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  • 1.
    Ahmed, Fareed
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ding, Penghui
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ail, Ujwala
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Warczak, Magdalena
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Grimoldi, Andrea
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Håkansson, Karl M. O.
    RISE Bioeconomy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gueskine, Viktor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Manufacturing Poly(3,4-Ethylenedioxythiophene) Electrocatalytic Sheets for Large-Scale H2O2 Production2022In: Advanced Sustainable Systems, E-ISSN 2366-7486, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 2100316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Producing thick films of conducting polymers by a low-cost manufacturing technique would enable new applications. However, removing huge solvent volume from diluted suspension or dispersion (1-3 wt%) in which conducting polymers are typically obtained is a true manufacturing challenge. In this work, a procedure is proposed to quickly remove water from the conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene:poly(4-styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) suspension. The PEDOT:PSS suspension is first flocculated with 1 m H2SO4 transforming PEDOT nanoparticles (approximate to 50-500 nm) into soft microparticles. A filtration process inspired by pulp dewatering in a paper machine on a wire mesh with apertures dimension between 60 mu m and 0.5 mm leads to thick free-standing films (approximate to 0.5 mm). Wire mesh clogging that hinders dewatering (known as dead-end filtration) is overcome by adding to the flocculated PEDOT: PSS dispersion carbon fibers that aggregate and form efficient water channels. Moreover, this enables fast formation of thick layers under simple atmospheric pressure filtration, thus making the process truly scalable. Thick freestanding PEDOT films thus obtained are used as electrocatalysts for efficient reduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide, a promising green chemical and fuel. The inhomogeneity of the films does not affect their electrochemical function.

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  • 2.
    Ail, Ujwala
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wang, Hui
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Thermoelectric Properties of Polymeric Mixed Conductors2016In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 26, no 34, p. 6288-6296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The thermoelectric (TE) phenomena are intensively explored by the scientific community due to the rather inefficient way energy resources are used with a large fraction of energy wasted in the form of heat. Among various materials, mixed ion-electron conductors (MIEC) are recently being explored as potential thermoelectrics, primarily due to their low thermal conductivity. The combination of electronic and ionic charge carriers in those inorganic or organic materials leads to complex evolution of the thermovoltage (Voc) with time, temperature, and/or humidity. One of the most promising organic thermoelectric materials, poly(3,4-ethyelenedioxythiophene)-polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT-PSS), is an MIEC. A previous study reveals that at high humidity, PEDOT-PSS undergoes an ionic Seebeck effect due to mobile protons. Yet, this phenomenon is not well understood. In this work, the time dependence of the Voc is studied and its behavior from the contribution of both charge carriers (holes and protons) is explained. The presence of a complex reorganization of the charge carriers promoting an internal electrochemical reaction within the polymer film is identified. Interestingly, it is demonstrated that the time dependence behavior of Voc is a way to distinguish between three classes of polymeric materials: electronic conductor, ionic conductor, and mixed ionic–electronic conductor

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  • 3.
    Ajjan, Fátima
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Javad Jafari, Mohammad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rebis, T.
    Poznan University of Tech, Poland.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Spectroelectrochemical investigation of redox states in a polypyrrole/lignin composite electrode material2015In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, Vol. 3, no 24, p. 12927-12937Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report spectroelectrochemical studies to investigate the charge storage mechanism of composite polypyrrole/lignin electrodes. Renewable bioorganic electrode materials were produced by electropolymerization of pyrrole in the presence of a water-soluble lignin derivative acting as a dopant. The resulting composite exhibited enhanced charge storage abilities due to a lignin-based faradaic process, which was expressed after repeated electrochemical redox of the material. The in situ FTIR spectroelectrochemistry results show the formation of quinone groups, and reversible oxidation-reduction of these groups during charge-discharge experiments in the electrode materials. The most significant IR bands include carbonyl absorption near 1705 cm(-1), which is attributed to the creation of quinone moieties during oxidation, and absorption at 1045 cm(-1) which is due to hydroquinone moieties.

  • 4.
    Aldred, Nick
    et al.
    Newcastle University, England .
    Gohad, Neeraj V.
    Clemson University, SC USA .
    Petrone, Luigi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Orihuela, Beatriz
    Duke University, NC USA .
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mount, Andrew
    Clemson University, SC USA .
    Rittschof, Dan
    Duke University, NC USA .
    Clare, Anthony S.
    Newcastle University, England .
    Confocal microscopy-based goniometry of barnacle cyprid permanent adhesive2013In: Journal of Experimental Biology, ISSN 0022-0949, E-ISSN 1477-9145, Vol. 216, no 11, p. 1969-1972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biological adhesives are materials of particular interest in the fields of bio-inspired technology and antifouling research. The adhesive of adult barnacles has received much attention over the years; however, the permanent adhesive of the cyprid - the colonisation stage of barnacles - is a material about which very little is presently known. We applied confocal laser-scanning microscopy to the measurement of contact angles between the permanent adhesive of barnacle cyprid larvae and self-assembled monolayers of OH- and CH3-terminated thiols. Measurement of contact angles between actual bioadhesives and surfaces has never previously been achieved and the data may provide insight into the physicochemical properties and mechanism of action of these functional materials. The adhesive is a dual-phase system post-secretion, with the behaviour of the components governed separately by the surface chemistry. The findings imply that the cyprid permanent adhesion process is more complex than previously thought, necessitating broad re-evaluation of the system. Improved understanding will have significant implications for the production of barnacle-resistant coatings as well as development of bio-inspired glues for niche applications.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Björefors, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Ulrich, Christian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Characterization of Surface Modifications using Voltammetry and Imaging SPR2006In: Europtrode VIII, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Bittoun, Eyal
    et al.
    Technion Israel Institute Technology.
    Marmur, Abraham
    Technion Israel Institute Technology.
    Östblom, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Filled Nanoporous Surfaces: Controlled Formation and Wettability2009In: LANGMUIR, ISSN 0743-7463, Vol. 25, no 20, p. 12374-12379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The controlled filling of hydrophobic nanoporous surfaces with hydrophilic molecules and their wetting properties are described and demonstrated by using thiocholesterol (TC) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold and mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) as the filling agent. A novel procedure was developed for filling the nanopores in the TC SAMs by immersing them into a "cocktail" solution of TC and MUA, with TC in huge excess. This procedure results in an increasing coverage of MUA with increasing immersion time up to an area fraction of similar to 23%, while the amount of TC remains almost constant. Our findings strongly support earlier observations where linear omega-substituted alkanethiols selectively fill defects (nanopores) in the TC SAM (Yang et al. Langmuir 1997, 12, 1704-1707). They also support the formation of a homogeneously mixed SAM, given by the distribution of TC on the gold surface, rather than of a phase-segregated overlayer structure with domains of varying size, shape, and composition. The wetting properties of the Filled SAMs were investigated by measuring the most stable contact angle as well as contact angle hysteresis. It is shown that the most stable contact angle is very well described by the Cassie equation, since the drops arc much larger than the scale of chemical heterogeneity of the SAM surfaces. In addition, it is demonstrated that contact angle hysteresis is sensitive to the chemical heterogeneity of the surface, even at the nanometric scale.

  • 7.
    Busch, Christian
    et al.
    Applied Physical Chemistry, Institute for Physical Chemistry, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Nagy, Bela
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Stöcklin, Andreas
    Applied Physical Chemistry, Institute for Physical Chemistry, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Gutfreund, Philipp
    Institut Laue-Langevin, France.
    Dahint, Reiner
    Applied Physical Chemistry, Institute for Physical Chemistry, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A mobile setup for simultaneous and in situ neutron reflectivity, infrared spectroscopy, and ellipsometry studies2022In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 93, no 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neutron reflectivity at the solid/liquid interface offers unique opportunities for resolving the structure–function relationships of interfacial layers in soft matter science. It is a non-destructive technique for detailed analysis of layered structures on molecular length scales, providing thickness, density, roughness, and composition of individual layers or components of adsorbed films. However, there are also some well-known limitations of this method, such as the lack of chemical information, the difficulties in determining large layer thicknesses, and the limited time resolution. We have addressed these shortcomings by designing and implementing a portable sample environment for in situ characterization at neutron reflectometry beamlines, integrating infrared spectroscopy under attenuated total reflection for determination of molecular entities and their conformation, and spectroscopic ellipsometry for rapid and independent measurement of layer thicknesses and refractive indices. The utility of this combined setup is demonstrated by two projects investigating (a) pH-dependent swelling of polyelectrolyte layers and (b) the impact of nanoparticles on lipid membranes to identify potential mechanisms of nanotoxicity. 

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  • 8.
    Di Fino, A.
    et al.
    Newcastle University, England .
    Petrone, Luigi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Aldred, N.
    Newcastle University, England .
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Clare, A. S.
    Newcastle University, England .
    Correlation between surface chemistry and settlement behaviour in barnacle cyprids (Balanus improvisus)2014In: Biofouling (Print), ISSN 0892-7014, E-ISSN 1029-2454, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 143-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In laboratory-based biofouling assays, the influence of physico-chemical surface characteristics on barnacle settlement has been tested most frequently using the model organism Balanus amphitrite (= Amphibalanus amphitrite). Very few studies have addressed the settlement preferences of other barnacle species, such as Balanus improvisus (= Amphibalanus improvisus). This study aimed to unravel the effects of surface physico-chemical cues, in particular surface-free energy (SFE) and surface charge, on the settlement of cyprids of B. improvisus. The use of well-defined surfaces under controlled conditions further facilitates comparison of the results with recent similar data for B. amphitrite. Zero-day-old cyprids of B. improvisus were exposed to a series of model surfaces, namely self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols with varying end-groups, homogenously applied to gold-coated polystyrene (PS) Petri dishes. As with B. amphitrite, settlement of cyprids of B. improvisus was influenced by both SFE and charge, with higher settlement on low-energy (hydrophobic) surfaces and negatively charged SAMs. Positively charged SAMs resulted in low settlement, with intermediate settlement on neutral SAMs of similar SFE. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that despite previous suggestions to the contrary, these two species of barnacle show similar preferences in response to SFE; they also respond similarly to charge. These findings have positive implications for the development of novel antifouling (AF) coatings and support the importance of consistency in substratum choice for assays designed to compare surface preferences of fouling organisms.

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  • 9.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Neutrons for scattering: What they are, where to get them, and how to deal with them2018In: EPJ Web of Conferences, E-ISSN 2100-014X, Vol. 188, article id 01002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In neutron scattering studies of soft matter, a diverse array of methods and instruments are used, providing information on structure and dynamics on various length and energy scales. However, much of the infrastructure needed for neutron scattering is common for many instruments. After a brief historical retrospect of neutron scattering, this chapter introduces the basic infrastructure needed to conduct scattering experiments. This includes equipment that is used to produce, spectrally adjust and purify, and to deliver neutrons to the instruments where scattering experiments are conducted. The basics of the interaction of neutrons with matter is also introduced, as a preparation for the final sections on the different means at hand for neutron detection.

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    Neutrons for scattering: What they are, where to get them, and how to deal with them
  • 10.
    Ederth, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Swelling of grafted poly(ethylene glycol)-containing hydrogels: a neutron re°ectivity studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrogels are used to enhance biocompatibility and reduce inflammation in biomedical applications, and as area-enlarging matrices in bioanalytical devices. For either of these applications, the structure of the hydrogel is important for the function, and thus structural understanding of hydrogels in their wet state is highly relevant for the use and development of these materials. Also, processing of these materials is frequently made in ambient air, and it is of interest to relate the properties of dry, or humid air-swollen hydrogels, to their wet properties.

    We use neutron reflectometry to follow the swelling of hydrogels in air of controlled humidity. Comparing hydrogels prepared on silica and gold substrates { both of relevance to bioanalytical applications { we observe that the swelling is different, reflecting a structural difference between these polymers, but that the water content of the polymer films near saturation is near 33% in both cases. Upon immersion in water, the swelling is estimated to approximately 2 x the dry thickness of the polymer, though a consistent quantitative determination of the polymer profile could not be made. Finally, we observe that the hydrogels are unaffected by either positively and negatively charged proteins.

  • 11.
    Ederth, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pettitt, Michala E
    University of Birmingham.
    Conlan, Sheelagh L
    Newcastle University.
    Du, Chun-Xia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Callow, Maureen E
    University of Birmingham.
    Callow, James A
    University of Birmingham.
    Mutton, Robert
    Newcastle University.
    Clare, Anthony S
    Newcastle University.
    D`Souza, Fraddry
    TNO Science and Industry.
    Donnelly, Glen
    TNO Science and Industry.
    Bruin, Anouk
    TNO Science and Industry.
    Willemsen, Peter R
    TNO Science and Industry.
    Su, Xueju J
    University of Dundee.
    Wang, Su
    University of Dundee.
    Zhao, Qi
    University of Dundee.
    Hederos, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Resistance of Galactoside-Terminated Alkanethiol Self-Assembled Monolayers to Marine Fouling Organisms2011In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 3, no 10, p. 3890-3901Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of galactoside-terminated alkanethiols have protein-resistance properties which can be tuned via the degree of methylation [Langmuir 2005, 21, 2971-2980]. Specifically, a partially methylated compound was more resistant to nonspecific protein adsorption than the hydroxylated or fully methylated counterparts. We investigate whether this also holds true for resistance to the attachment and adhesion of a range of marine species, in order to clarify to what extent resistance to protein adsorption correlates with the more complex adhesion of fouling organisms. The partially methylated galactoside-terminated SAM was further compared to a mixed monolayer of omega-substituted methyl- and hydroxyl-terminated alkanethiols with wetting properties and surface ratio of hydroxyl to methyl groups matching that of the galactoside. The settlement (initial attachment) and adhesion strength of four model marine fouling organisms were investigated, representing both micro- and macrofoulers; two bacteria (Cobetia marina and Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus), barnacle cypris larvae (Balanus amphitrite), and algal zoospores (Ulva linza). The minimum in protein adsorption onto the partially methylated galactoside surface was partly reproduced in the marine fouling assays, providing some support for a relationship between protein resistance and adhesion of marine fouling organisms. The mixed alkanethiol SAM, which was matched in wettability to the partially methylated galactoside SAM, consistently showed higher settlement (initial attachment) of test organisms than the galactoside, implying that both wettability and surface chemistry are insufficient to explain differences in fouling resistance. We suggest that differences in the structure of interfacial water may explain the variation in adhesion to these SAMs.

  • 12.
    Ederth, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lerm, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation.
    Orihuela, Beatriz
    Duke Univ, NC 28516 USA.
    Rittschof, Daniel
    Duke Univ, NC 28516 USA.
    Resistance of Zwitterionic Peptide Monolayers to Biofouling2019In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 1818-1827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are widely used in science and engineering, and recent progress has demonstrated the utility of zwitterionic peptides with alternating lysine (K) and glutamic acid (E) residues for antifouling purposes. Aiming at developing a peptide-based fouling-resistant SAM suitable for presentation of surface-attached pheromones for barnacle larvae, we have investigated five different peptide SAMs, where four are based on the EK motif, and the fifth was designed based on general principles for fouling resistance. The SAMs were formed by self-assembly onto gold substrates via cysteine residues on the peptides, and formation of SAMs was verified via ellipsometry, wettability, infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Settlement of cypris larvae of the barnacle Balanus (=Amphibalanus) amphitrite, the target of pheromone studies, was tested. SAMs were also subjected to fouling assays using protein solutions, blood serum, and the bacterium Mycobacterium marinum. The results confirm the favorable antifouling properties of EK-containing peptides in most of the assays, although this did not apply to the barnacle larvae settlement test, where settlement was low on only one of the peptide SAMs. The one peptide that had antifouling properties for barnacles did not contain a pheromone motif, and would not be susceptible to degredation by common serine proteases. We conclude that the otherwise broadly effective antifouling properties of EK-containing peptide SAMs is not directly applicable to barnacles, and that great care must be exercised in the design of peptide-based SAMs for presentation of barnacle-specific ligands.

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  • 13.
    Ederth, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Porous nanoparticle assemblies as permeable supports for lipid bilayer membranes (Poster)2005Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Nanoscale Surface Self-Assembly (EuChem Conference, June 19-23, 2005, Sigtuna, Sweden

  • 14.
    Ederth, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nygren, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Östblom, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pettitt, M.E.
    The University of Birmingham, School of Biosciences, Birmingham, UK.
    Callow, M.E.
    The University of Birmingham, School of Biosciences, Birmingham, UK.
    Callow, J.A.
    The University of Birmingham, School of Biosciences, Birmingham, UK.
    Interactions of algal spores and diatoms with mixed synthetic peptide SAMs2007Conference paper (Other academic)
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  • 15.
    Ederth, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nygren, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pettitt, M. E.
    University of Birmingham.
    Oumlstblom, M.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Du, Chun-Xia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Broo, Klas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Callow, M. E.
    University of Birmingham.
    Callow, J.
    University of Birmingham.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Anomalous settlement behavior of Ulva linza zoospores on cationic oligopeptide surfaces2008In: Biofouling (Print), ISSN 0892-7014, E-ISSN 1029-2454, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 303-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identification of settlement cues for marine fouling organisms opens up new strategies and methods for biofouling prevention, and enables the development of more effective antifouling materials. To this end, the settlement behaviour of zoospores of the green alga Ulva linza onto cationic oligopeptide self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) has been investigated. The spores interact strongly with lysine- and arginine-rich SAMs, and their settlement appears to be stimulated by these surfaces. Of particular interest is an arginine-rich oligopeptide, which is effective in attracting spores to the surface, but in a way which leaves a large fraction of the settled spores attached to the surface in an anomalous fashion. These 'pseudo-settled' spores are relatively easily detached from the surface and do not undergo the full range of cellular responses associated with normal commitment to settlement. This is a hitherto undocumented mode of settlement, and surface dilution of the arginine-rich peptide with a neutral triglycine peptide demonstrates that both normal and anomalous settlement is proportional to the surface density of the arginine-rich peptide. The settlement experiments are complemented with physical studies of the oligopeptide SAMs, before and after extended immersion in artificial seawater, using infrared spectroscopy, null ellipsometry and contact angle measurements.

  • 16.
    Ederth, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pettitt, M E
    University of Birmingham.
    Nygren, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Du, Chun-Xia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zhou, Ye
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Callow, M E
    University of Birmingham.
    Callow, J A
    University of Birmingham.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Interactions of Zoospores of Ulva linza with Arginine-Rich Oligopeptide Monolayers2009In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 25, no 16, p. 9375-9383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We recently reported oil the strong interactions of zoospores of the green alga, Ulva linza with all arginine-rich oligopeptide self-assembled monolayer (SAM) [Biofouling 2008, 24, 303-312], where the arginine-rich peptide induced not only high spore settlement, but also a form of abnormal settlement, or "pseudo-settlement", whereby it proportion of spores do not go through the normal process of surface exploration, adhesive exocytosis, and loss of flagella. Further. it was demonstrated that both the total number of settled spores and the fraction of pseudosettled spores were related to the surface density of the arginine-rich peptide. Here we present a further investigation of the interactions of zoospores of ulva with a set of oligomeric, de nom designed, arginine-rich peptides, specifically aimed to test the effect of peptide primary structure on the interaction. Via variations in the peptide length and by permutations in the amino acid sequences, we gain further insight into the spore-surface interactions. The interpretation of the biological assays is supported by physicochemical characterization of the SAMs using infrared spectroscopy, ellipsometry, and contact angle measurement. Results confirm the importance of arginine residues for the anomalous pseudosettlement, and we found that settlement is modulated by variations in both the total length and peptide primary structure. To elucidate the Causes of the anomalous settlement and the possible relation to peptide-membrane interactions, we also compared the settlement of the "naked" zoospores of Ulva(which present it lipoprotein membrane to the exterior without a discrete polysaccharide cell wall), with the settlement of diatoms (unicellular algae that are surrounded by it silica cell wall), onto the peptide SAMs. Cationic SAMs do not notably affect settlement (attachment), adhesion strength, or viability of diatom cells, Suggesting that the effect of the peptides on zoospores of Ulva is mediated via specific peptide-membrane interactions.

  • 17.
    Ederth, Thomas
    et al.
    Phys and Theoret Chem Lab, Oxford OX1 3QZ, England.
    Thomas, R K
    Phys and Theoret Chem Lab, Oxford OX1 3QZ, England; .
    A neutron reflectivity study of drainage and stratification of AOT foam films2003In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 19, no 19, p. 7727-7733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Structural properties of Aerosol-OT (AOT) foam films were studied by neutron reflectometry. The drainage of large (10 cm(2)), horizontally oriented AOT films under zero applied external pressure is slow and proceeds from thick colored or gray films to black films of approximately 200 Angstrom thickness over many hours, resulting in quasi-static conditions over the time scales required for the acquisition of reflectivity profiles throughout the whole drainage process. After formation of the foam film-while still showing colored interference fringes-and during the early stages of thinning, the appearance of Bragg diffraction peaks demonstrates that the film contains multilamellar structure, in agreement with studies at free air/water interfaces. Upon further reduction of the film thickness, below approximately 250 Angstrom, the reflectivity profile is well fitted by a three-layer slab model with two surfactant layers and an aqueous core with a high surfactant content. The composition of the aqueous core and the manner in which the reflectivity during the latter stages of draining evolves from Bragg peaks to a Kiessig fringe structure indicate stratification within the thin foam film.

  • 18.
    Ederth, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. MariboHilleshog Res AB, Sweden.
    Swelling of Thin Poly(ethylene glycol)-Containing Hydrogel Films it Water Vapor-A Neutron Reflectivity Study2018In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 34, no 19, p. 5517-5526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrogels are widely used in biomedicine and for bioanalytical purposes, normally under wet conditions. For certain applications, processing steps, or process monitoring, hydrogel films are used or treated under ambient conditions, and because they are hygroscopic, it is of interest to investigate how they respond to changes in atmospheric humidity. We have used neutron reflectometry to follow the swelling of thin UV-polymerized hydrogel films in air under different relative humidities (RHs). These polymers were prepared to similar thicknesses on silica and gold substrates, and the chemical similarity between them was verified by infrared spectroscopy. The swelling in response to variations in RH was different for the layers on the two substrate types, reflecting structural changes induced by differences in the UV exposure required to achieve a given polymer thickness, as demonstrated also by differences in the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter, obtained by fitting a Flory-Huggins-type sorption model to the swelling data. Wetting studies show small changes in contact angles with surrounding humidity variations, indicating that structural reorganization at the interface in response to humidity changes is limited.

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  • 19.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tai, Feng-i
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg , Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lateral Control of Protein Adsorption on Charged Polymer Gradients2009In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 3755-3762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work describes the fabrication, characterization, and protein adsorption behavior of charged polymer gradients. The thin gradient films were fabricated by a two-step technique using UV-initiated free-radical polymerization in a reactor with a moving shutter. A homogeneous layer of cationic poly(2-aminoethyl methacrylate hydrochloride) was first formed, followed by a layer of oppositely charged poly(2-carboxyethyl acrylate) with a continuously increasing thickness. Adsorption from protein solutions as well as human blood plasma was investigated by imaging surface plasmon resonance and infrared microscopy. The results showed excessive protein adsorption in the areas where one of the polymers dominated the composition, while there was a clear minimum at an intermediate position of the gradient. The charge of the surface was estimated by direct force measurements and found to correlate well with the protein adsorption, showing the lowest net charge in the same area as the protein adsorption minimum. We therefore hypothesize that a combination of the charged polymers, in the right proportions, can result in a protein-resistant surface due to balanced charges.

  • 20.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Bergström, Gunnar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biotechnology .
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Conlan, Sheelagh L.
    Liu, Yunli
    Zhao, Qi
    DSouza, Fraddry
    Donnelly, GlenT.
    Willemsen, Peter R.
    Pettitt, Michala E.
    Callow, Maureen E.
    Callow, James A.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Poly(ethylene glycol)-Containing Hydrogel Surfaces for Antifouling Applications in Marine and Freshwater Environments2008In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 9, no 10, p. 2775-2783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 21.
    Fernandez-Benito, Amparo
    et al.
    CSIC, Spain.
    Martinez-Lopez, Juan Carlos
    CSIC, Spain.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Martinez Gil, Jose Gabriel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Garcia-Gimenez, Daniel
    CSIC, Spain.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Carretero-Gonzalez, Javier
    CSIC, Spain.
    Green and Scalable Biopolymer-Based Aqueous Polyelectrolyte Complexes for Zinc-Ion Charge Storage Devices2023In: ChemElectroChem, E-ISSN 2196-0216, Vol. 10, no 2, article id e202300327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Green and scalable materials are essential to fulfill the need of electrification for transitioning into a fossil-fuels free society, and sustainability is a requirement for all new technologies. Rechargeable batteries are one of the most important elements for electrification, enabling the transition to mobile electronics, electrical vehicles and grid storage. We here report synthesis and characterization of polyelectrolyte complexes of alginate and chitosan, both biopolymers deriving from the sea, for transport of zinc ions in hydrogel electrolytes. We have used vibrational spectroscopy, thermal measurements and microscopy, as well as transport measurements with ohmic or blocking contacts. The transference number for zinc ions is close to 1, the conductivity is approximate to 10 mS/cm, with stability at Zn interfaces seen through 7000 cycles in symmetric zinc//zinc cell. A zinc ion aqueous electrolyte was prepared from blends of chitosan and alginate, by using a simple and scalable route. These green zinc ion electrolytes exhibit a stability window up to 2 V, a zinc ion transference number close to 1, and electrochemical cyclability over 7000 cycles at interfaces to zinc. This biologically derived polyelectrolyte complex offers many possibilities for optimizing transport and stability at electrode interfaces.image

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  • 22.
    Fyrner, Timmy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Nanyang Technology University, Singapore .
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping, .
    Synthesis of oligo(lactose)-based thiols and their self-assembly onto gold surfaces2013In: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, ISSN 0927-7765, E-ISSN 1873-4367, Vol. 105, p. 187-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to produce monomolecular coatings with well-defined structural and functional properties is of key importance in biosensing, drug delivery, and many recently developed applications of nanotechnology. Organic chemistry has proven to be a powerful tool to achieve this in many research areas. Herein, we present the synthesis of three oligo(lactosides) glycosylated in a (1 → 3) manner, and which are further functionalized with amide-linked short alkanethiol spacers. The oligosaccharides (di-, tetra-, and hexasaccharide) originate from the inexpensive and readily available lactose disaccharide. These thiolated derivatives were immobilized onto gold surfaces, and the thus formed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on planar gold were characterized by wettability, ellipsometry and infrared reflection–absorption spectroscopy. Further, the ability of these SAMs to stabilize gold nanoparticles in saline solutions was also demonstrated, indicating that the oligosaccharides may be used as stabilizing agents in gold nanoparticle-based assays.

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  • 23.
    Fyrner, Timmy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lee, Hung-Hsun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mangone, Alberto
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pettitt, Michala E
    University of Birmingham, UK.
    Callow, Maureen E
    University of Birmingham, UK.
    Callow, James A
    University of Birmingham, UK.
    Conlan, Sheelagh L
    Newcastle University, UK.
    Mutton, Robert
    Newcastle University, UK.
    Clare, Anthony S
    Newcastle Universitym, UK.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Saccharide-Functionalized Alkanethiols for Fouling-Resistant Self-Assembled Monolayers: Synthesis, Monolayer Properties, and Antifouling Behavior2011In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 27, no 24, p. 15034-15047Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the synthesis of a series of mono-, di-, and trisaccharide-functionalized alkanethiols as well as the formation of fouling-resistant self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) from these. The SAls,,Is were characterized using ellipsometry, wetting measurements, and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (WAS). We show that the structure of the carbohydrate moiety affects the packing density and that this also alters the alkane chain organization. Upon increasing the size of the sugar moieties (from mono- to di- and trisaccharides), the structural qualities of the monolayers deteriorated with increasing disorder, and for the trisaccharide, slow reorganization dynamics in response to changes in the environmental polarity were observed. The antifouling properties of these SAMs were investigated through protein adsorption experiments from buffer solutions as well as settlement (attachment) tests using two common marine fouling species, zoospores of the green macroalga Ulva linza and cypris larvae of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite. The SAMs showed overall good resistance to fouling by both the proteins and the tested marine organisms. To improve the packing density of the SAMs with bulky headgroups, we employed mixed SAMs where the saccharide-thiols are diluted with a filler molecule having a small 2-hydroxyethyl headgroup. This method also provides a means by which the steric availability of sugar moieties can be varied, which is of interest for specific interaction studies with surface-bound sugars. The results of the surface dilution study and the low nonspecific adsorption onto the SAMs both indicate the feasibility of this approach.

  • 24.
    Gamage, Sampath
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kang, Evan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Chungbuk Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Åkerlind, Christina
    FOI Swedish Def Res Agcy, S-58330 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Sardar, Samim
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Ist Italiano Tecnol, Italy.
    Edberg, Jesper
    RISE Acreo, Sweden.
    Kariis, Hans
    FOI Swedish Def Res Agcy, S-58330 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jonsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Transparent nanocellulose metamaterial enables controlled optical diffusion and radiative cooling2020In: Journal of Materials Chemistry C, ISSN 2050-7526, E-ISSN 2050-7534, Vol. 8, no 34, p. 11687-11694Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Materials that provide independent control of infrared thermal radiation and haze in the visible could benefit many areas and applications, including clothing, packaging and photovoltaics. Here, we study this possibility for a metamaterial composite paper based on cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) and silicon dioxide (SiO2) microparticles with infrared (IR) Frohlich phonon resonances. This CNF-SiO2 composite shows outstanding transparency in the visible wavelength range, with the option of controlling light diffusion and haze from almost zero to 90% by varying the SiO2 microparticle concentration. We further show that the transparent metamaterial paper could maintain high thermal emissivity in the atmospheric IR window, as attributed to strong IR absorption of both the nanocellulose and the resonant SiO2 microparticles. The high IR emissivity and low visible absorption make the paper suitable for passive radiative cooling and we demonstrate cooling of the paper to around 3 degrees C below ambient air temperature by exposing it to the sky.

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  • 25.
    Ghorbani Shiraz, Hamid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ruoko, Tero-Petri
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Tampere Univ, Finland.
    Gueskine, Viktor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karon, Krzysztof
    Silesian Tech Univ, Poland.
    Lapkowski, Mieczyslaw
    Silesian Tech Univ, Poland.
    Abrahamsson, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Towards electrochemical hydrogen storage in liquid organic hydrogen carriers via proton-coupled electron transfers2022In: Journal of Energy Challenges and Mechanics, E-ISSN 2056-9386, Vol. 73, p. 292-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Green hydrogen is identified as one of the prime clean energy carriers due to its high energy density and a zero emission of CO2. A possible solution for the transport of H2 in a safe and low-cost way is in the form of liquid organic hydrogen carriers (LOHCs). As an alternative to loading LOHC with H2 via a two-step procedure involving preliminary electrolytic production of H2 and subsequent chemical hydrogenation of the LOHC, we explore here the possibility of electrochemical hydrogen storage (EHS) via conversion of proton of a proton donor into a hydrogen atom involved in covalent bonds with the LOHC (R) via a protoncoupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction: . We chose 9-fluorenone/ fluorenol (Fnone/Fnol) conversion as such a model PCET reaction. The electrochemical activation of Fnone via two sequential electron transfers was monitored with in-situ and operando spectroscopies in absence and in presence of different alcohols as proton donors of different reactivity, which enabled us to both quantify and get the mechanistic insight on PCET. The possibility of hydrogen extraction from the loaded carrier molecule was illustrated by chemical activation.

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  • 26.
    Golabi, Mohsen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    ATR-FTIR: a simple and rapid tool for bacterial resistance detection2015In: Conference on Advanced Vibrational Spectroscopy - ICAVS, Vienna, Austria, 12- 17 July 2015., 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Backlund, Fredrik G.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; RISE Res Inst Sweden, Sweden.
    Arndt, Tina
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Schmuck, Benjamin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Greco, Gabriele
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Rising, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Barth, Andreas
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Force-Induced Structural Changes in Spider Silk Fibers Introduced by ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy2023In: ACS APPLIED POLYMER MATERIALS, ISSN 2637-6105, Vol. 5, no 11, p. 9433-9444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Silk fibers have unique mechanical properties, and many studies of silk aim at understanding how these properties are related to secondary structure content, which often is determined by infrared spectroscopy. We report significant method-induced irreversible structural changes to both natural and synthetic spider silk fibers, derived from the widely used attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) technique. By varying the force used to bring fibers into contact with the internal reflection elements of ATR-FTIR accessories, we observed correlated and largely irreversible changes in the secondary structure, with shape relaxation under pressure occurring within minutes. Fitting of spectral components shows that these changes agree with transformations from the alpha-helix to the beta-sheet secondary structure with possible contributions from other secondary structure elements. We further confirm the findings with IR microspectroscopy, where similar differences were seen between the pressed and unaffected regions of spider silk fibers. Our findings show that ATR-FTIR spectroscopy requires care in its use and in the interpretation of the results.

  • 28.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Golabi, Mohsen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Isfahan, Iran.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing using infrared attenuated total reflection (IR-ATR) spectroscopy to monitor metabolic activity2024In: Spectrochimica Acta Part A - Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy, ISSN 1386-1425, E-ISSN 1873-3557, Vol. 304, article id 123384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fast and accurate detection of antimicrobial resistance in pathogens remains a challenge, and with the increase in antimicrobial resistance due to mis- and overuse of antibiotics, it has become an urgent public health problem. We demonstrate how infrared attenuated total reflection (IR-ATR) can be used as a simple method for assessment of bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics. This is achieved by monitoring the metabolic activities of bacterial cells via nutrient consumption and using this as an indicator of bacterial viability. Principal component analysis of the obtained spectra provides a tool for fast and simple discrimination of antimicrobial resistance in the acquired data. We demonstrate this concept using four bacterial strains and four different antibiotics, showing that the change in glucose concentration in the growth medium after 2 h, as monitored by IR-ATR, can be used as a spectroscopic diagnostic technique, to reduce detection time and to improve quality in the assessment of antimicrobial resistance in pathogens.

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  • 29.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Jiang
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Engquist, Isak
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Time-Resolved Chemical Mapping in Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells2017In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 2747-2757Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An understanding of the doping and ion distributions in light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) is required to approach a realistic conduction model which can precisely explain the electrochemical reactions, p-n junction formation, and ion dynamics in the active layer and to provide relevant information about LECs for systematic improvement of function and manufacture. Here, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) microscopy is used to monitor anion density profile and polymer structure in situ and for time-resolved mapping of electrochemical doping in an LEC under bias. The results are in very good agreement with the electrochemical doping model with respect to ion redistribution and formation of a dynamic p-n junction in the active layer. We also physically slow ions by decreasing the working temperature and study frozen-junction formation and immobilization of ions in a fixed-junction LEC device by FTIR imaging. The obtained results show irreversibility of the ion redistribution and polymer doping in a fixed-junction device. In addition, we demonstrate that infrared microscopy is a useful tool for in situ characterization of electroactive organic materials.

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  • 30.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Oshaug Pedersen, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Barhemat, Samira
    Mabema AB, Dept Vis Inspect, S-58422 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    In Situ Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy on Organic Mixed Ionic-Electronic Conductors: Tracking Dynamic Doping in Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells2024In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the domain of organic mixed ionic-electronic conductors (OMIECs), simultaneous transport and coupling of ionic and electronic charges are crucial for the function of electrochemical devices in organic electronics. Understanding conduction mechanisms and chemical reactions in operational devices is pivotal for performance enhancement and is necessary for the informed and systematic development of more promising materials. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a potent tool for monitoring electrochemical evolution and dynamic doping in operational devices, offering enhanced sensitivity to subtle spectral changes. We demonstrate the utility of SERS for in situ tracking of doping in OMIECs in an organic light-emitting electrochemical cell (LEC) containing a conjugated polymer (poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene]; MEH-PPV), a molecular anion (lithium triflate), and an electrolyte network (poly(ethylene oxide); PEO). SERS enhancement is achieved via an interleaved layer of gold particles formed by spontaneous breakup of a deposited thin gold film. The results successfully highlight the ability of SERS to unveil time-resolved MEH-PPV doping and polaron formation, elucidating the effects of triflate ion transfer in the operating device and validating the electrochemical doping model in LECs.

  • 31.
    Ji, Fuxiang
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Klarbring, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wang, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ning, Weihua
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wang, Linqin
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Yin, Chunyang
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mendoza Figueroa, José Silvestre
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Christensen, Christian Kolle
    DESY, Germany.
    Etter, Martin
    DESY, Germany.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden; Dalian Univ Technol, Peoples R China.
    Simak, Sergey
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Abrikosov, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Natl Univ Sci and Technol MISIS, Russia.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lead-Free Halide Double Perovskite Cs2AgBiBr6with Decreased Band Gap2020In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 59, no 35, p. 15191-15194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmentally friendly halide double perovskites with improved stability are regarded as a promising alternative to lead halide perovskites. The benchmark double perovskite, Cs2AgBiBr6, shows attractive optical and electronic features, making it promising for high-efficiency optoelectronic devices. However, the large band gap limits its further applications, especially for photovoltaics. Herein, we develop a novel crystal-engineering strategy to significantly decrease the band gap by approximately 0.26 eV, reaching the smallest reported band gap of 1.72 eV for Cs(2)AgBiBr(6)under ambient conditions. The band-gap narrowing is confirmed by both absorption and photoluminescence measurements. Our first-principles calculations indicate that enhanced Ag-Bi disorder has a large impact on the band structure and decreases the band gap, providing a possible explanation of the observed band-gap narrowing effect. This work provides new insights for achieving lead-free double perovskites with suitable band gaps for optoelectronic applications.

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  • 32.
    Jin, Jing
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Ma, Jiao
    Taiyuan Univ Technol, Peoples R China.
    Song, Lingjie
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Jiang, Wei
    Chinese Acad Sci, Peoples R China.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fabrication of a polypropylene immunoassay platform by photografting reaction2019In: Materials science & engineering. C, biomimetic materials, sensors and systems, ISSN 0928-4931, E-ISSN 1873-0191, Vol. 102, p. 492-501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The technology of an immunoassay detection platform is critical to clinical disease diagnoses, especially for developing a medical diagnostic system. A polymer-based immunoassay platform was fabricated on nonwoven fabric polypropylene (PP) using a photografting reaction to graft 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and sulfobetaine (SBMA). The antifouling properties of PP-g-P(HEMA-co-SBMA) were investigated by fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion. Carbonyldiimidazole was employed to activate the pendant hydroxyl groups in HEMA moieties and covalently coupled antibody molecules. The detection of the limit of the immunoassay platform was as low as 10 pg/mL. Antibody amount and bioactivity affected the availability of antibody and the sensitivity of immunoassay. The immune efficiency was dependent on the strategies of antibody immobilization. The immune efficiency of Au-g-P(SBMA-co-HEMA) and Au-SH surfaces measured by QCM-D was 165% and 35.7%, respectively. The covalently binding antibody via hydrophilic polymer chains as spacers could retain fragment antigen-binding up orientation, maintain the bioactivity of antibody, and mainly improve the accessibility of antibody molecules via adjusting the conformations of polymer chains when the antibodies recognized the antigens. Therefore, grafting hydrophilic polymers, such as zwitterionic PSBMA and reactive PHEMA onto nonwoven fabric PP, and binding antibody by covalent strategy had the potential to be developed as a commercial immunoassay platform.

  • 33.
    Kim, Nara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lienemann, Samuel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petsagkourakis, Ioannis
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mengistie, Desalegn
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Calif Polytech State Univ San Luis Obispo, CA 93407 USA.
    Kee, Seyoung
    Univ Auckland, New Zealand.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gueskine, Viktor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Leclere, Philippe
    Univ Mons, Belgium.
    Lazzaroni, Roberto
    Univ Mons, Belgium.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tybrandt, Klas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Elastic conducting polymer composites in thermoelectric modules2020In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 11, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid growth of wearables has created a demand for lightweight, elastic and conformal energy harvesting and storage devices. The conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) has shown great promise for thermoelectric generators, however, the thick layers of pristine poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) required for effective energy harvesting are too hard and brittle for seamless integration into wearables. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-elastomer composites have been developed to improve its mechanical properties, although so far without simultaneously achieving softness, high electrical conductivity, and stretchability. Here we report an aqueously processed poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-polyurethane-ionic liquid composite, which combines high conductivity (>140Scm(-1)) with superior stretchability (>600%), elasticity, and low Youngs modulus (<7MPa). The outstanding performance of this organic nanocomposite is the result of favorable percolation networks on the nano- and micro-scale and the plasticizing effect of the ionic liquid. The elastic thermoelectric material is implemented in the first reported intrinsically stretchable organic thermoelectric module. Though deformable thermoelectric materials are desirable for integrating thermoelectric devices into wearable electronics, typical thermoelectric materials are too brittle for practical application. Here, the authors report a high-performance elastic composite for stretchable thermoelectric modules.

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  • 34.
    Klenkar, Goran
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Brian, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Stengel, Gudrun
    Chalmers.
    Hook, Fredrik
    Chalmers.
    Piehler, Jacob
    University of Frankfurt.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Addressable adsorption of lipid vesicles and subsequent protein interaction studies2008In: BIOINTERPHASES, ISSN 1559-4106, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 29-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate a convenient chip platform for the addressable immobilization of protein-loaded vesicles on a microarray for parallelized, high-throughput analysis of lipid-protein systems. Self-sorting of the vesicles on the microarray was achieved through DNA bar coding of the vesicles and their hybridization to complementary strands, which are preimmobilized in defined array positions on the chip. Imaging surface plasmon resonance in ellipsometric mode was used to monitor vesicle immobilization, protein tethering, protein-protein interactions, and chip regeneration. The immobilization strategy proved highly specific and stable and presents a mild method for the anchoring of vesicles to predefined areas of a surface, while unspecific adsorption to both noncomplementary regions and background areas is nonexistent or, alternatively, undetectable. Furthermore, histidine-tagged receptors have been stably and functionally immobilized via bis-nitrilotriacetic acid chelators already present in the vesicle membranes. It was discovered though that online loading of proteins to immobilized vesicles leads to cross contamination of previously loaded vesicles and that it was necessary to load the vesicles offline in order to obtain pure protein populations on the vesicles. We have used this cross-binding effect to our benefit by coimmobilizing two receptor subunits in different ratios on the vesicle surface and successfully demonstrated ternary complex formation with their ligand. This approach is suitable for mechanistic studies of complex multicomponent analyses involving membrane-bound systems.

  • 35.
    Lander, Sanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Cellfion AB, Sweden.
    Pang, Jiu
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    Linköping University. Cellfion AB, Sweden.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Korhonen, Leena
    BillerudKorsnas AB, Sweden.
    Yang, Hongli
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Abrahamsson, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ding, Penghui
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gueskine, Viktor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mehandzhiyski, Alexandar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zozoulenko, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wågberg, Lars
    Linköping University. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Crispin, Reverant
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Controlling the rate of posolyte degradation in all-quinone aqueous organic redox flow batteries by sulfonated nanocellulose based membranes: The role of crossover and Michael addition2024In: Journal of Energy Storage, ISSN 2352-152X, E-ISSN 2352-1538, Vol. 83, article id 110338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aqueous organic redox flow battery (AORFB) is a technological route towards the large-scale sustainable energy storage. However, several factors need to be controlled to maintain the AORFB performance. Prevention of posolyte and negolyte cross-contamination in asymmetric AORFBs, one of the main causes of capacity decay, relies on their membranes' ability to prevent migration of the redox-active species between the two electrolytes. The barrier properties are often traded for a reduction in ionic conductivity which is crucial to enable the device operation. Another factor greatly affecting quinone-based AORFBs is the Michael addition reaction (MAR) on the charged posolyte, quinone, which has been identified as a major reason for all-quinone AORFBs performance deterioration. Herein, we investigate deterioration scenarios of an all-quinone AORFB using both experimental and computational methods. The study includes a series of membranes based on sulfonated cellulose nanofibrils and different membrane modifications. The layer-by-layer (LbL) surface modifications, i.e. the incorporation of inorganic materials and the reduction of the pore size of the sulfonated cellulose membranes, were all viable routes to reduce the passive diffusion permeability of membranes which correlated to an increased cycling stability of the battery. The kinetics of MAR on quinone was detected using NMR and its impact on the performance fading was modeled computationally. The localization of MAR close to the membrane, which can be assigned to the surface reactivity, affects the diffusion of MAR reagent and the deterioration dynamics of the present all-quinone AORFB.

  • 36.
    Lefevre, Mathilde
    et al.
    Univ Mons, Belgium; Univ Mons, Belgium.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Masai, Thibault
    Univ Mons, Belgium.
    Wattiez, Ruddy
    Univ Mons, Belgium.
    Leclere, Philippe
    Univ Mons, Belgium.
    Flammang, Patrick
    Univ Mons, Belgium.
    Hennebert, Elise
    Univ Mons, Belgium.
    Disentangling the Roles of Functional Domains in the Aggregation and Adsorption of the Multimodular Sea Star Adhesive Protein Sfp12021In: Marine Biotechnology, ISSN 1436-2228, E-ISSN 1436-2236, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 724-735Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sea stars can adhere to various underwater substrata using an adhesive secretion of which Sfp1 is a major component. Sfp1 is a multimodular protein composed of four subunits (Sfp1 Alpha, Beta, Delta, and Gamma) displaying different functional domains. We recombinantly produced two fragments of Sfp1 comprising most of its functional domains: the C-terminal part of the Beta subunit (rSfp1 Beta C-term) and the Delta subunit (rSfp1 Delta). Surface plasmon resonance analyses of protein adsorption onto different model surfaces showed that rSfp1 Beta C-term exhibits a significantly higher adsorption than the fibrinogen control on hydrophobic, hydrophilic protein-resistant, and charged self-assembled monolayers, while rSfp1 Delta adsorbed more on negatively charged and on protein-resistant surfaces compared to fibrinogen. Truncated recombinant rSfp1 Beta C-term proteins were produced in order to investigate the role of the different functional domains in the adsorption of this protein. The analysis of their adsorption capacities on glass showed that two mechanisms are involved in rSfp1 Beta C-term adsorption: (1) one mediated by the EGF-like domain and involving Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions, and (2) one mediated by the sequence of Sfp1 Beta with no homology with known functional domain in databases, in the presence of Na+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions.

  • 37.
    Li, Zaifang
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Huazhong Univ Sci and Technol, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Hengda
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hsiao, Ching-Lien
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yao, Yulong
    Univ Kentucky, KY 40506 USA.
    Xiao, Yiqun
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Shahi, Maryam
    Univ Kentucky, KY 40506 USA.
    Jin, Yingzhi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cruce, Alex
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jiang, Youyu
    Huazhong Univ Sci and Technol, Peoples R China.
    Meng, Wei
    Huazhong Univ Sci and Technol, Peoples R China.
    Qin, Fei
    Huazhong Univ Sci and Technol, Peoples R China.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fabiano, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lu, Xinhui
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brill, Joseph W.
    Univ Kentucky, KY 40506 USA.
    Zhou, Yinhua
    Huazhong Univ Sci and Technol, Peoples R China; South China Univ Technol, Peoples R China.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhang, Fengling
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A Free-Standing High-Output Power Density Thermoelectric Device Based on Structure-Ordered PEDOT:PSS2018In: Advanced Electronic Materials, E-ISSN 2199-160X, Vol. 4, no 2, article id 1700496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A free-standing high-output power density polymeric thermoelectric (TE) device is realized based on a highly conductive (approximate to 2500 S cm(-1)) structure-ordered poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate film (denoted as FS-PEDOT:PSS) with a Seebeck coefficient of 20.6 mu V K-1, an in-plane thermal conductivity of 0.64 W m(-1) K-1, and a peak power factor of 107 mu W K-2 m(-1) at room temperature. Under a small temperature gradient of 29 K, the TE device demonstrates a maximum output power density of 99 +/- 18.7 mu W cm(-2), which is the highest value achieved in pristine PEDOT:PSS based TE devices. In addition, a fivefold output power is demonstrated by series connecting five devices into a flexible thermoelectric module. The simplicity of assembling the films into flexible thermoelectric modules, the low out-of-plane thermal conductivity of 0.27 W m(-1) K-1, and free-standing feature indicates the potential to integrate the FS-PEDOT:PSS TE modules with textiles to power wearable electronics by harvesting human bodys heat. In addition to the high power factor, the high thermal stability of the FS-PEDOT:PSS films up to 250 degrees C is confirmed by in situ temperature-dependent X-ray diffraction and grazing incident wide angle X-ray scattering, which makes the FS-PEDOT:PSS films promising candidates for thermoelectric applications.

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  • 38.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kariis, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundgren, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Spetz, Anita.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Winquist, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Recent developments in field-effect gas sensors1995In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 23, no 2-3, p. 127-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some of the ongoing studies at our laboratory of gas-sensitive field-effect devices with catalytic metal gates are reviewed. More particularly, we discuss the use of such devices in so-called electronic noses due to the possibility of changing the selectivity patterns of the devices by the choice of catalytic metal and operation temperature. Several examples of the application of electronic noses consisting of field-effect devices in combination with metal oxide-based sensors are given. Finally, a summary is given of some remaining scientific problems and studies related to the understanding and development of gas-sensitive field-effect devices.

  • 39.
    Maleshlijski, S.
    et al.
    Ruhr University of Bochum, Germany; Karlsruhe Institute Technology, Germany; Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Sendra, G. H.
    Ruhr University of Bochum, Germany; Karlsruhe Institute Technology, Germany; Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Aldred, N.
    Newcastle University, England.
    Clare, A. S.
    Newcastle University, England.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Nanyang Technology University, Singapore.
    Grunze, M.
    Karlsruhe Institute Technology, Germany; Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosenhahn, A.
    Ruhr University of Bochum, Germany; Karlsruhe Institute Technology, Germany; Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Imaging SPR combined with stereoscopic 3D tracking to study barnacle cyprid-surface interactions2016In: Surface Science, ISSN 0039-6028, E-ISSN 1879-2758, Vol. 643, p. 172-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Barnacle larvae (cyprids) explore surfaces to identify suitable settlement sites. This process is selective, and cyprids respond to numerous surface cues. To better understand the settlement process, it is desirable to simultaneously monitor both the surface exploration behavior and any close interactions with the surface. Stereoscopic 3D tracking of the cyprids provides quantitative access to surface exploration and pre-settlement rituals. Imaging surface plasmon resonance (SPR) reveals any interactions with the surfaces, such as surface inspection during bipedal walking and deposition of temporary adhesives. We report on a combination of both techniques to bring together information on swimming behavior in the vicinity of the interface and physical interactions of the cyprid with the surface. The technical requirements are described, and we applied the setup to cyprids of Balanus amphitrite. Initial data shows the applicability of the combined instrument to correlate exploration and touchdown events on surfaces with different chemical termination. (C) 2015 Published by Elsevier B.V.

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  • 40.
    Mitraka, Evangelia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gryszel, Maciej
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Singh, Amritpal
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Warczak, Magdalena
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mitrakas, Manassis
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zozoulenko, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Glowacki, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen Peroxide with Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) Electrodes2019In: Advanced Sustainable Systems, ISSN 2366-7486, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 1-6, article id 1800110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrocatalysis for energy‐efficient chemical transformations is a central concept behind sustainable technologies. Numerous efforts focus on synthesizing hydrogen peroxide, a major industrial chemical and potential fuel, using simple and green methods. Electrochemical synthesis of peroxide is a promising route. Herein it is demonstrated that the conducting polymer poly(3,4‐ethylenedioxythiophene), PEDOT, is an efficient and selective heterogeneous catalyst for the direct reduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide. While many metallic catalysts are known to generate peroxide, they subsequently catalyze decomposition of peroxide to water. PEDOT electrodes can support continuous generation of high concentrations of peroxide with Faraday efficiency remaining close to 100%. The mechanisms of PEDOT‐catalyzed reduction of O2 to H2O2 using in situ spectroscopic techniques and theoretical calculations, which both corroborate the existence of a chemisorbed reactive intermediate on the polymer chains that kinetically favors the selective reduction reaction to H2O2, are explored. These results offer a viable method for peroxide electrosynthesis and open new possibilities for intrinsic catalytic properties of conducting polymers.

  • 41.
    Mitraka, Evangelia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jonsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Oxygen-induced doping on reduced PEDOT2017In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, Vol. 5, no 9, p. 4404-4412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) has shown promise as air electrode in renewable energy technologies like metal-air batteries and fuel cells. PEDOT is based on atomic elements of high abundance and is synthesized at low temperature from solution. The mechanism of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) over chemically polymerized PEDOT: Cl still remains controversial with eventual role of transition metal impurities. However, regardless of the mechanistic route, we here demonstrate yet another key active role of PEDOT in the ORR mechanism. Our study demonstrates the decoupling of conductivity (intrinsic property) from electrocatalysis (as an extrinsic phenomenon) yielding the evidence of doping of the polymer by oxygen during ORR. Hence, the PEDOT electrode is electrochemically reduced (undoped) in the voltage range of ORR regime, but O-2 keeps it conducting; ensuring PEDOT to act as an electrode for the ORR. The interaction of oxygen with the polymer electrode is investigated with a battery of spectroscopic techniques.

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  • 42.
    Nagy, Bela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Campana, Mario
    STFC, England.
    Khaydukov, Yury N.
    Max Planck Inst Festkorpetforsch, Germany; Heinz Maier Leibnitz Zentrum MLZ, Germany.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Structure and pH-Induced Swelling of Polymer Films Prepared from Sequentially Grafted Polyelectrolytes2022In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 1725-1737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have prepared a series of ampholytic polymer films, using a self-initiated photografting and photopolymerization (SI-PGP) method to sequentially polymerize first anionic (deuterated methacrylic acid (dMAA)) and thereafter cationic (2-aminoethyl methacrylate (AEMA)) monomers to investigate the SI-PGP grafting process. Dry films were investigated by ellipsometry, X-ray, and neutron reflectometry, and their swelling was followed over a pH range from 4.5 to 10.5 with spectroscopic ellipsometry. The deuterated monomer allows us to separate the distributions of the two components by neutron reflectometry. Growth of both polymers proceeds via grafting of solution-polymerized fragments to the surface, and also the second layer is primarily grafted to the substrate and not as a continuation of the existing chains. The polymer films are stratified, with one layer of near 1:1 composition and the other layer enriched in one component and located either above or below the former layer. The ellipsometry results show swelling transitions at low and high pH but with no systematic variation in the pH values where these transitions occur. The results suggest that grafting density in SI-PGP-prepared homopolymers could be increased via repeated polymerization steps, but that this process does not necessarily increase the average chain length.

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  • 43.
    Nagy, Bela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fragneto, Giovanna
    Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Structure of Self-Initiated Photopolymerized Films: A Comparison of Models2022In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 38, no 45, p. 14004-14015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-initiated photografting and photopolymerization (SI-PGP) uses UV illumination to graft polymers to surfaces without additional photoinitiators using the monomers as initiators, “inimers”. A wider use of this method is obstructed by a lack of understanding of the resulting, presumably heterogeneous, polymer structure and of the parallel degradation under continuous UV illumination. We have used neutron reflectometry to investigate the structure of hydrated SI-PGP-prepared poly(HEMA-co-PEG10MA) (poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-(ethylene glycol)10 methacrylate)) films and compared parabolic, sigmoidal, and Gaussian models for the polymer volume fraction distributions. Results from fitting these models to the data suggest that either model can be used to approximate the volume fraction profile to similar accuracy. In addition, a second layer of deuterated poly(methacrylic acid) (poly(dMAA)) was grafted over the existing poly(HEMA-co-PEG10MA) layer, and the resulting double-grafted films were also studied by neutron reflectometry to shed light on the UV-polymerization process and the inevitable UV-induced degradation which competes with the grafting.

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  • 44.
    Nugraha, Roni
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Finlay, John A.
    University of Birmingham, England.
    Hill, Sophie
    University of Birmingham, England.
    Fyrner, Timmy
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Yandi, Wetra
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Callow, Maureen E.
    University of Birmingham, England.
    Callow, James A.
    University of Birmingham, England.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Antifouling properties of oligo(lactose)-based self-assembled monolayers2015In: Biofouling (Print), ISSN 0892-7014, E-ISSN 1029-2454, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 123-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The antifouling (AF) properties of oligo(lactose)-based self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), using four different proteins, zoospores of the green alga Ulva linza and cells of the diatom Navicula incerta, were investigated. The SAM-forming alkylthiols, which contained 1, 2 or 3 lactose units, showed significant variation in AF properties, with no differences in wettability. Non-specific adsorption of albumin and pepsin was low on all surfaces. Adsorption of lysozyme and fibrinogen decreased with increasing number of lactose units in the SAM, in agreement with the generally observed phenomenon that thicker hydrated layers provide higher barriers to protein adsorption. Settlement of spores of U. linza followed an opposite trend, being greater on the bulkier, more hydrated SAMs. These SAMs are more ordered for the larger saccharide units, and it is therefore hypothesized that the degree of order, and differences in crystallinity or stiffness between the surfaces, is an important parameter regulating spore settlement on these surfaces.

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  • 45.
    Nygren, Patrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundqvist, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Biotechnology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Broo, Klas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Biotechnology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jonsson, Bengt-Harald
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Biotechnology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Secondary structure in de novo designed peptides induced by electrostatic interaction with particles and membranes.2011Conference paper (Other academic)
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  • 46.
    Nygren, Patrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundqvist, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Biotechnology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jonsson, Bengt-Harald
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Biotechnology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Secondary Structure in de Novo Designed Peptides Induced by Electrostatic Interaction with a Lipid Bilayer Membrane2010In: LANGMUIR, ISSN 0743-7463, Vol. 26, no 9, p. 6437-6448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We show that it is possible to induce a defined secondary structure in de nova designed peptides upon electrostatic attachment to negatively charged lipid bilayer vesicles without partitioning of the peptides into the membrane, and that the secondary structure can be varied via small changes in the primary amino acid sequence of the peptides. The peptides have a random-coil conformation in solution, and results from far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrate that the structure induced by the interaction with silica nanoparticles is solely alpha-helical and also strongly pH-dependent. The present study shows that negatively charged vesicles, to which the peptides are electrostatically adsorbed via cationic amino acid residues, induce either alpha-helices or beta-sheets and that the conformation is dependent on both lipid composition and variations in peptide primary structure. The pH-dependence of the vesicle-induced peptide secondary structure is weak, which correlates well with small differences in the vesicles electrophoretic mobility, and thus the surface charge, as the pH is varied.

  • 47.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wanzhu, Cai
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ever Aguirre, Luis
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wang, Chuan Fei
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The contraction of PEDOT films formed on a macromolecular liquid-like surface2018In: Journal of Materials Chemistry C, ISSN 2050-7526, E-ISSN 2050-7534, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 654-660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vapour phase polymerized (VPP) PEDOT obtained using triblock copolymer PEG-PPG-PEG: Fe(III) tosylate polymeric oxidative layers has shown record-high conductivity and unique thermoelectric properties. These properties are related to the molecular weight, morphology and doping of PEDOT. Here we show that in its unwashed condition, the PEDOT chain adopts a neutral benzenoid conformation. The polymer chain converts into the charged quinoid structure after the removal of oxidizers with solvent washing. X-ray diffraction results suggest that the dopant is also incorporated into the packed polymer after the washing process. The changes in the chain structure and doping lead to the characteristic polaron and bipolaron absorption in the 800 and 1200 nm range. We observed a large contraction of the film after washing that is likely due to these changes, along with the removal of excessive polymer: oxidizer trapped in the PEDOT matrix. The contraction of films can be completely suppressed by mechanical clamping. PEDOT films without contraction show both a higher conductivity and higher optical transparency.

  • 48.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Musumeci, Chiara
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Imaging the Phase Separation Between PEDOT and Polyelectrolytes During Processing of Highly Conductive PEDOT:PSS Films2015In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 7, no 35, p. 19764-19773Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Treating PEDOT:PSS (Clevios) with certain additives, such as ethylene glycol (EG), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and sorbitol, has been shown to increase the conductivity of this material from roughly 1 to nearly 1000 S/cm. Using a slow drying method, we show that the additive induced a separation between free PSS and reorganized PEDOT:PSS complexes in the highly conductive PEDOT:PSS films. Additives (DMSO, DEG, and PEG 400) were included in PEDOT:PSS aqueous dispersions at large volume fractions. The mixtures were slowly dried under room conditions. During drying, the evaporation of water resulted in an additive-rich solvent mixture from which the reorganized PEDOT:PSS complexes aggregated " into a dense film while free PSS remained in the solution. Upon complete drying, PSS formed a transparent rim film around the conducting PEDOT film. The chemical compositions of the two phases were studied using an infrared microscope. This removal of PSS resulted in more compact packing of PEDOT molecules, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction measurements. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscope measurements suggested the enrichment of PEDOT on the film surface after PSS separation. Through a simple drying process in an additive-containing dispersion, the conductivity of PEDOT films increased from 0.1 to 200-400 S/cm. Through this method, we confirmed the existence of two phases in additive-treated and highly conductive PEDOT:PSS films. The proper separation between PSS and PEDOT will be of relevance in designing strategies to process high-performance plastic electrodes.

  • 49.
    Petrone, Luigi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Aldred, Nick
    Newcastle University, England.
    Emami, Kaveh
    Newcastle University, England.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Clare, Anthony S.
    Newcastle University, England.
    Chemistry-specific surface adsorption of the barnacle settlement-inducing protein complex2015In: Interface Focus, ISSN 2042-8898, E-ISSN 2042-8901, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 20140047-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gregarious settlement in barnacle larvae (cyprids) is induced by a contact pheromone, the settlement-inducing protein complex (SIPC). The SIPC has been identified both in the cuticle of adult barnacles and in the temporary adhesive secretion (footprint) of cyprids. Besides acting as a settlement inducer, the presence of the SIPC in footprints points to its additional involvement in the adhesion process. SIPC adsorption behaviour was therefore investigated on a series of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) by surface plasmon resonance at the pH of seawater (8.3). Fibrinogen and alpha(2)-macroglobulin (A2M) (blood complement protease inhibitors with which the SIPC shares 29% sequence homology) were used in the adsorption experiments as positive and negative standards, respectively. The mass uptake of the SIPC was comparable to that of fibrinogen, with adsorption observed even on the protein-resistant oligo(ethylene glycol) surface. Notably, on the positively charged SAM the SIPC showed a kinetic overshoot, indicating a metastable configuration causing the amount of adsorbed protein to temporarily exceed its equilibrium value. A2M adsorption was low or negligible on all SAMs tested, except for the positively charged surface, indicating that A2M adsorption is mainly driven by electrostatics. Evaluation of SIPC non-specific adsorption kinetics revealed that it adsorbed irreversibly and non-cooperatively on all surfaces tested.

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  • 50.
    Petrone, Luigi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Di Fino, Alessio
    Newcastle University.
    Aldred, Nick
    Newcastle University.
    Sukkaew, Pitsiri
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Clare, Anthony S
    Newcastle University.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Effects of surface charge and Gibbs surface energy on the settlement behaviour of barnacle cyprids (Balanus amphitrite)2011In: Biofouling (Print), ISSN 0892-7014, E-ISSN 1029-2454, Vol. 27, no 9, p. 1043-1055Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gibbs surface energy has long been considered to be an important parameter in the design of fouling-resistant surfaces for marine applications. Rigorous testing of the hypothesis that settlement is related to Gibbs surface energy however has never been accomplished, due mainly to practical limitations imposed by the necessary combination of surface engineering and biological evaluation methods. In this article, the effects of surface charge and Gibbs surface energy on the settlement of cyprids of an important fouling barnacle, Balanus amphitrite, were evaluated. Settlement assays were conducted on a range of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) (CH(3)-, OH-, COOH-, N(CH(3))(3)(+)-, NH(2)-terminated), presented in gold-coated polystyrene well plates, varying in terms of their surface charge and Gibbs surface energy. Contrary to contemporary theory, settlement was not increased by high-energy surfaces, rather the opposite was found to be the case with cyprids settling in greater numbers on a low-energy CH(3)- SAM compared to a high-energy OH- SAM. Settlement was also greater on negatively-charged SAMs, compared to neutral and positively-charged SAMs. These findings are discussed in the context of data drawn from surfaces that varied in multiple characteristics simultaneously, as have been used previously for such experiments. The finding that surface charge, rather than total surface energy, may be responsible for surface selection by cyprids, will have significant implications for the design of future fouling-resistant materials.

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