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  • 1.
    Hesselstrand, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Liedberg, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Occupational Therapy Interventions in Chronic Pain - A Systematic Review2015In: Occupational Therapy International, ISSN 0966-7903, E-ISSN 1557-0703, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 183-194Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of interventions based on the best available evidence in occupational therapy is essential, and evaluation of research is part of an evidence-based practice. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of studies describing and evaluating the effects of occupational therapy interventions on chronic pain. A systematic review of studies with diverse designs was carried out. A quality assessment was conducted, and the level of evidence was defined using the Research Pyramid Model. Of 19 included studies, three received the highest evidence level, and three were considered to be of high quality. The clinical recommendations that can be derived from this study are the following: occupational therapy interventions should start from the identified needs of the person with chronic pain; no support exists for the effectiveness of electromyographic biofeedback training as a supplement, more studies are needed to confirm this result; the efficacy of instructions on body mechanics was significant during work-hardening treatment; and occupational therapists need to perform and present more clinical studies of high quality and high-evidence level to build up a trustworthy arsenal of evidence-based interventions, for example, in persons with chronic pain. Copyright (C) 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 2.
    Liedberg, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hesselstrand, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Henriksson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Time Use and Activity Patterns in Women with Long-term Pain2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 26-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier studies of people with fibromyalgia have shown that pain, tiredness, and sleep disruption seriously affect their daily performance and their ability to maintain life roles. A time-geographic diary method was used to study activities and time use in the daily lives of women with long-term pain. The results of the diaries were also used to evaluate activity changes over time. Sixteen women wrote diaries over seven days, and after three months for another four days. The diaries were analysed in a computer program. After considering the results of the first diary, the women formulated goals to be met in the following three months. The results showed that working women spent significantly less time on “Care for others”, “Care for oneself”, Rest, and “Procure and prepare food” compared with non-working women. Further, working women used time in a manner similar to that of the Swedish female population. The diary method gave a clear picture of the women's daily lives. Visualized in graphs and tables, it will serve as an educational tool in rehabilitation and can be used as a framework for discussing adjustment and coping strategies.

  • 3.
    Samuelsson, Kersti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Carlberg, Ulla
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hesselstrand, Malin
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ölander, Elisabet
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Patient-Reported Outcome of a Multidisciplinary Pain Management Program, Focusing on Occupational Performance and Satisfaction with Performance2011In: The Open Rehabilitation Journal, ISSN 1874-9437, E-ISSN 1874-9437, Vol. 4, p. 42-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim was to describe the effect of a multidisciplinary pain management program, in terms of patientreported occupational performance and satisfaction with performance.

    Methods: The study is a retrospective, case series study. Data from interviews documented routinely in patient medical records were used. Interviews were made at introduction, on conclusion and six months after a pain management program. Data from all participants (n=85) introduced during one year, were analysed. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) was used as the main outcome measure.

    Results: Estimated occupational performance as well as satisfaction with performance improved between measures (occupational performance p<0.001; satisfaction with performance p<0.001). The percentage of participants, who improved two or more points on the COPM ten-point scale between baseline and the 6-month follow up, was 27% for occupational performance and 40% for satisfaction with performance.

    Conclusion: The findings raise questions regarding what the team might learn from different ways of scrutinizing results; the relevant level of MID in this program; and the overall objective in terms of the proportion of clients who reported a ‘successful’ outcome in occupational performance and satisfaction with performance, based on the identified MID. These questions need to be further analysed and discussed within the professional team.

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