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  • 1.
    Asplund, Therese
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Schmid Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Käyhkö, Janina
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Wiréhn, Lotten
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Juhola, Sirkku
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Benefits and challenges of serious gaming – the case of “The Maladaptation Game”2019In: Open Agriculture, ISSN 2391-9531, p. 107-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of digital tools and interactive technologies for farming systems has increased rapidly in recent years and is likely to continue to play a significant role in meeting future challenges. Particularly games and gaming are promising new and innovative communication strategies to inform and engage public and stakeholders with scientific research. This study offers an analysis of how a research based game on climate change maladaptation can support, but also hinder players’ sense-making processes. Through the analysis of eight gaming workshops, this study identifies challenges and support for the players’ sense-making. While it concludes that conceptual thinking of game content sometimes clashes with players’ everyday experiences and practice, possibly resulting in loss of credibility, this study also concludes that gaming may function as an eye-opener to new ways of thinking. Overall, this paper suggests that the communication of (social) science and agricultural practices through serious gaming has great potential but at the same time poses challenges due to different knowledge systems and interpretive frameworks among researchers and practitioners.

  • 2.
    Ballantyne, Anne Gammelgaard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change.
    Schmid Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change.
    Wibeck, Victoria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Localizing Climate Change: Nordic Homeowners' Interpretations of Visual Representations for Climate Adaptation2018In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, no 5, p. 638-652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, effort has been put into developing various forms of climate visualization to create opportunities for people to explore and learn about local climate change risks and adaptation options. However, how target audiences make sense of such climate visualization has rarely been studied from a communication perspective. This paper analyses how Nordic homeowners made sense of a specific climate visualization tool, the VisAdapt™ tool. Involving 35 homeowners from three cities in 15 group test sessions, this study analyses the interpretive strategies participants applied to make sense of and assess the relevance of the visualized data. The study demonstrates that participants employed a set of interpretive strategies relating to personal experience and well-known places to make sense of the information presented, and that critical negotiation of content played an important role in how participants interpreted the content.

  • 3.
    Bohman, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Neset, Tina
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Opach, Tomasz
    Norwegain University of Science and Technology, Trondheim.
    Rød, Jan
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim.
    Decision support for adaptive action: - assessing the potential of geovisualisation2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Bohman, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Opach, Tomasz
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Geography, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Rød, Jan-Ketil
    Department of Geography, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Decision support for Adaptive Action: Assessing the potential of Geographic Visualization2015In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 58, no 12, p. 2193-2211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the role of geographic visualization for supporting theimplementation of climate change adaptation. Interviews and group discussions withplanners and decision makers indicate that geographic visualization bears primarypotential for communicative purposes. In order to respond to analytical needs a highlevel of interactivity including the exploration of background data and the ability tolink the tools with own databases were some of the key requirements made by theparticipants. The study concludes that more than better climate predictions, awarenessand involvement may be precisely what is needed to narrow the implementation gapin climate change adaptation

  • 5.
    Cordell, Dana
    et al.
    Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology Sydney, Australia.
    Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Phosphorus vulnerability: A qualitative framework for assessing the vulnerability of national and regional food systems to the multi-dimensional stressors of phosphorus scarcity2014In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 24, p. 108-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The element phosphorus underpins the viability of global and national food systems, by ensuring soil fertility, maximising crop yields, supporting farmer livelihoods and ultimately nutritional security of the global population. The implications of global phosphorus scarcity therefore have serious potential consequences for future food security, yet these implications have not been be comprehensively or sufficiently assessed at the global or national scales. This paper offers a new integrated framework for assessing the vulnerability of national food systems to global phosphorus scarcity—the Phosphorus Vulnerability Assessment framework. Drawing on developments in assessing climate and water vulnerability, the framework identifies and integrates 26 phosphorus-related biophysical, technical, geopolitical, socio-economic and institutional factors that can lead to food system vulnerability. The theoretical framework allows analysis of context-specific food system by examining impact due to exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity. The framework will also ultimately provide guidance for food and agriculture policy-makers, phosphate producers and phosphorus end-users (primarily farmers and consumers) to take action to reduce their vulnerability to this new global challenge. 

  • 6.
    Cordell, Dana
    et al.
    Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia.
    Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Prior, Tim
    Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia.
    The phosphorus mass balance: identifying ‘hotspots’ in the food system as a roadmap to phosphorus security2012In: Current Opinion in Biotechnology, ISSN 0958-1669, E-ISSN 1879-0429, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 839-845Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphorus is a critical element on which all life depends. Global crop production depends on fertilisers derived from phosphate rock to maintain high crop yields. Population increase, changing dietary preferences towards more meat and dairy products, and the continuing intensification of global agriculture supporting this expansion will place increasing pressure on an uncertain, but finite supply of high-quality phosphate rock. Growing concern about phosphorus scarcity and security, coupled with the environmental impact of phosphorus pollution, has encouraged an increase in research exploring how phosphorus is used and lost in the food system-from mine to field to fork. An assessment of recent phosphorus flows analyses at different geographical scales identifies the key phosphorus 'hotspots', for example within the mining, agriculture or food processing sectors, where efficiency and reuse can be substantially improved through biotechnological approaches coupled with policy changes.

  • 7.
    Cordell, Dana
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Schmid-Neset, Tina
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    White, Stuart
    Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Preferred future phosphorus scenarios: A framework for meeting long-term phosphorus needs for global food demand2009In: International Conference on Nutrient Recovery from Wastewater Streams, Vancouver, 2009 / [ed] Don Mavinic, Ken Ashley and Fred Koch, London: IWA Publishing , 2009, 1, p. 23-44Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Closing the loop for nutrients in wastewaters (municipal sewage, animal wastes, food industry, commercial and other liquid waste streams) is a necessary, sustainable development objective, to reduce resource consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Chemistry, engineering and process integration understanding are all developing quickly, as new processes are now coming online. A new "paradigm" is emerging, globally. Commercial marketing of recovered nutrients as "green fertilizers" or recycling of nutrients through biomass production to new outlets, such as bioenergy, is becoming more widespread.This exciting conference brings together various waste stream industries, regulators, researchers, process engineers and commercial managers, to develop a broad-based, intersectional understanding and joint projects for phosphorus and nitrogen recovery from wastewater streams, as well as reuse. Over 90 papers from over 30 different countries presented in this volume.

  • 8.
    Gammelgaard Ballantyne, Anne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Business Development and Technology, Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Wibeck, Victoria
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Images of climate change: A pilot study of young people’s perceptions of ICT-based climate visualization2016In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 134, no 1, p. 73-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change can be difficult for laypeople to make sense of, because of its complexity, the uncertainties involved and its distant impacts. Research has identified the potentials of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) for visualizing and communicating climate change to lay audiences and thus addressing these communication challenges.However, little research has focused on how ICT-based visualization affects audiences’ understandings of climate change. Employing a semiotic framework and through a combination of focus group interviews and mindmap exercises, we investigated how Swedish students make sense of climate messages presented through an ICT-based visualisation medium; a dome theatre movie. The paper concludes that visualization in immersive environments works well to concretize aspects of climate change and provide a starting point for reflection, but we argue that the potential to add interactive elements should be further explored, as interaction has the potential to influence meaning-making processes. In addition, audiences’ preconceptions of climate change influence their interpretations of climate messages, which may function as a constraint to climate communication.

  • 9.
    Glaas, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Gammelgaard Ballantyne, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Department of Business Development and Technology, Aarhus BSS, Aarhus University, Danmark.
    Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Navarra, Carlo
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Opach, Tomasz
    Department of Geography, Norwegian University of Science and Technology and Department of Global Development and Planning, University of Agder, Norge.
    Rød, Jan Ketil
    Department of Geography, Norwegian University of Science and Technology and Department of Global Development and Planning, University of Agder, Norge.
    Goodsite, Michael E.
    Department of Technology and Innovation, University of Southern Denmark, Danmark.
    Facilitating climate change adaptation through communication: Insights from the development of a visualization tool2015In: Energy Research and Social Science, ISSN 2214-6296, Vol. 10, p. 57-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change communication on anticipated impacts and adaptive responses is frequently presentedas an effective means to facilitate implementation of adaptation to mitigate risks to residential buildings.However, it requires that communication is developed in a way that resonates with the context of thetarget audience, provides intelligible information and addresses perceived barriers to adaptation. In thispaper we reflect upon criteria for useful climate change communication gained over a three year developmentprocess of a web-based tool – VisAdaptTM – aimed at increasing the adaptive capacity amongNordic homeowners. Based on the results from continuous user-testing and focus group interviews weoutline lessons learned and key aspects to consider in the design of tools for communicating complexissues such as climate change effects and adaptive response measures.

  • 10.
    Glaas, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Storbjörk, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Schmid Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Bohman, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Muthumanickam, Prithiviraj
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Developing transformative capacity through systematic assessments and visualization of urban climate transitions2019In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 515-528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transforming cities into low-carbon, resilient, and sustainable places will require action encompassing most segments of society. However, local governments struggle to overview and assess all ongoing climate activities in a city, constraining well-informed decision-making and transformative capacity. This paper proposes and tests an assessment framework developed to visualize the implementation of urban climate transition (UCT). Integrating key transition activities and process progression, the framework was applied to three Swedish cities. Climate coordinators and municipal councillors evaluated the visual UCT representations. Results indicate that their understanding of UCT actions and implementation bottlenecks became clearer, making transition more governable. To facilitate UCT, involving external actors and shifting priorities between areas were found to be key. The visual UCT representations improved system awareness and memory, building local transformative capacity. The study recommends systematic assessment and visualization of process progression as a promising method to facilitate UCT governance, but potentially also broader sustainability transitions.

  • 11.
    Glaas, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Neset, Tina Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Kjellström, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) Norrköping, Sweden.
    Almås, Anders-Johan
    SINTEF Building and Infrastructure, Oslo, Norway.
    Increasing house owners adaptive capacity: Compliancebetween climate change risks and adaptation guidelines in Scandinavia2015In: Urban Climate, ISSN 2212-0955, E-ISSN 2212-0955, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 41-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is expected to intensify weather related risks affecting the existing buildingstock. To increase the understanding of how the capacity among individual house ownersto mitigate such risks can be improved, this study analyses the compliance between anticipatedclimate risks and existing adaptation guidelines to house owners in Denmark,Norway and Sweden. The assessment of climate risks is based on a review of climatechange and building research literature. The compilation of available guidelines is basedon an assessment of information from government authorities, municipalities as well asinsurance companies and organizations. Results reveal a high compliance between availableguidelines and risks for already experienced weather risks, while somewhat new risksfrom anticipated climate change impacts are less covered. To better facilitate adaptiveresponses, further adaptation guidelines would earn from explicitly targeting house owners,as well as highlighting relationships between anticipated climate impacts, existingweather risks and individual management practices. Public–private cooperation is identifiedas an important means for making information more accessible and easily available.

  • 12.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Schmid Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Energy Visualization: Why, What and How2009In: / [ed] Neset, Tina, Johansson, Jimmy & Linnér Björn-Ola, Linköping University Electronic Press, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Navarra, Carlo
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Neset, Tina
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Erik, Glaas
    Tomasz, Opach
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    VisAdapt—Increasing Nordic Houseowners' Adaptive Capacity to Climate Change2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Navarra, Carlo
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Opach, Tomasz
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Björn-Ola, Linnér
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    VisAdapt-Increasing Nordic Houseowners' Adaptive Capacity to Climate Change2014In: 2014 IEEE Conference on Visual Analytics Science and Technology (VAST) / [ed] Min Chen, David Ebert, Chris North, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2014, p. 255-256Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This poster presents the design and implementation of the web-based visual analytics tool VisAdapt which allows houseowners in the Nordic countries to assess potential climate related risk factors that may have an impact on their living conditions, and to get an overview of existing guidelines of how to adapt to climate change and extreme weather effects.

  • 15.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Evaluating Climate Visualization: An Information Visualization Approach2010In: Proceedings of the 14th IEEE International Conference on Information Visualization, IV10, IEEE Communications Society, 2010, p. 156-161Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To meet the growing demand of communicating climate science and policy research, the interdisciplinary field of climate visualization has increasingly extended its traditional use of 2D representations and techniques from the field of scientific visualization to include information visualization for the creation of highly interactive tools for both spatial and abstract data. This paper provides an initial discussion on the need and design of evaluations for climate visualization. We report on previous experiences and identify how evaluation methods commonly used in information visualization can be used in climate visualization to increase our understanding of visualization techniques and tools.

  • 16.
    Juhola, Sirkku
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Finland; Aalto University, Finland.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Neset, Tina Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Redefining maladaptation2016In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 135-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As experiences of implementation of climate change adaptation are accumulating, there is a need toincrease the understanding of the potential negative consequences of adaptation actions that mightoccur, and the capacity of research to assess them. Maladaptation used in this context has remainedelusively defined and sparingly used, and therefore difficult to apply. Based on a literature review, wediscuss the conceptual boundaries of maladaptation and how it can be used to analyse negativeoutcomes of adaptation and propose a refined definition. We present a typology of maladaptation thatdistinguishes between three types of maladaptive outcomes – rebounding vulnerability, shiftingvulnerability and eroding sustainable development, and argue that maladaptation can be defined as a resultof an intentional adaptation policy or measure directly increasing vulnerability for the targeted and/orexternal actor(s), and/or eroding preconditions for sustainable development by indirectly increasing society’svulnerability. We note that the recognition of adaptation as an intentional action and the importance ofsetting clear spatial and temporal boundaries, as well as thresholds, are key to analysing negativeoutcomes.

  • 17.
    Juhola, Sirkku
    et al.
    Helsinki University, Finland.
    Goodsite, M.E.
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Davis, M.
    Stockholm Environment Institute US Centre, USA.
    Klein, Richard J.T.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Stockholm Environment Institute, Sweden.
    Davídsdóttir, B.
    University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Atlason, R.
    University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Landauer, Mia
    Aalto University, Finland.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Neset, Tina Schmid
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Eskeland, Gunnar
    Norwegian School of Economics, Norway.
    Gammelgaard Ballantyne, Anne
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Adaptation decision-making in the Nordic countries: assessing the potential for joint action2014In: Environment Systems and Decisions, ISSN 2194-5403, E-ISSN 2194-5411, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 600-611Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a global context, the outlook for the Nordic region is relatively favourable, given its relatively stronger resiliency to climate change impacts in comparison to many other geo-political regions of the world. Overall, the projected climatic changes include increases in mean temperatures and in precipitation, although regional variations can be significant. The countries’ robust institutions and economies give them a strong capacity to adapt to these changes. Still, the need for adaptation to the changing climate has been and still is substantial, and in most of the region, there has been progress on the issue. This paper explores the potential for Nordic cooperation on adaptation; specifically, for the development of a regional adaptation strategy. In particular, it addresses two questions (1) What is the current state of adaptation in the Nordic countries? and (2) What are the potential benefits and weaknesses of a Nordic strategy for adaptation? In order to answer these two questions, this paper examines reviews the current national adaptation policies of each Nordic country and discusses the challenges facing a Nordic strategy and finally assesses the potential for common Nordic adaptation policy and further cooperation.

  • 18.
    Juhola, Sirkku
    et al.
    Helsinki University, Finland.
    Schmid Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Vulnerability to climate change in food systems: challenges in assessment methodologies2015In: Climate change adaptation and food supply chain management / [ed] Ari Paloviita, Marja Järvelä, Taylor & Francis Group, 2015, p. 57-69Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Markus Meier, H. E.
    et al.
    Swedish Meteorol and Hydrol Institute, Sweden .
    Andersson, Helen C.
    Swedish Meteorol and Hydrol Institute, Sweden .
    Arheimer, Berit
    Swedish Meteorol and Hydrol Institute, Sweden .
    Donnelly, Chantal
    Swedish Meteorol and Hydrol Institute, Sweden .
    Eilola, Kari
    Swedish Meteorol and Hydrol Institute, Sweden .
    Gustafsson, Bo G.
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Kotwicki, Lech
    Polish Academic Science, Poland .
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Niiranen, Susa
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Piwowarczyk, Joanna
    Polish Academic Science, Poland .
    Savchuk, Oleg P.
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Schenk, Frederik
    Helmholtz Zentrum Geesthacht, Germany .
    Marcin Weslawski, Jan
    Polish Academic Science, Poland .
    Zorita, Eduardo
    Helmholtz Zentrum Geesthacht, Germany .
    Ensemble Modeling of the Baltic Sea Ecosystem to Provide Scenarios for Management2014In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 37-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a multi-model ensemble study for the Baltic Sea, and investigate the combined impact of changing climate, external nutrient supply, and fisheries on the marine ecosystem. The applied regional climate system model contains state-of-the-art component models for the atmosphere, sea ice, ocean, land surface, terrestrial and marine biogeochemistry, and marine food-web. Time-dependent scenario simulations for the period 1960-2100 are performed and uncertainties of future projections are estimated. In addition, reconstructions since 1850 are carried out to evaluate the models sensitivity to external stressors on long time scales. Information from scenario simulations are used to support decision-makers and stakeholders and to raise awareness of climate change, environmental problems, and possible abatement strategies among the general public using geovisualization. It is concluded that the study results are relevant for the Baltic Sea Action Plan of the Helsinki Commission.

  • 20.
    Neset, Tina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    State of Climate Visualization2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In a time of global change and global resource constraints the academic community is constantly seeking new ways of communicating current research to inform the public and create a basis for decision making on an individual to global scale. For climate researchers, this challenge is pertinent, given the vast amount of information regarding issues, such as emissions, scenarios, trends, risks and options for mitigation and adaptation that flows through media every day. To create a solid representation of research data and scenarios as well as what impacts of climate change could imply in different regions, climate researchers have over the past years started to collaborate with designers and researchers within the field of visualization. Applications assisting data analysis as well as geospatial and abstract visual representations bear great potential for future research and science communication. We are referring to this transdisciplinary field of research and science communication as climate visualization.

  • 21.
    Neset, Tina- Simone
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Opach, Tomasz
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Lion, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lilja, Anna
    Swedish Meteorol and Hydrol Institute, Sweden.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Map-Based Web Tools Supporting Climate Change Adaptation2016In: Professional Geographer, ISSN 0033-0124, E-ISSN 1467-9272, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 103-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the state of the art in geovisualization supporting climate change adaptation. We reviewed twenty selected map-based Web tools, classified by their content and functionality, and assessed them by visual representations, interactive functions, information type, target audience, and how vulnerability and adaptation to climate change are addressed. Our study concludes that the tools (1) can be classified as data viewers with basic functionality and data explorers offering more sophisticated interactive functions; (2) mostly feature moderate or high richness of data content; and (3) predominantly target expert users.

  • 22.
    Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    In Hac Vita: Increasing Nordic Homeowners’ Adaptative Capacity to Climate Change: research and development of a web-based tool VisAdaptTM2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     

    The NordForsk funded research project In Hac Vita project is a collaboration between the Nordic insurance companies If, Gjensidige, Trygg-Hansa/ Codan and Tryg Insurance, and the Top-level Research Initiative the Nordic Centre of Excellence NORD-STAR.

    The project concerns climate change adaptation and insurance in the Nordic countries and focuses on  the design and implementation of the web-based visualisation tool VisAdaptTM, allowing homeowners to assess potential climate related risk factors that may have an impact on their living conditions, and to get an overview of existing guidelines of how to adapt to climate change and extreme weather effects.

  • 23.
    Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Koppla ihop fosforförsörjning och andra 75 hållbarhetsutmaningar2011In: Återvinna fosfor - hur bråttom är det? / [ed] Birgitta Johansson, Formas: Forskningsrådet Formas, 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Fosfor är nödvändigt för allt liv och för all matproduktion. Nu varnar forskare för att fosforreserverna kan ta slut fortare än vi anar. Men är läget verkligen så allvarligt som vissa forskare säger? Kan vi effektivisera fosforanvändningen? Hur kan vi återvinna fosfor och återföra den till matproduktion? Vad kan jordbruket göra - och vad kan vi göra i städerna? Ska vi gödsla med avloppsslam? Eller ska vi bränna slam och återvinna fosfor ur askan? Ska vi bygga om husens och städernas avloppssystem för källsortering? Vilka lösningar är rimliga i ett hållbart samhälle?

  • 24.
    Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Phosphorus2012In: Materials for a Sustainable Future / [ed] Trevor M. Letcher and Janet L. Scott, London: Royal Society of Chemistry, 2012Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Neset, Tina-Simone
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cordell, Dana
    Institute for Sustainable Futures, Univ of Technology, Sydney, Australia.
    Global phosphorus scarcity: identifying synergies for a sustainable future2012In: Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, ISSN 0022-5142, E-ISSN 1097-0010, Vol. 92, no 1, p. 2-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global food production is dependent on constant inputs of phosphorus. In the current system this phosphorus is not predominantly derived from organic recycled waste, but to a large degree from phosphate-rock based mineral fertilisers. However, phosphate rock is a finite resource that cannot be manufactured. Our dependency therefore needs to be addressed from a sustainability perspective in order to ensure global food supplies for a growing global population. The situation is made more urgent by predictions that, for example, the consumption of resource intensive foods and the demand for biomass energy will increase. The scientific and societal debate has so far been focussed on the exact timing of peak phosphorus and on when the total depletion of the global reserves will occur. Even though the timing of these events is important, all dimensions of phosphorus scarcity need to be addressed in a manner which acknowledges linkages to other sustainable development challenges and which takes into consideration the synergies between different sustainability measures. Many sustainable phosphorus measures have positive impacts on other challenges; for example, shifting global diets to more plant-based foods would not only reduce global phosphorus consumption, but also reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce nitrogen fertiliser demand and reduce water consumption. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry

  • 26.
    Neset, Tina-Simone
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cordell, Dana
    Insitute for Sustainable Futures, Univ of Technology, Sydney, Australia.
    Andersson, Lotta
    SMHI, Sweden.
    The flow of phosphorus in food production and consumption system2013In: Improving Water and Nutrient Use Efficiency in Food Production Systems / [ed] Zed Rengel, New York: John Wiley & Sons, 2013, p. 320-Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Improving Water and Nutrient Use Efficiency in Food Production Systems  provides professionals, students, and policy makers with an in-depth view of various aspects of water and nutrient us in crop production

  • 27.
    Neset, Tina-Simone
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Opach, Tomasz
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Lilja, Anna
    SMHI.
    Lion, Peter
    Johansson, Jimmy
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Map-Based Web Tools for Climate Change AdaptationIn: Professional Geographer, ISSN 0033-0124, E-ISSN 1467-9272Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Neset, Tina-Simone S
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cordell, Dana
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Lotta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fosfor – livsnödvändig resurs och global förorening2010In: Jordbruk som håller i längden / [ed] Birgitta Johansson, Forskningsrådet Formas , 2010, p. 133-146Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Neset, Tina-Simone
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Wiréhn, Lotten
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Klein, Natacha
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Käyhköb, Janina
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Juhola, Sirkku
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Maladaptation in Nordic agriculture2019In: Climate Risk Management, E-ISSN 2212-0963, Vol. 23, p. 78-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climatic changes are expected to pose challenges to Nordic agriculture. While some changes may provide opportunities for higher productivity, others may severely increase agricultural vulnerability. Farmers attempt to adapt or cope with these changes by taking measures to decrease vulnerability or to take advantage of potential benefits, but little is known what outcomes these adaptation measures might have. This study identifies unintended negative impacts of adaptation measures, drawing on a literature review and interviews with farmers and agricultural officials and experts in Sweden and Finland. Based on the conceptual framework of maladaptation, this study identifies outcomes that either increase the vulnerability of the implementing actor, shift the vulnerability to other actors or sectors or affect common pool resources. While a large number of adaptation measures rebound vulnerability to the implementing actor, several potential maladaptive outcomes may shift vulnerability or affect common pool resources. The findings point to the large number of trade-offs that are involved in adaptation decision-making and lead to the conclusion that raising awareness of these aspects can support future adaptation strategies.

  • 30.
    Rød, Jan Ketil
    et al.
    Department of Geography, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
    Opach, Tomasz
    Department of Geography, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
    Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Three core activities toward a relevant integrated vulnerability assessment: validate, visualize, and negotiate2015In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 877-895Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Future climate in the Nordic countries is expected to become ‘warmer, wetter, and wilder’, and this will probably cause more extreme weather events. Therefore, local authorities need to improve their ability to assess weather-related hazards such as floods, landslides, and storms, as well as people’s sensitivity and capacity to cope with or adjust to such events. In this article, we present an integrated assessment of vulnerability to natural hazards, which incorporates both exposure and social vulnerability. In our assessment, we screen places and rank them by their relative scores on exposure and vulnerability indices. We also design a web-based visualization tool – ViewExposed – that shows maps that reveal a considerable geographic variation in integrated vulnerability. ViewExposed makes it easy to identify the places with the highest integrated vulnerability, and it facilitates the understanding of the factors that make these places exposed and/or vulnerable. For empirical validation, we correlate the exposure indices with insurance claims due to natural damage. However, we also emphasize the importance of a dialog with relevant stakeholders to ensure a participatory validation. Our top-down exposure and vulnerability assessment benefits from a participatory bottom-up assessment. This is crucial to support decisions about where to implement adaptive and preventive measures against hazards related to climate change.

  • 31.
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Bader, Hans-Peter
    Department SIAM EAWAG, Switzerland.
    Scheidegger, Ruth
    Department SIAM EAWAG, Switzerland.
    Lohm, Ulrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    The flow of phosphorus in food production and consumption - Linköping, Sweden, 1870-20002008In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 396, no 2-3, p. 111-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphorus is an important substance for agricultural production of food. Being a limited resource, it is of great interest for regional, as well as global food security. At the same time it presents a pollution problem for the aquatic environment in Sweden since it contributes to eutrophication of surface waters and the Baltic Sea. This study analyses the flow of phosphorus based on consumption and production of food for an average inhabitant of a Swedish city, Linköping, from 1870 until 2000. The study shows the changes in flows within the system of production and consumption of food, as well as between the different processes in this system, such as agriculture, food processing, consumption and waste handling, and output flows to the environment. The main changes in this system over time are a) the increasing flow of phosphorus reaching the consumer and hence the waste handling system, b) the increase in the flow of products from animal production, which mainly causes the increase in (a), and most notably c) the increased input of chemical fertilizer. © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 32.
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Hallström, Jonas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Educational Science (IUV).
    The Pipe-Bound City in Time and Space: Applying GIS to the Historical Development of Two Cities2006In: A History of Water: volume 2 The Political Economy of Water / [ed] Terje Tvedt and Richard Coopey, London & New York: I.B. Tauris , 2006, 2, p. -564Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    These three volumes present an original exploration of all aspects of water--social, cultural, political, religious, historical, economic and technological--from ancient times until the present day. Among the varied themes, the contributors examine the changing histories of water as a private or common good, the politics of water at local, urban, national and international level, water in cities, great river plans, dams, river biographies, and cultural constructions of water--images of water in religion, myth, literature and art. With empirical and ethnographic case studies from around the world the three volumes together represent one of the most complete and up to date accounts of the central role of water in the history and development of humanity.

  • 33.
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Lohm, Ulrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Historical Metabolism of Food Consumption and Production - Sweden, 1870-20002005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Lohm, Ulrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    The spatial imprint of changing consumption pattern during 130 years2003In: Dealing with diversity,2003, Praha: Charles University , 2003, p. 311-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 35.
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Singer, Heinz
    Eawag, Switzerland.
    Longree, Philipp
    Eawag, Switzerland.
    Bader, Hans-Peter
    Eawag, Switzerland.
    Scheidegger, Ruth
    Eawag, Switzerland.
    Wittmer, Anita
    Eawag, Switzerland.
    Andersson, Jafet Clas Martin
    Eawag, Switzerland.
    Understanding consumption-related sucralose emissions - A conceptual approach combining substance-flow analysis with sampling analysis2010In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 408, no 16, p. 3261-3269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the potential of combining substance-flow modelling with water and wastewater sampling to trace consumption-related substances emitted through the urban wastewater. The method is exemplified on sucralose. Sucralose is a chemical sweetener that is 600 times sweeter than sucrose and has been on the European market since 2004. As a food additive, sucralose has recently increased in usage in a number of foods, such as soft drinks, dairy products, candy and several dietary products. In a field campaign, sucralose concentrations were measured in the inflow and outflow of the local wastewater treatment plant in Linkoping, Sweden, as well as upstream and downstream of the receiving stream and in Lake Roxen. This allows the loads emitted from the city to be estimated. A method consisting of solid-phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography and high resolution mass spectrometry was used to quantify the sucralose in the collected surface and wastewater samples. To identify and quantify the sucralose sources, a consumption analysis of households including small business enterprises was conducted as well as an estimation of the emissions from the local food industry. The application of a simple model including uncertainty and sensitivity analysis indicates that at present not one large source but rather several small sources contribute to the load coming from households, small business enterprises and industry. This is in contrast to the consumption pattern seen two years earlier, which was dominated by one product. The inflow to the wastewater treatment plant decreased significantly from other measurements made two years earlier. The study shows that the combination of substance-flow modelling with the analysis of the loads to the receiving waters helps us to understand consumption-related emissions.

  • 36.
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Uhrqvist, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Visualizing Climate Change: beyond technological enchantment and critical deconstruction2015In: Climate change and museum futures / [ed] Fiona Cameron and Brett Neilson, New York: Routledge, 2015, p. 152-156Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Schmid Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Environmental Imprint of Human Food Consumption: Linköping, Sweden 1870 - 20002005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Human food consumption has changed from the late 19th century to the turn of the millennium, and so has the need for resources to sustain this consumption. For the city of Linköping, situated in southeastern Sweden, the environmental imprint of an average inhabitant’s food consumption is studied from the year 1870 to the year 2000. The average consumer is the driving factor in this study, since changes in food consumption have a direct influence on the environmental imprint. This thesis analyses the environmental imprint of human food consumption from a historical perspective, by applying two different methods. An analysis of the average Swedish food consumption creates the basis for a material flow analysis of nitrogen and phosphorus, as well as a study of the spatial imprint.

    Emissions of nitrogen and phosphorus into the hydrosphere have decreased over this period for the system of food consumption and production for an average consumer, while the input via chemical fertilizer has increased significantly. The efficiency of this system could be increased if for instance more phosphorus in human excreta would be reused within the system instead of large deposition and losses into the hydrosphere. The spatial imprint of human food consumption shows, given the changing local preconditions, that less space would be needed for regional production of the consumed food. However, the share of today’s import and thus globally produced food doubles this spatial imprint.

    The results of this study show not only a strong influence of the consumption of meat and other animal products on the environmental imprint, but also great potential in the regional production of food. In the context of an increasing urban population, and thus additional billions of people who will live at an increasing distance from the agricultural production land, concern for the direct effects of our human food consumption can be of decisive importance for future sustainable food supply.

    List of papers
    1. Reconstructing Swedish Food Consumption from Hospital Diets after 1870
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reconstructing Swedish Food Consumption from Hospital Diets after 1870
    2004 (English)In: Ecology of Food and Nutrition, ISSN 0367-0244, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 149-179Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Food consumption is of great interest from an environmental point of view since different diets have a significant impact on space, water, and the use of other resources. This article studies the quantity and composition of food consumption in Sweden between 1870 and 2000. The primary material, consisting of historical hospital dietary regulations from 1871 to 1928, is introduced in detail and compared to other national investigations. The results show a distinctive increase in the consumption of meat, fish, vegetables, and fruits, with a parallel decrease in cereal and milk consumption. Strong regional patterns could be detected concerning the consumption of meat and fish. The data are compared to other national investigations and particularly to studies of German and Finnish food consumption in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.

    Keywords
    Food consumption, Sweden, nineteenth and twentieth centuries, hospital diet
    National Category
    Food Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13349 (URN)10.1080/03670240490446786 (DOI)
    Available from: 2005-09-02 Created: 2005-09-02 Last updated: 2009-06-04
    2. Food Consumption and Nutrient Flows – Nitrogen in Sweden since the 1870s
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Food Consumption and Nutrient Flows – Nitrogen in Sweden since the 1870s
    2006 (English)In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 61-75Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in food consumption and related processes have a significant impact on the flow of nitrogen in the environment. This study identifies both flows within the system and emissions to the hydrosphere and atmosphere. A case study of an average inhabitant of the city of Linköping, Sweden, covers the years 1870, 1900, 1950, and 2000 and includes changes in food consumption and processing, agricultural production, and organic waste handling practices. Emissions to the hydrosphere from organic waste handling increased from 0.57 kilograms of nitrogen per capita per year (kg N/cap per year) to 3.1 kg N/cap per year, whereas the total flow of nitrogen to waste deposits grew from a negligible amount to 1.7 kg N/cap per year. The largest flow of nitrogen during the entire period came from fodder. The input of chemical fertilizer rose gradually to a high level of 15 kg N/cap per year in the year 2000. The total load per capita disposed of to the environment decreased during these 130 years by about 30%.

    Keywords
    dynamic modeling, food production, industrial ecology, materials flow analysis (MFA), mathematical materials flow analysis (MMFA), substance flow analysis (SFA)
    National Category
    Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13350 (URN)10.1162/jiec.2006.10.4.61 (DOI)
    Available from: 2005-09-02 Created: 2005-09-02 Last updated: 2018-01-13
    3. The Flow of Phosphorus in Food Production and Consumption: Linköping, Sweden, 1870-2000
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Flow of Phosphorus in Food Production and Consumption: Linköping, Sweden, 1870-2000
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13351 (URN)
    Available from: 2005-09-02 Created: 2005-09-02 Last updated: 2010-01-13
    4. Recycling of Phosphorus in Urban Sweden: A historical overview to prepare a strategy for the future
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recycling of Phosphorus in Urban Sweden: A historical overview to prepare a strategy for the future
    2010 (English)In: Water Policy, ISSN 1366-7017, E-ISSN 1996-9759, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 611-624Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable sanitation and food security have been issues in all human history although named differently. This study describes the evolution of sanitation arrangements in the Swedish town Linkoping for the period 1870-2000. The flow of phosphorus from food consumption is estimated for the period and its output is divided into gainful reuse in agriculture and energy production and (harmful) losses to the hydrosphere and landfills. The rate of gainful reuse varies dramatically, from very high, up until the 1920s, followed by a drop to almost zero around 1950. Reuse was picking up since the introduction of a phosphorus removal unit at wastewater treatment plants and application of sludge in agriculture from the 1970s, but was followed by a sharp decline at the end of the 20th century. The results from Linkoping are applied to scenarios for Sweden as a whole and extended to some anticipated implications for the world in the years to come.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    IWA Publishing, 2010
    Keywords
    Food security, Material flow analysis, Phosphorus, Recycling, Reuse, Strategy, Sustainability, Sustainable sanitation, Sweden
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13352 (URN)10.2166/wp.2009.165 (DOI)000280882100010 ()
    Available from: 2005-09-02 Created: 2005-09-02 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    5. Spatial Imprint of Food Consumption: A Historical Analysis for Sweden, 1870-2000
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spatial Imprint of Food Consumption: A Historical Analysis for Sweden, 1870-2000
    2005 (English)In: Human Ecology, ISSN 0300-7839, E-ISSN 1572-9915, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 565-580Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Depending on quantity and composition of food as well as on production conditions and techniques, the space needed to sustain an individual’s nourishment varies. The amount of space needed also depends on the use of resources such as energy, water, and fertilizers, as well as potential land degradation and water pollution. Our study focuses on the changing spatial imprint of an average inhabitant of an expanding Swedish city, Linköping, from 1870 to 2000 taking into account both shifts in consumption as well as agricultural productivity and practices. Despite the distinctly larger amount of animal food products, such as meat and fish, consumed in 2000, we calculate the area needed to sustain an individual’s annual food consumption could be less than one fourth of that needed in 1870. However, if the import of various globally produced foods is included in our calculations, the land needed to sustain the consumption of an inhabitant of Linköping in 2000 doubles. We also argue that an examination of this regional imprint can be used to explore and evaluate possibilities for regional development.

    Keywords
    spatial imprint, food consumption, nineteenth/twentieth century, Sweden, ecological footprint
    National Category
    Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13353 (URN)10.1007/s10745-005-5160-3 (DOI)
    Available from: 2005-09-02 Created: 2005-09-02 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
  • 38.
    Schmid Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Reconstructing Swedish Food Consumption from Hospital Diets after 18702004In: Ecology of Food and Nutrition, ISSN 0367-0244, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 149-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food consumption is of great interest from an environmental point of view since different diets have a significant impact on space, water, and the use of other resources. This article studies the quantity and composition of food consumption in Sweden between 1870 and 2000. The primary material, consisting of historical hospital dietary regulations from 1871 to 1928, is introduced in detail and compared to other national investigations. The results show a distinctive increase in the consumption of meat, fish, vegetables, and fruits, with a parallel decrease in cereal and milk consumption. Strong regional patterns could be detected concerning the consumption of meat and fish. The data are compared to other national investigations and particularly to studies of German and Finnish food consumption in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.

  • 39.
    Schmid Neset, Tina-Simone
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bader, Hans-Peter
    Systems Analysis, Integrated Assessment and Modelling (SIAM) Department of the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology (EAWAG), in Dübendorf, Switzerland.
    Scheidegger, Ruth
    Systems Analysis, Integrated Assessment and Modelling (SIAM) Department of the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology (EAWAG), in Dübendorf, Switzerland.
    Food Consumption and Nutrient Flows – Nitrogen in Sweden since the 1870s2006In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 61-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in food consumption and related processes have a significant impact on the flow of nitrogen in the environment. This study identifies both flows within the system and emissions to the hydrosphere and atmosphere. A case study of an average inhabitant of the city of Linköping, Sweden, covers the years 1870, 1900, 1950, and 2000 and includes changes in food consumption and processing, agricultural production, and organic waste handling practices. Emissions to the hydrosphere from organic waste handling increased from 0.57 kilograms of nitrogen per capita per year (kg N/cap per year) to 3.1 kg N/cap per year, whereas the total flow of nitrogen to waste deposits grew from a negligible amount to 1.7 kg N/cap per year. The largest flow of nitrogen during the entire period came from fodder. The input of chemical fertilizer rose gradually to a high level of 15 kg N/cap per year in the year 2000. The total load per capita disposed of to the environment decreased during these 130 years by about 30%.

  • 40.
    Schmid Neset, Tina-Simone
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bader, H-P.
    Eawag, Switzerland.
    Scheidegger, R.
    Eawag, Switzerland.
    Recycling of Phosphorus in Urban Sweden: A historical overview to prepare a strategy for the future2010In: Water Policy, ISSN 1366-7017, E-ISSN 1996-9759, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 611-624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable sanitation and food security have been issues in all human history although named differently. This study describes the evolution of sanitation arrangements in the Swedish town Linkoping for the period 1870-2000. The flow of phosphorus from food consumption is estimated for the period and its output is divided into gainful reuse in agriculture and energy production and (harmful) losses to the hydrosphere and landfills. The rate of gainful reuse varies dramatically, from very high, up until the 1920s, followed by a drop to almost zero around 1950. Reuse was picking up since the introduction of a phosphorus removal unit at wastewater treatment plants and application of sludge in agriculture from the 1970s, but was followed by a sharp decline at the end of the 20th century. The results from Linkoping are applied to scenarios for Sweden as a whole and extended to some anticipated implications for the world in the years to come.

  • 41.
    Schmid Neset, Tina-Simone
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lohm, Ulrik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Spatial Imprint of Food Consumption: A Historical Analysis for Sweden, 1870-20002005In: Human Ecology, ISSN 0300-7839, E-ISSN 1572-9915, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 565-580Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Depending on quantity and composition of food as well as on production conditions and techniques, the space needed to sustain an individual’s nourishment varies. The amount of space needed also depends on the use of resources such as energy, water, and fertilizers, as well as potential land degradation and water pollution. Our study focuses on the changing spatial imprint of an average inhabitant of an expanding Swedish city, Linköping, from 1870 to 2000 taking into account both shifts in consumption as well as agricultural productivity and practices. Despite the distinctly larger amount of animal food products, such as meat and fish, consumed in 2000, we calculate the area needed to sustain an individual’s annual food consumption could be less than one fourth of that needed in 1870. However, if the import of various globally produced foods is included in our calculations, the land needed to sustain the consumption of an inhabitant of Linköping in 2000 doubles. We also argue that an examination of this regional imprint can be used to explore and evaluate possibilities for regional development.

  • 42.
    Schmid Neset, Tina-Simone
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wibeck, Victoria
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Uhrqvist, Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Visualizing climate change: the potential of dome presentations as a tool for climate communication2010In: Eurographics 2010 - Areas Papers / [ed] M. Cooper and K. Pulli, Eurographics - European Association for Computer Graphics, 2010, Vol. 12/2009, p. 31-35Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents the outline of a climate visualization programme directed to various target groups that was presented in a dome environment. The efforts of climate and visualization researchers to jointly develop presentations for immersive environments on the cause and effect of climate change as well as potential responses both in terms of national and international policy as well as individuals’ lifestyles are described. Further we discuss the results of an evaluation with 64 participants of dome presentations. The results point towards an initial support for the dome visualization in terms of increased engagement of the audience. Further, visual representations such as choice of colouring and volume bar charts that were expected to be problematic by the research group were considered straightforward by the audience. In this paper we discuss visual representation and climate communication, and to what extent climate visualization in a dome environment can contribute to enhance the audience’s understanding of the complexity of climate change issues

  • 43.
    Wibeck, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Communicating Climate Change through ICT-Based Visualization: Towards an Analytical Framework2013In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 5, no 11, p. 4760-4777Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The difficulties in communicating climate change science to the general public are often highlighted as one of the hurdles for support of enhanced climate action.  The advances of interactive visualization using information and communication technology (ICT) are claimed to be a game-changer in our ability to communicate complex issues. However, new analytical frameworks are warranted to analyse the role of such technologies. This paper develops a novel framework for analyzing the content, form, context and relevance of ICT-based visualization of climate change, based on insights from literature on climate change communication. Thereafter, we exemplify the analytical framework by applying it to a pilot case of ICT-based climate visualization in a GeoDome. Possibilities to use affordable advanced ICT-based visualization devices in science and policy communication are rapidly expanding. We thus see wider implications and applications of the analytical framework not only for other ICT environments but also other issue areas in sustainability communication.

  • 44.
    Wibeck, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Schmid Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Communicating Climate Change through interactive dome visualization - frameworks, potentials and challenges2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Wilk, Julie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jonsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andre, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Opach, Tomasz (Contributor)
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Neset, Tina S. (Contributor)
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A Guidebook for Integrated Assessment and Management of Vulnerability to Climate Change2013Book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Wiréhn, Lotten
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Danielsson, Åsa
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Assessment of composite index methods for agricultural vulnerability to climate change2015In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 156, p. 70-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common way of quantifying and communicating climate vulnerability is to calculate composite indices from indicators, visualizing these as maps. Inherent methodological uncertainties in vulnerability assessments, however, require greater attention. This study examines Swedish agricultural vulnerability to climate change, the aim being to review various indicator approaches for assessing agricultural vulnerability to climate change and to evaluate differences in climate vulnerability depending on the weighting and summarizing methods. The reviewed methods are evaluated by being tested at the municipal level. Three weighting and summarizing methods, representative of climate vulnerability indices in general, are analysed. The results indicate that 34 of 36 method combinations differ signifi- cantly from each other. We argue that representing agricultural vulnerability in a single composite index might be insufficient to guide climate adaptation. We emphasize the need for further research into how to measure and visualize agricultural vulnerability and into how to communicate uncertainties in both data and methods.

  • 47.
    Wiréhn, Lotten
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Opach, Tomasz
    Norwegain University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Assessing agricultural vulnerability to climate change in the Nordic countries an interactive geovisualization approach2017In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 115-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nordic agriculture must adapt to climate change to reduce vulnerability and exploit potential opportunities. Integrated assessments can identify and quantify vulnerability in order to recognize these adaptation needs. This study presents a geographic visualization approach to support the interactive assessment of agricultural vulnerability to climate change. We have identified requirements for increased transparency and reflexivity in vulnerability assessments, arguing that these can be met by geographic visualization. A conceptual framework to support the integration of geographic visualization for vulnerability assessments has been designed and applied for the development of AgroExplore, an interactive tool for assessing agricultural vulnerability to climate change in Sweden. To open up the black box of composite vulnerability indices, AgroExplore enables the user to select, weight, and classify relevant indicators into sub-indices of exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity. This enables the exploration of underlying indicators and factors determining vulnerability in Nordic agriculture.

  • 48.
    Withers, Paul J. A.
    et al.
    Bangor University, United Kingdom.
    van Dijk, Kimo C.
    Wageningen University, The Netherlands.
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Nesme, Thomas
    Bordeaux University, France.
    Oenema, Oene
    Wageningen University, The Netherlands.
    Rubæk, Gitte H.
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Schoumans, Oscar
    Wageningen University, The Netherlands.
    Smit, Bert
    Wageningen University, The Netherlands.
    Pellerin, Sylvain
    INRA, France.
    Stewardship to tackle global phosphorus inefficiency: The case of Europe2015In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 193-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The inefficient use of phosphorus (P) in the food chain is a threat to the global aquatic environment and the health and well-being of citizens, and it is depleting an essential finite natural resource critical for future food security and ecosystem function. We outline a strategic framework of 5R stewardship (Re-align P inputs, Reduce P losses, Recycle P in bioresources, Recover P in wastes, and Redefine P in food systems) to help identify and deliver a range of integrated, cost-effective, and feasible technological innovations to improve P use efficiency in society and reduce Europe’s dependence on P imports. Their combined adoption facilitated by interactive policies, co-operation between upstream and downstream stakeholders (researchers, investors, producers, distributors, and consumers), and more harmonized approaches to P accounting would maximize the resource and environmental benefits and help deliver a more competitive, circular, and sustainable European economy. The case of Europe provides a blueprint for global P stewardship.

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