support irrespective of care needs. The aim was to study the implementation of this policy in a local community with high ambitions in this regard. With the focus on the frail, all the elderly over seventy were followed via mailed questionnaires, prospective studies of the serviceduring a two-year period and selected interviews with users and providers of care and support.

    The degree of self-reported health was shown to be a dominant factor related to support and care needs, but the mix of services and support varied considerably as regards health, formal/informal support and availability of housing adaptations. The very frail received more care and support but were clearly less satisfied with the help received. Poor continuity characterized for home help; 35% of the help recipients were individually helped by more than 40 different persons during the two-year period. However, the degree of continuity did not significantly affect the recipients' opinion of the total help and their overall satisfaction with life. The results also indicate that for persons in need of home help life is often difficult and problematic, and factors such as health and physical functional ability arc more important than continuity in home help. Reciprocal emotional relationships between home helpers and recipients were infrequent, probably due, at least partly, to poor continuity.

    A conclusion of this study is that there is a need to develop a new organisation for home care, with better opportunities for the recipients to form one or two close relationships. This is especially important for persons who. lack informal relationships. Traditional community services are generally designed for the less frail and needy elderly, and both formal and informal support will have to be "professionally" and organisationally restructured to fit the growing category of more vulnerable users.

  • 16.
    Lundh, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV).
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies.
    Nolan, Mike
    God vård vid demenssjukdom: samarbete mellan personal och anhöriga.2004In: Rapporter från hälsans provinser. Jubileumsantologi. / [ed] Ingemar Nordin, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2004, p. 123-144Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Lundh, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Science in Nursing.
    Nolan, M
    I wasn't aware of that: creating dialogue between family and professionals carers2003In: Partnerships in family care / [ed] Mike Nolan, Ulla Lundh, Gordon Grant, John Keady, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2003, p. 108-127Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Considers how family and professional carers can work together more effectively in order to provide the highest quality of care to people who need support in order to remain in their own homes. Adopting a temporal perspective, this book looks at key transitions in caregiving and is useful for health care students and professionals

  • 18.
    Lundh, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Science in Nursing.
    Nolan, M
    Hellström, I
    Ericsson, I
    Quality care for people with dementia: the views of family and professional carers2003In: Partnership in family care / [ed] Mike Nolan, Ulla Lundh, Gordon Grant, John Keady, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2003, p. 72-89Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Considers how family and professional carers can work together more effectively in order to provide the highest quality of care to people who need support in order to remain in their own homes. Adopting a temporal perspective, this book looks at key transitions in caregiving and is useful for health care students and professionals.

  • 19.
    Lundh, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV).
    Nolan, Mike
    Närståendes vård av äldre : anhörigas och professionellas perspektiv 2001Report (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Lundh, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Science in Nursing.
    Pålsson, Å
    Hellström, I
    Forging partnerships in care homes: the impact of an educational intervention2003In: Partnerships in family care / [ed] Mike Nolan, Ulla Lundh, Gordon Grant, John Keady, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2003, p. 238-256Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    http://Considers how family and professional carers can work together more effectively in order to provide the highest quality of care to people who need support in order to remain in their own homes. Adopting a temporal perspective, this book looks at key transitions in caregiving and is useful for health care students and professionals

  • 21.
    Lundh, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Geriatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nolan, Mike
    Gerontological Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Sheffeld, Sheffeld, England.
    'I don't have any other choice': spouses' experiences of placing a partner in a care home for older people in Sweden2000In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 1178-1186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main aim of this paper is to consider the experiences of Swedish spouses who have placed a partner in a care home for older people. Data were gathered from semi-structural interviews with 14 spouses (11 wives and 3 husbands) who had been involved in a care home placement within the previous 6 months. The results reported here are from the first component of a larger grounded theory study, the aim of which is to explore, describe and understand the experience of care home placement from a variety of perspectives and to identify the implications for policy and practice in Sweden. The focus here is on the experience of spouses, relating to the decision-making process, the move into care and subsequent contact with the care home. Four themes emerged from the data – making the decision, making the move, adjusting to the move and reorientation. The results show a lack of planning for the elder person’s entry to a care home, and professional dominance of this stage of the process. The largely ambivalent emotional responses to the move that spouses experience and the difficulties in initiating and sustaining relationships with staff in the home are discussed in the light of previous research.

  • 22.
    Mörelius, Eva-Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Barn.
    Ulla, Ulla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Science in Nursing.
    Nelson, Nina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Barn.
    Parental stress in relation to the severity of congenital heart disease in the offspring.2002In: Pediatric nursing, ISSN 0097-9805, Vol. 28, p. 28-34Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23. Nolan, M
    et al.
    Grant, G
    Keady, J
    Lundh, Ulla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Science in Nursing.
    New directions for partnerchip: relationship-centred care2003In: Partnerships in family care / [ed] Mike Nolan, Ulla Lundh, Gordon Grant, John Keady, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2003, p. 257-291Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Considers how family and professional carers can work together more effectively in order to provide the highest quality of care to people who need support in order to remain in their own homes. Adopting a temporal perspective, this book looks at key transitions in caregiving and is useful for health care students and professionals

  • 24. Nolan, M
    et al.
    Keady, J
    Grant, G
    Lundh, Ulla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Science in Nursing.
    Introduction: why another book on family care?2003In: Partnerships in family care: understanding the caregiving career / [ed] Mike Nolan, Ulla Lundh, Gordon Grant, John Keady, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2003, p. -333Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Considers how family and professional carers can work together more effectively in order to provide the highest quality of care to people who need support in order to remain in their own homes. Adopting a temporal perspective, this book looks at key transitions in caregiving and is useful for health care students and professionals

  • 25. Nolan, M
    et al.
    Lundh, Ulla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Brown, J
    Changing aspects of nurses' work environment: A comparison of perceptions in two hospitals in in Sweden and in the UK and implications for recruitment retention of staff.1999In: NT Res, ISSN 1361-4096, Vol. 4, p. 221-233Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26. Nolan, Mike
    et al.
    Lundh, Ulla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV).
    Knowledge for practice-based disciplines: advancing the debate.2004In: Research into practice. Essential Skills for Reading and Applying Research in Nursing and Health Care. / [ed] Patrick Crookes, Edinburgh m fl: Baillière Tindall , 2004, 2, p. -308Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for all health care professionals to develop research appreciation skills has been recognized and emphasized.  Otherwise, research remains irrelevant and unrelated to practice.  Traditional research textbooks have used the format of the research process which makes research seem even more difficult and remote. This book is different.  Because the purpose of research appreciation is to enable practitioners to use research to develop and improve practice, it focuses instead on the skills of research appreciation and application which are distinct from the skills necessary to undertake research.  It prepares you to access, critically evaluate, understand and use research-based literature within the multi-disciplinary context of today's health services, and emphasises:

    • The range of sources of knowledge which inform nursing practice
    • Contemporary research and the context in which health care research and development takes place
    • Critical evaluation of research reports and research-based literature, examining the implication of project design and conduct
    • The range of skills needed for the application of research findings and innovation within practice

  • 27. Nolan, Mike
    et al.
    Lundh, Ulla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV).
    Omsorgsansvar for närstående gamle2004In: Geriatri. En tvärfaglig udfordring, Köpenhamn: Munksgaard , 2004, p. 198-210Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28. Nolan, Mike
    et al.
    Lundh, Ulla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Satisfactions and coping strategies of family carers.1999In: British Journal of Community Nursing, ISSN 1462-4753, Vol. 4, p. 470-475Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29. Sandberg, J
    et al.
    Lundh, Ulla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Science in Nursing.
    Nolan, M
    Placing a spouce in a care home for older people: (re)-constructing roles and relationships2003In: Partnership in family care / [ed] Mike Nolan, Ulla Lundh, Gordon Grant, John Keady, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2003, p. 199-217Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Considers how family and professional carers can work together more effectively in order to provide the highest quality of care to people who need support in order to remain in their own homes. Adopting a temporal perspective, this book looks at key transitions in caregiving and is useful for health care students and professionals

  • 30.
    Sandberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Geriatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundh, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nolan, Mike
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Sheffield, Samuel Fox House, Northern General Hospital, Herries Road, Sheffield, UK.
    Moving into a care home: the role of adult children in the placement process2002In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 353-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Admission of an older person to a care home is widely recognised as a very stressful period for the family and one which, despite community care policy, is likely to be an increasingly common experience. Although there is a growing research base in this area, there have been few studies on the role of adult children in supporting their parents during this difficult transition. This paper reports on the third stage of a grounded theory study conducted in Sweden which explored the part played by adult children in the placement process. Data were collected from 13 adult children using in-depth semi-structured interviews and the results are compared with themes previously derived from interviews with 26 spouse carers. The analysis reveals important overlaps and differences and suggests the need for further research exploring the dynamics of the placement process.

  • 31.
    Sandberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Geriatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundh, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nolan, Mike
    Gerontological Nursing, University of Sheffield, UK.
    Placing a spouse in a care home: the importance of keeping2001In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 406-416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    • Despite a universal policy of community care, the number of frail older people entering care homes is likely to increase in the future.

    • There have been relatively few studies exploring the experience of spouses who have placed a partner in care.

    • Due to a lack of preparation, the placement process is often ad hoc, with little attention being given to spouses’ emotional reactions or their efforts to maintain their relationship with their partner.

    • The relationship between care home staff and families is often superficial and strained.

    • There is a need for more proactive efforts to facilitate a partnership between care home staff and families.

  • 32.
    Sandberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Geriatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nolan, Mike
    Gerontological Nursing, University of Sheffield, UK.
    Lundh, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The role of community staff in care home placement in Sweden2002In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 488-497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    • The role of community staff in placing a relative in a care home is a relatively unexplored area of practice.

    •  Interviews with a variety of community staff in Sweden suggest that they play a significant role in helping family carers, particularly spouses, research the decision about the need for placement.

    •  This role can include recognition that placement is required (seeing the need), initiating and sustaining discussions about placement (sowing the seed and nurturing the seed) and legitimating the decision.

    •  However, once the decision has been made relatively little attention is given to the emotional consequences of the move and attention is focused largely on instrumental aspects.

    •  Despite showing sensitivity in the decision-making phase, community staff could do more to help carers deal with the guilt they experience and to initiate contact with the care home.

  • 33.
    Sandberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nolan, M.R.
    Gerontological Nursing, University of Sheffield, United Kingdom.
    Lundh, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    'Entering a New World': empathic awareness as the key to positive family/staff relationships in care homes2002In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 507-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite an almost universal policy of community care, placing a relative in a care home will be an increasingly common event as population ageing continues. Studies suggest that most families wish to remain involved in care following placement but that they often experience difficulties in establishing relationships with staff. This paper reports on the fifth phase of a Swedish study exploring the experience of placement from a temporal perspective and including the views of all the key actors (relatives, staff in the community, staff in care homes). The focus here is placed on the perceptions of care home staff and their perceived role in relation to spouses who have recently placed a partner. The study adopted a grounded theory approach and data were collected from in-depth interviews with 16 staff members of varying grades and positions. Analysis of the data suggested 3 levels of awareness amongst staff: empathic awareness, guarded awareness and limited awareness. The characteristics of empathic awareness are outlined and its implications briefly considered.

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