liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    H Labrador, Roberto
    et al.
    Molecular Chemistry Applied Institute, Polytechnical University of Valencia. Camino de Vera, s/n. þ34 963877343, 46022 Valencia, Spain.
    Olsson, John
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Winquist, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Martinez-Manez, Ramon
    University Politecn Valencia.
    Sotoa, Juan
    Molecular Chemistry Applied Institute, Polytechnical University of Valencia. Camino de Vera, s/n. þ34 963877343, 46022 Valencia, Spain.
    Determination of Bisulfites in Wines with an Electronic Tongue Based on Pulse Voltammetry2009In: Electroanalysis, ISSN 1040-0397, E-ISSN 1521-4109, Vol. 21, no 3-5, p. 612-617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An electronic tongue (ET) based on pulse voltammetry is used to predict concentrations of bisulfites in wine samples. The ET array consists of four working electrodes (gold, rhodium, platinum and stainless steel) encapsulated into a stainless steel cylinder used at the same time as both the body of the ET system and the pseudoreference/counter electrode. The ET device is additionally equipped with a self-polishing system. Multivariate analysis including Cross validation and partial least square (PLS) techniques are applied for data management and prediction models building. Ascorbic acid and histamine have also been included in the predictive analysis.

  • 2.
    Olsson, John
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Characterization of a Voltammetric Electronic Tongue2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Electronic tongues were developed some ten years ago. These systems consist of an array of nonspecific sensors and a signal processing unit. The sensor signals are processed by pattern recognition methods which makes possible the extraction of specific properties from the sample. Depending on the calibration, attributes such as quality or taste can be determined. These systems also detect changes in the sample that they are not calibrated for which makes possible the detection of anomalous occurrences. Such sensor systems are suitable for process control and surveillance. Important factors are the sensitivity and stability, specifically the sensor's ability to respond to small changes and to provide true and reproducible readings over time. Problems with sensor stability are commonly referred to as drift. The major topic of this thesis is the improvement of long term stability for electronic tongues used in liquid process applications.

    Drift counteractions, such as renewal of the electrode surface by polishing, was compared with mathematical correction methods. Since drift is induced by the environment of the sensor, mathematical correctional actions must include reference samples and the induced drift must be identical between measurements. These conditions restrict and complicate the use of mathematical drift counteractions. It was found that mechanical polishing renewed the electrode surfaces, and that the induced drift was unique for each sample. The sample induced drift pattern can be treated as information from the sample, but only if the sensors are renewable in a repeatable way. Applications where polishing the electrode surfaces are necessary to obtain repeatable analyses are described, such as the detection of urea and measurements in corrosive environments such as wine.

    Electrochemical oxidation of urea in water is difficult to use for analytical purposes because of residues left on the electrode surface. An important result from this thesis is that mechanical cleaning of the electrodes between samples gives sensor signals that are both repeatable and proportional to the concentrations of urea and glucose. An experimental design was employed for optimal effect of the calibration of urea in the presence of glucose as a disturbance in the sample. The goal was to minimize the correlation between the two analytes. This made possible the prediction of both analyte concentrations.

    Wine is a complex sample to analyze with many sources of disturbances for electrochemical measurements. The carefully planned experiments and calibrations reported in this thesis minimized covariance and background effects. A method for prediction of bisulfite, histamine and ascorbic acid concentrations in wine was developed. The method was tested with spiked samples of white-, red-, rose-wines and even apple juice. The reproducibility of the measurements was excellent. Since polishing renewed the electrodes between measurements, a validation performed one month after the calibration was also predicted with good results. This demonstrated that the renewal of the electrodes eliminated special requirements for maintenance and storage of the sensor.

    Drinking water surveillance has been performed with an electronic tongue. The potential of using a voltammetric electronic tongue for multicomponent analysis of compounds in drinking water has been evaluated. By using such a non-selective sensor it was possible to detect anomalies without the need of a specific sensor for each type of event. The device can be calibrated for the most likely events, and it can also be used for sensing and alarm when exceptional events occur.

    The detection of surface active species like detergents is normally done by titration. An in-line sensor that could control the washing process by detecting the concentrations of detergents during the different steps in a wash cycle could enhance the performance of washing machines. An electronic tongue was used to predict concentrations of detergents in samples from different stages in the washing procedure. The tongue was compared with a much simpler conductivity meter, and due to the covariation of supporting electrolyte, both sensors were able to predict concentrations of ionic surfactants. The electronic tongue showed promising results in predicting also non ionic surfactants where the conductivity meter failed. The detection mechanism was probably due to shielding the electrode surface from electro active species in the samples.

    List of papers
    1. A self polishing electronic tongue
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A self polishing electronic tongue
    2006 (English)In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 118, no 1-2, p. 461-465Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    An investigation to obtain reproducible measurements with a pulse voltammetric electronic tongue has lead to the development of self polishing device. A grit paper covered bar rotating over the working electrodes is performing the polishing, to avoid measurements while the polishing bar covers the electrodes an angular decoder is fitted. Measurements in buffer, 2 mM K3[Fe(CN)6] and a buffered tea samples shows that polishing reduces drift, sensitivity decreases with electrode fouling, pre-treatment or conditioning of electrodes post polishing must be optimised concerning the analyte. Also found was that drift due to electrode fouling is a repeatable mechanism which pattern can be used to increase information about the analyte. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    Keywords
    Drift, Electronic tongue, Renewable electrodes, Sensitivity, Voltammetry
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-50101 (URN)10.1016/j.snb.2006.04.042 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12
    2. Determination of detergents in washing machine wastewater with a voltammetric electronic tongue
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Determination of detergents in washing machine wastewater with a voltammetric electronic tongue
    2008 (English)In: Talanta: The International Journal of Pure and Applied Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0039-9140, E-ISSN 1873-3573, Vol. 76, no 1, p. 91-95Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A voltammetric electronic tongue (ET) and a conductivity meter were used to predict amounts of detergents in process water from washing machines. The amount of detergent in over sixty samples was also determined by a HPLC reference method. Prediction was more accurate for the electronic tongue, but both techniques could be used. The composition of the detergent, e.g. supporting electrolyte, is an important factor for the ability to predict the detergent quantity by conductivity. Also two different surfactants, alkyl benzyl sulfonate (ABS) and etoxylated fatty alcohol (EOA), were fingerprinted by the HPLC. Their behaviour during the wash cycle differs from each other, ABS rinses away in the same proportions as the supporting electrolyte, but EOA appears to stay within the machine and laundry. Prediction models for ABS are accurate both with ET and conductivity meter, mostly due to the correlation with supporting electrolyte. The behaviour of EOA, with almost no correlation to the supporting electrolyte makes it difficult to predict using conductivity but ET prediction models give promising indications of its capabilities. © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    Keywords
    Detergents, Electronic tongue, HPLC, Surfactants
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-45944 (URN)10.1016/j.talanta.2008.02.028 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    3. Determination of Bisulfites in Wines with an Electronic Tongue Based on Pulse Voltammetry
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Determination of Bisulfites in Wines with an Electronic Tongue Based on Pulse Voltammetry
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Electroanalysis, ISSN 1040-0397, E-ISSN 1521-4109, Vol. 21, no 3-5, p. 612-617Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    An electronic tongue (ET) based on pulse voltammetry is used to predict concentrations of bisulfites in wine samples. The ET array consists of four working electrodes (gold, rhodium, platinum and stainless steel) encapsulated into a stainless steel cylinder used at the same time as both the body of the ET system and the pseudoreference/counter electrode. The ET device is additionally equipped with a self-polishing system. Multivariate analysis including Cross validation and partial least square (PLS) techniques are applied for data management and prediction models building. Ascorbic acid and histamine have also been included in the predictive analysis.

    Keywords
    Electronic tongue, Pulse voltammetry, Bisulfite, Prediction model, PLS
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17513 (URN)10.1002/elan.200804457 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-03-27 Created: 2009-03-27 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    4. A Flow System for Urea and Glucose Measurement with a Self Polishing Electronic Tongue
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Flow System for Urea and Glucose Measurement with a Self Polishing Electronic Tongue
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A self polishing voltammetric electronic tongue was evaluated for simultaneousl prediction of urea and glucose concentrations in phosphate buffer in a flow system. The voltammetric electronic tongue consisted of three working electrodes (gold, platinum and rhodium) and a counter electrode, also acting as reference electrode. The flowsystem contained five valves, controlled by a computer and a peristaltic pump. Two batches of sample standards were used; one for calibration and the other for validation. The system could predict concentrations of urea and glucose in the interval 0 – 20 mM in the validation batch. No significant difference between the two batches was seen. The self polishing approach makes the system in principle maintenance free. With a large potential use in hemodialysis.

    Keywords
    Voltammetry, electronic tongue, urea, glucose, multivariate data analysis
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-65409 (URN)
    Available from: 2011-02-07 Created: 2011-02-07 Last updated: 2011-02-07Bibliographically approved
    5. Multicomponent analysis of drinking water by a voltammetric electronic tongue
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multicomponent analysis of drinking water by a voltammetric electronic tongue
    2011 (English)In: Analytica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0003-2670, E-ISSN 1873-4324, Vol. 683, no 2, p. 192-197Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A voltammetric electronic tongue is described that was used for multicomponent analysis of drinking water. Measurements were performed on drinking water from a tap and injections of the compounds NaCl, NaN3, NaHSO3, ascorbic acid, NaOCl and yeast suspensions could be identified. A PLS based model was developed for the simultaneously prediction of identification and concentration of the compounds NaCl, NaHSO3 and NaOCl .By utilizing this type of nonselective sensor technique for water quality surveillance, it will be feasible to detect a plurality of events without the need of a specific sensor for each type of event.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2011
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-65410 (URN)10.1016/j.aca.2010.10.027 (DOI)000286854700006 ()
    Available from: 2011-02-07 Created: 2011-02-07 Last updated: 2017-12-11
    6. In situ studies of electrode regeneration by polishing during measurements
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>In situ studies of electrode regeneration by polishing during measurements
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A general problem for all electronic tongues (and for most other sensor systems), especially when measuring in crude and complex media, is electrode fouling. The possibility of using a selfpolishing voltammetric electronic tongue has been investigated using cyclic voltammetry. The tested compounds were potassium hexacyanoferrat(II) (K4Fe(CN)6) and urea, respectively. Effects of short term drift, directly after polishing before the electrode is completely equilibrated, are repeatable.

    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-65412 (URN)
    Available from: 2011-02-07 Created: 2011-02-07 Last updated: 2011-02-07Bibliographically approved
  • 3.
    Olsson, John
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ivarsson, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Winquist, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics.
    Determination of detergents in washing machine wastewater with a voltammetric electronic tongue2008In: Talanta: The International Journal of Pure and Applied Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0039-9140, E-ISSN 1873-3573, Vol. 76, no 1, p. 91-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A voltammetric electronic tongue (ET) and a conductivity meter were used to predict amounts of detergents in process water from washing machines. The amount of detergent in over sixty samples was also determined by a HPLC reference method. Prediction was more accurate for the electronic tongue, but both techniques could be used. The composition of the detergent, e.g. supporting electrolyte, is an important factor for the ability to predict the detergent quantity by conductivity. Also two different surfactants, alkyl benzyl sulfonate (ABS) and etoxylated fatty alcohol (EOA), were fingerprinted by the HPLC. Their behaviour during the wash cycle differs from each other, ABS rinses away in the same proportions as the supporting electrolyte, but EOA appears to stay within the machine and laundry. Prediction models for ABS are accurate both with ET and conductivity meter, mostly due to the correlation with supporting electrolyte. The behaviour of EOA, with almost no correlation to the supporting electrolyte makes it difficult to predict using conductivity but ET prediction models give promising indications of its capabilities. © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Olsson, John
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Winquist, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Flow System for Urea and Glucose Measurement with a Self Polishing Electronic TongueManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A self polishing voltammetric electronic tongue was evaluated for simultaneousl prediction of urea and glucose concentrations in phosphate buffer in a flow system. The voltammetric electronic tongue consisted of three working electrodes (gold, platinum and rhodium) and a counter electrode, also acting as reference electrode. The flowsystem contained five valves, controlled by a computer and a peristaltic pump. Two batches of sample standards were used; one for calibration and the other for validation. The system could predict concentrations of urea and glucose in the interval 0 – 20 mM in the validation batch. No significant difference between the two batches was seen. The self polishing approach makes the system in principle maintenance free. With a large potential use in hemodialysis.

  • 5.
    Olsson, John
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Winquist, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    A self polishing electronic tongue2006In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 118, no 1-2, p. 461-465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An investigation to obtain reproducible measurements with a pulse voltammetric electronic tongue has lead to the development of self polishing device. A grit paper covered bar rotating over the working electrodes is performing the polishing, to avoid measurements while the polishing bar covers the electrodes an angular decoder is fitted. Measurements in buffer, 2 mM K3[Fe(CN)6] and a buffered tea samples shows that polishing reduces drift, sensitivity decreases with electrode fouling, pre-treatment or conditioning of electrodes post polishing must be optimised concerning the analyte. Also found was that drift due to electrode fouling is a repeatable mechanism which pattern can be used to increase information about the analyte. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 6.
    Olsson, John
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Winquist, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    In situ studies of electrode regeneration by polishing during measurementsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A general problem for all electronic tongues (and for most other sensor systems), especially when measuring in crude and complex media, is electrode fouling. The possibility of using a selfpolishing voltammetric electronic tongue has been investigated using cyclic voltammetry. The tested compounds were potassium hexacyanoferrat(II) (K4Fe(CN)6) and urea, respectively. Effects of short term drift, directly after polishing before the electrode is completely equilibrated, are repeatable.

  • 7.
    Winquist, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Olsson, John
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Multicomponent analysis of drinking water by a voltammetric electronic tongue2011In: Analytica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0003-2670, E-ISSN 1873-4324, Vol. 683, no 2, p. 192-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A voltammetric electronic tongue is described that was used for multicomponent analysis of drinking water. Measurements were performed on drinking water from a tap and injections of the compounds NaCl, NaN3, NaHSO3, ascorbic acid, NaOCl and yeast suspensions could be identified. A PLS based model was developed for the simultaneously prediction of identification and concentration of the compounds NaCl, NaHSO3 and NaOCl .By utilizing this type of nonselective sensor technique for water quality surveillance, it will be feasible to detect a plurality of events without the need of a specific sensor for each type of event.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf