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  • 1.
    Ahmadi, Ahmad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jerregård, H.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åkerbäck, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fall, Per-Arne
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Geriatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rannug, A.
    National Institute for Working Life, Solna and Inst. of Environ. Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    GSTM1 and mEPHX polymorphisms in Parkinson's disease and age of onset2000In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 269, no 3, p. 676-680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both environmental and genetic factors are involved in the development of PD and biotransformation of exogenous and endogenous compounds and may play a role in inter-individual susceptibility. Therefore, we investigated the presence of null genotypes of GSTM1, GSTT1, and two polymorphisms of mEPHX in subjects with Parkinson's disease and in a reference population. The study included 35 male PD patients and a male control group including 283 subjects. Homozygosity of the histidine (H) 113 isoform of mEPHX was significantly increased in PD patients (odds ratio = 3.8 CI 95% 1.2–11.8) and analysis of allele frequencies displayed an increased frequency of the H-allele among PD patients (odds ratio = 1.9 CI 95% 1.1–3.3). However, a significantly elevated median age for the onset of PD was found among GSTM1 gene carriers (median age = 68 years) compared to PD patients being GSTM1 null genotypes (median age = 57 years). Our observations suggest that (H) 113 isoform of mEPHX, which has been suggested as a low activity isoform, is overrepresented in PD patients and that inherited carriers of the GSTM1 gene postpone the onset of PD. These detoxification pathways may represent important protective mechanisms against reactive intermediates modifying the susceptibility and onset of PD.

  • 2.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Alternative for estimating the burden of lung cancer from occupational exposures - Some calculations based on data from Swedish men2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 58-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. This study attempts to demonstrate a calculation of the occupational lung cancer burden using economically active men in Sweden as an example. Methods. Estimates were calculated using Swedish register data on occupation in 1970, lung cancer incidence in 1971-1989, smoking frequencies in 1963, and the formula I = RI0F + I0(I-F), where I is the overall incidence, R is the relative risk associated with a factor (here smoking), F is the fraction of persons at risk (smokers), and I0 is the incidence among those not at risk (nonsmokers). Results. Farmers, gardeners, forestry workers, and fishermen had the lowest lung cancer risk (42.1 per 100 000 person-years) and a smoking frequency of 44.7%. Their I0 was 12.6 or 8.4 per 100 000 person-years, taking R for smoking as 6 or 10, respectively. From these I0 estimates, the expected rates for white- and blue-collar workers (smoking frequencies 52.7 and 57.7%, respectively) were 45.8 and 49.1 per 100 000 person-years, as compared with the 22% and 57% higher observed rates, respectively. Weighing these excesses proportionally according to the sizes of the three occupational categories gave, respectively for R equal to 6 and 10, occupation-related excesses of 39% and 32% and population-attributable risks of 28% and 24%. Conclusions. About one-fourth of the lung cancers that occur among economically active Swedish men seem to have been related to occupation. This figure agrees with estimates made by other methods in Nordic countries. Due to interaction, the population-attributable risk from smoking is still high, 73% and 83% at relative risk values of 6 and 10, respectively.

  • 3.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Ethylene oxide and cancer2004In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 61Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Negative and non-positive epidemiological studies.2004In: International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health, ISSN 1232-1087, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 115-121Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Axelson, Olav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Balbus, JM
    Cohen, G
    Davis, D
    Donnay, A
    Doolittle, R
    Duran, BM
    Egilman, D
    Epstein, SS
    Goldman, L
    Grandjean, P
    Hansen, ES
    Heltne, P
    Huff, J
    Infante, P
    Jacobson, MF
    Joshi, TK
    LaDou, J
    Landrigan, PJ
    Lee, PR
    Lockwood, AH
    MacGregor, G
    Melnick, R
    Messing, K
    Needleman, H
    Ozonoff, D
    Ravanesi, B
    Richter, ED
    Sass, J
    Schubert, D
    Suzuki, D
    Teitelbaum, D
    Temple, NJ
    Terracini, B
    Thompson, A
    Tickner, J
    Tomatis, L
    Upton, AC
    Whyatt, RM
    Wigmore, D
    Wilson, T
    Wing, SB
    Sharpe, VA
    Regulatory toxicology and pharmacology.2003In: International journal of occupational and environmental health, ISSN 1077-3525, E-ISSN 2049-3967, Vol. 9, p. 386-389Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Axelson, Olav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Castleman, B
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Epstein, S
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Franco, G
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Giannasi, F
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Grandjean, P
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Greenberg, M
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Hooper, K
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Huff, J
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Jacobson, M
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Joshi, TK
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Kulkarni, GK
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    LaDou, J
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Mazaheri, M
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Mekonnen, Y
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Melnick, R
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Mirabelli, D
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Ofrin, R
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Partanen, T
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Pott, F
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Sass, J
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Soskolne, CL
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Suplido, ML
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Terracini, B
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Tomatis, L
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Ungvary, G
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Watterson, A
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Wesseling, C
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Yassi, A
    Linkoping Univ, Div Environm & Occupat Med, Linkoping, Sweden Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL 60680 USA Univ Modena, I-41100 Modena, Italy Univ So Denmark, Odense, Denmark Labor Inspectorate, Sao Paulo, Brazil NIEHS, Bethesda, MD USA Univ Tehran Med Sci, Dept Occupat Med, Tehran, Iran Univ Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia San Giovanni Battista Hosp, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Turin, Italy Univ Turin, Dept Biomed Sci & Human Oncol, I-10124 Turin, Italy Univ Philippines, Open Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Univ Dusseldorf, Dept Expt Hyg, D-4000 Dusseldorf, Germany Univ Alberta, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Edmonton, AB, Canada NIOSH, Budapest, Hungary Univ Stirling, Occupat & Environm Hlth Res Grp, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland Occupat Hlth & Safety Agcy Healthcare, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Letter to Dr. Gro Harlem Brundtland, Director-General, WHO2002In: International journal of occupational and environmental health, ISSN 1077-3525, E-ISSN 2049-3967, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 271-273Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [Abstract not available]

  • 7.
    Axelson, Olav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Castleman, B
    Epstein, S
    Franco, G
    Giannasi, F
    Grandjean, P
    Greenberg, M
    Hooper, K
    Huff, J
    Jacobsson, M
    Joshi, TK
    Kulkarni, GK
    La Dou, J-F
    Mazaheri, Marie
    Mekonnen, Y
    Melnick, R
    Mirabelli, DK
    Ofrin, R
    Partanen, Tony
    Pott, FJ
    Sass, J
    Soskolne, CL
    Suplido, ML
    Terracini, B
    Tomatis, L
    Ungvary, G
    Watterson, A
    Wessling, C
    Yassi, A
    Re: Implementation of WHO Guidelines on Disclosure of Interest by members of WHO Expert Panels.2002In: International journal of occupational and environmental health, ISSN 1077-3525, E-ISSN 2049-3967, Vol. 8, p. 271-273Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Axelson, Olav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Forastiere, Francesco
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Assessing dose-response relationships by cumulative exposures in epidemiological studies2007In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 217-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: If the occurrence of disease monotonically increases with the degree of exposure in an epidemiologic study, a dose-response (or exposure-response) relationship is indicated and facilitates the interpretation that the exposure has a causal role. It is not uncommon, however, that there is some effect in terms of an overall increased relative risk but no clear dose-response relationship. Methods: Models presented here show that cumulative exposure, as involving the duration of exposure, is not an adequate parameter when more recent exposure or the intensity of the exposure plays the greater role for the disease outcome. Conclusions: In lack of a dose-response pattern by cumulative exposure, the interpretation of an overall increased risk might well be that there is no definite effect. The proper consideration should be, however, that the measure of exposure could be inadequate, suggesting a need for further analyses and evaluations of the material studied. © 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • 9.
    Axelson, Olav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Åkerblom, G
    Hardell, L
    Leukemia in childhood and adolescence and exposure to ionizing radiation in homes built from uranium-containing alum shale concrete2002In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 146-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Concerns in Sweden about indoor radon around 1980 prompted measurements of gamma-radiation from the facades of houses to identify those constructed of uranium-containing alum shale concrete, with potentially high radon concentrations. To evaluate any possible risk of acute lymphocytic leukemia from exposure to elevated gamma-radiation in these homes, we identified the acute lymphocytic leukemia cases less than 20 years of age in Sweden during 1980-1989 as well as eight controls per case from the population registry, matching on age, gender, and county. Using the existing measurements, exposure was assessable for 312 cases and 1,418 controls from 151 properly measured municipalities. A conditional logistic odds ratio of 1.4 (95% confidence interval = 1.0-1.9) was obtained for those ever having lived in alum shale concrete houses, with the average exposure exceeding 0.10 microsieverts per hour. Comparing those who ever lived in alum shale concrete houses (divided by higher and lower annual average exposure) with those who never lived in such houses, we found a weak dose-response relation. The results suggest some risk of acute lymphocytic leukemia from indoor ionizing radiation among children and young adults.

  • 10.
    Axelson, Olav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Flodin, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Multiple sclerosis and ionizing radiation.2001In: Neuroepidemiology, ISSN 0251-5350, E-ISSN 1423-0208, Vol. 120, p. 175-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) may involve exposure to infectious, chemical or physical agents damaging the blood-brain barrier and an autoimmune reaction against myelin breakdown products. Here we report a pooled analysis of 174 MS cases and 815 population controls from two case-control studies with regard to such a potentially damaging exposure, namely X-ray examinations, radiological work and treatment with ionizing radiation. Exposure was assessed by questionnaires to the subjects. We obtained odds ratios of 4.4 (95% confidence interval, CI, 1.6-11.6) and 1.8 (95% CI 1.2-2.6) for radiological work and X-ray examinations, respectively, 5 cases, but no controls, in one of the studies had been treated with ionizing radiation. Our data and some other observations reported in the literature suggest a contributory role for ionizing radiation to the development of MS in some cases.

  • 11. Bochicchio, Francesco
    et al.
    Forastiere, Francesco
    Farchi, Sara
    Quarto, Maria
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Residential radon exposure, diet and lung cancer: A case-control study in a Mediterranean region2005In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 114, no 6, p. 983-991Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We performed a case-control study in Lazio, a region in central Italy characterized by high levels of indoor radon, Mediterranean climate and diet. Cases (384) and controls (404) aged 35-90 years were recruited in the hospital. Detailed information regarding smoking, diet and other risk factors were collected by direct interview. Residential history during the 30-year period ending 5 years before enrolment was ascertained. In each dwelling, radon detectors were placed in both the main bedroom and the living room for 2 consecutive 6-month periods. We computed odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for time-weighted radon concentrations using both categorical and continuous unconditional logistic regression analysis and adjusting for smoking, diet and other variables. Radon measurements were available from 89% and 91% of the time period for cases and controls, respectively. The adjusted ORs were 1.30 (1.03-1.64), 1.48 (1.08-2.02), 1.49 (0.82-2.71) and 2.89 (0.45-18.6) for 50-99, 100-199, 200-399 and 400+ Bq/m3, respectively, compared with 0-49 Bq/m3 (OR = 1, 0.56-1.79). The excess odds ratio (EOR) per 100 Bq/m3 was 0.14 (-0.11, 0.46) for all subjects, 0.24 (-0.09, 0.70) for subjects with complete radon measurements and 0.30 (-0.08, 0.82) for subjects who had lived in 1 or 2 dwellings. There was a tendency of higher risk estimates among subjects with low-medium consumption of dietary antioxidants (EOR = 0.32, -0.19, 1.16) and for adenocarcinoma, small cell and epidermoid cancers. This study indicates an association, although generally not statistically significant, between residential radon and lung cancer with both categorical and continuous analyses. Subjects with presumably lower uncertainty in the exposure assessment showed a higher risk. Dietary antioxidants may act as an effect modifier. © 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • 12. Buzio, L
    et al.
    De Palma, G
    Mozzoni, p
    Tondel, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Buzio, C
    Franchini, I
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Mutti, A
    Glutathione S-transferases M1-1 and T1-1 as risk modifiers for renal cell cancer associated with occupational exposure to chemicals2003In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 60, no 10, p. 789-793Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To investigate the possible interaction between occupational risk factors and genotype for glutathione S-transferases M1 and T1 (GSTM1 and GSTT1) in renal cell cancer (RCC). Methods: One hundred patients with RCC and 200 outpatient controls were enrolled at Parma University Hospital. The polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase M1-1 (GSTM1) and T1-1 (GSTT1) were investigated by PCR, occupational history was collected by a structured questionnaire. Results: Subjects with GSTM1 present genotype showed higher risks for RCC, compared to GSTM1 null subjects, if exposed to metals (OR 2.73, 95% CI 0.91 to 8.22 v 1.14, 95% CI 0.46 to 2.82) or pesticides (OR 3.46, 95% CI 1.12 to 10.74 v 1.59, 95% CI 0.48 to 5.34). The GSTT1 present genotype also enhanced the risk (about twofold) of RCC among subjects exposed to solvents and pesticides, compared with those GSTT1 null. Conclusions: Results support the hypothesis that GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms can interact with several occupational exposures to significantly modify the risk of RCC among exposed subjects.

  • 13. Buzio, L
    et al.
    Tondel, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    De Palma, G
    Buzio, C
    Franchini, I
    Mutti, A
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Occupational risk factors for renal cell cancer. An Italian case-control study2002In: Medicina del Lavoro, ISSN 0025-7818, Vol. 93, no 4, p. 303-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To examine possible associations between occupational and environmental risk factors and renal cell cancer (RCC), a tumour with unclear aetiology and increasing incidence. Methods: A questionnaire-based case-control study of 100 histologically verified cases of RCC and 200 controls was conducted at Parma University Hospital. The control group was enrolled from patients attending different outpatient departments and represented the same residential area as the cases. For all exposure variables under study, two levels of duration were defined: "short" and "prolonged" for less than 10 years or more, respectively. Results: The highest risk estimates for RCC were found for "prolonged" exposure to organic solvents with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.2 (95% confidence interval, CI: 1.0-4,8). "Prolonged" exposures to pesticides and copper sulphate were also associated with increased risk, OR 2.0 (95% CI: 0.8-4.7) and OR 2.7 (95% CI: 1.3-5.5), respectively. Conclusions: Our data suggests an association between RCC and exposure to organic solvents, pesticides and copper sulphate. A risk gradient as a function of exposure duration was found for organic solvents (p= 0.044) and copper sulphate (p= 0.036), but not for pesticides.

  • 14.
    Fall, Per-Arne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hansson, Gunilla
    Lindvall, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Jan-Edvin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Granérus, Ann-Kathrine.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Age standardised incidence and prevalence of Parkinson´s disease in a Swedish community1996In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, ISSN 0895-4356, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 637-641Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parkinson's disease (PD) shows a geographical variation. All prescriptions for anti-parkinsonian drugs were recorded for a half-year in a region with low -dopa consumption. Hospital and outpatient records were studied and physicians were asked to supply details of PD patients in the region, with 147,777 inhabitants. The crude prevalence was 115 PD per 100,000 inhabitants, based on 170 cases. In contrast to other studies we report an age-standardized prevalence, which was 76 per 100,000, using the European Standard Population as reference. The corresponding approximate incidences were 11.0 (crude) and 7.9 (age-standardized) per 100,000 person-years. Male preponderance appeared in all age groups. Mean age at onset was 65.6 years, the highest figure reported. Variation between studies for age at onset, differences in prevalence, and male preponderance suggest environmental risk factors to be of importance for PD.

  • 15.
    Fall, Per-Arne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Granérus, Ann-Kathrine.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Nutritional and occupational factors influencing the risk of Parkinson's disease: a case-control study in southeastern Sweden1999In: Movement Disorders, ISSN 0885-3185, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 28-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE AND METHODS: To investigate the possible impact of nutritional and environmental risk factors for idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IP), a case-control study was performed in the county of Ostergötland in southeastern Sweden. The study involved 113 cases of IP and 263 control subjects. Dietary, drinking, and smoking habits, as well as previous occupation, were requested in a structured questionnaire.

    RESULTS: No increased risk was found for any of the nutritional items in which information was requested. A reduced risk was found for coffee, wine, and liquor at various consumption levels but also for fried or broiled meat, smoked ham or meat, eggs, French loaf or white bread, and tomatoes. All these food and drink items contain niacin. As in many studies, the frequency of preceding and present smoking was reduced in IP patients. Various occupational groups and exposures were analyzed and increased risks of IP in men were found for agricultural work along with pesticide exposure; this was also the case for male carpenters and female cleaners.

    CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that nutritional factors and occupational exposures, especially to pesticides, could be of etiologic importance in IP.

  • 16.
    Flodin, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Multiple sclerosis in nurse anaesthetists2003In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 66-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Volatile anaesthetics are chemically related to organic solvents used in industry. Exposure to industrial solvents may increase the incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS). Aim: To examine the risk among nurse anaesthetists of contracting MS. Methods: Nurses with MS were identified by an appeal in the monthly magazine of the Swedish Nurse Union and a magazine of the Neurological Patients Association in Sweden. Ninety nurses with MS responded and contacted our clinic. They were given a questionnaire, which was filled in by 85 subjects, 13 of these were nurse anaesthetists. The questionnaire requested information about work tasks, exposure, diagnosis, symptoms, and year. The number of active nurse anaesthetists was estimated based on information from the National Board of Health and Welfare and The Nurse Union. Incidence data for women in the region of Gothenburg and Denmark were used as the reference to estimate the risk by calculation of the standardised incidence ratio (SIR). Results: Eleven of the 13 nurse anaesthetists were exposed to anaesthetic gases before onset of MS. Mean duration of exposure before diagnosis was 14.4 years (range 4-27 years). Ten cases were diagnosed in the study period 1980-99, resulting in significantly increased SIRS of 2.9 and 2.8 with the Gothenburg and the Danish reference data, respectively. Conclusion: Although based on crude data and a somewhat approximate analysis, this study provides preliminary evidence for an excess risk of MS in nurse anaesthetists. The risk may be even greater than observed, as the case ascertainment might have been incomplete because of the crude method applied. Further studies in this respect are clearly required to more definitely assess the risk.

  • 17. Hardell, Lennart
    et al.
    Eriksson, Mikael
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Flesch-Janys, Dieter
    Epidemiological studies on cancer and exposure to dioxins and related compounds.2003In: Dioxins and health / [ed] Arnold Schecter, Thomas A. Gasiewicz, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2003, 2, p. 729-764Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Now in its third edition, Dioxins and Healthis the most respected reference of its kind, presenting the latest scientific findings on dioxins, dibenzofurans, polychlorinated biphenyls and related compounds, and their impact on human health. The book fully examines the many toxicological effects—including immunological, neurological, developmental, dermatological, and cardiological—these chemicals have on health.

    This Third Editionhas been greatly expanded with the latest research findings on dioxins and related compounds. Moreover, it now includes coverage of other persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and endocrine disruptors, including:

    • Brominated flame retardants, such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers and hexabromocyclododecane

    • Perfluorinated chemicals such as perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid

    • Other endocrine disrupting chemicals similar to POPs such as bisphenol A

    Readers will also learn about the latest findings on the long-term impacts caused by the use of Agent Orange in Vietnam. Other chapters review the Seveso disaster in Italy and the Yusho and Yucheng rice oil poisoning incidents in Japan and Taiwan. In addition, there is a full chapter dedicated to the dioxin poisoning of former Ukraine President Victor Yushchenko.

    All the chapters in the book have been written by leading international experts. References at the end of each chapter guide readers to the primary literature in the field.

    Expertly organized in one volume, Dioxins and Health offers readers quick access to essential information about dioxins and related compounds written in clear, simple language that is accessible to not only scientists, clinicians and public health professionals, but also general readers.

  • 18. Hellström, L
    et al.
    Hellström, L
    Elinder, CG
    Elinder, C-G
    Dahlberg, B
    Dahlberg, B
    Lundberg, M
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Nephrology UHL.
    Lundberg, M
    Järup, L
    Persson, Bodil
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Cadmium exposure and end-stage renal disease2001In: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, ISSN 0272-6386, E-ISSN 1523-6838, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 1001-1008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental exposure to cadmium may cause kidney damage and tubular proteinuria. We investigated the relationship between low-level cadmium exposure and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), indicated by renal replacement therapy (RRT), in a Swedish population environmentally or occupationally exposed to cadmium. Based on records of all persons in the population previously or presently employed in cadmium-battery production or residing in cadmium-polluted areas near the battery plants, we defined exposure as high (occupational), moderate (domicile < 2 km from a plant), low (domicile 2 to 10 km from a plant), or no exposure (domicile > 10 km from a plant). Comprehensive data were available for all individuals undergoing RRT since 1978. The annual incidence of RRT increased from 41 per million in the age group 20 to 29 years to 243 per million in the age group 70 to 79 years and was greater in a priori-defined populations with cadmium exposure. Adjusting for age and sex gave an increased Mantel-Haenszel rate ratio (MH-RR) of 1.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 2.3) for RRT in the cadmium-exposed population compared with the unexposed group, the MH-RR was even higher for women (MH-RR, 2.3, 95% CI, 1.5 to 3.5). Directly age-standardized rate ratios for RRT and cadmium exposure increased from 1.4 (95% CI, 0.8 to 2.0) in the low-exposure group to 1.9 (95% CI, 1.3 to 2.5) and 2.3 (95% CI, 0.6 to 6.0) in the moderate- and high-exposure groups, respectively. We conclude that exposure to occupational or relatively low environmental levels of cadmium appears to be a determinant for the development of ESRD. ⌐ 2001 by the National Kidney Foundation, Inc.

  • 19.
    Hellström, Lennart
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Järup, Lars
    KI.
    Persson, Bodil
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Using environmental concentrations of cadmium and lead to assess human exposure and close2004In: Journal of Exposure Analysis And Environmental Epidemiology, ISSN 1053-4245, E-ISSN 1476-5519, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 416-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Using environmental concentrations and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to model human exposure is an emerging tool in environmental epidemiology. To evaluate the usefulness of this, we investigated to what extent cadmium and lead concentrations in soil and moss could be used as potential determinants for cadmium and lead exposure for a population living near a battery plant. Methods: Cadmium in urine and blood and lead in blood, as well as food, smoking habits, places of residence, occupations and health, were determined for 512 individuals living near a closed down battery factory in Sweden. Cadmium and lead contents in moss were available through previous assessments by the Geological Survey of Sweden. Soil samples had been collected at various distances from the factory, and analyzed for cadmium and lead contents in 1990. Kriging technique in GIS was used to create areas with different metal concentrations based on these measurements. By linking individual address coordinates to mapped concentration levels, each study subject home address received a value of cadmium and lead in moss and soil. Results: We found a statistically significant association between lead in soil and lead in blood, for female subjects eating homegrown vegetables regularly. No significant association was found between cadmium in soil and cadmium in urine for either gender in the study population. No clear associations were found for either gender regarding lead and cadmium in moss and lead in blood or cadmium in urine or in blood. Conclusion: In general, environmental concentrations may not be useful surrogates for assessing human exposure to lead and cadmium, but concentrations of metals in soil around emitting point sources can be a complement for estimating the exposure in certain subgroups.

  • 20.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Tondel, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Hjalmarsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Flodin, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    The risk for multiple sclerosis in female nurse anaesthetists: A register based study2006In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 63, no 6, p. 387-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous studies have suggested that exposure to organic solvents, including volatile anaesthetic agents, may be a risk factor for multiple sclerosis (MS), possibly in combination with genetic and other environmental factors. Aims: To further investigate the role of volatile anaesthetic agents having similar acute toxic effects to other organic solvents. Methods: Female nurse anaesthetists, other female nurses, and female teachers from middle and upper compulsory school levels were identified and retrieved from the 1985 census, Statistics Sweden. By means of the unique personal identity number in Sweden, these individuals were linked with the disability pension registers at The National Social Insurance Board and also with data on hospital care 1985-2000 at The National Board of Health and Welfare. Results: The cumulative incidence rate ratio of MS was found to be increased in female nurse anaesthetists in relation to other nurses (statistically not significant) and teachers (statistically significant), respectively. Conclusions: These findings give some support to previous findings of an increased risk for MS in nurse anaesthetists. This is interesting in the context of previous observations of organic solvents in general as a potential risk factor in MS.

  • 21.
    Lundqvist, G
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Flodin, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    A case-control study of fatty liver disease and organic solvent exposure.  1999In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 35, p. 132-136Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Mai, Xiaomei
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bråbäck, Lennart
    Mid-Sweden Research and Development Centre, Sundsvall Hospital, Sweden.
    Sandin, Anna
    Department of Paediatrics, Östersund Hospital, Sweden.
    Kjellman, Max
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Centre for Allergy Research and Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    High body mass index, asthma and allergy in Swedish schoolchildren participating in the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood: phase II2003In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 92, no 10, p. 1144-1148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To assess the relationship between high body mass index (BMI) and asthma and atopic manifestations in 12-y-old children.

    Methods: The relationship between high BMI and asthma symptoms was studied in 457 sixth-grade children, with (n= 161) and without (n= 296) current wheeze. High BMI was defined as ±75th percentile of gender-specific BMI reference values for Swedish children at 12 y of age; overweight as a subgroup of high BMI was defined as ±95th percentile. Children with a BMI >75th percentile served as controls. Questionnaires were used to assess asthmatic and allergic symptoms, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness was assessed by hypertonic saline provocation tests.

    Results: Current wheeze was associated with high BMI after adjustment for confounding factors (adjusted OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.0–2.5) and overweight had an even more pronounced effect (adjusted OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.0–3.6). In addition, asthma severity was associated with high BMI, as evaluated by the number of wheezing episodes during the previous 12 mo among the wheezing children (adjusted OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.0–4.0). There was also an association between high BMI and the presence of eczema in wheezing children (adjusted OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.0–4.6). However, high BMI was not significantly associated with hay fever, positive skin prick tests or bronchial hyperresponsiveness.

    Conclusion: The study confirms and extends a previously observed relationship between BMI and the presence of wheezing and asthma.

  • 23.
    Medin, Jennie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Nordlund, A.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Ergonomics.
    Axelsson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Job Strain and First-Ever Stroke in a Community Based Case Control Study in Sweden; Preliminary results2003In: ICPH Intl Congress on Occupational Health,2003, Iguassu Falls, Brasilien: ICPH , 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

         

  • 24.
    Medin, Jennie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Nordlund, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Ergonomics.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Axelsson, Olav
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Organisational change, job strain, effort reward and increased risk of stroke: a case control study.2005In: Second ICOH International Conference on Psychosocial factors at Work.,2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25. Nackaerts, K
    et al.
    Axleson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Brambilla, E
    Bromen, K
    Hirsch, FR
    Nemery, B
    Petit, MR
    Sasco, AJ
    van Meerbeeck, J
    vanZandwijk, N
    Epidemiology of lung cancer: a general update.2002In: European Respiratory Review, ISSN 0905-9180, E-ISSN 1600-0617, Vol. 12, p. 112-121Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Persson, Bodil
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Magnusson, Anders
    Westberg, Håkan
    Andersson, Eva
    Torén, Kjell
    Wingren, Gun
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Cardiovascular mortality among Swedish pulp and paper mill workers2007In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 221-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Malignant diseases but also cardiovascular and respiratory disorders and diabetes mellitus have been associated with work in pulp and paper production. The present cohort focuses on cardiovascular mortality in relation to various exposures in this industry. Methods: The cohort, followed-up for mortality, includes 7,107 workers, 6,350 men and 757 women, from three major old mills in the middle of Sweden. Results: Instead of a healthy-worker effect, a slightly increased risk for death in diseases of the circulatory system was found for male workers. Notably, work with sulfate digestion, steam and power generation and maintenance was associated with significantly increased risks. Cerebrovascular diseases showed non-significantly increased risks for maintenance and paper and paperboard production and manufacture. Conclusions: The differences in risk among various parts of the production are striking although it is hard to pinpoint any specific exposures. Dust and small particles along with sulfur compounds might be suspected. © 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • 27.
    Rahman, M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Tondel, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Ahmad, A
    Chowdhury, IA
    Faruquee, M
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Hypertension and arsenic exposure in Bangladesh.  1999In: Hypertension, ISSN 0194-911X, E-ISSN 1524-4563, Vol. 33, p. 74-78Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Rahman, M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Tondel, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Chowdhury, IA
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Relations between exposure to arsenic, skin lesions, and glucosuria.  1999In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 56, p. 277-281Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Reckner Olsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wingren, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Occupations and exposures in the work environment as determinants for rheumatoid arthritis2004In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 233-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: Several occupational categories have been associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA); this study was conducted to further evaluate these associations.

    Methods: Lifelong occupational history together with exposure experiences were collected through a postal questionnaire answered by 293 incident cases and 1346 population based referents. Occupational determinants were evaluated through stratified and multivariate analyses; pooled analyses with previously gathered data on 422 prevalent cases and 858 referents were also performed.

    Results: In both materials, significantly increased logistic odds ratios (LORs) were seen for male conductors, freight and transport workers (LOR 17.8, 95% CI 1.5 to 207.8 and LOR 4.7, 95% CI 1.4 to 16.3, respectively), and farmers and farm workers (LOR 2.4, 95% CI 1.1 to 5.2, and LOR 2.2, 95% CI 1.3 to 3.5, respectively). Among women, increased LORs were seen in the separate and the pooled material for printmakers and process engravers (LOR 5.5, 95% CI 0.9 to 32.6, and LOR 3.0, 95% CI 0.9 to 10.3, respectively). Increased risks were seen in both materials for men exposed to asbestos (LOR 2.5, 95% CI 1.0 to 6.8, and LOR 1.6, 95% CI 0.8 to 3.3, respectively), and vibrations (LOR 2.0, 95% CI 0.9 to 4.4, and LOR 2.2, 95% CI 1.3 to 3.8, respectively). The risk for RA increased with increasing duration of exposure to vibrations and mineral dust, respectively.

    Conclusions: There was evidence of a causal relation between exposures to vibrations and mineral dust and development of RA among men. Occupational factors seem to be aetiologically more important for men, and most occupations at risk involve multiple exposures. Several exposures associated with an increased risk for RA are frequent among farmers, and some of the occupations at risk include exposure to organic dust.

  • 30.
    Seldén, Anders I.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Westberg, Håkan B.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cancer morbidity in workers at aluminum foundries and secondary aluminum smelters1997In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 467-477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a Swedish cohort of workers (n = 6,454) from seven aluminum foundries and three secondary aluminum (scrap) smelters there was no overall excess risk of cancer among male or female workers less than 85 years of age (males: 325 observed cases, standardized incidence ratio (SIR) 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.91–1.13; females: 22 cases, SIR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.60–1.44). In male workers, however, significantly elevated risk estimates were observed for cancer of the lung (51 cases; SIR = 1.49, 95%CI = 1.11–1.96), anorectal cancer (33 cases; SIR 2.13, 95%CI = 1.47–2.99), and sinonasal cancer (4 cases; SIR = 4.70, 95%CI = 1.28–12.01). There was no increase of urinary bladder or liver cancer. Lung cancer risks were highest in workers with a short duration of employment (<5 years) suggesting determinants of risk related to socioeconomic factors rather than the occupational environment under study, but there were also indications of a lung cancer hazard from sand casting of aluminum for 10 years or more (SIR = 2.10, 95%CI = 1.01–3.87). The increase in anorectal cancer could not be etiologically related to occupational determinants of risk. Sand casting of aluminum aside, the cancer risk in secondary aluminum smelting seems to be lower than in primary aluminum smelting and in iron and steel founding, respectively.

  • 31. Semple, SE
    et al.
    Dick, F
    Cherrie, JW
    Study Group, Goeparkinson
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Hällsten, Anna-Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Tondel, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Exposure assessment for a population-based case-control study combining a job-exposure matrix with interview data.2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 241-248Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Settimi, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Comba, P.
    Istituto Superiore di Sanitá, Rome, Italy.
    Carrieri, P.
    Istituto Superiore di Sanitá, Rome, Italy.
    Boffetta, P.
    IARC, Lyon, France.
    Magnani, C.
    University of Turin, Turin, Italy.
    Terracini, B.
    University of Turin, Turin, Italy.
    Andrion, A.
    Ospedale Martini, Torino, Italy.
    Bosia, S.
    Ospedale Martini, Torino, Italy.
    Ciapini, C.
    Local Health Unit, Pistoia, Italy.
    De Santis, M.
    Istituto Superiore di Sanitá, Rome, Italy.
    Desideri, E.
    Local Health Unit, Grosseto, Italy.
    Fedi, A.
    Local Health Unit, Pescia, Italy.
    Luccoli, L.
    Ospedale Maggiore S.G. Battista, Turin, Italy.
    Maiozzi, P.
    Istituto Superiore di Sanitá, Rome, Italy.
    Masina, A.
    Local Health Unit, Imola, Italy.
    Perazzo, P. L.
    Local Health Unit, Imola, Italy.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cancer risk among female agricultural workers: a multi-center case-control study1999In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 135-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Cancer risk among women engaged in farming has been poorly investigated. This group of female workers is of particular interest, however, since they may experience exposure to several potential agricultural hazards.

    Methods

    A hospital-based case-control study was conducted in five Italian rural areas to examine the association between cancer and farming among women. The areas selected were located in three different regions (i.e., Piedmont, Tuscany, and Emilia-Romagna). The following cancer sites were selected for the study: stomach, colon, rectum, lung, skin melanoma, skin non-melanoma, breast, cervix and corpus uteri, ovary, bladder, kidney. Cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were also included. Altogether, 1,044 newly diagnosed cases aged 20–75 years were ascertained from hospital records from March 1990 to September 1992, and for 945 of them detailed information was collected by a standard questionnaire. The analyses of data were performed comparing each case series to a reference group drawn from among the other sites. Unconditional logistic regression models were used in the statistical analyses.

    Results

    Statistically significant increased risks in association with farming were estimated for skin melanoma (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.2–5.8) and bladder cancer (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.2–6.1). Lung cancer was also found increased but not at a statistically significant level (OR 1.7, 95% CI 0.7–4.4). An OR lower than unity was observed for postmenopausal breast cancer (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.3–0.7).

    Conclusions

    The present study suggests that women in farming might experience increased risk of cancers, not usually found in excess among male farmers, as well as a protective effect for postmenopausal breast cancer. The role of different patterns of exposure or gender specific responses should be considered in further studies.

  • 33.
    Settimi, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Comba, Pietro
    National Institute of Health, Rome, Italy.
    Bosia, Silvano
    Local Health Unit, Asti, Italy.
    Ciapini, Cesare
    Local Health Unit, Pistoia, Italy.
    Desideri, Enrico
    Local Health Unit, Grosseto, Italy.
    Fedi, Aldo
    Local Health Unit, Pistoia, Italy.
    Perazzo, Pier Luigi
    Local Health Unit, Imola, Italy.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cancer risk among male farmers: a multi-site case-control study2001In: International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health, ISSN 1232-1087, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 339-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Farmers may experience exposure to several hazardous substances, and cancer risk in this occupational group is considered an important public health issue.

    In order to examine the association between cancer and farming among male agricultural workers, a hospital-based case-control study was conducted in five Italian rural areas. The cancer sites selected for the study were: lip, oral cavity and oropharynx, oesophagus, stomach, colon, rectum, lung, skin melanoma, skin non-melanoma, prostate, bladder, kidney, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In all, 1525 newly diagnosed cases, aged 20-75 years, were ascertained in hospital records, covering the period between March 1990 and September 1992, and for 1279 of them, a detailed exposure information was collected by a standard questionnaire. Data analyses were performed comparing each cancer site to a control group, including a subset of the other cancer sites in the study. Unconditional logistic regression models were used in the statistical analyses.

    Increased risks of cancer associated with agricultural work were found for stomach (OR = 1.4, 95%CI:0.9-2.0), rectum (OR = 1.5, 95%CI:0.8-2.7), larynx (OR = 1.4, 95%CI:0.8-2.5), and prostate (OR = 1.4, 95%CI:1.0-2.1). The excess of prostate cancer was specifically related to application of pesticides (OR = 1.7, 95%CI:1.2-2.6).

  • 34.
    Settimi, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Masina, Alceste
    Local Health Unit, Imola, Italy.
    Andrion, Alberto
    Martini Hospital, Turin, Italy.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Prostate cancer and exposure to pesticides in agricultural settings2003In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 104, no 4, p. 458-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our study evaluates the association between prostate cancer and exposure to pesticides in agricultural settings in Italy. The data were derived from a hospital-based multi-site case-control study carried out in 5 rural areas between 1990–92. In our study, 124 new cases of prostate cancer were ascertained and interviewed, along with 659 cancer controls. A team of agronomists assessed past exposure to pesticides by using a checklist of 100 chemical families and 217 compounds applied from 1950–85 in the areas considered. The association between prostate cancer and different occupational risk factors was measured by maximum likelihood estimation of the odds ratio, controlling for potential confounders. “Ever been employed in agriculture” was associated with a 40% increased risk (OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 0.9–2.0). Prostate cancer was also related positively to food and tobacco (OR= 2.1, 95% CI = 1.1–4.1), and chemical products (OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 0.7–7.2) industries. The analyses carried out to estimate the association between different types of pesticides and prostate cancer showed increased risks among farmers exposed to organochlorine insecticides and acaricides (OR = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.4–4.2), more specifically to the often contemporary used compounds DDT (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.2–3.8), and dicofol (OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.5–5.0), whose effects could not be well separated.

  • 35.
    Settimi, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rapiti, Elisabetta
    Epidemiological Unit, Latium Regional Health Authority, Rome, Italy.
    Forastiere, Frencesco
    Epidemiological Unit, Latium Regional Health Authority, Rome, Italy.
    Fano, Valeria
    Epidemiological Unit, Latium Regional Health Authority, Rome, Italy.
    Pupp, Nicoletta
    Local Health Unit, Civitavecchia, Italy.
    Callopoli, A.
    Regina Elena Cancer Institute, Rome, Italy.
    Axelsson, Olav
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cancer among greenhouse owners and their relatives: results of a pilot study1998In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 88-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    No abstract is available for this article.

  • 36. Sperati, A
    et al.
    Abeni, D
    Tagesson, Christer
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Forastiere, F
    Miceli, M
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Exposure to indoor background radiation and urinary concentrations of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, a marker of oxidative DNA damage.1999In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 107, p. 213-215Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ahmadi, Ahmad
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åkerbäck, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Flodin, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Glutathione S-transferase M1 null genotype as a risk modifier for solvent-induced chronic toxic encephalopathy1996In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 360-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Exposure to organic solvents increases the risk of neuropsychiatric disability or chronic toxic encephalopathy (CTE). Polymorphisms in the biotransformation of xenobiotics and solvents may influence individual susceptibility to develop toxic effects. In this study the problem of whether there could be any association between the glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) null genotype and the risk for CTE, with regard to solvent exposure, was investigated.

    Methods Sixty patients referred to a clinic because of some degree of some degrees of psychiatric or neurological symptoms, as well as exposure to solvents, were examined by means of a validated questionnaire and psychometric testing. The degree of exposure to solvents was assessed by a thorough interview. According to clinical findings, the patients were classified into three categories as those with solvent-induced CTE, those with incipient CTE, and those who were non-CTE patients. Afterwards, leukocyte DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) was isolated and the GSTM1 null genotype was determined by an assay based on polymerase chain reaction, blindly with regard to both exposure and disease status.

    Results The relative proportion (RP) of GSTM1 null genotypes was significantly increased for patients with a diagnosed CTE when they were compared with non-CTE patients (RP 2.55, 95% confidence interval 1.0--6.2). Dichotomizing the patients by high and low exposure revealed an increased risk for both GSTM1 gene carriers and the GSTM1 null genotype in the high-exposure group, the relative risks (RR) being 4.5 and 7.9, respectively. The chi-square for the Mantel extension for trend was 6.2 (P=0.025).

    Conclusion The GSTM1 null genotype acts as a risk modifier for CTE among patients occupationally exposed to solvents. The risk seems to increase in a dose-dependent fashion.

  • 38.
    Tondel, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Concerns about privacy in research may be exaggerated.  1999In: British Medical Journal, ISSN 0959-8138, Vol. 319, p. 707-708Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Tondel, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Carlsson, Göran
    Hardell, Lennart
    Eriksson, Martin
    Jakobsson, Sören
    Flodin, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Skoldestig, Åsa
    Axelsson, Olav
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Incidence of neoplasms in ages 0-19 y in parts of Sweden with high 137Cs fallout after the Chernobyl accident1996In: Health Physics, ISSN 0017-9078, Vol. 71, no 6, p. 947-950Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The incidence of neoplasms in childhood and adolescence in northern and central Sweden before and after the radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl accident was investigated in an ecologic study, 1978 to 1992. The study included all parishes in the six most contaminated counties classified after aerial mapping of ground radiation from 137Cs and investigated 746 cases of neoplasms in ages 0-19 y, diagnosed in the six counties. Incidence and relative risks of neoplasms were compared in areas with high, intermediate, and low contamination after versus before the Chernobyl accident in 1986. A continuous increase of brain tumor incidence in the ages 0-19 y during the period 1978-92 without clear relationship to the Chernobyl fallout was discovered. No clear relationship between the incidence of brain tumor and the exposure to varying levels of radiation from 137Cs was apparent. A somewhat decreased relative risk of acute lymphatic leukemia appeared in areas with increased exposure. Other neoplasms showed no changes in incidence over time or with regard to exposure. Until now, there is no indication that the Chernobyl accident has affected the incidence of childhood and adolescence neoplasms in Sweden, but it is still too early for any final conclusion about the effect of this event.

  • 40.
    Tondel, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Hjalmarsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hardell, Lennart
    Department of Oncology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Göran
    Department of Health Policy, Västernorrland County Council, Härnösand, Sweden.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Increase of regional total cancer incidence in north Sweden due to the Chernobyl accident?2004In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 58, no 12, p. 1011-1016Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study objective: Is there any epidemiologically visible influence on the cancer incidence after the Chernobyl fallout in Sweden?

    Design: A cohort study was focused on the fallout of caesium-137 in relation to cancer incidence 1988–1996.

    Setting: In northern Sweden, affected by the Chernobyl accident in 1986, 450 parishes were categorised by caesium-137 deposition: <3 (reference), 3–29, 30–39, 40–59, 60–79, and 80–120 kiloBecquerel/m2.

    Participants: All people 0–60 years living in these parishes in 1986 to 1987 were identified and enrolled in a cohort of 1 143 182 persons. In the follow up 22 409 incident cancer cases were retrieved in 1988–1996. A further analysis focused on the secular trend.

    Main results: Taking age and population density as confounding factors, and lung cancer incidence in 1988–1996 and total cancer incidence in 1986–1987 by municipality as proxy confounders for smoking and time trends, respectively, the adjusted relative risks for the deposition categories were 1.00 (reference <3 kiloBecquerel/m2), 1.05, 1.03, 1.08, 1.10, and 1.21. The excess relative risk was 0.11 per 100 kiloBecquerel/m2 (95% CI 0.03 to 0.20). Considering the secular trend, directly age standardised cancer incidence rate differences per 100 000 person years between 1988 to 1996 and the reference period 1986–1987, were 30.3 (indicating a time trend in the reference category), 36.8, 42.0, 45.8, 50.1, and 56.4. No clear excess occurred for leukaemia or thyroid cancer.

    Conclusions: Unless attributable to chance or remaining uncontrolled confounding, a slight exposure related increase in total cancer incidence has occurred in northern Sweden after the Chernobyl accident.

  • 41.
    Tondel, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Hjalmarsson, Peter
    Hardell, Lennart
    Department of Oncology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Göran
    Department of Health Policy, Västernorrland County Council, Härnösand, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Olav
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Increase of regional total cancer incidence in North Sweden due to the Chernobyl accident?2004In: Journal of epidemiology and community health, ISSN 0143-005X, Vol. 58, no 12, p. 1011-1016Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study objective: Is there any epidemiologically visible influence on the cancer incidence after the Chernobyl fallout in Sweden?

    Design: A cohort study was focused on the fallout of caesium-137 in relation to cancer incidence 1988–1996.

    Setting: In northern Sweden, affected by the Chernobyl accident in 1986, 450 parishes were categorised by caesium-137 deposition: <3 (reference), 3–29, 30–39, 40–59, 60–79, and 80–120 kiloBecquerel/m2.

    Participants: All people 0–60 years living in these parishes in 1986 to 1987 were identified and enrolled in a cohort of 1 143 182 persons. In the follow up 22 409 incident cancer cases were retrieved in 1988–1996. A further analysis focused on the secular trend.

    Main results: Taking age and population density as confounding factors, and lung cancer incidence in 1988–1996 and total cancer incidence in 1986–1987 by municipality as proxy confounders for smoking and time trends, respectively, the adjusted relative risks for the deposition categories were 1.00 (reference <3 kiloBecquerel/m2), 1.05, 1.03, 1.08, 1.10, and 1.21. The excess relative risk was 0.11 per 100 kiloBecquerel/m2 (95% CI 0.03 to 0.20). Considering the secular trend, directly age standardised cancer incidence rate differences per 100 000 person years between 1988 to 1996 and the reference period 1986–1987, were 30.3 (indicating a time trend in the reference category), 36.8, 42.0, 45.8, 50.1, and 56.4. No clear excess occurred for leukaemia or thyroid cancer.

    Conclusions: Unless attributable to chance or remaining uncontrolled confounding, a slight exposure related increase in total cancer incidence has occurred in northern Sweden after the Chernobyl accident.

  • 42.
    Tondel, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Lindgren, P
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Hjalmarsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Hardell, L.
    Department of Oncology, Örebro, Sweden.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Increased cancer incidence in north Sweden-an early promoting effect caused by the chernobyl accident.2003In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, Vol. 14, no 5 Suppl., p. S94-S94Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: In Sweden the ground gamma radiation, due to uranium containing granite, contribute to the population's total radiation dose. After the Chemobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986 as much as five percent of the released caesium-137 was deposited in Sweden, especially in the Northern part of the country. Our hypothesis was that this radiation caused increased cancer incidence, after adjustment by ground gamma radiation exposure.

    Methods: The study base included the population of eight counties with the highest fallout after the Chernobyl accident, but also with unaffected areas in these counties serving as the reference. Each person 0-60 years of age living in the same parish at 31 December 1985 and 31 December 1987 were included in a cohort. With the coordinate of each person's dwelling from the National Land Survey of Sweden a total of 1 137 106 individuals could be given 1) ground gamma radiation exposure from the digital map of the Swedish Geological Agency and 2) caesium-137 exposure from a similar map created by Swedish Radiation Protection Institute. Accuracy of the dwelling coordinate was 100 metres and for the radiation exposures 200 metres as done by aeroplane measurements. Three time periods were analysed 1988-1991, 1992-1995 and 1988-1999.

    Results: Population density, lung cancer incidence 1988-1999 and total cancer incidence 1986-1987 was risk factors for total cancer outcome in 1988-1999. Age adjusted ERR per 100 nGy/h for ground gamma radiation and total cancer incidence did not show any significant dose response measured, either in each three years time intervals or in the total period of 1988-1999. For caesium the ERR per 100 nGy/h (adjusted by population density, lung cancer incidence, total cancer incidence 1986-1987 and ground gamma radiation) was significant in 1988-1991 followed by a decline in risk 1992-1995 and then a slight but not complete return in risk. The ERR of 0.042 (95% CL 0.001;0.084) per 100 nGy/h for caesium exposure 1988-1999 is therefore dependent on the first three years increase, and to less extent by the following six years.

    Conclusion: We have found an early effect of the Chernobyl fallout in Northern Sweden. However, even in the ERR of 0.101 per 100 nGy/h is relatively low in 1988-1991, it is stable in a stepwise regression, and therefore indicating a true effect. An interpretation of our results could be that the sudden exposure of ionizing radiation from Chernobyl might have acted as a late stage general promotor for cancer. Such an early effect can hitherto been overlooked in previous studies.

  • 43.
    Westberg, Håkan BT
    et al.
    Örebro .
    Hardell, Lennart O
    Örebro .
    Malmqvist, Nils
    Örebro .
    Ohlson, Carl-Göran
    Örebro .
    Axelson, Olav
    Örebro University Hospital.
    On the use of different measures of exposure - experiences from a case-control study on testicular cancer and PVC exposure.2005In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, ISSN 1545-9624, E-ISSN 1545-9632, Vol. 2, no 7, p. 351-356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Associations between exposure to PVC plastics and testicular cancer have been reported. To improve the exposure-response analysis in a matched case-control study on testicular cancer and occupational exposures, a self-administered exposure questionnaire and expert assessment was applied and different exposure measures were developed. The questionnaires regarding work histories and employment in PVC production, manufacturing, and handling of PVC products were completed by 1582 subjects (90%). By expert assessment, 360 subjects were considered exposed, and the exposure intensity to PVC plastics for different working periods was determined. Different exposure measures to PVC plastics were then developed, such as ever/never exposed, duration, maximum intensity, median intensity, and cumulative median intensity. The correlation between the different measures of exposure was high for exposure duration and the cumulative median exposure intensity (Spearman rank coefficient rs = 0.94), as was the correlation between the maximum intensity and the median intensity (rs = 0.94). The agreement between the answers in the questionnaire and the expert assessments was moderate, Kappa value 0.56. The odds ratio for “ever” exposed based on the exposure as reported in the questionnaire was 1.1 (95%, CI 0.82-1.56), and as determined by expert assessment 1.3 (CI 1.05-1.69). The odds ratios for all four different categories of exposure measures varied between 0.86 and 2.6 but decreased by increasing exposure. An overall excess of testicular cancer for the PVC exposed vs. the unexposed was not supported by the pattern seen in a standard exposure-response analysis based on several exposure measures. The findings stress the importance of using several exposure measures as dose surrogates when the underlying toxic mechanisms are unknown and when there are indications of an overall effect.

  • 44.
    Wingren, Gun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Cancer incidence and mortality in a Swedish rubber tire manufacturing plant2007In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 901-909Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A classification of 12 work categories was used to evaluate the cancer incidence and mortality among a cohort of Swedish rubber tire workers. Methods: Cancer incidence and mortality in the cohort was compared with expected values from national rates. Standardized incidence and mortality ratios were calculated for the total cohort, for sub-cohorts and with the inclusion of a latency requirement. Results: Among men, increased incidence and mortality risks were found for cancer in the larynx, SIR = 2.10, 95% confidence intervals (95% CI): 1.05-3.76, SMR = 2.08, 95% CI: 0.42-6.09. Increased risks were also seen for cancer in the trachea, bronchus, and lung, SIR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.28-2.02, SMR = 1.54, 95% CI: 1.21-1.94, the incidence risk was highest among those with the longest exposure duration and among workers in compounding/mixing, milling, and maintenance. Decreased incidence risks were seen for cancer of the prostate (SIR = 0.74, 95% CI: 059-0.92) and skin (SIR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.36-0.84). Conclusions: The finding of an excess of tumors in the respiratory system is in agreement with earlier findings in other studies on rubber tire workers. The results on other cancer types are compared to earlier findings and related to work processes and chemical exposures of possible causal importance. © 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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