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  • 1.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Torsten
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nutritional status and functional capacity after femoral neck fractures: a prospective randomized one-year follow-up study2000In: Aging, ISSN 1945-4589, E-ISSN 1945-4589, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 366-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two different surgical methods on nutritional status and functional capacity during the first postoperative year in patients with displaced femoral neck fractures. A further aim was to evaluate the effect of nutritional support. One hundred patients were randomly assigned to treatment with either primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) or osteosynthesis. Half of the patients in each treatment group received protein- and energy-enriched food in the hospital in addition to individual nutritional advice in order to optimize their intake of protein- and energy-rich food. Nutritional state and functional capacity were examined at baseline, one and three months, and one year after the operation. Pain was examined at three months and one year. The effect of nutritional intervention was equal within both surgical groups. Logistic regression showed that the dependent variable "living at one year" was significantly associated with serum albumin levels at one month. Advanced age, mental impairment and deteriorated nutritional status were predominant in the non-survivors. Overall, the primary THA group performed better compared with the osteosynthesis group concerning weight change over time, locomotion and pain. This study also showed that primary THA could safely be performed in the elderly without an increased postoperative mortality rate.

  • 2. Bauer, H.C.
    et al.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    The Scandinavian sarcoma group register.1999In: Acta Orthop Scand Suppl,1999, 1999, p. 41-44Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3. Bauer, Hjärtcentrum
    et al.
    Trovik, CS
    Alvegard, TA
    Berlin, O
    Erlanson, M
    Gustafson, P
    Klepp, R
    Moller, TR
    Rydholm, A
    Saeter, G
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Wiklund, T
    Monitoring referral and treatment in soft tissue sarcoma: Study based on 1,851 patients from the Scandinavian Sarcoma Group Register2001In: Acta Orthopaedica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6470, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 150-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report is based on 1.851 adult patients with soft tissue sarcoma (STS) of the extremities or trunk wall diagnosed between 1986 and 1997 and reported from all tertiary referral centers in Norway and Sweden. The median age at diagnosis was 65 years and the male-to-female ratio was 1.1:1. One third of the tumors were subcutaneous, one third deep, intramuscular and one third deep, extramuscular. The median size was 7 (1-35) cm and 75% were high grade (III-IV). Metastases at presentation were diagnosed in 8% of the patients. Two thirds of STS patients were referred before surgery and the referral practices have improved during the study. The preoperative morphologic diagnosis was made with fine-needle aspiration cytology in 81%, core-needle biopsy in 9% and incisional biopsy in 10%. The frequency of amputations has decreased from 15% in 1986-88 to 9% in 1995-1997. A wide surgical margin was achieved in 77% of subcutaneous and 60% of deep-seated lesions. Overall, 24% of operated STS patients had adjuvant radiotherapy. The use of such therapy at sarcoma centers increased from 20% 1986-88 to 30% in 1995-97. Follow-up has been reported in 96% of the patients. The cumulative local recurrence rate was 0.20 at 5 years and 0.24 at 10 years. The 5-year metastasis-free survival rate was 0.70.

  • 4.
    Bäck, Karolina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Differential expression of insulin and IGF-I receptors in human tissuesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Insulin and IGF-I are related peptides with similar structure. They both signal via their cognate receptors, the insulin receptor (IR) and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I receptor (IGF-IR).

    Our aim was to simultaneously measure the amount of insulin and IGF-I receptors in different human tissues and also the IR-A and IR-B isoforms to study tissue specific expression

    Renal artery intima-media, myometrium, skeletal muscle or liver tissue samples were obtained from patients undergoing surgery. IR, IGF-IR, IR-A and IR-B gene expression was investigated with real-time RT-PCR and expression of IR and IGF-IR protein was examined by Western blot and ELISA.

    Renal arteries and myometrium expressed the IGF-IR gene to a higher extent than the IR gene, liver expressed more IR than IGF-IR and skeletal muscle expressed almost equal amounts of both receptors. IR-B was the most abundant isoform in all tissues. With Western blot we could detect IR in skeletal muscle, liver and myometrium. With ELISA we found that, normalized to total protein, the highest levels of IGF-IR were found in renal arteries and myometrium and low levels in skeletal muscle and liver. The highest levels of IR were found in liver.

    In conclusion there is a large variation in the quantity and ratio of insulin receptors and IGF-I receptors expressed in different tissues, the extremes being arterial intima media with predominantly IGF-I receptors and liver with predominantly insulin receptors. This suggests that differential expression of insulin and IGF-I receptors is a key mechanism in regulation of growth and metabolism.

  • 5.
    Engstrom, Katarina
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Oncol, SE-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bergh, Peter
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Orthoped, SE-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gustafson, Pelle
    Lund Univ, Dept Orthoped, Lund, Sweden.
    Hultborn, Ragnar
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Oncol, SE-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Helena
    Lofvenberg, Rickard
    Norrland Univ Hosp, Dept Orthoped, Umea, Sweden.
    Zaikova, Olga
    Norwegian Radium Hosp, Dept Orthoped, Oslo, Norway.
    Trovik, Clement
    Haukeland Hosp, Dept Orthoped, N-5021 Bergen, Norway.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Bauer, Henrik C. F.
    Karolinska Hosp, Dept Orthoped, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Liposarcoma - Outcome based on the Scandinavian Sarcoma Group Register2008In: Cancer, ISSN 0008-543X, E-ISSN 1097-0142, Vol. 113, no 7, p. 1649-1656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND. The aim was to study the clinicopathological characteristics, treatment, and outcome of liposarcoma in an unselected, population-based patient sample, and to establish whether treatment was according to the Scandinavian Sarcoma Group (SSG) treatment guidelines. METHODS. The SSG Pathology Board reviewed 319 liposarcoma cases reported between 1986 and 1998. After the review, 237 patients without metastasis were analyzed for local recurrence rate in relation to surgical margins, radiotherapy, occurrence of metastasis, and survival. RESULTS. Seventy-eight percent of the patients were primarily operated oil at a sarcoma center, 45% with wide margins. All patients operated on outside the center had nonwide margins. Low-grade lesions constituted 67% of cases. Despite nonwide surgery, only 58% of high-grade lesions were treated with postoperative radiotherapy. The risk of local recurrence after nonwide surgery, without irradiation, was 47% for high-grade lesions. The estimated 10-year, local recurrence-free and metastasis-free survival in the low-grade group was 87% and 95%, respectively. In the high-grade group, it was 75% and 61%, respectively. Independent adverse prognostic factors for local recurrence were surgery outside a sarcoma center and histological type dedifferentiated liposarcoma. For metastases, they were old age, large tumor size, high grade, and histological type myxoid liposarcoma with a round cell component. Radiotherapy showed significant effect oil local recurrence rate for the same grade and margin. CONCLUSIONS. Patients with liposarcoma should be treated at specialized centers. Postoperative radiotherapy decreases the local recurrence rate. To maintain quality and provide support for further trials, reporting to quality registers is crucial.

  • 6.
    Hallberg, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosenqvist, A. M
    Department of Geriatrics, Ryhovs Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Kartous, L
    Department of Geriatrics, Ryhovs Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Löfman, Owe
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Health-related quality of life after osteoporotic fractures2004In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 15, no 10, p. 834-841Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To estimate the impact of osteoporosis fractures on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in postmenopausal women. Methods: To compare the impact on HRQOL of different osteoporotic fractures, 600 consecutive women 55-75 years old with a new fracture (inclusion fracture) were invited by mail. After exclusions by preset criteria (high-energy fractures, ongoing osteoporosis treatment, or unwillingness to participate), 303 women were included, 171 (56%) of whom had a forearm, 37 (12%) proximal humerus, 40 (13%) hip, and 55 (18%) vertebral fracture, respectively, and all were investigated and treated according to the current local consensus program for osteoporosis. In addition, HRQOL was evaluated by the SF-36 questionnaire and compared with local, age-matched reference material. Examinations were performed 82 days (median) after the fracture and 2 years later. Results: HRQOL was significantly reduced at baseline regarding all SF-36 domains after vertebral fractures and most after hip fractures, but only regarding some domains after forearm and humerus fracture. After 2 years, improvements had occurred after all types of fractures, and after forearm or humerus fracture, HRQOL was completely normalized in all domains. However, 2 years after hip fracture, HRQOL was still below normal regarding physical function, role-physical and social function, while after vertebral fracture, scores were still significantly lower for all domains, physical as well as mental. Patients with one or more previous fractures before the inclusion fracture had lower HRQOL at baseline and after 2 years, compared with those with no previous fracture. Patients with osteoporosis (T-score < - 2.5 in hip or spine) had lower HRQOL than those with normal BMD. Conclusion: Vertebral and hip fractures have a considerably greater and more prolonged impact on HRQOL than forearm and humerus fractures. The number of fractures was inversely correlated to HRQOL. These differences should be taken into account when making priorities in health care programs.

  • 7.
    Johansson, Torsten
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jonsson, Dick
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The total costs of a displaced femoral neck fracture: comparison of internal fixation and total hip replacement. A randomised study of 146 hips2006In: International Orthopaedics, ISSN 0341-2695, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We randomised 143 patients –age 75 years or older–with displaced femoral neck fracture to either internal fixation or total hip replacement (THR) and compared the socio-economic consequences. In the internal fixation group, 34 of 78 hips underwent secondary surgery. In the THR group, 12 of 68 hips dislocated, the majority in mentally impaired patients. We calculated the total hospital costs for two years after operation. When secondary surgery was included, there was no difference in costs between the internal fixation and THR groups, or between the mentally impaired and lucid subgroups. The costs to the community were calculated comparing the baseline cost before surgery with the average cost per month during the first postoperative year. No difference was found between the treatment groups. The Harris hip scores were higher in the THR group, and pain was more common in the internal fixation group. In lucid patients, THR gives a better clinical result at the same cost.

  • 8.
    Johansson, Torsten
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Jacobsson, Sven-Arne
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ivarsson, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Knutsson, A.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Internal fixation versus total hip arthroplasty in the treatment of displaced femoral neck fractures2000In: Acta Orthopaedica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6470, Vol. 71, no 6, p. 597-602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    100 patients 75 years or older, with displaced femoral neck fractures, were randomly assigned to osteosynthesis with two parallel and percutaneously inserted screws (Olmed) or total hip arthroplasty (Lubinus IP). Mean age was 84 (75-101) years, 74% were women and 45% had mental dysfunction. General complications were commoner in the arthroplasty group but the mortality rates did not differ. In the osteosynthesis group, fracture complications were seen in 27/50 hips. In the arthroplasty group, dislocation was the main complication and occurred in 11/50 cases. At 3 months and after 1 year, the Harris Hip Scores were significantly better in the arthroplasty group. When mental dysfunction was present, the dislocation rate after arthroplasty was 32%, whereas the reoperation rate after osteosynthesis was 5%. The opposite pattern of complications was found in patients with normal mental function, 12% versus 60%. The 2-year mortality rate among those with mental dysfunction was 26/45, compared to 7/55 of those with normal function (p < 0.001). We conclude that total hip arthroplasty should be considered for a displaced femoral neck fracture in old patients with normal mental function and high functional demands.

  • 9.
    Johansson, Torsten
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Risto, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Knutsson, A.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Heterotopic bone formation following internal fixation or arthroplasty for displaced femoral neck fractures: a prospective randomized study2001In: International Orthopaedics, ISSN 0341-2695, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 223-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One hundred hips in 99 patients of 75 years or older, with a displaced femoral neck fracture, were studied for heterotopic ossification (HO). The patients were randomized to either internal fixation or total hip arthroplasty (THA). In the THA group HO was found in 32 of 45 hips compared with 1 of 39 in the internal fixation group (P<0.0012). The frequency of HO after THA corresponds well with findings in other studies on patients receiving THA for osteoarthrosis. In cervical fractures the surgical procedure of total hip replacement seems to be a prerequisite for HO, indicating that the procedure itself is more important than the patient's age and the diagnosis. Severe symptoms due to HO were found in only one patient. HO following THA for a femoral neck fracture is of little clinical importance and prophylaxis is unnecessary.

  • 10.
    Kalén, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Linder, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    The content of bone morphogenetic proteins in platelets varies greatly between different platelet donors2008In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 375, no 2, p. 261-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Platelet derivates and platelet rich plasma have been used to stimulate bone formation and wound healing because of the rich content of potent growth factors. However, not all reports have been conclusive since some have not been able to demonstrate a positive effect. We investigated the interindividual variation of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in platelets from healthy donors, and the pH-dependent effect on the release of BMPs in preparations of lysed platelets in buffer (LPB). Platelet concentrates from 31 healthy donors were prepared in pH 4.3 and pH 7.4 buffers and investigated with respect to BMP-2, -4, -6, and -7. BMP-2 and BMP-4 were significantly more common in acidic LPBs in comparison with neutral preparations. We also observed a considerable variation among platelet donors with respect to the release of BMPs at pH 4.3 and 7.4. In conclusion, a considerable variation was found among platelet donors, which may be of importance considering the ambiguous results previously reported on osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 11.
    Liu, Yawei
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kalén, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Risto, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fibroblast proliferation due to exposure to a platelet concentrate in vitro is pH dependent2002In: Wound Repair and Regeneration, ISSN 1067-1927, E-ISSN 1524-475X, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 336-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of platelet-rich plasma lysates on fibroblast proliferation was studied in culture. Cells were exposed to platelet lysates that had been preincubated at different pHs (5.0, 7.1, and 7.6). Proliferation was evaluated with the MTT assay and incorporation of [3H]thymidine into macromolecules, while type I collagen production was assayed by Western blotting. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to determine platelet-derived growth factor and transforming growth factor-β concentrations. Platelets preincubated in an acidic environment (pH 5.0) induced the highest degree of fibroblast proliferation, and the concentration of platelet-derived growth factor in the different treated lysates was the highest at that particular pH. The concentration of transforming growth factor-β, however, was lower after incubation at pH 5.0 than at either pH 7.1 or 7.6. These findings may be relevant to normal wound healing in vivo and useful in the treatment of wounds and delayed healing processes.

  • 12.
    Liu, Yawei
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kalén, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Risto, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Time- and pH-dependent release of PDGF and TGF-ß from platelets in vitro2003In: Platelets, ISSN 0953-7104, E-ISSN 1369-1635, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 233-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied the spontaneous and thrombin-induced activation of platelets and their release of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) at different pH values. Platelet activation was assayed with anti-bodies against P-selectin and performed in serum-free media. The release of PDGF and TGF-β was determined by ELISA after 15 min and 12 h. There was no activation at pH 5.0, while a time-dependent release of growth factors occurred at neutral and alkaline pH. The results suggest that release of growth factors is not only dependent on platelet activation but also on incubation time and pH. Although the used serum-free experimental situation is different from normal conditions for platelets in vivo, the findings of a late release of growth factors may, nevertheless, be relevant to wound healing.

  • 13.
    Löfman, Owe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallberg, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berglund, Kenneth
    Community Medicine, County Council of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kartous, Lisa
    Div of Geriatric Medicine, Ryhov Hospital, County council of Jönköping.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Women with low energy fracture: Case for investigation?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The combined use of bone mineral density, fracture history and other risk markers for fracture is advocated for identifying subjects with high fracture risk. An incident fracture is suggested as an accurate indication for osteoporosis investigation, but there are still insufficient data for grading the priority between ages and types of fractures. We therefore decided to examine a consecutive series of 55-75 year old women with an incident fracture for evaluating a standardized clinical routine program and for studying the covariance between fracture history, bone mineral density and other risk markers.

    Materila and methods: We invited 600 consecutive women 55-75 years old with an incident newly diagnosed fracture in distal radius forearm, proximal humerus, vertebra or hip. External drop-out was 33%. Of the 400 responders 31 had a high-energy trauma, 62 were on treatment against osteoporosis and 4 were living in other counties and were therefore excluded. The remaining 303 subjects entered the study. A questionnaire on previous fractures and risk factors was enclosed with the invitation to the osteoporosis unit. At a single visit a short history was assessed and physical examination performed as well as a few laboratory investigations. Bone mineral density was measured at the hip, lumbar spine and forearm by DXA (Hologic QDR 4500A).

    Results: The fracture spectrum was: distal radius 56.4 %, proximal humerus 12.2%, vertebra 18.2% and hip 13.2%. 49% had had at least one previous fracture, 19% at least two previous and 6.3% three or more previous fractures before the recent one. As few spine X-rays were performed, the true prevalence of vertebral fracture is unknown. Patients with fracture in vertebra or hip had lower BMD and more previous fractures than patients with forearm or humerus fracture. The number of previous fractures was inversely correlated to BMD of the hip and forearm, while BMD of the spine had a biphasic relationship.

    The Odds ratio of having either osteopenia and osteoporosis were >20 for patients with hip fracture and 75 for the spine (mean values), whereas the OR of the forearm fracture group was slightly above 10, table 6. The OR were as expected dependent of cut-off limit used. Mean value for the OR was in the hip fracture group 8.2 and 9.2 for !-score -2.5 and -2.0 respectively at the lower end of the confidence interval. For the spine and the forearm, the corresponding odds ratios were 16-17 and 7-9 respectively.

    Conclussion: Vertebral fracture was the strongest and distal radius the weakest predictor of low BMD. The number of previous fractures is a helpful information for finding the most osteoporotic patients. Only 15 % had been treated for osteoporosis before the index fracture. Osteoporosis investigation therefore seems warranted in every woman 55-75 years old with a recent low-energy fracture in distal radius, proximal humerus, spine or hip, with highest priority to those in spine or hip and those with multiple previous fractures.

  • 14.
    Löfman, Owe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallberg, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berglund, Kenneth
    Community Medicine, County Council of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Kartous, Lisa
    Department of Geriatrics, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Rosenqvist, Anna-Maria
    Department of Geriatrics, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Women with low-energy fracture should be investigated for osteoporosis2007In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 78, no 6, p. 813-821Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Treatment of osteoporosis is becoming more effective, but methods to identify patients who are most suitable for investigation and treatment are still being debated. Should any type of fracture have higher priority for investigation of osteoporosis than any other? Is the number of previous fractures useful information? Material and methods: We investigated 303 consecutive women patients between 55 and 75 years of age who had a newly diagnosed low-energy fracture. They answered a questionnaire on previous fractures which also dealt with risk factors. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured at the hip, lumbar spine, and forearm. Results: The distribution of fracture location was: distal forearm 56%, proximal humerus 12%, vertebra 18%, and hip 13%, all with similar age. Half of the subjects had had at least one previous fracture before the index fracture, 19% had had two previous fractures, and 6% had had three or more previous fractures. Patients with vertebral or hip fracture had lower BMD and had had more previous fractures than patients with forearm or humerus fractures. There was an inverse correlation between number of fractures and BMD. Osteoporosis was present in one-third of patients with forearm fracture, in one-half of those with hip or humerus fracture, and in two-thirds of those with vertebral fracture. Interpretation: Vertebral fractures were the strongest marker of low BMD and forearm fractures the weakest. The number of previous fractures is helpful information for finding the most osteoporotic patient in terms of severity. Investigation of osteoporosis therefore seems warranted in every woman between the ages of 55 and 75 with a recent low-energy fracture, with highest priority being given to those with vertebral, hip, or multiple fractures. Copyright© Taylor & Francis 2007. all rights reserved.

  • 15.
    Nilsdotter-Augustinsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Briheim, Gunnas
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Herder, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Cytology.
    Ljunghusen, O.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Öhman, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Inflammatory response in 85 patients with loosened hip prostheses: A prospective study comparing inflammatory markers in patients with aseptic and septic prosthetic loosening2007In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 78, no 5, p. 629-639Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past decades, prosthetic hip joints have improved the quality oflife for many patients. The most common complications are aseptic biornechanical failures and prosthetic joint infections. For prosthetic hip joints, delayed low-grade infections are seen most often and they are also most difficult to distinguish from aseptic mechanical failures. A prospective study was conducted to campare inilammatory markers in patients diagnosed with aseptic or septic prosthetic loosenffig. The diagnostic criteria were based on the decisions of experienced orthoperlic surgeons and microbiological analys is of periprosthetic tissue samplestaken perioperatively. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most common pathogens in the infected patients. Pre- or perioperative results for C-reactive protein and erytlu-ocyte sedimentation rate were valuable tools for diagnosing most, hut not all, low virulence infections. White blood cell count in synavial fluid was an important marker of infection, which was not the case for lactate. Levels of the cytokines turnor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1 ß. and interleukin-6 in synavial fluid were significantly higher in the infected group. Patterus of inilammatory cell infiltration in periprosthetic tissue differed significantly between the groups, and infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells proved to be the best marker of distinguish between septic and aseptic loosenffig. Treatment and outcome are described for the infected patients.

  • 16.
    Pelling, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kalén, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Preparation for becoming members of health care teams: findings from a 5-year evaluation of a student interprofessional training ward2011In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 328-332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Setting. An orthopaedic interprofessional training ward manned by students at a University Hospital. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanObjective. To assess to what extent students from different undergraduate programmes evaluated the effects of a 2-week rotation at the ward on their professional roles and the value of teamwork within health care. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethod. A questionnaire was filled in by 841 students by the end of a 2-week rotation at the ward over 5 years. Questions concerned students estimate of how the rotation had strengthened their insight into their own future professional role, into other students professional roles and into the value of teamwork within health care. Differences between the different student categories and possible associations between the different estimates were statistically analysed. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults. Students from all programmes reported that the rotation at the student ward had dramatically strengthened their insight about their own future professional role as well as the roles of the other professions and the value of teamwork within health care. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion. Health care is a complicated system based on cooperation and professionalism. We suggest that interprofessional training of students from all professions within health care should be a part of their education as a worthwhile preparation for their future professional work and to ensure high-quality health care.

  • 17.
    Pettersson, Johanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tillander, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Simulation of Patient Specific Cervical Hip Fracture Surgery With a Volume Haptic Interface2008In: IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, ISSN 0018-9294, E-ISSN 1558-2531, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 1255-1265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interest for surgery simulator systems with anatomical models generated from authentic patient data is growing as these systems evolve.With access to volumetric patient data, e.g., from a computer tomography scan, haptic and visual feedback can be created directly from this dataset. This opens the door for patient specific simulations. Hip fracture surgery is one area where simulator systems is useful to train new surgeons and plan operations. To simulate the drilling procedure in this type of surgery, a repositioning of the fractured bone into correct position is first needed. This requires a segmentation process in which the bone segments are identified and the position of the dislocated part is determined. The segmentation must be automatic to cope with the large amount of data from the computer tomography scan. This work presents the first steps in the development of a hip fracture surgery simulation with patient specific models. Visual and haptic feedback is generated from the computer tomography data by simulating fluoroscopic images and the drilling process. We also present an automatic segmentation method to identify the fractured bone and determine the dislocation. This segmentation method is based on nonrigid registration with the Morphon method.

  • 18.
    Risto, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Hammar, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Karl
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Elderly men with a history of distal radius fracture have significantly lower calcaneal bone density and free androgen index than age-matched controls2012In: The Aging Male, ISSN 1368-5538, E-ISSN 1473-0790, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 59-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Age related bone loss is widely accepted as related to decreased serum levels of circulating sex hormones. Epidemiological data also show distal radius fractures in men to be a sensitive marker of bone fragility. The aim of this study was to assess if men with a history of distal radius fracture have lower bone mass density (BMD), lower free androgen index (FAI), lower total testosterone (T) and lower bio-available testosterone (Bio-T) than healthy age-matched controls. Patients and methods: A case-control study is based on consecutive cases treated for low energy distal radius fracture at our department and age-matched controls. Thirty-nine men treated between 1997-2004 and 45 age-matched controls underwent calcaneal bone density measurements (t-score) and analyses of T, Bio-T and serum hormone binding globulin (SHBG). Results: The fracture group had lower BMD (p andlt; 0.01) and lower FAI (p = 0.01). Linear regression analysis showed a correlation between Bio-T and t-scores (p = 0.03). Using analysis of covariance, a significant difference with lower Bio-T in the fracture group was shown. Conclusion: Bio-T seems to correlate with BMD in elderly men and may serve as a marker for increased fracture risk in this patient group.

  • 19. Skytting, Björn T.
    et al.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Clinical course in synovial sarcoma. A Scandinavian sarcoma group study of 104 patients.1999In: Acta Orthopaedica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6470, Vol. 70, p. 536-542Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Tillander, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Nordqvist, P.
    Melerit Medical AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Skarman, E.
    Melerit Medical AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    A virtual reality trauma simulator2004In: Medical teacher, ISSN 0142-159X, E-ISSN 1466-187X, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 189-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors have evaluated a trauma simulator based on virtual reality techniques. Ten surgeons and 15 medical students performed distal locking of a femoral nail (A). Furthermore, 10 medical students performed simulated osteosynthesis of a femoral neck fracture (B). Total surgery time (A) (mean value) was shorter for surgeons (108 s) compared with students (157 s) at the first (p = 0.033), second (102 respectively 138 s, p = 0.13) and third (96 respectively 160 s, p = 0.15) operation. Total fluoroscopy time (A) (mean value) was shorter for surgeons compared with students at the first (45 respectively 89s p = 0.001), second (48 respectively 83 s, p = 0.02) and third (50 respectively 107 s, p = 0.10) operation. The positioning of the hip nails (B) improved between the first and last trial. Total surgery and fluoroscopy time were reduced. All participants thought that this and similar simulators should be part of the programme and that this simulator would be helpful if they were about to learn the procedures).

  • 21. Trovik, C.
    et al.
    Gustavsson, P.
    Bauer, HCF
    Saeter, G.
    Klepp, R.
    Berlin, Ö
    Raabe, N
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Consequences of local recurrence of soft tissue sarcoma: 205 patients from the Scandinavian Sarcoma Group register2000In: Acta Orthopaedica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6470, Vol. 71, no 5, p. 488-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From the Scandinavian Sarcoma Group Register, information on 1,224 surgically-treated patients with soft tissue sarcoma (STS) of the extremity or trunk wall, diagnosed between 1987 and 1995, was collected. 205 patients, one third of whom were referred to a center with a local recurrence, had a total of 284 local recurrences. This analysis describes the treatment for these local recurrences, complications and risk of further recurrences. 169 patients were surgically treated for their first local recurrence. An intralesional or marginal margin was achieved in 110 of these patients, 59 of whom were also given radiotherapy. 54 of the 169 patients had a second local recurrence. The second local recurrence rate was 0.50 if the first local recurrence had been treated with only surgery with a marginal margin, compared to 0.28 if treated with surgery with a marginal margin and radiotherapy or with a wide margin (p = 0.0008). In extremity STS, the crude amputation rate for local recurrences was 0.22 (31 of 142) - i.e., higher than for primary tumors 0.09 (96 of 1065) (p < 0.0001). A high local recurrence rate after treatment outside of sarcoma centers has earlier been shown. We conclude that the consequences of local recurrence in terms of morbidity and costs justifies referral of STS patients for multidisciplinary evaluation and multimodality treatment.

  • 22. Trovik, CS
    et al.
    Bauer, Hjärtcentrum
    Berlin, O
    Tukiainen, E
    Erlanson, M
    Gustafson, P
    Klepp, R
    Saeter, G
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Local recurrence of deep-seated, high-grade, soft tissue sarcoma: 459 Patients from the Scandinavian Sarcoma Group Register2001In: Acta Orthopaedica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6470, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 160-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was based on 459 adult patients with deep, high-grade, soft tissue sarcoma of extremities or trunk wall reported to the Scandinavian Sarcoma Group Register (1986-1993). All patients had their definitive surgery for primary tumor at a sarcoma center. The median follow-up was 7.5 (3-12) years. 204 patients are still alive. 68 patients had amputations and 391 underwent limb-sparing surgery. Among 183 patients with intralesional or marginal margins after limb-sparing surgery, 65% had postoperative radiotherapy and 9% of the 198 patients with wide margins. The local recurrence rate after limb-sparing surgery was 26%. The rate with an intralesional or marginal margin was 39% without postoperative radiotherapy versus 24% when radiotherapy was given. It was 25% after a wide margin, and no recurrences were noted among the 10 patients with a compartmental surgical margin. Among patients with a wide margin, a subset fulfilling criteria for a myectomy was defined. The local recurrence rate was 26% among these 62 and there was no advantage of myectomy over other wide margins. More radical surgical margins would improve the local recurrence rate, but this can hardly be achieved in center-operated patients without increasing the amputation rate. Instead, increased use of radiotherapy in all patients with inadequate margins, and to a larger extent in those with wide margins will improve local control.

  • 23.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Commentaries:  in International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, vol 18, issue 12, pp2011In: International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, ISSN 1741-1645, E-ISSN 1759-779X, Vol. 18, no 12, p. 680-Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 24.
    Wahlström, Ola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Device for Generation of Electromagnetic Fields of Extremely Low Frequency1984In: Journal of Biomedical Engineering, ISSN 0141-5425, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 293-296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new device for generation of electromagnetic fields at extra low frequencies, to be used in fracture treatment, is described. The device involves a coil and a battery powered noise-generator. An alternating magnetic field of 4 × 10−4T (4 Gauss) (RMS value) with a frequency range 1–1000 Hz is generated. Results from a controlled randomized study of fresh fractures have shown significant differences (p < 0.01) between the treated group and the control group. The results are encouraging and motivate further investigations with this method.

  • 25.
    Wahlström, Ola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Linder, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ansell, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kalén, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Söderström, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Acidic preparations of lysed platelets upregulate proliferative pathways in osteoblast-like cells as demonstrated by genome-wide microarray analysis2011In: Platelets, ISSN 0953-7104, E-ISSN 1369-1635, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 452-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    latelets contain numerous growth factors essential for wound and fracture healing. We investigated the gene expression in human osteoblast-like cells stimulated with lysed platelets prepared in acidic, neutral, or alkaline buffers. Lysed platelets prepared in buffers at pH 5.4, 7.4, and 7.9, were added after neutralization to hFOB 1.19 cells. Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using the Affymetrix GeneChip 7G Scanner. Biometric, cluster, and pathway analyses were performed with GeneSpring GX. Biometric analyses demonstrated that 53 genes were differentially regulated (p andlt;= 0.005, andgt;= 2-fold increase). Pathway analysis revealed 10 significant pathways of which eight are common ones regulating bone formation and cancer growth. Eleven genes were selected for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on the microarray analysis of the lysed platelets prepared in the pH 5.4 experiments. In conclusion, acidic preparations of lysed platelet concentrates release factors essential for cell proliferation and particularly cell metabolism under hypoxic conditions. The genetic response from these factors was dominated by genes associated with the same pathways observed in bone formation and cancer growth. Activation of TGF-beta in the acidic preparation could be a stimulatory key factor of cell proliferation. These results support the hypothesis that acidification of platelets modifies the stimulatory response of mesenchymal cells in vitro, which is analogous with the observed milieu of a low pH present in wound and fracture sites, as well as in growing tumors.

  • 26.
    Wahlström, Ola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Linder, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Kalén, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Acidic preparations of platelet concentrates release bone morphogenetic protein-2.2008In: Acta orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 79, no 3, p. 433-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Growth factors released from platelets have potent effects on fracture and wound healing. The acidic tide of wound healing, i.e. the pH within wounds and fractures, changes from acidic pH to neutral and alkaline pH as the healing process progresses. We investigated the influence of pH on lysed platelet concentrates regarding the release of growth factors. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Platelet concentrates free of leukocyte components were lysed and incubated in buffers with pH between 4.3 and 8.6. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor-beta(TGF-beta), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were measured by quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. RESULTS: PDGF, TGF-beta, and VEGF were present in all platelet preparations but the levels varied in a pH-dependent fashion. BMP-2 was only detected in the most acidic preparation (pH 4.3), which is interesting since BMP-2 has been reported to be an endogenous mediator of fracture repair and to be responsible for the initiation of fracture healing. INTERPRETATION: Our findings indicate that platelets release substantial amounts of BMP-2 only under conditions of low pH, the milieu associated with the critical initial stage of fracture healing.

  • 27.
    Wahlström, Ola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Linder, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Kalén, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Variation of pH in lysed platelet concentrates influence proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity in human osteoblast-like cells.2007In: Platelets, ISSN 0953-7104, E-ISSN 1369-1635, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 113-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Activated platelets release a multifaceted blend of growth factors that has stimulatory effects on mesenchymal cells, both in vitro and in vivo, which imply beneficial effects on wound repair and tissue regeneration. Previous studies on fibroblast cultures have revealed that more potent growth factors, with respect to cell proliferation, are released in acidic preparations of lysed platelet concentrates in comparison with neutral and alkaline preparations. The current study was intended to investigate the influence of pH on lysed platelet concentrates with respect to release of growth factors, cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in human osteoblast-like cells (hFOB 1.19). Cell proliferation was assessed with the MTT kit, ALP activity by conventional enzymatic reaction kinetics and growth factors platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Osteoblast-like cells were stimulated with lysed platelet concentrates preincubated at pH 4.4, 5.4, 7.4, and 7.6. A 3-13-fold increase of cell proliferation was found in comparison with controls and the most evident increase was observed with platelets activated at pH 5.4. The highest ALP activity was observed in preparations at pH 7.6. Platelets incubated in an acidic environment (pH 5.4) induced a higher proliferation compared with preincubation at neutral or alkaline pH and the level of PDGF was also found to be higher in acidic preincubations. The level of TGF-beta was, in contrast, lowest at pH 4.4. We suggest, based on these experimental findings, that acidic milieu influence platelets to release growth factors more potent to stimulate osteoblast proliferation than neutral and alkaline platelet preparations. Lysed platelet concentrates prepared at an alkaline pH might release additional components with stimulating effects resulting in other features than cell proliferation. This is the first report, to our knowledge, about a pH dependent stimulatory effect of lysed platelet concentrates on human osteoblast-like cell proliferation. Lysed platelet concentrates, preincubated in acidic or alkaline buffers, may benefit fracture healing, implant fixation and might also be advantageous in the treatment of wounds with platelet constituents; however, this has to be investigated in extended experimental and clinical settings.

  • 28.
    Wahlström, Ola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Risto, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Kalén, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Linder, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ansell, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderström, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Acidic preparations of lysed platelets up-regulate proliferative and vascular genes, and the TGFBR pathway in osteoblast-like cells in BONE, vol 48, issue , pp S118-S1182011In: BONE, Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. , 2011, Vol. 48, p. S118-S118Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

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