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  • 1.
    Ekman, Bertil
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A dose titration model for recombinant GH substitution aiming at normal plasma concentrations of IGF-I in hypopituitary adults2002In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 147, no 1, p. 49-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a dose titration model for recombinant human GH substitution in adult patients with GH deficiency, aiming at normal plasma levels of IGF-I.

    DESIGN AND METHODS: Eighteen patients participated and a start dose of 0.17 mg GH/day was used except by two men who started with 0.33 mg/day. To demonstrate a clear GH effect the patients were first titrated, with steps of 0.17 mg GH/day every 6-8 weeks, to IGF-I levels in the upper range of age-adjusted reference values. The GH dose was then reduced 1 dose step and kept for a further 6 months. For comparison we investigated 17 healthy control subjects.

    RESULTS: Plasma IGF-I was increased after 2 weeks on the start dose and did not increase further for up to 8 weeks. Women had significantly lower GH sensitivity than men measured as net increment of IGF-I on the start dose of GH. GH sensitivity was not changed by age. The plasma IGF-I levels increased from 76.3+/-47.0 (s.d.) to 237+/-97 microg/l at the end of the study (P<0.001), and similar IGF-I levels were obtained in both sexes. The maintenance median GH dose was 0.33 mg/day in males and 0.83 mg/day in females (P=0.017). The GH dose correlated negatively with age in both sexes. Body weight, very low density triglycerides, lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)), and fasting insulin increased, whereas insulin sensitivity index (QUICKI) decreased significantly. In comparison with the controls, the patients had lower fasting blood glucose, fasting insulin and Lp(a) levels at baseline, but these differences disappeared after GH substitution. The two groups had equal insulin sensitivity (QUICKI), but 2 h oral glucose tolerance test values of blood glucose and insulin were significantly higher in the patients at the end of the study.

    CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion our data suggest that the starting dose of GH substitution and the dose titration steps should be individualised according to GH sensitivity (gender) and the IGF-I level aimed for (age). The reduced insulin sensitivity induced by GH substitution could be viewed as a normalisation if compared with control subjects.

  • 2.
    Grahn Kronhed, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Angbratt, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Blomberg, Carina
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Waller, John
    Möller, Margareta
    Research and Development Unit, Primary Health Care, BorÅs, Sweden.
    Association between physical activity and forearm bone mineral density in 20-72-year-olds2002In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 87-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical activity may influence bone mineral density (BMD) in different ways. In the present study the amount of physical activity and the associations between forearm BMD, body mass index, physical activity and several other lifestyle factors were explored. A random sample of the population in a Swedish municipality was invited to the study and examined by a questionnaire and by forearm bone mineral measurements using single photon absorptiometry. Forearm BMD was measured in 880 subjects. Forearm BMD was stable from 20 to 50 years of age in women and from 20 to 60 years of age in men. Reported moderate leisure-time physical activity levels in men were significantly associated with higher forearm BMD than low leisure-time physical activity levels ( p = 0.042). The findings that moderate levels of leisure-time physical activity in men were associated with higher forearm BMD, give some support to the hypothesis that increased amount of physical activity in a population might be of benefit in the prevention of osteoporosis. Further longitudinal studies of the effect of physical activity in the prevention of osteoporosis, falls and fractures are warranted.

  • 3.
    Grahn Kronhed, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Knutsson, Inger
    Primary Health Care Laboratory, Vadstena, Sweden.
    Löfman, Ove
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Möller, Margareta
    Research and Development Unit, Primary Health Care, BorÅs, Sweden.
    Is calcaneal stiffness more sensitive to physical activity than forearm bone mineral density?: A population-based study of persons aged 20-79 years2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 333-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between forearm bone mineral density (BMD), calcaneal stiffness, and physical activity levels in a normal population using different non-invasive methods.

    Methods: The participants were invited to undergo bone measurements using single photon absorptiometry of the forearm and quantitative ultrasound (QUS) of the calcaneal bone, and also to complete a questionnaire. Physical activity levels were designated low, moderate, and high in the question on leisure-time activity.

    Results: There were 956 participants included in the present study. Forearm BMD in the eighth age decade was 0.40 g/cm2 (95% CI 0.33 - 0.46 g/cm2) lower than in the third decade among women and 0.28 g/cm2 (95% CI 0.18 - 0.37 g/cm2) lower among men. The differences in calcaneal stiffness between the same age decades were 22.4 (95% CI 17.5 - 27.4) among women and 15.8 (95% CI 8.0 - 23.5) among men. The correlation between forearm BMD and calcaneal stiffness was 0.58 (95% CI 0.52 - 0.64) in women and 0.34 (95% CI 0.25 - 0.42) in men. Reported moderate and high leisure-time activity levels in both genders were associated with higher calcaneal stiffness but not with forearm BMD.

    Conclusions: The QUS may be used to measure the effect of present physical activity levels on calcaneal bone at the population level. Further longitudinal studies are warranted in order to determine the most appropriate non-invasive method in population-based studies.

  • 4. Hallberg, I
    et al.
    Lofman, O
    Wahlstrom, O
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Quality of life after different types of osteoporotic fractures.2001In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 16, p. S393-S393Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Hallberg, I
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, G
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Ek, A-C
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hjortswang, H
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Bachrach-Lindström, M
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Health-related Quality of Life after Vertebral or Hip Fracture in Women - Short Health Scale Useful for Clinical Practice?2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Hallberg, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care.
    Health-Related Quality of Life 7 Years After Hip or Vertebral fractures2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Hallberg, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A striving for independence: a qualitative study of women living with vertebral fractureManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Quantitative studies using generic and disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) questionnaires have shown that osteoporosis-related vertebral fractures have a significant negative effect on HRQOL, but there are only few studies that address what it means to live with vertebral fracture from a deeper experiential perspective. How HRQOL and daily life are affected several years after vertebral fracture and how women cope with this are more unclear. This study aimed to describe how HRQOL and daily life had been affected in women with vertebral fracture several years after diagnosis.

    Methods: The study design was qualitative. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten Swedish women during 2008. Data were analysed using qualitative inductive content analysis.

    Results: The findings of this study revealed three themes related to the influence on HRQOL and daily life: A threatened independence, i.e. back pain, anxiety, negative impact on self-image and consequences in daily life; Strategies for maintaining independence, i.e. coping, self-care and support; and The importance of maintaining independence, i.e. the ability to perform everyday activities, social interaction and having something meaningful to do. As a result of how their HRQOL and daily life have been affected by their vertebral fractures, the women in this study are striving for independence or maintaining their independence by trying to manage the different types of symptoms and consequences in different ways.

    Conclusion: HRQOL and daily life were strongly affected in a negative way by the impact of the vertebral fracture. One possible effective intervention for the future may be to support women in using self-management strategies so that they can be in charge of their situation and positively influence their HRQOL and daily life to achieve independence, but further evaluation is still needed. Information from this study may provide a foundation for guidelines for health care professionals to offer empathic and supportive care to women living with prevalent vertebral fracture.

  • 8.
    Hallberg, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A striving for independence: a qualitative study of women living with vertebral fracture2010In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 9, no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Quantitative studies using generic and disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) questionnaires have shown that osteoporosis-related vertebral fractures have a significant negative effect on HRQOL, but there are only few studies that address what it means to live with vertebral fracture from a deeper experiential perspective. How HRQOL and daily life are affected several years after vertebral fracture and how women cope with this are more unclear. This study aimed to describe how HRQOL and daily life had been affected in women with vertebral fracture several years after diagnosis.

    Methods

    The study design was qualitative. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten Swedish women during 2008. Data were analysed using qualitative inductive content analysis.

    Results

    The findings of this study revealed three themes related to the influence on HRQOL and daily life: A threatened independence, i.e. back pain, anxiety, negative impact on self-image and consequences in daily life; Strategies for maintaining independence, i.e. coping, self-care and support; and The importance of maintaining independence, i.e. the ability to perform everyday activities, social interaction and having something meaningful to do. The women were striving for independence or maintaining their independence by trying to manage different types of symptoms and consequences in different ways.

    Conclusion

    HRQOL and daily life were strongly affected in a negative way by the impact of the vertebral fracture. Information from this study may provide new knowledge and understanding of the women's experiences of living with vertebral fracture from an insider's point of view in order to obtain a deeper understanding of the women's everyday life. However, further evaluation is still needed in larger study groups.

  • 9.
    Hallberg, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosenqvist, A. M
    Department of Geriatrics, Ryhovs Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Kartous, L
    Department of Geriatrics, Ryhovs Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Löfman, Owe
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Health-related quality of life after osteoporotic fractures2004In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 15, no 10, p. 834-841Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To estimate the impact of osteoporosis fractures on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in postmenopausal women. Methods: To compare the impact on HRQOL of different osteoporotic fractures, 600 consecutive women 55-75 years old with a new fracture (inclusion fracture) were invited by mail. After exclusions by preset criteria (high-energy fractures, ongoing osteoporosis treatment, or unwillingness to participate), 303 women were included, 171 (56%) of whom had a forearm, 37 (12%) proximal humerus, 40 (13%) hip, and 55 (18%) vertebral fracture, respectively, and all were investigated and treated according to the current local consensus program for osteoporosis. In addition, HRQOL was evaluated by the SF-36 questionnaire and compared with local, age-matched reference material. Examinations were performed 82 days (median) after the fracture and 2 years later. Results: HRQOL was significantly reduced at baseline regarding all SF-36 domains after vertebral fractures and most after hip fractures, but only regarding some domains after forearm and humerus fracture. After 2 years, improvements had occurred after all types of fractures, and after forearm or humerus fracture, HRQOL was completely normalized in all domains. However, 2 years after hip fracture, HRQOL was still below normal regarding physical function, role-physical and social function, while after vertebral fracture, scores were still significantly lower for all domains, physical as well as mental. Patients with one or more previous fractures before the inclusion fracture had lower HRQOL at baseline and after 2 years, compared with those with no previous fracture. Patients with osteoporosis (T-score < - 2.5 in hip or spine) had lower HRQOL than those with normal BMD. Conclusion: Vertebral and hip fractures have a considerably greater and more prolonged impact on HRQOL than forearm and humerus fractures. The number of fractures was inversely correlated to HRQOL. These differences should be taken into account when making priorities in health care programs.

  • 10. Lofman, OC
    et al.
    Hallberg, I
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Women with osteoporotic fracture. Case for investigation?2001In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 16, p. S397-S397Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Lorefält, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Geriatrics. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ganowiak, Wojchiec
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pålhagen, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Granerus, Ann-Kathrine
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Factors of importance for weight loss in elderly patients with Parkinson's disease2004In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 110, no 3, p. 180-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective –  Weight loss is reported frequently in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The objective of this study was to find the underlying factors of this phenomenon.

    Participants and methods –  Twenty-six l-dopa-treated patients with PD and 26 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were assessed twice within a 1-year interval. Body weight, body fat mass, resting energy expenditure, physical activity, energy intake, thyroid hormones and cognitive function were investigated.

    Results –  Nineteen (73%) of the PD patients lost body weight, although energy intake and the time for rest increased. Weight loss was most marked in patients with more severe PD symptoms and in whom cognitive function had decreased. Multiple regression analyses showed that determinants for weight loss were female gender, age and low physical activity.

    Conclusion –  Weight loss was common in PD patients, in spite of the increased energy intake and was most obvious in patients with increased PD symptoms and decreased cognitive function.

  • 12.
    Lorefält, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Granerus, Ann-Kathrine
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Geriatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Bone mass in elderly patients with Parkinson's disease2007In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 116, no 4, p. 248-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective - The objective of the present study was to find risk factors for low bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Material and methods - Twenty-six PD patients and 26 age-and sex-matched healthy controls were assessed twice within a 1-year period. PD symptoms, body weight, body fat mass, BMD, physical activity, smoking and serum concentrations of several laboratory analyses were investigated. Results - BMD in different locations was lower in PD patients compared with their controls and decreased during the investigated year. BMD was lower in PD patients with low body weight. BMD Z-score of trochanter in the PD group was directly correlated to the degree of physical activity and indirectly to the length of recumbent rest. Total body BMD Z-score in the PD group was directly correlated to the degree of rigidity. Serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D was slightly lower in PD patients. Conclusion - Low body weight and low physical activity were risk factors for low BMD in PD, while rigidity seemed to be protective. © 2007 The Authors.

  • 13.
    Lorefält, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Granerus, Ann-Kathrine
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Weight Loss, Body Fat Mass, and Leptin in Parkinsons Disease2009In: MOVEMENT DISORDERS, ISSN 0885-3185, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 885-890Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Weight loss is a common problem in Parkinsons disease (PD), but the causative mechanisms behind this weight loss are unclear. We compared 2( PD patients with sex and age matched healthy controls. Examinations were repeated at baseline, after one and after two years. Body fat mass was measured by Dual X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA). Seventy three per cent of the PD patients lost body weight. Loss of body fat mass constituted a considerable part of the loss of body weight. In the patients who lost weight, serum leptin levels were lower than in those who did not lose weight. The relationship between low body fat mass and low leptin levels seems to be relevant, at least for female PD patients. It is reasonable to believe that low leptin levels in these patients could be secondary to the decreased body fat mass.

  • 14. Lundström, Åsa
    et al.
    Jendel, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: endomed.
    Stenström, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Ravald, Nils
    Periodontal conditions in 70-year-old women with osteoporosis.2001In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 25, p. 89-96Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Löfman, Owe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berglund, K.
    Department of Community Medicine, County Council of Uppsala, Uppsala.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Changes in Hip Fracture Epidemiology: Redistribution Between Ages, Genders and Fracture Types2002In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 18-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After several reports of increasing hip fracture incidence some studies have suggested a trend-break. In a previous study of hip fractures we forecast a 70% increase in the total number of fractures from 1985 up to year 2000. We therefore studied the incidence trend for the last 15 years and supply a new prognosis up to year 2010. We recorded all incident hip fractures treated in the county of Östergötland, Sweden (≈ 400 000 inhabitants) 1982–96. A total of 11 517 hip fractures in men and women aged 50 years and above were included in the study after cross-validation between a computerized register of radiologic investigations and the hospital records. The projected number of fractures up to year 2010 was estimated by a Poisson regression model, considering both age and year of fracture in every single year 1982–96 for the respective fracture type and gender, and applied to the projected population. The annual number of hip fractures increased by 39% in men and 25% in women during the study period. Amongst men, the age-adjusted incidence of cervical fractures increased from 188 to 220/100 000 and of trochanteric fractures from 138 to 170/100 000. In women the incidence of cervical fractures decreased from 462/100 000 to 418/100 000 and of trochanteric fractures from 407/100 000 to 361/100 000. Cervical/trochanteric fracture incidence rate ratio leveled off, and also the female/male fracture rate ratio declined. A prognosis assuming that the incidence development will continue as during 1982–96, and a population in agreement with the forecast, predicts that the total age- and sex-adjusted number of hip fractures will decrease by 11% up to year 2010 compared with 1996. In women and men, however, a decrease of 19% and an increase of 7% respectively were projected. If the age- and sex-specific incidence remains at the same level as at the end of the study period, no significant change in the total numbers will occur. A trend-break was thus found in hip fracture incidence for women but not for men. Whether this is due to therapeutic and/or preventive measures in women is unknown. According to the most probable scenario a substantial increase in male trochanteric fractures (36%) is expected up to 2010, while all other hip fractures in both genders will decrease by 4–32% resulting in a total reduction of 11%.

  • 16.
    Löfman, Owe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallberg, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berglund, Kenneth
    Community Medicine, County Council of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kartous, Lisa
    Div of Geriatric Medicine, Ryhov Hospital, County council of Jönköping.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Women with low energy fracture: Case for investigation?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The combined use of bone mineral density, fracture history and other risk markers for fracture is advocated for identifying subjects with high fracture risk. An incident fracture is suggested as an accurate indication for osteoporosis investigation, but there are still insufficient data for grading the priority between ages and types of fractures. We therefore decided to examine a consecutive series of 55-75 year old women with an incident fracture for evaluating a standardized clinical routine program and for studying the covariance between fracture history, bone mineral density and other risk markers.

    Materila and methods: We invited 600 consecutive women 55-75 years old with an incident newly diagnosed fracture in distal radius forearm, proximal humerus, vertebra or hip. External drop-out was 33%. Of the 400 responders 31 had a high-energy trauma, 62 were on treatment against osteoporosis and 4 were living in other counties and were therefore excluded. The remaining 303 subjects entered the study. A questionnaire on previous fractures and risk factors was enclosed with the invitation to the osteoporosis unit. At a single visit a short history was assessed and physical examination performed as well as a few laboratory investigations. Bone mineral density was measured at the hip, lumbar spine and forearm by DXA (Hologic QDR 4500A).

    Results: The fracture spectrum was: distal radius 56.4 %, proximal humerus 12.2%, vertebra 18.2% and hip 13.2%. 49% had had at least one previous fracture, 19% at least two previous and 6.3% three or more previous fractures before the recent one. As few spine X-rays were performed, the true prevalence of vertebral fracture is unknown. Patients with fracture in vertebra or hip had lower BMD and more previous fractures than patients with forearm or humerus fracture. The number of previous fractures was inversely correlated to BMD of the hip and forearm, while BMD of the spine had a biphasic relationship.

    The Odds ratio of having either osteopenia and osteoporosis were >20 for patients with hip fracture and 75 for the spine (mean values), whereas the OR of the forearm fracture group was slightly above 10, table 6. The OR were as expected dependent of cut-off limit used. Mean value for the OR was in the hip fracture group 8.2 and 9.2 for !-score -2.5 and -2.0 respectively at the lower end of the confidence interval. For the spine and the forearm, the corresponding odds ratios were 16-17 and 7-9 respectively.

    Conclussion: Vertebral fracture was the strongest and distal radius the weakest predictor of low BMD. The number of previous fractures is a helpful information for finding the most osteoporotic patients. Only 15 % had been treated for osteoporosis before the index fracture. Osteoporosis investigation therefore seems warranted in every woman 55-75 years old with a recent low-energy fracture in distal radius, proximal humerus, spine or hip, with highest priority to those in spine or hip and those with multiple previous fractures.

  • 17.
    Löfman, Owe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallberg, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berglund, Kenneth
    Community Medicine, County Council of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Kartous, Lisa
    Department of Geriatrics, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Rosenqvist, Anna-Maria
    Department of Geriatrics, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Women with low-energy fracture should be investigated for osteoporosis2007In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 78, no 6, p. 813-821Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Treatment of osteoporosis is becoming more effective, but methods to identify patients who are most suitable for investigation and treatment are still being debated. Should any type of fracture have higher priority for investigation of osteoporosis than any other? Is the number of previous fractures useful information? Material and methods: We investigated 303 consecutive women patients between 55 and 75 years of age who had a newly diagnosed low-energy fracture. They answered a questionnaire on previous fractures which also dealt with risk factors. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured at the hip, lumbar spine, and forearm. Results: The distribution of fracture location was: distal forearm 56%, proximal humerus 12%, vertebra 18%, and hip 13%, all with similar age. Half of the subjects had had at least one previous fracture before the index fracture, 19% had had two previous fractures, and 6% had had three or more previous fractures. Patients with vertebral or hip fracture had lower BMD and had had more previous fractures than patients with forearm or humerus fractures. There was an inverse correlation between number of fractures and BMD. Osteoporosis was present in one-third of patients with forearm fracture, in one-half of those with hip or humerus fracture, and in two-thirds of those with vertebral fracture. Interpretation: Vertebral fractures were the strongest marker of low BMD and forearm fractures the weakest. The number of previous fractures is helpful information for finding the most osteoporotic patient in terms of severity. Investigation of osteoporosis therefore seems warranted in every woman between the ages of 55 and 75 with a recent low-energy fracture, with highest priority being given to those with vertebral, hip, or multiple fractures. Copyright© Taylor & Francis 2007. all rights reserved.

  • 18.
    Löfman, Owe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society.
    Larsson, L
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Future changes in hip fracture epidemiology - Redistribution between ages, genders and fracture types.2000In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 15, p. F316-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Löfman, Owe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ross, I.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berglund, K.
    Department for Community Medicine and Public Health, County Council, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bone mineral density in normal Swedish women1997In: Bone, ISSN 8756-3282, E-ISSN 1873-2763, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 167-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined 429 women, aged 20–80 years, randomly selected from the population register to establish normal values for bone mineral density (BMD) in Swedish women. BMD of the spine and hip was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA; Hologic QDR 1000) and in the forearm by single photon absorptiometry (SPA; Molsgaard ND-1100). The recalled age of menarche was negatively correlated to BMD at all ages. There was no significant change in BMD from 20–49 years at any site except a slight decline at Ward's triangle. Bone loss was rapid at all sites during the first decade after menopause. Thereafter, BMD declined slowly in the trochanter and total hip but more rapidly in the forearm, femoral neck, and Ward's triangle. BMD in the spine even increased in the eighth decade probably due to osteoarthritis. The average change in forearm BMD during the 15 perimenopausal years comprising mean age for menopause ± 2 SD (43–57 years) was −0.4% per year in premenopausal females and −1.6% per year in postmenopausal females. The corresponding annual percental change was, for the spine, +0.2 and −1.7; neck, −0.7 and −1.7; trochanter, +0.5 and −1.5; and Ward's triangle, −0.1% and −2.2%, respectively. Our normal values for lumbar spine BMD prior to menopause did not differ from published values or the manufacturer's normal values; however, our spine BMD values for the first decade after menopause were significantly lower (≈10%) than in other studies. Our femoral neck BMD values for younger women were, like those of several other groups, significantly lower than the manufacturer's normal values, but our sample of young women in this study was small. The prevalence of osteoporosis, if defined as t score < −2.5 is highly dependent on the sampling of the reference population of young adult women, and also on the choice of skeletal site. Further studies on bone mineral density in healthy young adult women are needed.

  • 20.
    Löfman, Owe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bone mineral density instead of T-score?2001In: Journal of clinical densitometry, ISSN 1094-6950, E-ISSN 1559-0747, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 75-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    No abstract available.

  • 21.
    Löfman, Owe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Common biochemical markers of bone turnover predict future bone loss: A 5-year follow-up study2005In: Clinica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0009-8981, E-ISSN 1873-3492, Vol. 356, no 1-2, p. 67-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is used to follow gain or loss of bone mass but cannot detect changes within a short period of time. Biochemical markers of bone turnover may be of value for prediction of individual bone loss.

    Methods

    We studied the relation between common inexpensive markers of bone turnover (serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OC), urinary hydroxyproline (OHPr), and calcium (Ca)), BMD, age, and menopause in a combined cross-sectional and longitudinal design comprising 429 pre- and postmenopausal randomly selected women aged 21–79 years (mean 50 years). A follow-up was initiated after 5 years (including 192 of these women), which focused on changes in bone mass and the ability of these four common markers of bone turnover (sampled at baseline) to predict future bone loss.

    Results

    A marked increase was observed for all markers at the beginning of menopause. During the postmenopausal period ALP and Ca decreased to near premenopausal levels, while OC and OHPr remained high even 15 years after menopause. We also found inverse correlations at baseline between the bone markers and BMD, independent of the selected marker or skeletal site, r=−0.14 to −0.46, P<0.05. The correlations between ALP, OC, OHPr, and subsequent bone loss over 5 years, was significant for arm, r=−0.23 to −0.36, P<0.01. Baseline levels of all bone markers correlated significantly at group level with the 5-year follow-up of BMD for all sites. The ability of markers to predict individual bone loss was estimated by a multivariate regression model, which included baseline BMD, age, and body mass index as independent variables. ROC analysis showed a validity of approximately 76% for the forearm model, but was lower for the hip (55%) and lumbar spine (65%).

    Conclusions

    These data show that the common inexpensive biochemical markers of bone turnover ALP, OC, OHPr, and Ca were related to the current bone mass and, moreover, provides information about future bone loss at the individual level. Future investigations should include an evaluation of the clinical relevance of markers of bone turnover in relation to fracture risk.

  • 22.
    Löfman, Owe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bone Mineral Density in Diagnosis of Osteoporosis: Reference Population, Definition of Peak Bone Mass, and Measured Site Determine Prevalence2000In: Journal of clinical densitometry, ISSN 1094-6950, E-ISSN 1559-0747, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 177-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A population-based study was performed in order to compare different definitions of peak bone mass, and to apply the corresponding T-scores for different skeletal sites to a cohort of 70-yr-old women for studying the prevalence of osteoporosis. Bone mineral density (BMD) of the hip, lumbar spine, and forearm was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry (Hologic 4500) in 296 women ages 16–31 yr and 210 women age 70 yr. Peak bone mass occurred in women in their early 20s at the proximal femur and at 28 and 31 yr at the spine and forearm, respectively. BMD cutoff levels were compared to machine-specific cutoff values for the different sites. When applied to our cohort of 70-yr-old women, the prevalence of osteoporosis at the total hip was 9–25%, depending on which peak bone mass the T-score of – 2.5 was based. The prevalence in the spine was 28–33% and in the forearm 45–67%. Osteoporosis in at least one of the three measured sites was documented in 49–72% of the population sample. Our results show that the use of T-score to define osteoporosis results in a highly different prevalence rate in a given population depending on the reference population and the skeletal sites chosen for measurement.

  • 23.
    Nilsson, Rudmar
    et al.
    Kommunhälsan, Linköping, Sweden.
    Löfman, Owe
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Berglund, Kenneth
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Increased Hip-Fracture Incidence in the County of Östergötland, Sweden, 1940–1986, with Forecasts up to the Year 2000: An Epidemiological Study1991In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 1018-1024Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The incidence of hip fractures in the county of Östergōtland in Sweden has increased dramatically from 1940 to 1986, mainly due to an increase in age-specific incidence of trochanteric fractures. The increase is most pronounced in people over 80 but is present even in age groups down to 50 years. If the age-specific incidence rates continue to increase, and the population of the elderly grows in accordance with the forecast, there will be 70% more hip fractures in the year 2000 than in 1985.

  • 24.
    Pålhagen, Sven
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Geriatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lorefält, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Geriatrics. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, M.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Geriatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ganowiak, Wojchiec
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Geriatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Granerus, Ann-Kathrine
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Geriatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Does l-dopa treatment contribute to reduction in body weight in elderly patients with Parkinson's disease?2005In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 111, no 1, p. 12-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective –  Many patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) lose weight also early during the disease. The objective of the study was to investigate possible causative factors for this loss.

    Materials and methods –  In this report, 28 PD patients and 28 age- and sex-matched controls were repeatedly assessed with the focus on body weight, body fat mass, dysphagia, olfaction, physical activity, PD symptomatology and drug treatment.

    Results –  Weight loss was seen in PD patients both before and during l-dopa treatment.

    Conclusion –  The underlying disease could play a role, but our results also suggest that l-dopa per se could contribute to the weight loss.

  • 25.
    Tham, E.
    et al.
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, 171 76 Stockholm, Sweden, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Center of Molecular Medicine L8:02, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, 171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grandell, U.
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, 171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindgren, E.
    Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, 141 86 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Skogseid, B.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala University Hospital, 75185 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nordenskjold, M.
    Nordenskjöld, M., Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, 171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Clinical testing for mutations in the MEN1 gene in Sweden: A report on 200 unrelated cases2007In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 92, no 9, p. 3389-3395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is a tumor syndrome of the parathyroid, endocrine pancreas, and anterior pituitary caused by mutations in the MEN1 gene on 11q13. Objective: The goal of this study was to determine the MEN1 mutation spectrum and detection rate among Swedish patients and identify which patient categories should be tested for MEN1 mutations. Design/Setting/Patients: DNA sequences and referral forms from patients referred to the Department of Clinical Genetics at Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden, for clinical MEN1 mutation screening were analyzed. The mutation status of 371 patients (including 200 probands) was ascertained, and the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assay was evaluated for the detection of large deletions. Main Outcome Measure: The main outcome measure was MEN1 genotypes. Results: Forty-eight of 200 index cases (24%) shared 40 different mutations (18 novel). A total of 69% of all mutations resulted in a truncated protein. Two large deletions were detected by MLPA. A total of 94% of all MEN1 families had a mutation in the coding region of the MEN1 gene. A total of 6% of sporadic cases had MEN1 mutations. There was no correlation between severe disease and mutation type or location. Conclusions: A total of 4% of all mutations were large deletions, and MLPA is now included in our standard MEN1 mutation screening. Individuals with at least one typical endocrine tumour and at least one of the following: 1) a first-degree relative with a major endocrine tumor, 2) an age of onset less than 30 yr, and/or 3) multiple pancreatic tumors/parathyroid hyperplasia were most likely to harbor a mutation, thus these patients should be screened for MEN1 mutations. Copyright © 2007 by The Endocrine Society.

  • 26.
    Toss, Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Is a daily supplementation with 40 microgram vitamin D(3) sufficient? A randomised controlled trial2012In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 51, no 8, p. 939-945Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose  The effect of 40 μg (1,600 IU) per day of vitamin D3 on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and markers of bone and mineral metabolism was evaluated. Methods  This intervention study was designed as a double-blind randomised controlled trial. Forty-five community-dwelling subjects (32 females), age 55–84 years, at 58° North latitude were supplemented for 1 year with 40 μg vitamin D3 plus 1,000 mg calcium per day, or with 1,000 mg calcium per day for controls. Safety parameters and 25(OH)D, intact parathyroid hormone (PTH), ionized calcium, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP), and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase isoform 5b (TRACP5b) were measured over the study period. Results  All subjects supplemented with vitamin D3 reached a 25(OH)D level above 50 nmol/L. Mean (SD) serum 25(OH)D increased from 50.4 (13.5) nmol/L to 84.2 (17.5) nmol/L, range 55.0–125.0 nmol/L in the vitamin D3 supplemented group and the corresponding levels for the control group were 47.3 (14.1) nmol/L and 45.7 (13.4) nmol/L, range 26.0–73.0 nmol/L. No serious adverse event was recorded and the highest 25(OH)D level reached, 125.0 nmol/L, is well below toxic levels. BALP and TRACP5b did not change significantly over the study period. Conclusions  This trial suggests that a daily supplementation with 40 μg vitamin D3 is sufficient to secure a 25(OH)D level of 50 nmol/L. No side effects were observed in the study group.

  • 27.
    Toss, Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Vitamin D status: sunshine is nice but other factors prevail2012In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 255-256Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 28.
    Valdimarsson, T
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC - Medicin och kirurgicentrum, GE: gastromed.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Löfman, O
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of health and environment. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, FHVC - Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum, Förebygg.med.
    Ström, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC - Medicin och kirurgicentrum, GE: gastromed.
    Three years' follow-up of bone density in adult coeliac disease: Significance of secondary hyperparathyroidism2000In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 274-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The mechanisms of disturbances in bone mineral density (BMD) in coeliac disease are not completely understood. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the possible significance of secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) with regard to BMD in patients with untreated coeliac disease. Methods: One hundred and five adult patients with untreated coeliac disease were examined for BMD and serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentration. BMD in the hip, lumbar spine, and forearm were examined up to 3 years after the introduction of a gluten-free diet. Results: SHPT was found in 27% (28 of 105) of the patients. In patients with SHPT serum levels of 25- hydroxy-vitamin D were lower and those of alkaline phosphatase higher than in patients with normal PTH, but ionized serum calcium did not differ between the two groups. BMD was more severely reduced in patients with SHPT. Although the BMD increment was more rapid in patients with than in those without SPTH, only in the latter group did mean BMD became normal after 1-3 years on a gluten-free diet (GFD). After 3 years on a GFD more than half of the patients with initial SHPT still had low BMD in both the hip and the forearm. Furthermore, in patients with SHPT the intestinal mucosa more often remained atrophic at the 1-year follow-up, despite good compliance with the diet. Conclusions: Low BMD in patients with untreated coeliac disease is often associated with SHPT. After 3 years on a GFD the BMD remains low only in patients with initial SHPT. We therefore suggest that PTH should be measured when the diagnosis of coeliac disease is made, as an indicator of more serious intestinal disorder and complicating bone disease.

  • 29.
    Waller, John
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Foldevi, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grahn Kronhed, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of health and environment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Löfman, Owe
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Möller, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Knowledge of osteoporosis in a Swedish municipality: a prospective study2002In: Preventive Medicine, ISSN 0091-7435, E-ISSN 1096-0260, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 485-491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. As a part of the Vadstena Osteoporosis Prevention Project, the knowledge of osteoporosis was examined before the intervention program started, after 5 and 10 years.

    Methods. At baseline (in 1989) 15% of the population in two Swedish municipalities was randomly invited to the study. The participants in the study group were invited for examination by forearm bone densitometry and a questionnaire concerning lifestyle and risk factors for osteoporosis and also knowledge of osteoporosis, while the subjects in the control group were examined only by questionnaire. Follow-ups were made in 1994 and in 1999. Meanwhile education about osteoporosis was given to the study group, to the public, and to various professionals in the study community.

    Results. There was a difference in the level of knowledge between the groups prior to the intervention. The rate of increment did not differ significantly between the groups for the study period. Previous participants had 0.58 higher score than new participants in the study group in 1994 (P = 0.031) and 0.76 higher score in 1999 (P < 0.001) regarding the total number of correct answers. The women in the study group had 0.63 higher score than the men in 1994 (P = 0.016) and 1.03 higher score in 1999 (P < 0.001) regarding the total number of correct answers.

    Conclusion. There was no significant effect of a general intervention program concerning the knowledge of osteoporosis in participants in the intervention area compared to the control area.

  • 30.
    Westerberg, Per-Anton
    et al.
    Departments of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Olauson, Hannes
    Departments of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Wikström, Björn
    Departments of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Morales, Ollallo
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Linde, Torbjörn
    Departments of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Kenneth
    Departments of Surgical Science, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Departments of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Departments of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Preoperative tumor localization by means of venous sampling for fibroblast growth factor-23 in a patient with tumor-induced osteomalacia2008In: Endocrine Practice, ISSN 1530-891X, E-ISSN 1934-2403, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 362-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To report on a novel strategy for tumor localization in a 62-year-old man with hypophosphatemic tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO).

    Methods: Repeated computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging scans failed to localize any tumor in a patient with adult-onset hypophosphatemic osteomalacia. Therefore, venous sampling for fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23)—a circulating hormone that has been identified as a causative factor for TIO—in major veins was conducted. Serum FGF23 was measured from collected samples by an intact FGF23 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    Results: Venous sampling suggested a local increase in serum FGF23 in the left femoral vein; this finding prompted performance of octreotide scintigraphy restricted to the left leg. A tumor was located at the lateral condyle of the left femur, which was also confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Surgical resection of the tumor normalized the serum phosphorus and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 levels within 5 to 10 days, and FGF23 declined to normal levels within 24 hours. Histologic analysis supported the diagnosis of a soft-tissue giant cell tumor.

    Conclusion: Our study case demonstrates the diagnostic complexity and difficulties in localizing a small tumor in a patient with TIO. Venous sampling for FGF23 may be helpful in tumor localization in sporadic cases of hypophosphatemic osteomalacia, especially when noninvasive diagnostic techniques prove insufficient.

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