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  • 1. Biswas, AK
    et al.
    Shady, A
    Lundqvist, Jan Olof
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Takahashi, K
    Workshop 3 (synthesis): water, poverty alleviation and social programs2003In: Water Science and Technology, ISSN 0273-1223, E-ISSN 1996-9732, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 129-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poverty is a complex issue, which must be understood in a holistic manner. Low and variable income is certainly a key element, but it is far from enough to portray poverty. The various characteristics of poverty and their relative strength are determined through contextually specific circumstances, in terms of history, environmental preconditions, socio-cultural traits, etc. Much of this context is made up of local and national circumstances. The consequences of globalisation must, however, increasingly to be taken into account. At a larger scale, it is also relevant to mention that climate change will have a negative, although largely unpredictable, impact for the people in some parts of the world. For those who are already living on marginal lands or who are exposed to water problems, climate change is likely to create considerable adverse effects.

  • 2.
    Falkenmark, M.
    et al.
    Stockholm International Water Inst., Hantverkargatan 5, Stockholm S-112 21, Sweden.
    Gottschalk, L.
    Department of Geophysics, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Lundqvist, Jan Olof
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wouters, P.
    International Water Law Res. Inst., University of Dundee, Dundee, United Kingdom.
    Towards integrated catchment management: Increasing the dialogue between scientists, policy-makers and stakeholders2004In: International Journal of Water Resources Development, ISSN 0790-0627, E-ISSN 1360-0648, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 297-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the Hydrology for the Environment, Life and Policy (HELP) project is to strengthen the role and inputs of the scientific community in the integrated catchment management process. Water resources management in the 21st century requires a radical reorientation and an effective dialogue between decision-makers, stakeholders and the scientific water community. This paper offers a skeleton worldview as a starting point for that dialogue by bringing together key issues as identified by water resource experts from different disciplines. Experiences from all over the world demonstrate the need for multistakeholder advocacy and the importance of compromise-building mechanisms. Water law defines the rules of the game and provides a necessary framework for policy and its execution. However, there must be adequate social acceptance and active compliance, otherwise the formal rules and administrative regulation will not be perceived as legitimate and ultimately could prove ineffective. The challenge now is to create management systems where the formal decision-makers interact with relevant members of the scientific community, users and other stakeholders for a coordinated approach that successfully orchestrates water uses towards internal compatibility. Integrated water resources management is essential for securing a proper overview of all the activities that depend on the same resource-the precipitation over the basin-and which are internally linked by the mobility of water from the water divide to the river mouth. © 2004 Taylor and Francis Ltd.

  • 3.
    Hjort af Ornäs, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lundqvist, Jan Olof
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Life, livelihood, resources and security: Links and a call for a new order1999In: Managing the Globalized Environment. Local Strategies to Secure Livelihoods / [ed] TiiaRiita Granfelt, London: Intermediate Technology Development Group Publishing , 1999Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 4.
    Holzwarth, F
    et al.
    Fed Minist Environm, D-53048 Bonn, Germany Linkoping Univ, Dept Water & Environm Studies, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Jan Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Workshop 3 (synthesis): catchment-based governance - compromise building and institutional arrangements2002In: Water Science and Technology, ISSN 0273-1223, E-ISSN 1996-9732, Vol. 45, no 8, p. 145-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The catchment-based approach is widely recognised as essential to deal properly with water resources issues. For this to succeed political will and a widely based commitment are needed, these can best be developed by the participatory process, but for the developed consensus to lead to a successful outcome it must be based on sound technical appraisals and advice.

  • 5.
    Lundqvist, Jan Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    A global perspective on water and the environment2000In: Physics and chemistry of the earth. Part B: Hydrology, oceans and atmosphere, ISSN 1464-1909, E-ISSN 1873-4677, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 259-264Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    At the turn to a new millennium, it is titillating to try to foresee what issues that are likely to be significant when we enter into the next century. Many of the water issues that we have been pre-occupied with in the past will, no doubt, continue to be important. But in addition, we should be prepared for new dimensions in what is now called the 'impending water crisis'. A pro-active behaviour that would make it possible to avoid a new generation of problems is warranted as a complement to the need to re-act to and take care of old problems. As will be argued below, connections between water quantity and quality and between water and the environment have been overlooked in the past. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 6.
    Lundqvist, Jan Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Rules and roles in water policy and management - Need for clarification of rights and obligations2000In: Water international, ISSN 0250-8060, E-ISSN 1941-1707, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 194-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water policy and management are currently subject to a significant change. Water users and other stakeholders are gradually playing a much more active and also constructive role. This is no substitute for government efforts. Public sector activities and regulatory arrangements are of vital importance. Traditional functions and orientation of work need, however, to be modified and new tasks are forcing themselves on to the national, municipal, and local agendas. Interaction between government, civil society organizations, and professionals must be based on a policy where water is mane everybody's business and where the various components of management, i.e., development of the resource, provision, actual use, and disposal after use, are considered. With a policy where the relations between water, people, development, and the environment are duly recognised, it becomes imperative and natural that the rules for water management are defined that allow various stakeholders to contribute to achieve water security.

  • 7.
    Lundqvist, Jan Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Appasamy, Paul
    Madras School of Economics, Behind Government Data Centre, Gandhi Mandapam Road, Chennai, India.
    Nelliyat, Prakash
    Madras School of Economics, Behind Government Data Centre, Gandhi Mandapam Road, Chennai, India.
    Dimensions and approaches for Third World city water security2003In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 358, no 1440, p. 1985-1996Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A rapid expansion of urban systems, particularly in less-developed countries, pose considerable challenges. Urbanization also provides opportunities for socio-economic progress. Relative contribution from the urban sector to national economic growth is very high. The fate and the role of the socio-economic system in local, regional and national development hinges on many circumstances. Apart from delicate social issues, deficiencies in water provision, internal distribution and a hazardous water and environmental quality represent basic and tangible daily problems. Urban water security requires fresh thinking at two levels. Some kind of basin authority (corresponding to a county council, i.e. a formal administrative and regulatory body for the geographical area within a river basin) in combination with a national water policy is required, notably in countries that contemplate, or are in the process of implementing, regional and sometimes inter-basin schemes to augment supply to growing conglomerations. Similarly, the generation of large volumes of waste water and the associated threat to downstream areas cannot be effectively tackled through conventional urban planning. Within the urban area, and particularly in non-regulated parts, there is an urgent need for institutional arrangements that facilitate operations for providers who have the capacity and ability to function under the prevailing circumstances. Introduction of effective production and treatment technologies are other necessary and urgent prerequisites to reach urban water security in Third World cities.

  • 8.
    Lundqvist, Jan Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Falkenmark, M.
    Stockholm Intl. Water Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Drainage basin morphology: A starting point for balancing water needs, land use and fishery protection2000In: Fisheries Management and Ecology, ISSN 0969-997X, E-ISSN 1365-2400, Vol. 7, no 1-2Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The drainage basin, including the coastal zone, may be seen as a large-scale system of interlinked natural resources and ecosystem services which support human activities on land and in the sea. Social and economic activities in the drainage basin have to be consistent with the hydrological and ecological needs for human well-being. Proper attention must also be paid to the impacts of these factors on ecosystems further downstream. A macro-scale ecosystem approach to a basin has to consider: (1) direct uses of water both instream and after extraction when pollutants may be added to the return flow, and (2) indirect use of water for agriculture and forestry where the river may be depleted as a result of evapotranspiration from land surface, crops and trees. Both uses have repercussions on the quantitative flow and quality of water, which may damage water-based instream ecosystem services. The present paper addresses relationships between different types of human intervention in a drainage basin and their consequences. Two analytical models are introduced: (1) a conceptual model which distinguishes between urban and rural water uses, and their respective tools, and (2) a conceptual model for handling spatially ordered land/water use segments subjects to different types of interference. Finally, the present paper comments on the need to develop methodologies for cross-disciplinary dialogue, and for balancing water needs, land use and fishery protection.

  • 9.
    Lundqvist, Jan Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Falkenmark, Malin
    Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Editorial: Towards hydrosolidarity - Focus on the upstream-downstream conflicts of interests2000In: Water international, ISSN 0250-8060, E-ISSN 1941-1707, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 168-171p. 168-171Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Lundqvist, Jan Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Falkenmark, Malin
    Towards Water Security: Political Determination and Human Adaptation Crucial1998In: Natural resources forum (Print), ISSN 0165-0203, E-ISSN 1477-8947, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 37-51Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Lundqvist, Jan Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Tortajada, C
    Varis, O
    Biswas, A
    Water management in megacities2005In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 267-268Other (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Lundqvist, Jan Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Wilk, Julie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Andersson, Lotta
    SMHI.
    Okavango River Basin - a near pristine river under increasing pressure2005In: Groundwater under threat, Stockholm: The Swedish Research Council Formas , 2005, p. 29-36Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Sjömander-Magnusson, Therese
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lundqvist, Jan Olof
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Motives affecting water demand within the economic sector in Windhoek, Namibia: Contradictions and Dilemmas2005In: Water international, ISSN 0250-8060, E-ISSN 1941-1707Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Varis, O.
    et al.
    Helsinki University of Technology, Water Resources Laboratory, 02015 Espoo, Finland.
    Biswas, A.K.
    Third World Centre for Water Management, Atizapan, Mexico.
    Tortajada, C.
    Third World Centre for Water Management, Atizapan, Mexico.
    Lundqvist, Jan Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Megacities and water management2006In: International Journal of Water Resources Development, ISSN 0790-0627, E-ISSN 1360-0648, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 377-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Efficient and equitable water, wastewater and stormwater management for the megacities is becoming an increasingly complex task. When accelerating water scarcities and pollution in and around urban centres are superimposed on issues like continuing urbanization, lack of investment funds for constructing and maintaining water infrastructures, high public debts, inefficient resources allocation processes, inadequate management capacities, poor governance, inappropriate institutional frameworks and inadequate legal and regulatory regimes, water management in the megacities poses a daunting task in the future. This paper will focus on water management in its totality in megacities, including their technical, social, economic, legal, institutional and environmental dimensions through a series of case studies from different megacities of the world. © 2006 Taylor & Francis.

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