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  • 1.
    Abdalla, Maie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of General Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Norblad, Rickard
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Olsson, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Landerholm, Kalle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Surgery, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Söderholm, Johan D.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Surgery, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Anorectal Function After Ileo-Rectal Anastomosis Is Better than Pelvic Pouch in Selected Ulcerative Colitis Patients2019In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: With a lifelong perspective, 12% of ulcerative colitis patients will need a colectomy. Further reconstruction via ileo-rectal anastomosis or pouch can be affected by patients' perspective of their quality of life after surgery.

    AIM: To assess the function and quality of life after restorative procedures with either ileo-rectal anastomosis or ileal pouch-anal anastomosis in relation to the inflammatory activity on endoscopy and in biopsies.

    METHOD: A total of 143 UC patients operated with subtotal colectomy and ileo-rectal anastomosis or pouches between 1992 and 2006 at Linköping University Hospital were invited to participate. Those who completed the validated questionnaires (Öresland score, SF-36, Short Health Scale) were offered an endoscopic evaluation including multiple biopsies. Associations between anorectal function and quality of life with type of restorative procedure and severity of endoscopic and histopathologic grading of inflammation were evaluated.

    RESULTS: Some 77 (53.9%) eligible patients completed questionnaires, of these 68 (88.3%) underwent endoscopic evaluation after a median follow-up of 12.5 (range 3.5-19.4) years after restorative procedure. Patients with ileo-rectal anastomosis reported better overall Öresland score: median = 3 (IQR 2-5) for ileo-rectal anastomosis (n = 38) and 10 (IQR 5-15) for pouch patients (n = 39) (p < 0.001). Anorectal function (Öresland score) and endoscopic findings (Baron-Ginsberg score) were positively correlated in pouch patients (tau: 0.28, p = 0.006).

    CONCLUSION: Patients operated with ileo-rectal anastomosis reported better continence compared to pouches. Minor differences were noted regarding the quality of life. Ileo-rectal anastomosis is a valid option for properly selected ulcerative colitis patients if strict postoperative endoscopic surveillance is carried out.

  • 2.
    Ahle, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Drott, Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Epidemiology and Trends of Necrotizing Enterocolitis in Sweden: 1987-20092013In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 132, no 2, p. E443-E451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate temporal, seasonal, and geographic variations in the incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and its relation to early infant survival in the Swedish population and in subgroups based on gestational age, birth weight, and gender. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMETHODS: In the Swedish birth cohort of 1987 through 2009 all children with a diagnosis of NEC were identified in the National Patient Register, the Swedish Medical Birth Register, and the National Cause of Death Register. NEC incidence, early mortality, and seasonality were analyzed with descriptive statistics, Poisson regression, and auto regression. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESULTS: The overall incidence of NEC was 3.4 in 10 000 live births, higher in boys than in girls (incidence rate ratio 1.22, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.40, P = .005), with a peak in November and a trough in May, and increased with an average of similar to 5% a year during the study period. In most subgroups, except the most immature, an initial decrease was followed by a steady increase. Seven-day mortality decreased strongly in all subgroups over the entire study period (annual incidence rate ratio 0.96, 95% confidence interval 0.95-0.96, P andlt; .001). This was especially marked in the most premature and low birth weight infants. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCONCLUSIONS: After an initial decrease, the incidence of NEC has increased in Sweden during the last decades. An association with the concurrent dramatically improved early survival seems likely.

  • 3.
    Ahle, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Drott, Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Elfvin, Anders
    Department of Pediatrics, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Roland E.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Surgery, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Maternal, fetal and perinatal factors associated with necrotizing enterocolitis in Sweden: A national case-control study2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 3, article id e0194352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To analyze associations of maternal, fetal, gestational, and perinatal factors with necrotizing enterocolitis in a matched case-control study based on routinely collected, nationwide register data.

    Study design

    All infants born in 1987 through 2009 with a diagnosis of necrotizing enterocolitis in any of the Swedish national health care registers were identified. For each case up to 6 controls, matched for birth year and gestational age, were selected. The resulting study population consisted of 720 cases and 3,567 controls. Information on socioeconomic data about the mother, maternal morbidity, pregnancy related diagnoses, perinatal diagnoses of the infant, and procedures in the perinatal period, was obtained for all cases and controls and analyzed with univariable and multivariable logistic regressions for the whole study population as well as for subgroups according to gestational age.

    Results

    In the study population as a whole, we found independent positive associations with necrotizing enterocolitis for isoimmunization, fetal distress, cesarean section, neonatal bacterial infection including sepsis, erythrocyte transfusion, persistent ductus arteriosus, cardiac malformation, gastrointestinal malformation, and chromosomal abnormality. Negative associations were found for maternal weight, preeclampsia, maternal urinary infection, premature rupture of the membranes, and birthweight. Different patterns of associations were seen in the subgroups of different gestational age.

    Conclusion

    With some interesting exceptions, especially in negative associations, the results of this large, population based study, are in keeping with earlier studies. Although restrained by the limitations of register data, the findings mirror conceivable pathophysiological processes and underline that NEC is a multifactorial disease.

  • 4.
    Andersson, M.
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, County Hospital Ryhov, 551 85 Jönköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, Rolland E
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery .
    The appendicitis inflammatory response score: A tool for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis that outperforms the Alvarado score2008In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 32, no 8, p. 1843-1849Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The clinical diagnosis of appendicitis is a subjective synthesis of information from variables with ill-defined diagnostic value. This process could be improved by using a scoring system that includes objective variables that reflect the inflammatory response. This study describes the construction and evaluation of a new clinical appendicitis score. Methods: Data were collected prospectively from 545 patients admitted for suspected appendicitis at four hospitals. The score was constructed from eight variables with independent diagnostic value (right-lower-quadrant pain, rebound tenderness, muscular defense, WBC count, proportion neutrophils, CRP, body temperature, and vomiting) in 316 randomly selected patients and evaluated on the remaining 229 patients. Ordered logistic regression was used to obtain a high discriminating power with focus on advanced appendicitis. Diagnostic performance was compared with the Alvarado score. Results: The ROC area of the new score was 0.97 for advanced appendicitis and 0.93 for all appendicitis compared with 0.92 (p = 0.0027) and 0.88 (p = 0.0007), respectively, for the Alvarado score. Sixty-three percent of the patients were classified into the low- or high-probability group with an accuracy of 97.2%, leaving 37% for further investigation. Seventy-three percent of the nonappendicitis patients, 67% of the advanced appendicitis, and 37% of all appendicitis patients were correctly classified into the low- and high-probability zone, respectively. Conclusion: This simple clinical score can correctly classify the majority of patients with suspected appendicitis, leaving the need for diagnostic imaging or diagnostic laparoscopy to the smaller group of patients with an indeterminate scoring result. © 2008 Société Internationale de Chirurgie.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Manne
    et al.
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden .
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Correction: The Appendicitis Inflammatory Response Score: A Tool for the Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis that Outperforms the Alvarado Score (vol 32, pg 1843–1849, 2008, DOI 10.1007/s00268-008-9649-y2012In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 36, no 9, p. 2269-2270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 6.
    Andersson, Manne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Routine versus selective diagnostic imaging in patients with intermediate probability of acute appendicitis: A randomised controlled multicentre study2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Diagnostic imaging is increasingly used in patients with suspected appendicitis, with increased costs and concerns about exposure to ionising radiation. Indications suggest that routine imaging is associated with a higher detection rate and treatment of potentially resolving appendicitis. The efficiency of routine imaging compared with in-hospital observation and selective imaging is not well studied.

    Methods

    The proportions of negative appendectomy and treatments for appendicitis are studied in 1068 patients with intermediate suspicion of appendicitis, indicated by an Appendicitis Inflammatory Response (AIR) score sum of five to eight points, randomly allocated by opaque sealed envelopes to early routine diagnostic imaging (Imaging group, n=543) or re-assessment after 4–8 hours inhospital observation followed by selective diagnostic imaging (Observation group, n=525). Some 21 hospitals in Sweden participated in this multicentre study.

    Findings

    The Imaging and Observation groups had the same proportion of negative appendectomies (6·5% in both, difference 0·03%, CI –3·0%–3·1%, p=0·98) but routine imaging was associated with an increased proportion of patients treated for appendicitis (53·4% vs 46·3%, difference  7·1%, CI 1·0–13·2%, p=0·020). As secondary outcomes, the Imaging group had shorter time to surgery (median 13·7 hours vs 15·5 hours, p<0·01), but no difference in admissions, number of perforations or length of hospital stay.

    Interpretation

    Patients with suspected appendicitis and equivocal clinical findings do not benefit from early routine diagnostic imaging compared with re-assessment after observation and selective imaging. The latter is associated with fewer operations for non-perforated appendicitis which supports the hypothesis of resolving appendicitis.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Manne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Kolodziej, Blanka
    Department of Pathology, Ryhov County Hospital, County Council of Jönköping, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Structured Management of Patients with Suspected Acute Appendicitis Using a Clinical Score and Selective Imaging (STRAPPSCORE)2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The management of patients with suspected appendicitis is highly variable with implications for the rate of diagnostic errors, unnecessary admissions and resource consumption. We hypothesise that a structured management algorithm based on the Appendicitis Inflammatory Response (AIR) score can improve diagnostic accuracy, limit the use of diagnostic imaging, and reduce the number of hospital admissions for patients with suspected appendicitis.

    Methods

    Prospective interventional multicentre study. Patients at 25 Swedish hospitals over the age of five, presenting with suspected appendicitis at the emergency department were considered for inclusion. After an initial period of routine management and registration of the AIR score parameters (baseline period), an AIR-score-based management algorithm was implemented (intervention period). The study analyses the discriminating capacity and predictive value of the AIR score and the impact of implementing the AIR-score-based algorithm.

    Results

    In total, 3791 patients were included. Advanced appendicitis is unlikely at an AIR score <5 points (sensitivity 0.96), and appendicitis is likely at an AIR score >8 (specificity 0.98). The implementation of the AIR-score-based algorithm resulted in fewer negative explorations and operations for phlegmonous appendicitis (1.6% vs 3.4%, p=0.019 and 5.5% vs 9.4%, p=0.003, respectively), a reduction in admissions to hospital and use of imaging (29.5% vs 42.8%, p<0.001 and 19.2% vs 34.5%, respectively), and no difference with regard to advanced appendicitis in the low-risk group, and a decrease in the use of diagnostic imaging in the high-risk group (38.5% vs 53.1%, p=0.021).

    Conclusions

    The AIR score has high discriminating capacity. Implementing an AIR-score-based algorithm increased diagnostic accuracy and lowered the use of diagnostic imaging and in-hospital observation.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Manne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Rubér, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björnsson, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olaison, Gunnar
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Can New Inflammatory Markers Improve the Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis?2014In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 38, no 11, p. 2777-2783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The diagnosis of appendicitis is difficult and resource consuming. New inflammatory markers have been proposed for the diagnosis of appendicitis, but their utility in combination with traditional diagnostic variables has not been tested. Our objective is to explore the potential of new inflammatory markers for improving the diagnosis of appendicitis. The diagnostic properties of the six most promising out of 21 new inflammatory markers (interleukin [IL]-6, chemokine ligand [CXCL]-8, chemokine C-C motif ligand [CCL]-2, serum amyloid A [SAA], matrix metalloproteinase [MMP]-9, and myeloperoxidase [MPO]) were compared with traditional diagnostic variables included in the Appendicitis Inflammatory Response (AIR) score (right iliac fossa pain, vomiting, rebound tenderness, guarding, white blood cell [WBC] count, proportion neutrophils, C-reactive protein and body temperature) in 432 patients with suspected appendicitis by uni- and multivariable regression models. Of the new inflammatory variables, SAA, MPO, and MMP9 were the strongest discriminators for all appendicitis (receiver operating characteristics [ROC] 0.71) and SAA was the strongest discriminator for advanced appendicitis (ROC 0.80) compared with defence or rebound tenderness, which were the strongest traditional discriminators for all appendicitis (ROC 0.84) and the WBC count for advanced appendicitis (ROC 0.89). CCL2 was the strongest independent discriminator beside the AIR score variables in a multivariable model. The AIR score had an ROC area of 0.91 and could correctly classify 58.3 % of the patients, with an accuracy of 92.9 %. This was not improved by inclusion of the new inflammatory markers. The conventional diagnostic variables for appendicitis, as combined in the AIR score, is an efficient screening instrument for classifying patients as low-, indeterminate-, or high-risk for appendicitis. The addition of the new inflammatory variables did not improve diagnostic performance further.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Antibiotics versus surgery for appendicitis2011In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 378, no 9796, p. 1067-1067Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 10.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Appendicitis: Epidemiology and diagnosis1998Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The study concerns appendicitis, its epidemiology and diagnosis, and the outcome of appendectomy. A population based cohort of 9,274 patients undergoing appendectomy in 1969 to 1990 in Jönköping County was retrospectively studied, and 502 patients admitted for suspected appendicitis to the hospitals in Jönköping and Eksjö between October 1992 and December 1993 were prospectively studied.

    Appendicitis was found to occur in outbreaks and space-time clusters, indicating an infectious etiology. The incidence of non-perforating appendicitis was strongly age-dependent, with a peak in adolescence, whereas the incidence of perforating appendicitis was stable at all ages. This suggests that perforating and non-perforating appendicitis are separate entities.

    There was a high rate of negative appendectomies, but during the study period an increasing diagnostic accuracy and decreasing incidence of negative appendectomies was observed, indicating a trend towards a more restrictive attitude to exploration in patients with suspected appendicitis. This was accompanied by a decreasing incidence of non-perforating appendicitis, whereas the incidence of perforating appendicitis was stable. An analysis of population based studies showed a strong relation between surgeons' attitude to exploration and the incidence of non-perforating ap9endicitis, whereas the incidence of perforating appendicitis was unrelated. This is consistent with a high proportion of potentially resolving appendicitis.

    A conservative management decreases the munber of negative explorations and saves a number of patients with resolving appendicitis from an unnecessary operation. This leads to a high proportion of perforations among the operated patients but the number of perforations is not increased. The perforation rate, therefore, should not be used as a quality measure of the management of patients with suspected appendicitis.

    The rate of negative explorations is higher in women. This gender difference is found at all ages and is not due to gynecological diseases alone. The explanation is the larger number of women attending for nonsurgical abdominal pain, whereas the rate of diagnostic errors among these patients is similar in men and women.

    Patients with a negative appendectomy are characterized by high intensity of pain and tenderness without signs of a systemic inflammatory response. Surgeons pay too much attention to pain and tenderness in their decision to operate, and underestimate the importance of temperature, laboratory variables and duration of symptoms.

    No single clinical or laboratory variable has sufficiently high discriminating power to be used as a true diagnostic test. The inflammatory variables are as important predictors as the clinical findings, and they are especially important in advanced appendicitis. Their diagnostic value is higher at a repeat examination after a few hours of observation.

    The study show for a need of an improved management of patients with suspected appendicitis, and the potential for improved clinical diagnosis. Inflammatory variables should be given more attention, and pain and tenderness should be interpreted more cautiously. An expectant management, with repeated clinical and laboratory examinations, is advisable once advanced appendicitis has been ruled out.

  • 11.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Editorial Material: Does Delay of Diagnosis and Treatment in Appendicitis Cause Perforation? in WORLD JOURNAL OF SURGERY, vol 40, issue 6, pp 1315-13172016In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 1315-1317Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 12.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Editorial Material: The Magic of an Appendicitis Score in WORLD JOURNAL OF SURGERY, vol 39, issue 1, pp 110-1112015In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 110-111Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 13.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    Less invasive pilonidal sinus surgical procedures2019In: Colo-Proctology, ISSN 0174-2442, E-ISSN 1615-6730, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 117-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pilonidal disease can be treated by less invasive methods such as simple mechanical cleansing of the sinus and cavity of hairs and granulation tissue eventually supplemented by filling the space with an antiseptic or sclerosing agent like phenol (forbidden in Germany due to its toxicity) or space-holding fibrin glue. Minimal excision or debridement of the sinus and/or cavity through amidline or aseparate paramedial excision can also be performed, leaving the wounds open or closed. These methods are simple and cost-efficient, and associated with low pain, rapid healing, and arapid return to normal activity. Adisadvantage is the higher recurrence rate; however, these methods can be used repeatedly for recurrences. Whereas the evidence for treatment with phenol or fibrine glue is weak, there are numerous reports supporting the safety and efficiency of the minimally invasive surgical methods. Because of the associated low risk for complications and morbidity, these procedures are suitable for first-line treatment in the majority of pilonidal disease patients.

  • 14.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Letter: General Surgeon Supply and Appendiceal Rupture: Proportion of Perforation Is Not a Meaningful Measure of Quality of Care in ANNALS OF SURGERY, vol 261, issue 5, pp E132-E1322015In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 261, no 5, p. E132-E132Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 15.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Short and Long-Term Mortality After Appendectomy in Sweden 1987 to 2006. Influence of Appendectomy Diagnosis, Sex, Age, Co-morbidity, Surgical Method, Hospital Volume, and Time Period. A National Population-Based Cohort Study2013In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 974-981Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Avoiding mortality is the ultimate goal when managing patients with suspected appendicitis. Previous studies have shown high mortality after negative appendectomy. This national cohort study analyzes short- and long-term mortality after appendectomy in relation to appendectomy diagnosis, age, co-morbidity, surgical method, hospital volume, and time period. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanA total of 223,543 appendectomy patients treated from 1987 to 2006 were identified from the Swedish National Patient Register and followed up via the Swedish Cause of Death Register. Analysis of mortality was conducted as Standardized Mortality Ratio (SMR) and by Cox multivariate regression. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanNegative appendectomy was followed by a higher mortality in the short term (30-day Standardized Mortality Ratio (SMR30d) 8.95, confidence interval (CI) 6.68-12.61) than after perforated appendicitis (SMR30d 6.39, CI 5.44-7.48), and remained increased for up to 5 years (SMR5yr 1.31, CI 1.16-1.47). Non-perforated appendicitis had a lower than expected long-term mortality (SMR5yr 0.72, CI 0.68-0.76). These differences remained after adjustment for covariates. Laparoscopic appendectomy had similar short-term mortality as open appendectomy but lower than expected long-term morality (SMR5yr 0.70, CI 0.62-0.78). Mortality was decreasing during the study period. Hospital volume had no influence on mortality. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanNegative appendectomy is associated with excess short- and long-term mortality that remains after adjustment for known confounders, suggesting an association with underlying undetected morbidity. This motivates an improved preoperative diagnosis to avoid the additional trauma from unnecessary surgical interventions, but further studies are needed to investigate the cause of the increased long-term mortality and if this can be prevented by an improved follow-up of patients with negative appendectomy. Laparoscopic and open appendectomy have similar short-term mortality. The lower long-term mortality after non-perforated appendicitis and laparoscopic appendectomy suggest selection of healthier patients for these interventions. This possibility should be taken into account when comparing mortality after open and laparoscopic appendectomy.

  • 16.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Short-term complications and long-term morbidity of laparoscopic and open appendicectomy in a national cohort2014In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 101, no 9, p. 1135-1142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Laparoscopic appendicectomy has been proposed as the standard for surgical treatment of acute appendicitis, based on controversial evidence. This study compared outcomes after open and laparoscopic appendicectomy in a national, population-based cohort.

    METHODS:

    All patients who underwent open or intended laparoscopic appendicectomy in Sweden between 1992 and 2008 were identified from the Swedish National Patient Register. The outcomes were analysed according to intention to treat with multivariable adjustment for confounding factors and survival analytical techniques where appropriate.

    RESULTS:

    A total of 169 896 patients underwent open (136 754) or intended laparoscopic (33 142) appendicectomy. The rate of intended laparoscopic appendicectomy increased from 3·8 per cent (425 of 11 175) in 1992 to 32·9 per cent (3066 of 9329) in 2008. Laparoscopy was used most frequently in middle-aged patients, women and patients with no co-morbidity. The rate of conversion from laparoscopy to open appendicectomy decreased from 75·3 per cent (320 of 425) in 1992 to 19·7 per cent (603 of 3066) in 2008. Conversion was more frequent in women and those with perforated appendicitis, and the rate increased with age and increasing co-morbidity. After adjustment for co-variables, compared with open appendicectomy, laparoscopy was associated with a shorter length of hospital stay (by 0·06 days), a lower frequency of negative appendicectomy (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0·59; P < 0·001), wound infection (adjusted OR 0·54; P = 0·004) and wound rupture (adjusted OR 0·44; P = 0·010), but higher rates of intestinal injury (adjusted OR 1·32; P = 0·042), readmission (adjusted OR 1·10; P < 0·001), postoperative abdominal abscess (adjusted OR 1·58; P < 0·001) and urinary infection (adjusted OR 1·39; P = 0·020). Laparoscopy had a lower risk of postoperative small bowel obstruction during the first 2 years after surgery, but not thereafter.

    CONCLUSION:

    The outcomes of laparoscopic and open appendicectomy showed a complex and contrasting pattern and small differences of limited clinical importance. The choice of surgical method therefore depends on the local situation, the surgeon's experience and the patient's preference.

  • 17.
    Andersson, Roland
    County Hospital Ryhov.
    The natural history and traditional management of appendicitis revisited: spontaneous resolution and predominance of prehospital perforations imply that a correct diagnosis is more important than an early diagnosis2007In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 86-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background  The principle of early exploration on wide indications in order to prevent perforation has been the guiding star for the management of patients with suspected appendicitis for over 100 years, dating back to a time when appendicitis was a significant cause of mortality. Since then there has been a dramatic decrease in mortality due to appendicitis. Emerging evidence calls for a new understanding of the natural history of untreated appendicitis. This motivates a reappraisal of the fundamental principles for the management of patients with suspected appendicitis. Methods  Analysis of epidemiologic and clinical studies that elucidate the natural history of appendicitis, i.e. the possibility of spontaneous resolution or the risk of progression to perforation, the determinants of the proportion of perforations and mortality, and the consequence of in-hospital delay. Results  The results presented in a number of studies suggest that spontaneous resolution of appendicitis is common, that perforation can seldom be prevented, that the risk of perforation has been exaggerated and that in-hospital delay is safe. An alternative understanding of the inverse relationship between the proportion of negative explorations and perforation and the increasing proportion of perforation with length of time is presented, mainly explaining these findings by selection due to spontaneous resolution. Conclusion  Evidence suggests that spontaneous resolution of untreated, non-perforated appendicitis is common and that perforation can rarely be prevented and is associated with a lower increase in mortality than was previously thought. This motivates a shift in focus from the prevention of perforation to the early detection and treatment of advanced appendicitis. In order to minimize mortality, morbidity and costs avoidance of negative appendectomies is more important then preventing perforation. In patients with an equivocal diagnosis where advanced appendicitis is deemed less likely a correct diagnosis is more important than a rapid diagnosis. These patients can safely be managed by active observation with an improved diagnostic work-up under observation, which has consistently shown a low proportion of negative appendectomies without an increase in the proportion of perforations or morbidity. A high proportion of perforations can be explained by selection due to undiagnosed resolving appendicitis. The proportion of perforation is therefore a questionable measure of the quality of the management of patients with suspected appendicitis and should be used with caution.

  • 18.
    Andersson, Roland
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Surgery, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Doll, Dietrich
    Department of Surgery, St Marienhospital Vechta, Academic Teaching Hospital of the Medical School Hannover, Vechta, Germany.
    Stauffer, Verena K
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Sonnenhofspital, Lindenhofgruppe, Bern, Switzerland.
    Vogt, Andreas P
    Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Bern University Hospital, Inselspital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Boggs, Steven D
    Department of Anesthesiology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee.
    Luedi, Markus M.
    Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Bern University Hospital, Inselspital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Interdisciplinary Dialogue Is Needed When Defining Perioperative Recommendations: Conflicting Guidelines for Anesthetizing Patients for Pilonidal Surgery2018In: AandA practice, ISSN 2575-3126, Vol. 11, no 8, p. 227-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    National or international guidelines can help surgeons and anesthesiologists make treatment decisions, but the existence of conflicting recommendations can hinder treatment rather than helping. A case in point is the treatment of pilonidal sinus disease, a chronic subcutaneous infection located in the sacrococcygeal area. Its incidence is rising, reaching almost 100/100,000 inhabitants. Three surgical societies have proposed guidelines for treating the disease, but these guidelines vary greatly in their approach to anesthesia. Who should provide input into guidelines? And how can medical disciplines successfully collaborate? Anesthesiologists must be involved in defining perioperative recommendations not only in patients with pilonidal sinus disease.

  • 19.
    Andersson, Roland E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Letter: Resolving appendicitis is common2008In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 247, no 3, p. 553-553Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 20.
    Andersson, Roland E.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    The Role of Antibiotic Therapy in the Management of Acute Appendicitis2013In: Current Infectious Disease Reports, ISSN 1523-3847, E-ISSN 1534-3146, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 10-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nonsurgical treatment with antibiotics has recently been proposed as the first line of treatment for noncomplicated appendicitis. This has met with considerable interest, illustrated by the number of reviews and meta-analyses, which exceed the number of original reports of the issue. The results in these studies are seriously biased due to inclusion of patients with resolving appendicitis. At a time when we need to reduce inappropriate use of antibiotics in the struggle against the increasing rate of antibiotics resistance, there must be strong requirements of a proven effect and an improved cost-benefit ratio before antibiotics treatment is introduced for a new group of patients. These requirements have not yet been met for nonsurgical treatment with antibiotics for assumed uncomplicated appendicitis. Due to the high rate of spontaneous resolution, a randomized placebo-controlled trial is needed that can compare the efficiency of antibiotics treatment and expectant management in this group of patients. Antibiotics treatment, however, remains indicated for treatment of perforated appendicitis with localized abscess or phlegmone and in selected surgical high-risk patients.

  • 21.
    Andersson, Roland E
    et al.
    Länssjukhuset Ryhov.
    Andersson, R
    Länssjukhuset Ryhov.
    Offenbartl, K
    Länssjukhuset Ryhov.
    Deleskog, A
    Länssjukhuset Ryhov.
    Andrén-Sandberg, A
    Länssjukhuset Ryhov.
    Appendiceal abscess: Uncertainty concerning the therapeutic principles. A survey indicates the need of randomized controlled trials.2010In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 107, no 6, p. 325-327Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Andersson, Roland
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery .
    Hugander, AP
    Ryhov Hosp, Dept Surg, SE-55185 Jonkoping, Sweden Ryhov Hosp, Dept Clin Pathol, SE-55185 Jonkoping, Sweden Highlands Hosp, Dept Surg, Eksjo, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Surg, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Ghazi, SH
    Ryhov Hosp, Dept Surg, SE-55185 Jonkoping, Sweden Ryhov Hosp, Dept Clin Pathol, SE-55185 Jonkoping, Sweden Highlands Hosp, Dept Surg, Eksjo, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Surg, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Ravn, H
    Ryhov Hosp, Dept Surg, SE-55185 Jonkoping, Sweden Ryhov Hosp, Dept Clin Pathol, SE-55185 Jonkoping, Sweden Highlands Hosp, Dept Surg, Eksjo, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Surg, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Offenbartl, SK
    Ryhov Hosp, Dept Surg, SE-55185 Jonkoping, Sweden Ryhov Hosp, Dept Clin Pathol, SE-55185 Jonkoping, Sweden Highlands Hosp, Dept Surg, Eksjo, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Surg, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Nyström, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Olaison, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Why does the clinical diagnosis fail in suspected appendicitis?2000In: European Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1102-4151, E-ISSN 1741-9271, Vol. 166, no 10, p. 796-802Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To identify systematic errors in surgeons' estimations of the importance of diagnostic variables in the decision to explore patients with suspected appendicitis. Design: Prospective case series. Setting: Two emergency departments, Sweden. Patients: 496 patients with suspected appendicitis on admission, of whom 194 had a correct operation for appendicitis and 59 had a negative exploration. Main outcome measures: Predictors of a negative exploration expressed as the odds ratio (OR) for negative exploration. Variables influence on the decision to operate, expressed as the OR for operation, compared with the true diagnostic importance, expressed as the OR for appendicitis. Results: Predictors of negative explorations were high ratings in variables describing pain and tenderness (patient's perceived pain, abdominal tenderness, rebound tenderness, guarding or rectal tenderness), weak or absent inflammatory response, female sex, long duration of symptoms and absence of vomiting, with OR of 1.8-3.0. Pain and tenderness had too strong an influence on the decision to operate whereas the lack of an inflammatory response, no vomiting, and long duration of symptoms were not given enough attention. There was no sex difference in the proportion of patients with non-surgical abdominal pain (NSAP) who were operated on, but NSAP was more common and appendicitis less common among women, leading to a larger proportion of negative appendicectomies among women. Conclusion: Negative explorations in patients with suspected appendicitis are related to systematic errors in the clinical diagnosis with too strong an emphasis on pain and tenderness, and too little attention paid to duration of symptoms and objective signs of inflammation. Rectal tenderness is not a sign of appendicitis. The risk of diagnostic errors is similar in men and women.

  • 23.
    Andersson, Roland
    et al.
    Länssjukhuset Ryhov.
    Lukas, Gudrun
    Länssjukhuset Ryhov.
    Skullman, Stefan
    Kärnsjukhuset, Skövde.
    Hugander, Anders
    Länssjukhuset Ryhov.
    Local Administration of Antibiotics by Gentamicin–Collagen Sponge does not Improve Wound Healing or Reduce Recurrence Rate After Pilonidal Excision with Primary Suture: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial2010In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 34, no 12, p. 3042-3046Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background  Excision and primary suture for pilonidal disease is associated with a high rate of wound infection and recurrences. This randomized, controlled study was designed to analyze the effect of local application of a gentamicin-containing collagen sponge (Collatamp®) in reducing the wound infection rate and recurrences after excision of pilonidal sinus and wound closure with primary midline suture. Methods  From March 2003 to November 2005, 161 patients with symptomatic pilonidal disease were operated on at 11 hospitals with traditional wide excision of the sinus and all of its tracts. The patients were randomized to filling of the cavity with a gentamicin-containing collagen sponge (Collatamp®) before wound closure or to closure with no additional treatment. Information about the treatment allocation was hidden until the end of the study. Information about wound healing was noted at follow-up at the outpatient department after 2–4 days, 2 weeks, 3 months, and 1 year. Results  No statistically significant differences were observed between the groups during follow-up. Patients who received prophylaxis with Collatamp® had slightly fewer wounds with exudate at 2–4 days and 2 weeks of follow-up (2% vs. 10%, p = 0.051 and 57% vs. 65%, p = 0.325, respectively), a slightly larger proportion of healed wounds at 3 months follow-up (77% vs. 66%, p = 0.138) but not at 1 year (85% vs. 90%, p = 0.42, respectively), and slightly more reoperations (10% vs. 4%, p = 0.213). Conclusions  This randomized, controlled study showed no significant differences in the rates of wound infection, wound healing, and recurrences when a gentamicin–collagen sponge was added to the surgical treatment of pilonidal disease with excision and primary midline suture. This does not support the use of gentamicin–collagen sponge for the surgical treatment of pilonidal disease. This study was conducted for the Pilonidal Sinus Collatamp study group. Members of the Pilonidal Sinus Collatamp study group are listed in the appendix.

  • 24.
    Andersson, Roland
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery.
    Petzold, MG
    Nonsurgical treatment of appendiceal abscess or phlegmon: A systematic review and meta-analysis2007In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 246, no 5, p. 741-748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: A systematic review of the nonsurgical treatment of patients with appendiceal abscess or phlegmon, with emphasis on the success rate, need for drainage of abscesses, risk of undetected serious disease, and need for interval appendectomy to prevent recurrence. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Patients with appendiceal abscess or phlegmon are traditionally managed by nonsurgical treatment and interval appendectomy. This practice is controversial with proponents of immediate surgery and others questioning the need for interval appendectomy. METHODS: A Medline search identified 61 studies published between January 1964 and December 2005 reporting on the results of nonsurgical treatment of appendiceal abscess or phlegmon. The results were pooled taking the potential clustering on the study-level into account. A meta-analysis of the morbidity after immediate surgery compared with that after nonsurgical treatment was performed. RESULTS: Appendiceal abscess or phlegmon is found in 3.8% (95% confidence interval (CI), 2.6-4.9) of patients with appendicitis. Nonsurgical treatment fails in 7.2% (CI: 4.0-10.5). The need for drainage of an abscess is 19.7% (CI: 11.0-28.3). Immediate surgery is associated with a higher morbidity compared with nonsurgical treatment (odds ratio, 3.3, CI: 1.9-5.6, P < 0.001). After successful nonsurgical treatment, a malignant disease is detected in 1.2% (CI: 0.6-1.7) and an important benign disease in 0.7% (CI: 0.2-11.9) during follow-up. The risk of recurrence is 7.4% (CI: 3.7-11.1). CONCLUSIONS: The results of this review of mainly retrospective studies support the practice of nonsurgical treatment without interval appendectomy in patients with appendiceal abscess or phlegmon. © 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  • 25.
    Ansaloni, Luca
    et al.
    1st Unit of General Surgery, Ospedali Riuniti di Bergamo, Italy .
    Andersson, Roland E.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bazzoli, Franco
    Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, University of Bologna, Italy.
    Catena, Fausto
    Unit of General, Emergency and Transplant Surgery, St Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Bologna, Italy.
    Cennamo, Vincenzo
    Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, University of Bologna, Italy.
    Di Saverio, Salomone
    Acute Care and Trauma Surgery Unit, Maggiore Hospital Trauma Center, Bologna, Italy.
    Fuccio, Lorenzo
    Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, University of Bologna, Italy .
    Jeekel, Hans
    Department of Surgery, ZNA Middelheim, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Leppaniemi, Ari
    Department of Surgery, Helsinki University Hospital, Helnsiki, Finland.
    Moore, Ernest
    Department of Surgery, Denver Health Medical Center, University of Colorado Denver, CO, USA.
    Pinna, Antonio D.
    Unit of General, Emergency and Transplant Surgery, St Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Bologna, Italy.
    Pisano, Michele
    1st Unit of General Surgery, Ospedali Riuniti di Bergamo, Italy.
    Repici, Alessandro
    Department of Gastroenterology, Digestive Endoscopy Unit, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Milano, Italy.
    Sugarbaker, Paul H.
    The Washington Cancer Institute, Washington Hospital Center.
    Tuech, Jean-Jaques
    Department of Digestive Surgery, Rouen University Hospital, Rouen, France.
    Guidelines in the management of obstructing cancer of the left colon: consensus conference of the world society of emergency surgery (WSES) and peritoneum and surgery (PnS) society2010In: World Journal of Emergency Surgery, ISSN 1749-7922, E-ISSN 1749-7922, Vol. 5, p. 29-Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Obstructive left colon carcinoma (OLCC) is a challenging matter in terms of obstruction release as well of oncological issues. Several options are available and no guidelines are established. The paper aims to generate evidenced based recommendations on management of OLCC. Methods: The PubMed and Cochrane Library databases were queried for publications focusing on OLCC published prior to April 2010. A extensive retrieval, analyses, and grading of the literature was undertaken. The findings of the research were presented and largely discussed among panellist and audience at the Consensus Conference of the World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) and Peritoneum and Surgery (PnS) Society held in Bologna July 2010. Comparisons of techniques are presented and final committee recommendation are enounced. Results: Hartmann's procedure should be preferred to loop colostomy (Grade 2B). Hartmann's procedure offers no survival benefit compared to segmental colonic resection with primary anastomosis (Grade 2C+); Hartmann's procedure should be considered in patients with high surgical risk (Grade 2C). Total colectomy and segmental colectomy with intraoperative colonic irrigation are associated with same mortality/morbidity, however total colectomy is associated with higher rates impaired bowel function (Grade 1A). Segmental resection and primary anastomosis either with manual decompression or intraoperative colonic irrigation are associated with same mortality/morbidity rate (Grade 1A). In palliation stent placement is associated with similar mortality/morbidity rates and shorter hospital stay (Grade 2B). Stents as a bridge to surgery seems associated with lower mortality rate, shorter hospital stay, and a lower colostomy formation rate (Grade 1B). Conclusions: Loop colostomy and staged procedure should be adopted in case of dramatic scenario, when neoadjuvant therapy could be expected. Hartmann's procedure should be performed in case of high risk of anastomotic dehiscence. Subtotal and total colectomy should be attempted when cecal perforation or in case of synchronous colonic neoplasm. Primary resection and anastomosis with manual decompression seems the procedure of choice. Colonic stents represent the best option when skills are available. The literature power is relatively poor and the existing RCT are often not sufficiently robust in design thus, among 6 possible treatment modalities, only 2 reached the Grade A.

  • 26.
    Di Saverio, Salomone
    et al.
    AUSL, Italy.
    Birindelli, Arianna
    University of Bologna, Italy.
    Kelly, Micheal D.
    Canberra Hospital, Australia.
    Catena, Fausto
    Maggiore Hospital Parma, Italy.
    Weber, Dieter G.
    Trauma and Gen Surgeon Royal Perth Hospital, Australia; University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Sartelli, Massimo
    Macerata Hospital, Italy.
    Sugrue, Michael
    Letterkenny Hospital, Ireland.
    De Moya, Mark
    Harvard Medical Sch, MA USA.
    Augusto Gomes, Carlos
    University of Gen Juiz de Fora, Brazil.
    Bhangu, Aneel
    University Hospital Birmingham NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Agresta, Ferdinando
    Civil Hospital, Italy.
    Moore, Ernest E.
    Denver Health Medical Centre, CO USA.
    Soreide, Kjetil
    Stavanger University Hospital, Norway.
    Griffiths, Ewen
    University Hospital Birmingham NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    De Castro, Steve
    OLVG, Netherlands.
    Kashuk, Jeffry
    University of Jerusalem, Israel.
    Kluger, Yoram
    Rambam Health Care Campus, Israel.
    Leppaniemi, Ari
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Ansaloni, Luca
    Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Italy.
    Andersson, Manne
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Coccolini, Federico
    Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Italy.
    Coimbra, Raul
    UCSD Health Syst, CA USA.
    Gurusamy, Kurinchi S.
    UCL, England.
    Cesare Campanile, Fabio
    San Giovanni Decollato Andosilla Hospital, Italy.
    Biffl, Walter
    University of Hawaii, HI USA.
    Chiara, Osvaldo
    Osped Niguarda Ca Granda, Italy.
    Moore, Fred
    University of Florida, FL USA.
    Peitzman, Andrew B.
    University of Pittsburgh, PA USA.
    Fraga, Gustavo P.
    University of Estadual Campinas, Brazil.
    Costa, David
    Alicante, Spain.
    Maier, Ronald V.
    University of Washington, WA USA.
    Rizoli, Sandro
    St Michaels Hospital, Canada.
    Balogh, Zsolt J.
    John Hunter Hospital, Australia.
    Bendinelli, Cino
    John Hunter Hospital, Australia.
    Cirocchi, Roberto
    University of Perugia, Italy.
    Tonini, Valeria
    University of Bologna, Italy.
    Piccinini, Alice
    AUSL, Italy.
    Tugnoli, Gregorio
    AUSL, Italy.
    Jovine, Elio
    AUSL, Italy.
    Persiani, Roberto
    Catholic University, Italy.
    Biondi, Antonio
    University of Catania, Italy.
    Scalea, Thomas
    R Adams Cowley Trauma Centre, MD USA.
    Stahel, Philip
    Denver Health Medical Centre, CO USA.
    Ivatury, Rao
    Virginia Commonwealth University, VA USA.
    Velmahos, George
    Harvard Medical Sch, MA USA.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    WSES Jerusalem guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of acute appendicitis2016In: World Journal of Emergency Surgery, ISSN 1749-7922, E-ISSN 1749-7922, Vol. 11, no 34Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acute appendicitis (AA) is among the most common cause of acute abdominal pain. Diagnosis of AA is challenging; a variable combination of clinical signs and symptoms has been used together with laboratory findings in several scoring systems proposed for suggesting the probability of AA and the possible subsequent management pathway. The role of imaging in the diagnosis of AA is still debated, with variable use of US, CT and MRI in different settings worldwide. Up to date, comprehensive clinical guidelines for diagnosis and management of AA have never been issued. In July 2015, during the 3rd World Congress of the WSES, held in Jerusalem (Israel), a panel of experts including an Organizational Committee and Scientific Committee and Scientific Secretariat, participated to a Consensus Conference where eight panelists presented a number of statements developed for each of the eight main questions about diagnosis and management of AA. The statements were then voted, eventually modified and finally approved by the participants to The Consensus Conference and lately by the board of co-authors. The current paper is reporting the definitive Guidelines Statements on each of the following topics: 1) Diagnostic efficiency of clinical scoring systems, 2) Role of Imaging, 3) Non-operative treatment for uncomplicated appendicitis, 4) Timing of appendectomy and in-hospital delay, 5) Surgical treatment 6) Scoring systems for intra-operative grading of appendicitis and their clinical usefulness 7) Non-surgical treatment for complicated appendicitis: abscess or phlegmon 8) Pre-operative and post-operative antibiotics.

  • 27.
    Frisch, Morten
    et al.
    Statens Serum Institute, Denmark.
    Pedersen, Bo V
    Statens Serum Institute, Denmark.
    Andersson , Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Appendicitis, mesenteric lymphadenitis, and subsequent risk of ulcerative colitis: cohort studies in Sweden and Denmark2009In: BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, ISSN 0959-8146 , Vol. 338, no b716Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To determine whether the repeatedly observed low risk of ulcerative colitis after appendicectomy is related to the appendicectomy itself or the underlying morbidity, notably appendicitis or mesenteric lymphadenitis.

    Design Nationwide cohort studies.

    Setting Sweden and Denmark.

    Participants 709 353 Swedish (1964-2004) and Danish (1977-2004) patients who had undergone appendicectomy were followed up for subsequent ulcerative colitis. The impact of appendicectomy on risk was also studied in 224 483 people whose parents or siblings had inflammatory bowel disease.

    Main outcome measures Standardised incidence ratios and rate ratios as measures of relative risk.

    Results During 11.1 million years of follow-up in the appendicectomy cohort, 1192 patients developed ulcerative colitis (10.8 per 100 000 person years). Appendicectomy without underlying inflammation was not associated with reduced risk (standardised incidence ratio 1.04, 95% confidence interval 0.95 to 1.15). Before the age of 20, however, appendicectomy for appendicitis (0.45, 0.39 to 0.53) or mesenteric lymphadenitis (0.65, 0.46 to 0.90) was associated with significant risk reduction. A similar pattern was seen in those with affected relatives, whose overall risk of ulcerative colitis was clearly higher than the background risk (1404 observed v 446 expected; standardised incidence ratio 3.15, 2.99 to 3.32). In this cohort, appendicectomy without underlying appendicitis did not modify risk (rate ratio 1.04, 0.66 to 1.55, v no appendicectomy), while risk after appendicectomy for appendicitis was halved (0.49, 0.31 to 0.74).

    Conclusions In individuals with or without a familial predisposition to inflammatory bowel disease, appendicitis and mesenteric lymphadenitis during childhood or adolescence are linked to a significantly reduced risk of ulcerative colitis in adulthood. Appendicectomy itself does not protect against ulcerative colitis.

  • 28.
    Kaplan, G.G.
    et al.
    Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinic, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada, Departments of Medicine and Community Health Sciences, Teaching Research and Wellness Center, University of Calgary, 3280 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4N1, Canada.
    Jackson, T.
    Department of Surgery, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Sands, B.E.
    Gastrointestinal Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.
    Frisch, M.
    Department of Epidemiology Research, Division of Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Andersson, Rolland E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Korzenik, J.
    Gastrointestinal Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.
    The risk of developing Crohn's disease after an appendectomy: A meta-analysis2008In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0002-9270, E-ISSN 1572-0241, Vol. 103, no 11, p. 2925-2931Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Studies exploring the association between appendectomy and Crohn's disease (CD) have reported conflicting findings. We conducted a systematic review of the literature and a meta-analysis to assess the risk of CD following an appendectomy and determine the effect of time between appendectomy and CD diagnosis. METHODS: MEDLINE was used to identify observational studies evaluating the association between appendectomy and CD. Authors were contacted when data were insufficient. Relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using a random effects model. Studies that analyzed their data by the interval between the appendectomy and the diagnosis of CD were assessed separately. The Woolf ?2 statistic was used to test for homogeneity. Egger's test was used to evaluate publication bias. RESULTS: The summary RR estimate for CD following an appendectomy was significantly elevated (RR 1.61, 95% CI 1.28-2.02), though heterogeneity was observed (P < 0.0001). The risk was elevated within the first year following the operation (RR 6.69, 95% CI 5.42-8.25). The risk of CD was also significantly increased 1-4 yr following an appendectomy (RR 1.99, 95% CI 1.66- 2.38), however, after 5 yr or more, the risk fell to baseline levels (RR 1.08, 95% CI 0.99-1.18). Publication bias was not detected (P = 0.2). CONCLUSION: The meta-analysis demonstrated a significant risk of CD following an appendectomy, though heterogeneity was observed between the studies. The elevated risk early after an appendectomy, which diminishes thereafter, likely reflects diagnostic problems in patients with incipient CD. © 2008 by Am. Coll. of Gastroenterology.

  • 29.
    Kaplan, GG
    et al.
    Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard University.
    Pedersen, BV
    Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery.
    Sands, BE
    Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard University.
    Korzenik, J
    Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard University.
    Frisch, M
    Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen.
    The risk of developing Crohn's disease after an appendectomy: A population-based cohort study in Sweden and Denmark2007In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 56, no 10, p. 1387-1392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The relationship between appendectomy and Crohn's disease is controversial. A Swedish-Danish cohort study was conducted to assess the risk of developing Crohn's disease after an appendectomy. Methods: 709 353 appendectomy patients in Sweden (since 1964) and Denmark (since 1977) were followed for first hospitalisations for Crohn's disease to 2004. Standardised incidence ratios (SIR) served as relative risks. Results: Overall, 1655 Crohn's disease cases were observed during 11.1 million person-years of follow-up. Whereas appendectomy before the age of 10 years was not associated with the risk of Crohn's disease (SIR 1.00, 95% CI 0.80-1.25), the overall SIR of developing Crohn's disease was 1.52 (95% CI 1.45-1.59), being highest in the first 6 months (SIR 8.69, 95% CI 7.68-9.84). SIR diminished rapidly thereafter, with the risk of Crohn's disease reaching background levels after 5-10 years for Crohn's disease overall, as well as for Crohn's ileitis, ileocolonic Crohn's disease, Crohn's colitis and other/unspecified Crohn's disease. A long-term increased risk of Crohn's disease up to 20 years after the appendectomy was seen only in appendectomy patients without appendicitis or mesenteric lymphadenitis. Conclusion: The transient increased risk of Crohn's disease after an appendectomy is probably explained by diagnostic bias.

  • 30.
    Landerholm, Kalle
    et al.
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden; Oxford University Hospital NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Abdalla, Maie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Survival of ileal pouch anal anastomosis constructed after colectomy or secondary to a previous ileorectal anastomosis in ulcerative colitis patients: a population-based cohort study2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 52, no 5, p. 531-535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) affects bowel function, sexual function and reproduction less negatively than ileal pouch anal anastomosis (IPAA), the standard reconstruction after colectomy for ulcerative colitis (UC). In younger UC patients, IRA may have a role postponing pelvic surgery and IPAA. The aim of the present study was to investigate the survival of IPAA secondary to IRA compared to IPAA as primary reconstruction, as this has not previously been studied in UC. Patients and methods: All patients with UC diagnosis between 1960 and 2010 in Sweden were identified from the National Patient Registry. From this cohort, colectomized patients reconstructed with primary IPAA and patients reconstructed with IPAA secondary to IRA were identified. The survival of the IPAA was followed up until pouch failure, defined as pouchectomy and ileostomy or a diverting ileostomy alone. Results: Out of 63,796 patients, 1796 were reconstructed with IPAA, either primarily (n=1720) or secondary to a previous IRA (n=76). There were no demographic differences between the groups, including length of follow-up (median 12.6 (IQR 6.7-16.6) years and 10.0 (IQR 3.5-15.9) years, respectively). Failure of the IPAA occurred in 103 (6.0%) patients with primary and in 6 (8%) patients after secondary IPAA (P=0.38 log-rank). The 10-year pouch survival was 94% (95% CI 93-96) for primary IPAA and 92% (81-97) for secondary. Conclusions: Patients choosing IRA as primary reconstruction do not have an increased risk of failure of a later secondary IPAA in comparison with patients with primary IPAA.

  • 31.
    Malterling, R R
    et al.
    Ryhov Hospital.
    Andersson, Roland E
    Ryhov Hospital.
    Falkmer, S
    Ryhov Hospital.
    Falkmer, U
    Ryhov Hospital.
    Niléhn, E
    Ryhov Hospital.
    Järhult, J
    Ryhov Hospital.
    Differentiated thyroid cancer in a Swedish county--long-term results and quality of life.2010In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 454-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: There is still no complete agreement about the proper treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC).

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: All patients (n=130) with DTC in a defined population, treated with surgery between 1985 and 1999, were carefully followed up (median 13.1 years). Fifty three were operated with subtotal and 77 with total thyroidectomy. Twenty seven percent of the patients in the subtotal group and 56% of those in the total thyroidectomy group had postoperative radioiodine ablation. Thirty nine patients had papillary cancers incidentally detected during surgery for benign disorders (median size 7 (1-30) mm). Living patients answered the Swedish version of the SF-36 health survey.

    RESULTS: Eleven of 106 patients considered tumour-free after primary surgery developed recurrences during follow-up. Fifteen patients (12%) died from DTC but only one within stage I-II (1.2%). No patient below 50 years of age at diagnosis died from DTC. Only three of 29 patients with isolated loco-regional spreading of their disease at the time of diagnosis have died from thyroid cancer. There was no statistically significant difference in the 10 year cancer-specific survival rate between those operated with subtotal or total thyroidectomy--irrespective of stage. Survival rate was significantly better for papillary than for follicular cancer. Mental and physical quality of life among patients treated for DTC were similar to the healthy Swedish population.

    CONCLUSIONS: Patients with DTC stage I-II (according to TNM) or low-risk (according to AMES) have an excellent prognosis. Treatment as well as follow-up should not be exaggerated.

  • 32.
    Rubér, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Manne
    Unit for Autoimmunity and Immune regulation, County hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Olaison, Gunnar
    Copenhagen University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Surgery, Hospital Nord, Holbæk, Denmark.
    Andersson, Roland E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Unit for Autoimmunity and Immune regulation, County hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Dysregulated Th1/Th17 response in advanced appendicitisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The pathogenesis of appendicitis, the most common abdominal emergency for surgical intervention, is still unknown. Epidemiological differences between perforated and nonperforated appendicitis, polymorphism in the interleukin (IL)-6 gene associated with severity of appendicitis and a more pronounced Th1/Th17-like deviation in advanced compared to phlegmonous appendicitis has been reported. Altogether these findings may indicate that appendicitis harbours two different entities with different immuno-pathogenesis, one progressing to gangrene and perforation and one resolving. In this study we aimed to further investigate systemic cytokine profiles in a large sample of patients, with advanced and phlegmonous appendicitis from a Th1, Th2, Th17 and innate perspective, and also clarify if time as duration of symptoms could explain the differences.

    Methods: Blood samples were preoperatively collected from patients with advanced (n=61) and phlegmonous appendicitis (n=108). The Th1-associated (IFN-γ, IL-12p70), Th2-associated (IL-4, IL-5), Th17-associated (IL-17, IL-6, CCL20, CCL2) and innate-associated (IL-1β, IL-6, MPO, CXCL8, GM-CSF), markers were analyzed in plasma using multiplex bead assay.

    Results: Patients with advanced appendicitis had increased levels of IL-6 (P=0.0001), CCL2 (P=0.001), MPO (P=0.039), IL-12p70 (P=0.010) and CCL20 (P=0.002) as compared to phlegmonous appendicitis and age, sex or duration of symptoms at sampling could not explain the differences.

    Conclusion: The findings suggest a dysregulated Th1/Th17 type inflammation in advanced appendicitis, already early in the disease course, that eventuates in gangrene and perforation and gives further support to the notion of appendicitis as two entities.

  • 33.
    Rubér, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Manne
    County Hospital Ryhov.
    Petersson, B Fredrik
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Olaison, Gunnar
    University of Copenhagen.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Systemic Th17-like cytokine pattern in gangrenous appendicitis but not in phlegmonous appendicitis2010In: SURGERY, ISSN 0039-6060, Vol. 147, no 3, p. 366-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Increasing circumstantial evidence suggests that not all patients with appendicitis will progress to perforation and that appendicitis that resolves may be a common event. Based on this theory and on indications of aberrant regulation of inflammation in gangrenous appendicitis, we hypothesized that. phlegmonous and gangrenous appendicitis are different entities with divergent immunoregulation. Methods. Blood samples were collected from patients with gangrenous appendicitis (n = 16), phlegmonous appendicitis (n = 21), and nonspecific abdominal pain (n = 42). Using multiplex bead arrays, we analyzed a range of inflammatory markers, such as interleukin (IL)-1ra, IL-1r beta, IL-2 IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-15, and IL-17; interferon-gamma; tumor necrosis factor; CXCL8; CCL2; CCL3; and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-7, MMP-8, MMP-9, MMP-12, and MMP-13 in blood. Results. Compared with patients with phlegmonous appendicitis and nonspecific abdominal pain, the patients With gangrenous appendicitis had increased levels of the proinflammatory markers IL-6, CCL2, IL-17, MMP-8, and MMP-9 (P andlt;= .04 each) accompanied by increased levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-1ra and IL-10 (P andlt;= .02). Patients with phlegmonous appendicitis had increased levels of IL-10 only. Conclusion. The finding of a pattern inflammatory markers compatible with the highly inflammatory A 17 subset in sera from, patients with gangrenous appendicitis, but not in phlegmonous appendicitis, supports the hypothesis that gangrenous and phlegmonous appendicitis are different entities with diver gent immune regulation. Additional studies of the differential immunopathogenesis of phlegmonous and gangrenous appendicitis are warranted, as this may have important implications in the diagnosis and management of patients with suspicion of appendicitis.

  • 34.
    Rubér, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery.
    Berg, A
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology.
    Olaison, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery.
    Different cytokine profiles in patients with a history of gangrenous or phlegmonous appendicitis2006In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 143, no 1, p. 117-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Appendicitis is one of the most common and costly acute abdominal states of illnesses. Previous studies suggest two types of appendicitis which may be different entities, one which may resolve spontaneously and another that progresses to gangrene and perforation. Gangrenous appendicitis has a positive association to states of Th1 mediated immunity whereas Th2 associated immune states are associated with lower risk of appendicitis. This study investigated the inflammatory response pattern in patients previously appendicectomized for gangrenous (n = 7), or phlegmonous appendicitis (n = 8) and those with a non-inflamed appendix (n = 5). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were analysed with ELISPOT analysis for number of spontaneous or antigen/mitogen stimulated IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-12 secreting cells or with ELISA for concentration of spontaneous or antigen/mitogen stimulated IFN-γ, IL-5 and IL-10. Spontaneously IL-10 secreting cells/100 000 lymphocytes were increased in the gangrenous group compared to the phlegmonous group (P = 0.015). The median concentration of IL-10 secreted after Tetanus toxoid (TT)-stimulation were higher in the gangrenous group and the control group, than the phlegmonous group (P = 0.048 and P = 0.027, respectively). The median concentration of TT induced IFN-γ secretion was higher for the gangrenous group compared to both the phlegmonous group and the control group (P = 0.037 and P = 0.003). Individuals with a history of gangrenous appendicitis demonstrated ability to increased IL-10 and IFN-γ production. The increased IFN-γ may support the notion of gangrenous appendicitis as an uncontrolled Th1 mediated inflammatory response and increased IL-10 may speculatively indicate the involvement of cytotoxic cells in the progression to perforation. © 2005 British Society for Immunology.

  • 35.
    Rubér, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Unit for Autoimmunity and Immune regulation, County hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, Roland E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olaison, Gunnar
    Copenhagen University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Surgery, Hospital Nord, Holbæk, Denmark.
    Local and systemic cytokine secretion in advanced and phlegmonous appendicitisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Appendicitis is the most common abdominal emergency for surgery, but its underlying pathogenesis is still unknown. Appendicitis most likely harbors two different entities with different pathogenesis, one progressing to gangrene and perforation and one resolving. Previous studies on cytokines in peripheral blood points to different immunopathogenesis in advanced and resolving appendicitis. The relation of the peripheral blood analyzes to the local immune response in appendix is unclear. This study investigated local immune response in the appendix compared to blood, utilizing enzyme linked immunospot essay (ELISpot) which allows detection of low grade cytokine secretion from single cells.

    Methods: Appendiceal tissue and blood samples were collected from patients with advanced (gangrenous or perforated) (n=11) and phlegmonous appendicitis (n=7). Mononuclear cells were analyzed with ELISpot for number of spontaneous and PHA stimulated IFN-γ-, IL-12p70-(both Th1), IL-4-(Th2), IL-17-(Th17), TGF-β-(anti-inflammatory/Th17) and IL-10-(anti-inflammatory/Th1) secreting cells.

    Results: In appendix, the number of IL-4-(P=0.042) and IL-10-(P=0.042) secreting cells was increased in advanced appendicitis as compared to phlegmonous and a trend for increase was observed for IL-12p70 (P=0.055) and TGF-β (P=0.067). In blood the number of IL-4-(P=0.045), TGF-β-(P=0.007) and IFN-γ-(P=0.019), secreting cells were increased in patients with advanced appendicitis and a trend for increase was observed for IL-12p70 (P=0.068)

    Conclusion: Present findings are in line with previous studies demonstrating an increased inflammatory response in advanced as compared to phlegmonous appendicitis. The local immune response in the appendiceal tissue is mirrored in the blood, which justifies the use of analyzes on peripheral blood when investigating immune response in appendicitis.

  • 36.
    Sjoberg Bexelius, Tomas
    et al.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Astrid Lindgrens Children Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ahle, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Elfvin, Anders
    Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Björling, Oscar
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Pediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK; Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York City, New York, USA.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Intestinal failure after necrotising enterocolitis: incidence and risk factors in a Swedish population-based longitudinal study2018In: BMJ paediatrics open, ISSN 2399-9772, Vol. 2, no 1, article id e000316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Paediatric intestinal failure (IF) is a disease entity characterised by gut insufficiency often related to short bowel syndrome. It is commonly caused by surgical removal of a large section of the small intestine in association with necrotising enterocolitis (NEC), which usually affects premature infants. This study investigated the incidence and risk of IF in preterm infants with or without NEC.

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