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  • 1.
    Folkmarson Käll, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Arts and Humanities. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bodily Relational Autonomy2014In: Journal of consciousness studies, ISSN 1355-8250, E-ISSN 2051-2201, Vol. 21, no 9-10, p. 100-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conceptions of autonomy in western philosophy and ethics have often centred on self-governance and self-determination. However, a growing bulk of literature also questions such conceptions, including the understanding of the autonomous self as a self-governing independent individual that chooses, acts, and lives in accordance with her or his own values, norms, or sense of sell This article contributes to the critical interrogation of selfhood, autonomy, and autonomous decision making by combining a feminist focus on relational dimensions of selfhood and autonomy with phenomenological philosophy of the embodied self as being-in-the-world. It offers a philosophical investigation of different dimensions of bodily relational autonomy by turning to phenomenological accounts of the lived body as self-reflexive. When so doing, we hope to contribute to bridging the gap that sometimes exists between discussions of autonomy in analytic moral philosophy and of freedom and facticity in phenomenological philosophy. We see this gap as unfortunate, and hold that a nuanced understanding of autonomy and autonomous decision making can be reached if these strands of philosophy are brought into dialogue.

  • 2.
    Guntram, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Ethics of the Societal Entrenchment-approach and the case of live uterus transplantation-IVF2019In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 557-571Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2014, the first child in the world was born after live uterus transplantation and IVF (UTx-IVF). Before and after this event, ethical aspects of UTx-IVF have been discussed in the medical and bioethical debate as well as, with varying intensity, in Swedish media and political fora. This article examines what comes to be identified as important ethical problems and solu-tions in the media debate of UTx-IVF in Sweden, showing specifically how problems, target groups, goals, benefits, risks and stakes are delineated and positioned. It also demonstrates how specific assumptions, norms and values are expressed and used to underpin specific positions within this debate, and how certain subjects, desires and risks become shrouded or simply omitted from it. This approach—which we label the Ethics of the Societal Entrenchment-approach, inspired by Koch and Stemerding (1994)—allows us to discuss how the identification of something as the problem helps to shape what gets to be described as a solution, and how specific solutions provide frameworks within which problems can be stated and emphasised. We also offer a critical discussion of whether some of these articulations and formations should be seen as ethically troubling, and if so, why.

  • 3.
    Guntram, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    ‘You have all those emotions inside that you cannot show because of what they will cause’: Disclosing the absence of one’s uterus and vagina2016In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 167, p. 63-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines young women's experiences of telling others that they have no uterus and no, or a so-called small, vagina – a condition labelled ‘congenital absence of uterus and vagina’, which falls within the larger category of ‘atypical’ sex development. Our aim is to investigate how affective dissonances such as fear and frustration are expressed in young women's narratives about letting others know about their ‘atypical’ sex development, and how these women narrate desired steps to recognition. By drawing on feminist writings on the performativity of affects or emotions, we examine what affective dissonances accomplish within three identified narratives: how affective dissonances may contribute to the women's positioning of themselves vis-à-vis other individuals and how affective dissonances can imply a strengthening and/or questioning of norms about female embodiment and heterosexuality. This allows us to tease out how routes for questioning of these norms become available through the three narratives that together form a storyline of coming out about a congenital absence of a uterus and vagina in the Swedish context. Furthermore, by demonstrating how others' responses shape the women – their understandings of their own bodies, their envisaged future disclosures and their relations – our analysis highlights the multifaceted intersubjective and in other ways relational, affective and temporal dimensions of coming out about one's 'atypical' sex development.

  • 4.
    Malmqvist, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zeiler, KristinLinköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bodily Exchanges, Bioethics and Border Crossing: Perspectives on Giving, Selling and Sharing Bodies2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Medical therapy, research and technology enable us to make our bodies, or parts of them, available to others in an increasing number of ways. This is the case in organ, tissue, egg and sperm donation as well as in surrogate motherhood and clinical research. Bringing together leading scholars working on the ethical, social and cultural aspects of such bodily exchanges, this cutting-edge book develops new ways of understanding them.

    Bodily Exchanges, Bioethics and Border Crossing both probes the established giving and selling frameworks for conceptualising bodily exchanges in medicine, and seeks to develop and examine another, less familiar framework: that of sharing. A framework of sharing can capture practices that involve giving up and giving away part of one’s body, such as organ and tissue donation, and practices that do not, such as surrogacy and research participation. Sharing also recognizes the multiple relationalities that these exchanges can involve and invites inquiry into the context in which they occur. In addition, the book explores the multiple forms of border crossing that bodily exchanges in medicine involve, from the physical boundaries of the body to relational borders – as can happen in surrogacy – to national borders and the range of ethical issues that these various border-crossings can give rise to. 

    Engaging with anthropology, sociology, philosophy, and feminist and postcolonical perspectives, this is an original and timely contribution to contemporary bioethics in a time of increasing globalization. It will be of use to students and researchers from a range of humanities and social science backgrounds as well as medical and other healthcare professionals with an interest in bioethics.

  • 5.
    Malmqvist, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Concluding reflections: Bodily exchanges as sharing2016In: Bodily Exchanges, Bioethics and Border Crossing: Perspectives on Giving, Selling and Sharing Bodies / [ed] Erik Malmqvist, Kristin Zeiler, London and New York: Routledge, 2016, p. 197-207Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Malmqvist, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Cultural Norms, the Phenomenology of Incorporation and the Experience of Having a Child Born with Ambiguous Sex.2010In: Social Theory and Practice, ISSN 0037-802X, E-ISSN 2154-123X, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 133-156Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Malmqvist, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Introduction2016In: Bodily Exchanges, Bioethics and Border Crossing: Perspectives on Giving, Selling and Sharing Bodies / [ed] Erik Malmqvist, Kristin Zeiler, London and New York: Routledge, 2016, p. 1-18Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Munthe, Christian
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Broström, Linus
    Lunds universitet.
    Brülde, Bengt
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Cutas, Daniela
    Umeå och Göteborgs universitet.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    Uppsala universitet.
    Helgeson, Gert
    Karolinska institutet.
    Juth, Niklas
    Karolinska institutet.
    Kihlbom, Ulrik
    Uppsala universitet.
    Malmqvist, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Göteborg och Borås.
    Sandman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Mats
    Lunds universitet.
    Efter skandalen: ”Gråzoner sätt att blanda bort korten”2016In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Efter skandalen kring kirurgen på Karolinska Institutet som gjorde experimentella operationer, talas det om gråzoner i lagen. Men detta stämmer inte, utan är ett sätt att blanda bort korten, skriver en rad professorer från sex olika universitet gemensamt.

  • 9.
    Murano, Maria Cristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Medicine, Science, Health and Society (Cermes3), School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences (EHESS), Paris, France ; Center for Bioethics, Children’s Mercy Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, USA.
    Slatman, Jenny
    Department of Culture Studies, Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    How sociophenomenology of the body problematises the ‘problem-oriented approach’ to growth hormone treatment2018In: Medical Humanities, ISSN 1468-215X, E-ISSN 1473-4265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how people who are shorter than average make sense of their lived experience of embodiment. It offers a sociophenomenological analysis of 10 semistructured interviews conducted in the Netherlands, focusing on if, how, and why height matters to them. It draws theoretically on phenomenological discussions of lived and objective space, intercorporeality and norms about bodies. The analysis shows that height as a lived phenomenon (1) is active engagement in space, (2) coshapes habituated ways of behaving and (3) is shaped by gendered norms and beliefs about height. Based on this analysis, the article challenges what we label as the ‘problem-oriented approach’ to discussions about growth hormone treatment for children with idiopathic short stature. In this approach, possible psychosocial disadvantages or problems of short stature and quantifiable height become central to the ethical evaluation of growth hormone treatment at the expense of first-hand lived experiences of short stature and height as a lived phenomenon. Based on our sociophenomenological analysis, this paper argues that the rationale for giving growth hormone treatment should combine medical and psychological assessments with investigations of lived experiences of the child. Such an approach would allow considerations not only of possible risks or disadvantages of short stature but also of the actual ways in which the child makes sense of her or his height.

  • 10.
    Zbikowski, Ancke
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brüggemann, Adrianus Jelmer
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Swahnberg, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ethical guidelines and the prevention of abuse in healthcare2012In: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, ISSN 0301-2115, E-ISSN 1872-7654, Vol. 165, no 1, p. 18-28Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    In obstetrical and gynaecological healthcare, patients often find themselves in a vulnerable position. Sensitive issues such as sexual and reproductive health are addressed and certain procedures can be experienced as abusive. According to research a lifetime prevalence of abuse in healthcare (AHC) can be assumed for 13–28% of female patients in the Nordic countries. In the present study we analyse the content of ethical documents for healthcare professionals within obstetrics and gynaecology in Sweden, in order to find out to what extent ethicalguidelines consider issues that have shown to be related to the occurrence of AHC.

    Study design

    We searched the literature to find empirical data on AHC. Guidelines for nurses, midwives and physicians were selected. After developing an analytical framework based on the empirical data the content of the ethicalguidelines was analysed.

    Results

    The various ethicalguidelines for staff working within obstetrics and gynaecology differ distinctively from each other regarding their content of issues that are related to AHC. Issues that were mostly disregarded were: considering the patient's perspective and the patients’ possible experience of violence, considering power imbalances within healthcare, sexual misconduct, how to deal with other professional's ethical misconduct and how professionals relate to each other. We found the ethicalguidelines of the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) and of the International Confederation of Midwives to be those which contained most of the issues that have empirically shown to be important in regard to AHC.

    Conclusion

    While staff members from different professions may share responsibility for the same patient, their ethicalguidelines vary considerably. To become a possible resource for prevention of AHC, we suggest that ethicalguidelines in healthcare should be revised following empirical research on ethical conduct. As ethicalguidelines cannot be effective by their existence only, we would like to initiate a discussion on the function and use of ethicalguidelines in general and regarding AHC in particular. Being aware that ethicalguidelines are only a part of ethics in healthcare, however, we envision a broader approach to the aim of preventing AHC, where research is encouraged on how a virtue ethics approach could be applied.

  • 11.
    Zbikowski, Anke
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department for Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Swahnberg, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden .
    Forum Play as a method for learning ethical practice: A qualitative study among Swedish health-care staff2016In: Clinical Ethics, ISSN 1477-7509, E-ISSN 1758-101X, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 9-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In Scandinavia 13–28% of gynecology patients have experienced abuse in health care in their life time, which contradicts the ethical obligations not to harm the patient and to protect the patient's dignity. Concerning learning to act ethically, scholars have emphasized the importance of combining theoretical and practical dimensions. This article explores Forum Play as a way of learning to act ethically in abusive situations in health care.

    Method: Ten health-care workers participating in a Forum Play course took part in this study. To explore participants' experiences of Forum Play, semi-structured interviews were conducted and processed by using the grounded theory analysis techniques of coding and constant comparison.

    Results: The analysis resulted in the core category “developing response–ability.” It encompasses the processes bringing about the ability to respond adequately to situations where abuse occurs and the conditions for these processes, as well as the participants' achieved understanding of the third person's potential to act in a situation with a power imbalance. Forum Play allows participants to reflect on both verbal and body language, and gives them time to enact and think through issues of moral agency.

    Conclusion: The simulated reality of Forum Play offers a platform where learning to act ethically in abusive situations in health care is facilitated by providing a safe space, suspending constricting structural conditions such as hierarchies and lack of time, fostering moral imagination, allowing creativity in developing and trying out a variety of acting alternatives, and reflecting upon the observed and experienced situation.

  • 12.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A phenomenological analysis of bodily self-awareness in the experience of pain and pleasure: on dys-appearance and eu-appearance2010In: MEDICINE HEALTH CARE AND PHILOSOPHY, ISSN 1386-7423, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 333-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to explore nuances within the field of bodily self-awareness. My starting-point is phenomenological. I focus on how the subject experiences her or his body, i.e. how the body stands forth to the subject. I build on the phenomenologist Drew Leders distinction between bodily dis-appearance and dys-appearance. In bodily dis-appearance, I am only prereflectively aware of my body. My body is not a thematic object of my experience. Bodily dys-appearance takes place when the body appears to me as "ill" or "bad." This is often the case when I experience pain or illness. Here, I will examine three versions of bodily dys-appearance. Whereas many phenomenological studies have explored cases of bodily dys-appearance, few studies have focused on the opposite of bodily dys-appearance, i.e. on bodily modes of being where the body appears to the subject as something good, easy or well. This is done in this article. When the body stands forth as good, easy or well to the subject, I suggest that the body eu-appears to this person. The analysis of eu-appearance shows that the subject can attend to her or his body as something positive and that this attention need not result in discomfort or alienation. Eu-appearance can take place in physical exercise, in sexual pleasure and in some cases of wanted pregnancies. I also discuss, briefly, the case of masochism.

  • 13.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A phenomenological approach to the ethics of transplantation medicine: sociality and sharing when living-with and dying-with others2014In: Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics, ISSN 1386-7415, E-ISSN 1573-0980, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 369-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent years have seen a rise in the number of sociological, anthropological, and ethnological works on the gift metaphor in organ donation contexts, as well as in the number of philosophical and theological analyses of giving and generosity, which has been mirrored in the ethical debate on organ donation. In order to capture the breadth of this field, four frameworks for thinking about bodily exchanges in medicine have been distinguished: property rights, heroic gift-giving, sacrifice, and gift-giving as aporia. Unfortunately, they all run into difficulties in terms of both making sense of the relational dimensions of postmortem and live organ donations and being normatively adequate in the sense of shedding light and providing guidance on ethical concerns when body parts are donated. For this reason, this article presents a phenomenological framework of giving-through-sharing, based on Maurice Merleau-Pontys philosophy. This framework makes sense of relational dimensions of postmortem and live organ donation. It also sheds light on three highly debated concerns in organ donation ethics: indebtedness on the part of recipients, the fact that some live donors do not experience donation as a matter of choice, and the potentially painful experience of donors relatives, who need to make decisions about postmortem organ donation at a time of bereavement. It can indirectly support what may be called a normalization of bodily exchanges in medicine.

  • 14.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A phenomenology of excorporation, bodily alienation and resistance: rethinking sexed and racialized embodiment2013In: Hypatia, ISSN 0887-5367, E-ISSN 1527-2001, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 69-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article examines how some culturally shared and corporeally enacted beliefs and norms about sexed and racialized embodiment can form embodied agency, and this with the aid of the concepts of incorporation and excorporation. It discusses how the phenomenological concept of excorporation can help us examine painful experiences of how one's lived body breaks in the encounter with others. The article also examines how a continuous excorporation can result in bodily alienation, and what embodied resistance can mean when one has undergone or undergoes excorporation. Elaborating on the work of, among others, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Martin Heidegger, Drew Leder, and Sarah Ahmed, I discuss incorporation and excorporation of beliefs and norms regarding sexual difference, such as beliefs and norms regarding female and male embodiment, through a reading of Jeffrey Eugenides' novel Middlesex. I also suggest that it is useful to understand the postcolonial scholar Frantz Fanon's narrative of how he could not but attend to his own skin color while living in France in the 1940s and 1950s, in terms of excorporation. Whereas these are different narratives in many ways, I regard them as helpful for clarifying what excorporation implies and what analytic work this concept can enable.

  • 15.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    A philosophical defense of the idea that we can hold each other in personhood: intercorporeal personhood in dementia care2014In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 131-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since John Locke, regnant conceptions of personhood in Western philosophy have focused onindividual capabilities for complex forms of consciousness that involve cognition such as thecapability to remember past events and one’s own past actions, to think about and identify oneself asoneself, and/or to reason. Conceptions of personhood such as this one qualify as cognition-oriented,and they often fail to acknowledge the role of embodiment for personhood. This article offers analternative conception of personhood from within the tradition of phenomenology of the body. Thearticle presents a phenomenological analysis of joint musical activity in dementia care and outlines anintercorporeal conception of personhood based on this analysis. It also provides a philosophical basisfor the idea that others can hold us in personhood and it questions a strict one-body-one-person logicthat has pertained in much personhood debate.

  • 16.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bringing the lived body to medical ethics education: Learning to See the Suffering Other2012In: Reconceiving Medical Ethics / [ed] Christopher Cowley, London: Continuum, 2012, p. 44-55Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume of original work comprises a modest challenge, sometimes direct, sometimes implicit, to the mainstream Anglo-American conception of the discipline of medical ethics.  It does so not by trying to fill the gaps with exotic minority interest topics, but by re-examining some of the fundamental assumptions of the familiar philosophical arguments, and some of the basic situations that generate the issues. The most important such situation is the encounter between the doctor and the suffering patient, which forms one of the themes of the book. The authors show that concepts such as the body, suffering and consent - and the role such concepts play within patients' lives - are much more complicated than the Anglo-American mainstream appreciates. Some of these concepts have been discussed with subtlety by Continental philosophers (like Heidegger, Ricoeur), and a secondary purpose of the volume is to apply their ideas to medical ethics. Designed for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students with some philosophical background in ethics, Reconceiving Medical Ethics opens up new avenues for discussion in this ever-developing field.   

  • 17.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Case. Parental living kidney donation2010In: Teaching Ethics in Organ Transplantation and Tissue Donation - Cases and Movies / [ed] Eds. S. Schicktanz, C. Wieseman, S. Wöhlke, in cooperation with A Carmi UNESCO Chair in Bioethics, Göttingen: Göttingen University Press , 2010, p. 19-21Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Chosen Children?: An empirical study and a philosophical analysis of moral aspects of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis and germ-line gene therapy2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), genetic testing and selective transfer of embryos is possible. In the future, germ-line gene therapy (GLGT) applied to embryos before implantation, in order to introduce missing genes or replace mutant ones, may be possible. The objective of this dissertation is to analyse moral aspects of these technologies, as described by eighteen British, Italian and Swedish gynaecologists and geneticists. The objective is systematised into three parts: research interviews and qualitative analysis, philosophical analysis, and elaboration of a framework that supports the combination of analytic methods.

    PGD was described as positive since it enabled some couples at risk for a genetic disease to have a child without the disease. PGD was described as in different senses ‘better’ than methods for prenatal diagnosis and selective termination of pregnancy. It was also described as positive since it provided couples at risk with one more option, even if it did not result in the birth of a healthy child. However, interviewees were concerned about the difficulty of defining and evaluating genetic disease. They were also concerned about patients’ choices, and about exaggerated use or misuse. Whereas PGD gave rise to ambivalence in terms of how to understand, describe and evaluate it, GLGT was often described as unrealistic or undesirable.

    The results of the qualitative analysis are used in a philosophical analysis of the concepts of choice, autonomous choice, ambivalence, trust and ambivalence in trust relations. A set of distinct characteristics of each concept are elaborated. The results of the philosophical analysis are used in the discussion of the results of the qualitative analysis.

    The study shows that the technologies imply both ‘new’ ways to perform ‘old’ medical practices and ‘new’ practices. Old moral questions are reformulated. New moral questions are added. Against the background of this, the concept of genetic identity is discussed.

    Key words: empirical ethics, pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, germ-line gene therapy, qualitative research, philosophical analysis, medical progress, genetic disease, choice, autonomous choice, ambivalence, trust, genetic identity.

  • 19.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Complexities in Reproductive Choice: Medical Professionals' Attitudes to and Experiences of Pre-implantation Genetic Diagnosis2007In: Human Fertility, ISSN 1464-7273, E-ISSN 1742-8149, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 165-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies have been made on attitudes to and experiences of women and men who have undergone pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), or who are regarded as potential users of this diagnostic method. Few studies have been conducted regarding the attitudes to and experiences of medical professionals as regards PGD. This paper reports on findings from such a qualitative study in which 18 semi-structured interviews were performed with geneticists and gynaecologists in Italy, Sweden and the UK. Interviewees emphasized, among other things, the importance of choice provision. Interviewees also told stories that indicated the many ways through which choice was feared to be hampered - or was hampered. A similar emphasis on the importance of PGD as one more alternative to choose between, for 'high-risk' couples, is not found in studies on the experiences, attitudes and views of potential, or actual, users of PGD.

  • 20.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Correction: Neither property right nor heroic gift, neither sacrifice nor aporia: the benefit of the theoretical lens of sharing in donation ethics (vol 13, pg 225, 2010) in MEDICINE HEALTH CARE AND PHILOSOPHY vol 17, Issue 2, pg 3212014In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 1p. 321-321Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 21.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Deadly Pluralism? Why Death-Concept, Death-Definition, Death-Criterion and Death-Test Pluralism Should Be Allowed, Even Though It Creates Some Problems2009In: BIOETHICS, ISSN 0269-9702, Vol. 23, no 8, p. 450-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Death concept, death definition, death criterion and death test pluralism has been described by some as a problematic approach. Others have claimed it to be a promising way forward within modern pluralistic societies. This article describes the New Jersey Death Definition Law and the Japanese Transplantation Law. Both of these laws allow for more than one death concept within a single legal system. The article discusses a philosophical basis for these laws starting from John Rawls understanding of comprehensive doctrines, reasonable pluralism and overlapping consensus. It argues for the view that a certain legal pluralism in areas of disputed metaphysical, philosophical and/or religious questions should be allowed, as long as the disputed questions concern the individual and the resulting policy, law or acts based on the policy/law, do not harm the lives of other individuals to an intolerable extent. However, while this death concept, death definition, death criterion and death test pluralism solves some problems, it creates others.

  • 22.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ethics and Organ Transfer: A Merleau-Pontean Perspective2009In: HEALTH CARE ANALYSIS, ISSN 1065-3058, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 110-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The articles aim is to explore human hand allograft recipients postoperative experience of disownership and their gradual experience of their new hand as theirs, with the aid of the work of the French phenomenologist Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Many have used a Merleau-Pontinian perspective in the analysis of embodiment. Far fewer have used it in medico-ethical analysis. Drew Leders phenomenologically based ethics of organ donation and organ sale is an exception to this tendency. The articles second aim is to examine Leders phenomenologically based ethics of organ donation and organ sale. Though I find parts of Leders approach promising, I also elaborate a line of reasoning that draws on Merleau-Ponty, that does allow us to argue for certain kinds of organ donation and against organ sale-and that avoids some of the problems with Leders approach. This alternative route builds on the concept of the integrity of the body-subject.

  • 23.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Gender and medical technologies: the case of living organ donation2007In: Dynamics of health and welfare: texts and contexts, Lisboa: Edicoes Colibri , 2007, p. 159-162Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This part briefly reviews the most important contributions made to the wide issue of Gender and Health in Europe and Latin America over the past 12 years. Particular attention is paid to historiographic production focused on the contemporary world, identifying the main research lines and taking account of the constant interactions and exchanges among different disciplines, notably sociology, anthropology and history. Relevant non-European literature in the English language has been included when new topics are developed, theoretical contributions are advanced or European and/or Latin American realities are addressed. The following types of studies are reviewed: those that incorporate feminist perspectives, specifically a gender approach, to the study of health, medicine and healthcare practices; those that study the ways in which medicine and science have explained the feminine body and the sexual difference; those that make women the subject of investigation, addressing their health, work and role in social-cultural systems of health; and those that investigate the part played by male- -female relationships in healthcare organization and in the production of ideas, norms and values related to health and disease. First, we summarize the concepts of gender and androcentrism and their interest for the history of medicine and health, proposing some methodological points for a gender approach. Second, we outline the main contributions and research lines on these issues. Finally, the results of research into gender and health are illustrated by 15 collaborations that gather documentary sources and case studies.

  • 24.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Gynaecologists and Geneticists as Storytellers: Disease, Choice and Normality as the Fabric of Narratives on Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis2006In: Medical Technologies and the Life-world.: The Social Construction of Normality / [ed] Sonja Olin Lauritzen and Lars-Christer Hydén, London: Routledge , 2006, 1, p. 69-92Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the use of new health technologies in healthcare and medicine is generally seen as beneficial, there has been little analysis of the impact of such technologies on people’s lives and understandings of health and illness. This ground-breaking book explores how new technologies not only provide hope for cure and well-being, but also introduce new ethical dilemmas and raise questions about the 'natural' body.

    Focusing on the ways new health technologies intervene into our lives and affect our ideas about normalcy, the body and identity, Medical Technologies and the Life World explores:

    • how new health technologies are understood by lay people and patients
    • how the outcomes of these technologies are communicated in various clinical settings
    • how these technologies can alter our notions of health and illness and create ‘new illness’.

    Written by authors with differing backgrounds in phenomenology, social psychology, social anthropology, communication studies and the nursing sciences, this sensational text is essential reading for students and academics of medical sociology, health and allied studies, and anyone with an interest in new health technologies.

  • 25.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Just love in live organ donation2009In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 323-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emotionally-related live organ donation is different from almost all other medical treatments in that a family member or, in some countries, a friend contributes with an organ or parts of an organ to the recipient. Furthermore, there is a long-acknowledged but not well-understood gender-imbalance in emotionally-related live kidney donation. This article argues for the benefit of the concept of just love as an analytic tool in the analysis of emotionally-related live organ donation where the potential donor(s) and the recipient are engaged in a love relation. The concept of just love is helpful in the analysis of these live organ donations even if no statistical gender-imbalance prevails. It is particularly helpful, however, in the analysis of the gender-imbalance in live kidney donations if these donations are seen as a specific kind of care-work, if care-work is experienced as a labour one should perform out of love and if women still experience stronger pressures to engage in care-work than do men. The aim of the article is to present arguments for the need of just love as an analytic tool in the analysis of emotionally-related live organ donation where the potential donor(s) and the recipient are engaged in a love relation. The aim is also to elaborate two criteria that need to be met in order for love to qualify as just and to highlight certain clinical implications.

  • 26.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Levinas och det kroppsliga givandets etik2011In: Människan sedd: genom olika vetenskapliga prismor / [ed] Matz Hammarström, Elisabeth Gerle och Peter Gärdenfors, Nora: Bokförlaget Nya Doxa, 2011, p. 153-172Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hur ser vetenskapen på människan 150 år efter Darwins Om arternas ursprung?Är hon fortfarande skapelsens krona, eller bara ett djur som styrs av själviska gener?Och hur är det med hennes förnuft? Är det dags att nedgradera dess betydelse?Slår evolutionsläran undan benen för all form av gudstro eller finns det en möjlighet till fredlig samexistens mellan religion och darwinism? Kan idén om det "naturliga urvalet" hjälpa oss att förstå förändringsprocesser i samhället lika väl som i naturen? Går det att förena en humanistisk och en biologistisk syn på människan?I boken, som är en del i det samtal mellan olika positioner som blir allt viktigare, hävdas att evolutionsläran åtminstone är glasklar på enpunkt: den ger inget utrymme för rasistiska spekulationer om olika etniska gruppers olika värde.Möt den mångfasetterade människan, sedd genom ett antal olika vetenskapliga prismor.Människan sedd genom olika vetenskapliga prismor

  • 27.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Medical identity ant trust - in Lars von Trier's film the Kingdom2005In: Medical identity, public trust and professional identity,2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Neither property right nor heroic gift, neither sacrifice nor aporia: the benefit of the theoretical lens of sharing in donation ethics2014In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 171-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two ethical frameworks have dominated the discussion of organ donation for long: that of property rights and that of gift-giving. However, recent years have seen a drastic rise in the number of philosophical analyses of the meaning of giving and generosity, which has been mirrored in ethical debates on organ donation and in critical sociological, anthropological and ethnological work on the gift metaphor in this context. In order to capture the flourishing of this field, this article distinguishes between four frameworks for thinking about bodily exchanges in medicine: those of property rights, heroic gift-giving, sacrifice, and gift-giving as aporia. These frameworks represent four different ways of making sense of donation of organs as well as tissue, gametes and blood, draw on different conceptions of the relations between the self and the other, and bring out different ethical issues as core ones. The article presents these frameworks, argues that all of them run into difficulties when trying to make sense of reciprocity and relational interdependence in donation, and shows how the three gift-giving frameworks (of heroism, sacrifice and aporia) hang together in a critical discussion about what is at stake in organ donation. It also presents and argues in favour of an alternative intercorporeal framework of giving-through-sharing that more thoroughly explicates the gift metaphor in the context of donation, and offers tools for making sense of relational dimensions of live and post mortem donations.

  • 29.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    On the Autós of Autonomous Decision Making: Intercorporeality, Temporality, and Enacted Normativities in Transplantation Medicine2018In: Existential Medicine: Essays on Health and Illness / [ed] Kevin Aho, London and New York: Rowman & Littlefield International, 2018, p. 81-100Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter brings phenomenological philosophy to bioethics debates about decision-making in transplantation medicine in general and parental live kidney donation in specific. It clarifies why both discussions of parental live kidney donation in terms of coercion (Kärrfelt et al 2004) and as “indicative” of parents’ autonomy (if it expresses what they want or who they want to be, see Crouch and Elliot 1999) fail to make sense of the complexity of the situation. Noting that the rich literature that explores relational aspects of subjectivity and conceptualises autonomous individuals as making decisions situated within and dependent on particular social contexts (see Freeman 2011; Donchin 2001; Mackenzie and Stoljars 2000; Christman 1998; Friedman 1997) still rarely addresses the role of the body, the chapter also addresses the role of embodiment for perception and choice. It argues for the need to think-through what may be labelled as the autós of autonomy and, more precisely, the focus on one’s own, the same/sameness, oneself or one’s self that has come to characterise much autonomy discussions, via phenomenological philosophy.

    The chapter is divided into three parts. First, I make use of the phenomenological understanding of the intercorporeal self as being-in-the-world, in a discussion of how pain, fear or bodily symptoms of ESRD that unfolds in the shared space of child and parent can shape both of them in relation to each other (c.f. Käll 2013; Zeiler 2014a), feed into their bodily style of being-together, and help form parents’ perception of actions ‘within’ reach for them. Second, I shift the focus from the parent–child dyad to the larger semiotic–material context of haemodialysis and kidney transplantation in Sweden. This allows for an examination of embodied and enacted normativities, through an engagement with what Martin Gunnarson (2016: 128) has identified as a ‘dominant […] orientation towards transplantation’ in Sweden and Latvia. This second part also combines the discussion of an orientation towards transplantation with that of how norms about parenthood may be incorporated and excorporated into parents’ lived bodies,4 thereby making it possible to show why the no-choice theme in previous empirical work is understandable but more disconcerting than may first be assumed. Third, I argue that the acknowledgement of intercorporeal dimensions of bodily existence (argued for in Part I) and the role of orientation (argued for in Part II) demonstrates the need for a thinking-through of the autós of autonomous decision making, i.e. the understanding of the ‘ownness’ of this decision making, in ways other than those argued for in much of the bioethical autonomy and relational autonomy literature.

  • 30.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Relational ontology and ethics in online organ solicitation: the problem of sharing one's body when being touched online2016In: Bodily exchanges, bioethics and border crossing: Perspectives on Giving, Selling and Sharing Bodies / [ed] Erik Malmqvist and Kristin Zeiler, Abingdon: Routledge, 2016, p. 119-134Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Reproductive Autonomous Choice - A Cherished Illusion?2004In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 7, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Reproductive autonomous choice--a cherished illusion? Reproductive autonomy examined in the context of preimplantation genetic diagnosis.2004In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 175-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enhancement of autonomous choice may be considered as an important reason for facilitating the use of genetic tests such as preimplantation genetic diagnosis. The principle of respect for autonomy is a crucial component not only of Western liberal traditions but also of Western bioethics. This is especially so in bioethical discussions and analyses of clinical encounters within medicine. On the basis of an analysis of qualitative research interviews performed with British, Italian and Swedish geneticists and gynaecologists on ethical aspects of preimplantation genetic diagnosis, the plausibility of the notion of autonomy within reproductive medicine is discussed. The analysis of interviews indicates not only that there is a gap between theoretical discussions and concrete practice, but also that an increase in choice--paradoxically--can hamper couples' choice.

  • 33.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Reproduktionsteknologisk etik - ett ekumeniskt minfält?2001In: Svensk kyrkotidning, ISSN 0346-2153, no no 52Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 34.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Rättrådig kärlek. En etik för intima relationer2008In: Svensk teologisk kvartalskrift, ISSN 0039-6761, Vol. 84, no 3, p. 127-133Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Self and other in global bioethics: Critical hermeneutics and the example of different death concepts2009In: Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 137-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our approach to global bioethics will depend, among other things, on how we answer the questions whether global bioethics is possible and whether it, if it is possible, is desirable. Our approach to global bioethics will also vary depending on whether we believe that the required bioethical deliberation should take as its principal point of departure that which we have in common or that which we have in common and that on which we differ. The aim of this article is to elaborate a theoretical underpinning for a bioethics that acknowledges the diversity of traditions and experiences without leading to relativism. The theoretical underpinning will be elaborated through an exploration of the concepts of sameness, otherness, self and other, and through a discussion of the conditions for understanding and critical reflection. Furthermore, the article discusses whether the principle of respect for the other as both the same and different can function as the normative core of this global bioethics. The article also discusses the New Jersey Death Definition Law and the Japanese Transplantation Law. These laws are helpful in order to highlight possible implications of the principle of respect for the other as both the same and different. Both of these laws open the door to more than one concept of death within one and the same legal system. Both of them relate preference for a particular concept of death to religious and/or cultural beliefs.

  • 36.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Self, Identities and Medicine: in HEALTH CARE ANALYSIS, vol 17, no. 22009Other (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Shared decision-making, gender and new technologies.2007In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 279-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much discussion of decision-making processes in medicine has been patient-centred. It has been assumed that there is, most often, one patient. Less attention has been given to shared decision-making processes where two or more patients are involved. This article aims to contribute to this special area. What conditions need to be met if decision-making can be said to be shared? What is a shared decision-making process and what is a shared autonomous decision-making process? Why make the distinction? Examples are drawn from the area of new reproductive medicine and clinical genetics. Possible gender-differences in shared decision-making are discussed.

  • 38.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Short Literature Notice. On Hottois, G: Essais de philosophie bioéthique et biopolitique2002In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 318-318Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Simone Weil - personen, det heliga och etiken2010In: På Spaning / [ed] Hanna Stenström, Verbum , 2010, p. 117-132Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    På spaning: från Svenska kyrkans forskardagar 2009. Detta är tredje delen i en forskningsserie som vänder sig till alla inom kyrka och akademi, baserad på Svenska kyrkans forskardagar för kyrkorelevant forskning 2009. Boken fokuserar kring fyra stora utmaningar: utmaningar i möten med den Andre, utmaningar i möten med samhället, utmaningar i möten mellan kyrkan och dess medlemmar, och slutligen utmaningar i möten mellan nutid och tradition. Bland skribenterna märks Jesper Svartvik, Kristin Zeiler, Kjell-Åke Nordquist, Sara Gehlin, Jan-Olof Aggedal, Kerstin Wimmer, Robert K Johnston, Elisabeth Gerle m fl.

  • 40.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Special Section on Sex and Surgery: Doing sex and feminist theory2013In: Feminist Theory, ISSN 1464-7001, E-ISSN 1741-2773, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 57-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 41.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Sweden, Stem cell research and Ethics - Two Weakness of the Debate2002In: Journal of Lutheran ethics, E-ISSN 1538-5264, Vol. 2, no 2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Symposium on Genetics, Ethics and Identity.2009In: New genetics and society (Print), ISSN 1463-6778, E-ISSN 1469-9915, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 153-156Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 43.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Teenage Girlhood and Bodily Agency: On Power, Weight, Dys-Appearance and Eu-Appearance in a Norwegian Lifestyle Programme2018In: Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology, ISSN 2079-7222, E-ISSN 1445-7377, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the growing literature on childhood obesity and lifestyle intervention programmes focusing on weight loss, few studies have examined young persons’ experiences of being identified as candidates for such programmes and of participating in them. This paper does so. Juxtaposing insights from phenomenology with an approach inspired by Foucault, the paper shows how teenage girls’ bodily self-perception and bodily self-awareness are shaped in intercorporeal assemblages comprising other people and specific features or elements of the lifestyle programme.

    Inspired by van Manen’s hermeneutic-phenomenological approach, with its point of departure in lived experience, this paper draws on interviews with Norwegian teenage girls participating in the same lifestyle programme and identifies three core thematic aspects of the girls’ experiences: being identified as a candidate for a lifestyle programme and not wanting this; negotiating the lack of weight loss and the scales; and bodily situated agency – feeling good and being able. Permeating all three themes are two central, interrelated phenomena: agency and resistance. Furthermore, the paper shows how a combination of Foucauldian insights and a phenomenological understanding of intercorporeality can help to shed light on the power, affective, material and temporal dimensions of dys-appearance (i.e., when one’s body appears as bad or wrong), as well as those of eu-appearance (i.e., when one’s body appears as healthy or strong), and thus contribute to the understanding of the girls’ narrated lived experiences.

    On the basis of these findings, we argue that weight-related treatment goals are not necessarily compatible with the strengthening of adolescents’ body images and self-esteem. However, whilst being obliged to attend to their bodies while in the programme, the girls also encountered unexpected, positive bodily feelings and experiences. Such events, we suggest, offer a means of resisting the more troubling dys-appearing bodily situations our participants described so powerfully.

  • 44.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Teologi för livets slut: Om palliativ sedering.2010In: Svensk teologisk kvartalskrift, ISSN 0039-6761, Vol. 86, no 1, p. 22-28Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Transgressive Technologies in Reproductive Medicine: Do they call for a revision of notions of health?2003In: Dimensions of health and health promotion / [ed] Lennart Nordenfelt, Per-Erik Liss, Amsterdam: Rodopi Publishers , 2003, p. 133-148Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book contains scholarly contributions to several current debates in the philosophy of medicine and health care regarding the nature of health and health promotion, concepts and measurements of mental illness, phenomenological conceptions of health and illness, allocation of health care resources, criteria for proper medical science, the clinical meeting, and ethical constraints in such a meeting.

    With one exception, the authors in this book are or have been teachers or graduate students at the interdisciplinary Department of Health and Society (Tema H) at Linköping University, Sweden. While all the texts have a philosophical focus, many other disciplines have influenced the choice of specific perspectives. The university backgrounds of the authors range from medicine, psychology, sociology, and religion to philosophy. What binds the authors together is their deep interest in the theory of medicine and in the pursuit of a philosophy of humanistic medicine and health care.

  • 46.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Tre teser om etik och stamcellsforskning2003In: Ars Medica, no no 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 47.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Vad finns i etikens tassemarker? Om etik och livstolkning i reproduktionsteknologiernas tidevarv.2004In: När människan möter medicinen -: Livsvärldens och berättelsens betydelse för förståelsen av sjukdom och medicinsk teknologi / [ed] Sonja Olin Lauritzen, Fredrik Svenaeus & Ann-Christine Jonsson, Stockholm: Carlssons förlag , 2004, p. 209-226Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    När möter människan medicinen? Det sker varje gång en individ söker sig till hälso- och sjukvården för att få hjälp med sina besvär. Denna antologi fokuserar på kommunikationer mellan människor och mellan olika kunskapstraditioner i vården, patientens förståelse av diagnosen, och på den nya medicinska teknologins konsekvenser för människor i deras dagliga liv .

  • 48.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Weil2012In: Filosofi och medicin: från Platon till Foucault / [ed] Lennart Nordenfelt, Stockholm: Thales, 2012, p. 217-231Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Who am I? When do "I" become another? An analytic exploration of identities, sameness and difference, genes and genomes.2007In: Health Care Analysis, ISSN 1065-3058, E-ISSN 1573-3394, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 25-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What is the impact of genetics and genomics on issues of identity and what do we mean when we speak of identity? This paper explores how certain concepts of identity used in philosophy can be brought together in a multi-layered concept of identity. It discusses the concepts of numerical, qualitative, personal and genetic identity-over-time as well as rival concepts of genomic identity-over-time. These are all understood as layers in the multilayered concept of identity. Furthermore, the paper makes it clear that our understanding of genomic identity and the importance attached to genomic sameness-over-time matters for the ethical questions raised by certain new gene technologies.

  • 50.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    With Levinas against Levinas: Steps Towards a Phenomenological Ethics of Bodily Giving in Medicine2012In: The Body as Gift, Resource and Commodity: Exchanging Organ, Tissues and Cells in the 21st Century / [ed] Martin Gunnarson, Fredrik Svenaeus, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola , 2012, p. 31-57Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Departing from three metaphors—the body as gift, resource, and commodity—the book explores the contemporary exchange of organs, tissues, and cells. Although the gift is the sanctioned metaphor for donating parts of the body, the underlying perspective from the side of states, authorities, and the medical establishment often seems to be that the body shall be understood as a resource. But medicine, as some of the contributors to this book show, is not sealed off from the market economy. Increasingly, therefore, body parts become commodities on legal as well as illegal markets.

    The chapters of the book are arranged in a way that presents, one after the other, the three metaphors of the body, starting with the body as gift, proceeding by way of the body as resource, and ending in the body as commodity. Although all three metaphors as ways of conceptualizing and making use of the human body can be found throughout human history, the present drive of commercialization will increasingly force us to identify and scrutinize the way these metaphors are used. Not only in addressing the fascinating question of what kind of an object (subject) the human body is, but also in trying to decipher what interests lurk behind the use of the metaphors in question when claiming that human bodies, organs, tissues, and cells are gifts, resources or commodities. The ambition of this volume is to address and remedy the need of a hermeneutics not only of depth, but also of suspicion, in the case of organ transplantation and other medical technologies involving the transfer of human tissues and cells.

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