liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 31 of 31
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Cordell, Dana
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    White, Stuart
    Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology Sydney.
    The story of phosphorus: Global food security and food for thought2009In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 292-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food production requires application of fertilizers containing phosphorus, nitrogen and potassium on agricultural fields in order to sustain crop yields. However modern agriculture is dependent on phosphorus derived from phosphate rock, which is a non-renewable resource and current global reserves may be depleted in 50–100 years. While phosphorus demand is projected to increase, the expected global peak in phosphorus production is predicted to occur around 2030. The exact timing of peak phosphorus production might be disputed, however it is widely acknowledged within the fertilizer industry that the quality of remaining phosphate rock is decreasing and production costs are increasing.

    Yet future access to phosphorus receives little or no international attention. This paper puts forward the case for including long-term phosphorus scarcity on the priority agenda for global food security. Opportunities for recovering phosphorus and reducing demand are also addressed together with institutional challenges.

  • 2.
    Cordell, Dana
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Schmid-Neset, Tina
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    White, Stuart
    Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Preferred future phosphorus scenarios: A framework for meeting long-term phosphorus needs for global food demand2009In: International Conference on Nutrient Recovery from Wastewater Streams, Vancouver, 2009 / [ed] Don Mavinic, Ken Ashley and Fred Koch, London: IWA Publishing , 2009, 1, p. 23-44Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Closing the loop for nutrients in wastewaters (municipal sewage, animal wastes, food industry, commercial and other liquid waste streams) is a necessary, sustainable development objective, to reduce resource consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Chemistry, engineering and process integration understanding are all developing quickly, as new processes are now coming online. A new "paradigm" is emerging, globally. Commercial marketing of recovered nutrients as "green fertilizers" or recycling of nutrients through biomass production to new outlets, such as bioenergy, is becoming more widespread.This exciting conference brings together various waste stream industries, regulators, researchers, process engineers and commercial managers, to develop a broad-based, intersectional understanding and joint projects for phosphorus and nitrogen recovery from wastewater streams, as well as reuse. Over 90 papers from over 30 different countries presented in this volume.

  • 3.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    How Rational Are We?: The Illusive Water Sector1998In: Water: The Taming of a Scarce Resource / [ed] Gunnel Cederlöf, Uppsala: Uppsala University , 1998, August, p. 63-71Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Norms and Attitudes Towards Ecosan and Other Sanitation Systems2004Report (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Phosphorus - a Limited Resource that could be made Limitless2012In: SYMPHOS 2011 - 1ST INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY IN THE PHOSPHATE INDUSTRY, Elsevier , 2012, Vol. 46, p. 228-233Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphorus is a non-substitutable component in all living plants and organisms and thus a crucial element in the food chain. The use of fertilizers derived from phosphate rock has made increases in food production possible and reduced malnourishment since the mid-20th century. Recent worries about a future shortage of phosphorus have sparked a debate over the lifespan of existing reserves. In this article, the author focuses on improved management of the phosphorus we have access to, and argue the case that halting present wastage of phosphorus and reuse/recycling nutrients in waste products can make phosphorus (almost) limitless.

  • 6.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rapid Population Increase: A Development Trap. A Study of a Social Sector Development in Rural Tanzania1994In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 23, no 4-5, p. 309-311Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rural household water: crucial and insignificant1996In: IRDCurrents, ISSN 1102-1144, no 12, p. 29-33Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The amount of water that rural households require is insignificant in a water resources perspective. Yet its quality and availability is crucial to human well-being. In Sukumaland, Tanzania, in a number of villages, more water sources have been developed over the years, water quality maintained, and sources have been used more intensively to compensate for increasing population. With intensification of use maintenance problems may surge. Experience shows, however, that people have the ability to manage their water sources. A new division of tasks and responsibilities between different stakeholders in the community may be required. Intervention projects, usually involving the global community, should be avoided as they deprive men in communities with an abundance of labour from performing tasks which could be part of local craftmanship and pride.

  • 8.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rural Water Sources Reconsidered: Development Perspectives from Sweden and Tanzania1996Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Urine blindness and the use of nutrients from human excreta in urban agriculture1998In: GeoJournal, ISSN 0343-2521, E-ISSN 1572-9893, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 201-208Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A brief look around the globe shows that most countries are facing sanitary problems, especially in the expanding cities in the Southern Hemisphere. Governments and municipal councils are trying hard to improve sanitation conditions within the mind set of piped systems. There is a need to know what is being done in other countries in order to enlarge the policy options. Among these are the ones recirculating water and nutrients. This article focuses on excreta disposal systems which use little or no water, and various ways to use the end products of faeces and urine. Doing away with our urine blindness will pave the way to discover new possibilities which will save scarce resources in the future.

  • 10.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Who cares about water?1995In: Waterlines, ISSN 0262-8104, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 11-18Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Successfully supplying water to households in rural areas is only partly a matter of technology; mainly, it is a question of improving or adapting the existing ways in which rural people organize their human and physical resources. A study carried out in Sukumaland, Tanzania, looked into what individuals had done (or had not done)— and why — by using a combination of observation, interviews, and water-testing.

  • 11.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Who cares about water?: A study of household water development in Sukumaland, Tanzania1993Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a study of the incentives and constraints which bear upon people's ability to improve access to and quality of household water through their own cooperative and household efforts. The focus is on activities that are managed and controlled in the community and involve human and physical resources. Equal emphasis is given to understanding continuity aspects (doing more of the same) and change (doing new things).

    Thirty knowledgeable informants from six rural villages in Sukumaland provided the bulk of the information. They live in an area with a semi-arid to sub-humid climate situated south-east of Lake Victoria in Tanzania.

    Human and physical factors influence what takes place on the local scene and a model is developed to analyse water-related activities. In-depth interviews and observation provide the basis for an exploration of ways in which individuals and neighbourhoods reason and act to obtain household water of acceptable quality at a reasonable distance. The interviews were aimed at elucidating the actual levels of knowledge and technical skills employed in effecting specific improvements. The informants' knowledge of hydrogeological conditions and of the hygienic aspects of water use are appraised and compared with full professional standards of knowledge.

    Sukuma norms about water-related issues have been explored: water rights and control over water sources, and household and cooperative efforts. Informants' individual values on these matters are compared with the norms. The aim is to learn the ways in which both norms and individual values affect negotiations about proper measures in the community and within the household.

    Four major findings come out of the analysis. The first is that villagers in general believe that there are affordable and manageable solutions to their own household water problems. Secondly, government and donor involvement in the household water sector tends to inhibit more advanced local initiatives and activities. Thirdly, the present gender-based division of household tasks interferes negatively with improvements. Finally, there are considerable differences in the value placed upon different kinds of accessible water sources by outside observers and the villagers themselves.

    The prospects for future improvement in household water conditions are heavily influenced by the rapid population increase. The capacity for government interventions is limited, and in future most efforts to develop water supplies are expected to be made by individuals and neighbourhoods. The hydrological conditions allow for the provision of enough household water well into the next century, although the population growth will eventually cause water scarcity and hit food production.

  • 12.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    et al.
    VATEMA Co., Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Barbara, Kielbasa
    Agriculture and Economics, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Krakow, Poland.
    Ulén, Barbro
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Soil and Environment, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Tonderski, Karin
    POMInnO Sp. Zo.o., Gdynia, Poland.
    Tonderski, Andrzej
    POMInnO Sp. Zo.o., Gdynia, Poland.
    Generating Applicable Environmental Knowledge among Farmers: Experiences from Two Regions in Poland2017In: Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems, ISSN 2168-3565, E-ISSN 2168-3573, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 671-690Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Raising environmental awareness among farmers is the key to successfully reaching environmental goals. The present study assessed the knowledge development process and the raising of environmental awareness among 30 farmers from Poland exposed to four approaches aimed to reduce phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) losses to water. The farmers were interviewed with open-ended questions on-farm both before and after the project intervention. As hoped, the farmers attempted to adjust their farm practices to the European Union regulations, which are in some cases supported by subsidies. As a complement, the project offered tools for system-thinking based on farm data and support from agricultural advisors: a) a survey of plant-available P, potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), and soil pH, resulting in soil maps; b) assessment of nitrogen leaching risks from individual fields; c) compilation of a farm-gate balance. Farmers were positive to soil surveys and maps, but had limited understanding of the nutrient balance concept and calculations. They generally relied on their own experiences regarding fertilization rather than on calculated farm nutrient balances and leaching risks. Farmers’ understanding and willingness to adopt new approaches to improve nutrient efficiency and reduce negative environmental impacts are discussed.

  • 13.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Clark Nelson, Marie
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of History. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Centre for Local History. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Why Did They Become Pipe-Bound Cities?: Early Water and Sewerage Alternatives in Swedish Cities2002In: Public Works Management & Policy, ISSN 1087-724X, E-ISSN 1552-7549, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 172-172-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For decades and even centuries, Swedish towns, prompted by the need for clean water, haddiscussedpotential water systems. Some towns haddevelopedplans, but it was first in the secondhalf of the 19th century that the gradual conversion was made to pipe-boundsystems for water andsanitation. Not until 1863, after towns hadgainedthe authority to collect taxes, borrow money, lay pipes through private compounds, and monitor the urban environment, did infrastructure development become the task of local government. Cholera epidemics and fire protection (and thus lower insurance fees) were among the factors motivating the town councils andproperty owners. Especially from 1875 on, the hygienic value of water was also emphasizedin the effort to enforce public health legislation. Pipes for the systems were importedanddesigns emulated.

  • 14.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hallström, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Educational Science (IUV). Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Den urbana renhållningen i Stockholm och Norrköping: -från svin till avfallskvarn?2002In: Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0349-2834, no 44Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hallström, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Educational Science (IUV). Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Det urbana jordbrukslandskapets öde. Näringsämnenas kretslopp i Norrköping 1850-19202005In: Bruka, odla, hävda.: Odlingssystem och uthålligt jordbruk under 400 år / [ed] Ulf Jansson och Erland Mårald, Stockholm: Kungl. Skogs och Lantbruksakademien , 2005, p. 187-202Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Nya kunskaper om odlingssystemens historia och om uthålligt jordbruk, presenteras i denna antologi. Kan det ha varit förändrade matvanor för 400 år sedan som drastiskt kom att förändra odlingssystemen? Hur skapades ett jordbruk som kunde vara hållbart under den stora befolkningstillväxten på 1800-talet? Hur har landskapet förändrats? Hur kan jordbrukets framtidsscenario se ut?Bokens författare kommer från olika forskningsfält - de är naturvetare, samhällsvetare såväl som humanister. Även deras bidrag spänner över stora områden, allt från konkreta förändringar i landskapet till teorier om jordbrukets utveckling. Antologins huvudområden är: odlingssystemens historia, de idéhistoriska perspektiven, naturens kretslopp, energi- och näringsflöden samt landskapsförändringar och hållbart nyttjande. Denna spännvidd gör att boken vänder sig till många kategorier - planerare, kulturgeografer, miljöforskare, kommunekologer, historiker, museimän, agrara praktiker och övriga intresserade av jordbruket och dess historia. Alla läsare får möjlighet att göra sig en egen syntes av förlopppen.

  • 16.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Heyns, Piet
    Falkenmark, Malin
    Lundqvist, Jan
    Seely, Mary
    Hydén, Lars
    Bethune, Shirley
    Kemper, Karin
    Sharing Water in Southern Africa1997In: Sharing Water in Southern Africa: Desert Research Foundation of Namibia, Windhoek / [ed] John Pallett, Windhoek: Desert Research Foundation of Namibia , 1997Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Klockner, Anna
    Linköping University.
    Nors, Linda
    Linköping University.
    På väg mot en hållbar stad: uppfattad och uppmätt påverkan av miljösatsningar i Hammarby Sjöstad, Stockholm2005Report (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Krantz, Helena
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hammarby Sjöstad - miljöföreställningar och verkligheter.2002In: Vatten. Tidskrift för vattenvård., ISSN 0042-2886, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 89-95Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nawab, Bahadar
    COMSATS University Abbottabad, Pakistan.
    A Cultural - spatial analysis of excreting, recirculation of human excreta and health - The case of North West Frontier Province, Pakistan2011In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 57-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sanitation issue is entering the development discussion and the UN proclaimed 2008 the year of sanitation. The study aims to understand the cultural–spatial dimension among Muslim communities of excreting and recirculating human excreta in North West Frontier Province in Pakistan. Information on local perceptions and cultural understanding was collected through interviews, group discussions and observations in four selected villages. The study identifies a diversity of excreting practices among age groups and sexes, and varied adherence to expressed cultural norms. Interviewees express less resentment towards urine compared to faeces, however, their negative attitude subsides when faecal matter is mixed with water since this changes appearance, odour—and cultural meaning. Religious dictums about excreta and sewage accommodate contradicting routine behaviours to cater for needs of residents and farmers. For example, when mothers pray wearing soiled clothing, and in the use of wastewater as fertiliser for food production. The excreta-related practices are compatible with good hygienic behaviour as outlined by WHO Guidelines, except for children who are allowed to defecate anywhere.

  • 20.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Okotto-Okotto, J
    Linkoping Univ, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Okotto, LGO
    Linkoping Univ, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Auko, O
    Linkoping Univ, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Going small when the city grows big - New options for water supply and sanitation in rapidly expanding urban areas2002In: Water international, ISSN 0250-8060, E-ISSN 1941-1707, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 354-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Actual development of water and wastewater systems in towns is an outcome of several interrelated factors such as physical, economic, and social environments. Demography is also an important factor to consider in the formulation of development strategies. Too often in policy papers, population increase only serves as an argument for urgent action, but rarely as a factor in its own right that affects chances of improving a grave situation. A model is developed to generate water management options in urban areas related to population growth. A hypothesis is that management should go small in periods when the city expands rapidly. A study is presented of the development of water and sanitation in the town of Kisumu in Kenya on the shore of Lake Victoria during last century. The aim is to describe and analyze actual development in the water sector and to foresee what prospective developments could be identified in light of continued rapid population growth. The slow growth of the town in the colonial period allowed towns to adequately meet the needs of all residents for water The extremely rapid population growth after Independence in 1963 interacted with other factors to cause a successive deterioration of residents access to water and sewage disposal.

  • 21.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Okotto-Okotto, Joseph
    Lake Basin Development Authority, Kisumu, Kenya.
    Okotto, Lorna G. O.
    Moi University, Kenya.
    Auko, Otieno
    Bandaptai Laboratories, Homa Bay, Kenya.
    Going Small When the City Grows Big : New Options for Water Supply and Sanitation in Rapidly Expanding Urban Areas 2002In: Water international, ISSN 0250-8060, E-ISSN 1941-1707, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 354-363Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Actual development of water and wastewater systems in towns is an outcome of several interrelated factors such as physical, economic, and social environments. Demography is also an important factor to consider in the formulation of development strategies. Too often in policy papers, population increase only serves as an argument for urgent action, but rarely as a factor in its own right that affects chances of improving a grave situation. A model is developed to generate water management options in urban areas related to population growth. A hypothesis is that management should go small in periods when the city expands rapidly. A study is presented of the development of water and sanitation in the town of Kisumu in Kenya on the shore of Lake Victoria during last century. The aim is to describe and analyze actual development in the water sector and to foresee what prospective developments could be identified in light of continued rapid population growth. The slow growth of the town in the colonial period allowed towns to adequately meet the needs of all residents for water. The extremely rapid population growth after Independence in 1963 interacted with other factors to cause a successive deterioration of residents access to water and sewage disposal.

  • 22.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Swiderski, RichardFaculty of Health Sciences, Moi University, Kenya.Woodhouse, MelvinLondon School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK.
    Conference on Safe Water Environments, Eldoret, Kenya, August 21-23, 19951995Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Tonderski, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    McConville, Jennifer
    Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Extending the European Union Waste Hierarchy to Guide Nutrient-Effective Urban Sanitation toward Global Food Security: Opportunities for Phosphorus Recovery2018In: Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems, E-ISSN 2571-581X, Vol. 2, p. 1-13, article id 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With growing urbanization cities become hotspots for nutrients. Food items are imported, and food residues, including excreta and not-eaten food, are often exported to landfill sites and water bodies. However, urban sanitation systems can be designed to achieve a high degree of nutrient recovery and food security while counteracting current nutrient resources depletion, environmental degradation, and wasteful energy use. This article illustrates how an extended solid waste hierarchy also including human excreta and wastewater can guide actions to save and recover phosphorus (P) by the three sectors: food industry, households, and waste utilities. P use in diets and agricultural production is not part of the analysis, despite the potential to save P. Novel systems thinking and material flow analysis show that waste prevention can replace over 40% of mined P presently used for making fertilizers. Reuse and recycling of P in excreta and food waste can replace another 15–30%, depending on P efficiency from mine to plate. Keeping excreta separated from other wastewater facilitates such measure. Incineration and land filling are deemed the least appropriate measures since mainly P is recovered in the ashes. The European Union (EU) waste management policy is analyzed for real barriers and opportunities for this approach. The EU Parliament policy guidelines were watered down in the EU Commission’s Directives, and today most biowastes are still being landfilled or incinerated instead of recovered. An anticipated overcapacity of incineration plants in Europe threatens to attract all combustible materials and therefore, irrevocably, reduce nutrient recovery. On the other hand, reduced generation and enhanced recovery can delay exhaustion of P resources by several centuries and simultaneously reduce environmental degradation.

  • 24.
    Drangert, J.-O.
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cronin, A.A.
    Robens Ctr. for Pub./Environ. Health, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
    Use and abuse of the urban groundwater resource: Implications for a new management strategy2004In: Hydrogeology Journal, ISSN 1431-2174, E-ISSN 1435-0157, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 94-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various human activities threaten the groundwater quality and resource under urban areas, and yet residents increasingly depend on it for their livelihood. The anticipated expansion of the world's urban population from 3 to 6 billion in the coming 50 years does not only pose a large water management threat but also provides an opportunity to conserve groundwater in a better way than up to now. The authors argue for a new way to manage urban activities in order to conserve the precious groundwater resource. The focus is on the quality of the discharged water after use in households. Restrictions on what is added to water while using it, e.g. detergents, excreta, paint residues, oils, and pharmaceuticals, are important to simplify the treatment and reuse of used water. Avoiding mixing different wastewater flows has the same positive effect. If increased volumes of wastewater can be treated and reused, the demand on the groundwater resource is reduced, as also occurs with demand management measures. Reduced discharge of polluted water to the environment from households and utilities also conserves the quality of groundwater and reduces sophisticated treatment costs. © Springer-Verlag 2004.

  • 25.
    Jönsson, Håkan
    et al.
    n/a.
    Ashbolt, Nicholas
    n/a.
    Baky, Andras
    n/a.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Krantz, Helena
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kärrman, Erik
    n/a.
    Ledin, Anna
    n/a.
    Ottosson, Jacob
    n/a.
    Almqvist, Helena
    n/a.
    Westrell, Therese
    n/a.
    Vinnerås, Björn
    n/a.
    Slutrapport för modellstaden Urbana Enklaven.2005Report (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Krantz, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Household perspectives in managing sustainable cities2006In: Strategic Planning of Sustainable Urban Water Management / [ed] Per-Arne Malmqvist, Gerald Heinicke, Erik Kärrman, Thor Axel Stenström and Gilbert Svensson, London: IWA Publishing , 2006, p. 112-122Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The strategic planning of urban water systems is a complex task. The Urban Water programme covered projects from various disciplines at 9 Swedish Universities, from 1999 to 2006. The projects developed a "toolbox" for strategic planning of drinking-, waste- and stormwater management, covering aspects such as the environment, health and hygiene, financing, organisation, households, and technical function. Strategic Planning of Sustainable Urban Water Management synthesises the results and presents a comprehensive approach, which includes not only the technical, economic and environmental aspects, but also the challenges of institutional capacity and public participation in the planning process. Furthermore, the experience from a number of case studies are summarised and can offer readers inspiration for their own planning situations.

  • 27.
    Mara, D.
    et al.
    School of Civil Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, United Kingdom.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nguyen, V.A.
    Faculty of Environmental Engineering, Hanoi University of Civil Engineering, 55 Giai Phong Road, Hanoi, Viet Nam.
    Tonderski, A.
    Enviston, Ekängsvägen 45, SE-582 75, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gulyas, H.
    Institute of Wastewater Management, Hamburg University of Technology, Eissendorfer Straße 42, D-21073, Hamburg, Germany.
    Sundblad-Tonderski, Karin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Ecology .
    Selection of sustainable sanitation arrangements2007In: Water Policy, ISSN 1366-7017, E-ISSN 1996-9759, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 305-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To meet the Millennium Development Goal for sanitation around 440,000 people will have to be provided with adequate sanitation every day during 2001-2015, and the corresponding figure to meet the WHO/UNICEF target of "sanitation for all" by 2025 is around 480,000 people per day during 2001-2025. The provision of sanitation services to such huge numbers necessitates action on an unprecedented scale. This is made even more difficult by the general lack of knowledge on the part of professionals and the intended beneficiaries about which sanitation arrangement is the most appropriate under which circumstances. A sanitation selection algorithm, which considers all the available sanitation arrangements, including ecological sanitation and low-cost sewerage, and which is firmly based on the principles of sustainable sanitation, is developed as a guide to identify the most appropriate arrangement in any given situation, especially in poor and very poor rural and periurban areas in developing countries. © IWA Publishing 2007.

  • 28.
    Mariwah, Simon
    et al.
    Dep. of Geography and Reg. Planning Univ. of Cape Coast, Ghana.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Community perceptions of human excreta as fertilizer in peri-urban agriculture in Ghana.2011In: Waste Management & Research, ISSN 0734-242X, E-ISSN 1096-3669, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 815-822Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although human excreta contain the necessary nutrients for plant growth, local authorities in Ghana spend huge sums of money to dispose them as waste. Reusing excreta for agricultural purposes saves expenditure for chemical fertilizers, improves soil fertility, reduces poverty and ensures food security. People’s attitudes and perceptions about excreta vary between cultures and even within specific cultures. This study aimed to explore attitudes and perceptions among a peri-urban agricultural community towards sanitized human excreta and its use. The study adopted an exploratory design and collected data from 154 randomly selected households using questionnaires and focus group discussions. It was found that there is a general negative attitude to fresh excreta and the handling of it. However, the residents accept that excreta can be used as fertilizer, but they are not willing to use it on their own crops or consume crops fertilized with excreta. The study recommends open discussions in the community for a successful implementation of ecological sanitation.

  • 29.
    McConville, Jennifer
    et al.
    Department of Architecture, Chalmes University of Technology, Sweden.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Tidåker, Pernilla
    Swedish Institute of Agricultural and Envisonmental Engineering, Uppsala.
    Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Tema Environmental Change.
    Rauch, Sebastien
    Department of Civil and Envisonmental Engineering, Chalmers University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Strid, Ingrid
    Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish UNiversity of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Tonderski, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Closing the food loops: guidelines and criteria for improving nutrient management2015In: Sustainability: Science, Practice, & Policy, ISSN 1548-7733, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As global consumption expands, the world is increasingly facing threats to resource availability and food security. To meet future food demands, agricultural resource efficiency needs to be optimized for both water and nutrients. Policy makers should start to radically rethink nutrient management across the entire food chain. Closing the food loop by recycling nutrients in food waste and excreta is an important way of limiting the use of mineral nutrients, as well as improving national and global food security. This article presents a framework for sustainable nutrient management and discusses the responsibility of four key stakeholder groups—agriculture, the food industry, consumers, and waste management—for achieving an effective food loop. In particular, we suggest a number of criteria, policy actions, and supporting strategies based on a cross-sectoral application of the waste hierarchy.

  • 30.
    Rahman, AU
    et al.
    Natl Univ Singapore, Singapore 0511, Singapore Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Workshop 7 (synthesis): towards a recycling society2001Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Population increase and growing quantities of human excreta create serious problems and high risks for people's health. Alternative solutions are becoming crucial to improve urban living conditions, and to shorten water and nutrient flows into circulation of used water and nutrient in human excreta. The speakers presented a wide range of experiences of "closing the loops" and thereby turning potential waste into productive use. The focus of the workshop deliberations was on simplifying the hygienisation of urine and faeces and the reuse in food production by using urine-diverting toilets, as well as innovative ways to recycle sewage after various stages of treatment.

  • 31.
    Schmid Neset, Tina-Simone
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bader, H-P.
    Eawag, Switzerland.
    Scheidegger, R.
    Eawag, Switzerland.
    Recycling of Phosphorus in Urban Sweden: A historical overview to prepare a strategy for the future2010In: Water Policy, ISSN 1366-7017, E-ISSN 1996-9759, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 611-624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable sanitation and food security have been issues in all human history although named differently. This study describes the evolution of sanitation arrangements in the Swedish town Linkoping for the period 1870-2000. The flow of phosphorus from food consumption is estimated for the period and its output is divided into gainful reuse in agriculture and energy production and (harmful) losses to the hydrosphere and landfills. The rate of gainful reuse varies dramatically, from very high, up until the 1920s, followed by a drop to almost zero around 1950. Reuse was picking up since the introduction of a phosphorus removal unit at wastewater treatment plants and application of sludge in agriculture from the 1970s, but was followed by a sharp decline at the end of the 20th century. The results from Linkoping are applied to scenarios for Sweden as a whole and extended to some anticipated implications for the world in the years to come.

1 - 31 of 31
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf