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  • 1.
    Brismar, T
    et al.
    Department of Radiology, CLINTEC, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Department of Radiology, Hudiksvall Hospital, Sweden.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Albiin, N
    Department of Radiology, CLINTEC, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Liver vessel enhancement by Gd-BOPTA and Gd-EOB-DTPA- a comparison in healthy volunteers2006In: ISMRM 2006,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Brismar, Torkel
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, CLINTEC, Röntgenavdelningen, Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset Huddinge.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Edsborg, Nick
    Karolinska Institutet, CLINTEC, Röntgenavdelningen, Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset Huddinge.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Albiin, Nils
    Karolinska Institutet, CLINTEC, Röntgenavdelningen, Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset Huddinge.
    Liver Vessel Enhancement by Gd-BOPTA and Gc-EOB-DTPA – a Comparison in Healthy Volunteers.2009In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 50, no 7, p. 709-715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A thorough understanding of magnetic resonance (MR) contrast media dynamics makes it possible to choose the optimal contrast media for each investigation. Differences in visualizing hepatobiliary function between Gd-BOPTA and Gd-EOB-DTPA have previously been demonstrated, but less has been published regarding differences in liver vessel visualization.Purpose: To compare the liver vessel and liver parenchymal enhancement dynamics of Gd-BOPTA (MultiHance®) and Gd-EOB-DTPA (Primovist®). Material and Methods: The signal intensity of the liver parenchyma, the common hepatic artery, the middle hepatic vein, and a segmental branch of the right portal vein, was obtained in 10 healthy volunteers before contrast media administration, during arterial and portal venous phases, and 10, 20, 30, 40 and 130 minutes after intravenous contrast medium injection, but due to scanner limitations not during the hepatic venous phase. Results: Maximum enhancement of liver parenchyma was observed from the portal venous phase until 130 minutes after Gd-BOPTA administration and from 10 minutes to 40 minutes after Gd-EOB-DTPA. There was no difference in maximum enhancement of liver parenchyma between the two contrast media. When using Gd-BOPTA, the vascular contrast enhancement was still apparent 40 minutes after injection, but had vanished 10 minutes after Gd-EOB-DTPA injection. The maximum difference in signal intensity between the vessels and the liver parenchyma was significantly greater with Gd-BOPTA than with Gd-EOB-DTPA (p<0.0001). Conclusion: At the dosage used in this study Gd-BOPTA yields higher maximum enhancement of the hepatic artery, portal vein and middle hepatic vein during the arterial and the portal venous phase and during the delayed phases than Gd-EOB-DTPA does, whereas there is no difference in liver parenchymal enhancement between the two contrast agents.

  • 3.
    Daghighi, Abtin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Klarbring, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Correction: F.E.M. Stress-Investigation of Scolios Apex2018In: Open Biomedical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1874-1207, E-ISSN 1874-1207, Vol. 12, p. 51-71Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Daghighi, Abtin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Spinal Surgery.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Klarbring, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    F.E.M. Stress-Investigation of Scolios Apex2018In: Open Biomedical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1874-1207, E-ISSN 1874-1207, Vol. 12, p. 51-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In scoliosis, kypholordos and wedge properties of the vertebrae should be involved in determining how stress is distributed in the vertebral column. The impact is logically expected to be maximal at the apex.

  • 5.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology . Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Brismar, T
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics . Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    A liver function test based on measurement of liver-specific contrast agent uptake2008In: Proceedings 16th Scientific meeting, ISMRM,2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 6.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery.
    Brismar, Torkel
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology at Karolinska Institutet, Division of Medical Imaging and Technology, Karolinska University Hospital in Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Quantifying differences in hepatic uptake of the liver specific contrast agents Gd-EOB-DTPA and Gd-BOPTA: a pilot study2012In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 642-653Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives   To develop and evaluate a procedure for quantifying the hepatocyte-specific uptake of Gd-BOPTA and Gd-EOB-DTPA using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. Methods   Ten healthy volunteers were prospectively recruited and 21 patients with suspected hepatobiliary disease were retrospectively evaluated. All subjects were examined with DCE-MRI using 0.025 mmol/kg of Gd-EOB-DTPA. The healthy volunteers underwent an additional examination using 0.05 mmol/kg of Gd-BOPTA. The signal intensities (SI) of liver and spleen parenchyma were obtained from unenhanced and enhanced acquisitions. Using pharmacokinetic models of the liver and spleen, and an SI rescaling procedure, a hepatic uptake rate, K Hep, estimate was derived. The K Hep values for Gd-EOB-DTPA were then studied in relation to those for Gd-BOPTA and to a clinical classification of the patient’s hepatobiliary dysfunction. Results   K Hep estimated using Gd-EOB-DTPA showed a significant Pearson correlation with K Hep estimated using Gd-BOPTA (r = 0.64; P < 0.05) in healthy subjects. Patients with impaired hepatobiliary function had significantly lower K Hep than patients with normal hepatobiliary function (K Hep = 0.09 ± 0.05 min-1 versus K Hep = 0.24 ± 0.10 min−1; P < 0.01). Conclusions   A new procedure for quantifying the hepatocyte-specific uptake of T 1-enhancing contrast agent was demonstrated and used to show that impaired hepatobiliary function severely influences the hepatic uptake of Gd-EOB-DTPA. Key Points   • The liver uptake of contrast agents may be measured with standard clinical MRI.Calculation of liver contrast agent uptake is improved by considering splenic uptake.Liver function affects the uptake of the liver-specific contrast agent Gd-EOB-DTPA.Hepatic uptake of two contrast agents (Gd-EOB-DTPA, Gd-BOPTA) is correlated in healthy individuals.This method can be useful for determining liver function, e.g. before hepatic surgery

  • 7.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandström, P
    Brismar, Torkel
    Karolinska institutet.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A liver function test based on measurement of liver specific contrast agent uptake2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandström, P
    Freij, Anna
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brismar, Torkel
    Karolinska institutet.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The hepatic uptake of Gd-EOB-DTPA is strongly affected by the hepatobiliary function2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandström, P
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brismar, Torkel
    Karolinska institutet.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The hepatic uptake of Gd-EOB-DTPA is strongly correlated with the uptake of Gd-BOPTA2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Hepatobiliary System Using Hepatocyte-Specific Contrast Media2009Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There are two Gadolinium-based liver-specific contrast media for Magnetic Resonance Imaging on the market, Gd-BOPTA (MultiHance®, Bracco Imaging, Milan, Italy) and Gd-EOB-DTPA (Primovist®, Bayer Schering Pharma, Berlin, Germany). The aim of this study in two parts was to evaluate the dynamics of biliary, parenchymal and vascular enhancement using these contrast media in healthy subjects. Ten healthy volunteers were examined in a 1.5 T magnetic resonance system using three-dimensional Volumetric Interpolated Breath-Hold (VIBE) sequences for dynamic imaging with both contrast media – at two different occasions – until five hours after injection. The doses given were 0.025 mmol/kg for Gd-EOB-DTPA and 0.1 mmol/kg for Gd-BOPTA. The enhancement over time of the common biliary duct in contrast to the liver parenchyma was analyzed in the first study. This was followed by a study of the image contrasts of the hepatic artery, portal vein and middle hepatic vein versus the liver parenchyma.While Gd-EOB-DTPA gave an earlier and more prolonged enhancement of the biliary duct, Gd-BOPTA achieved higher image contrast for all vessels studied, during the arterial and portal venous phases. There was no significant difference in the maximal enhancement obtained in the liver parenchyma.At the obtained time-points and at the dosage used, the high contrast between the common biliary duct and liver parenchyma had an earlier onset and longer duration for Gd-EOB-DTPA, while Gd-BOPTA achieved higher maximal enhancement of the hepatic artery, portal vein and middle hepatic vein than Gd-EOB-DTPA. Diseases of the liver and biliary system may affect the vasculature, parenchyma, biliary excretion or a combination of these. The clinical context regarding the relative importance of vascular, hepatic parenchymal and biliary processes should determine the choice of contrast media for each patient and examination.

     

    List of papers
    1. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography with Gd-BOPTA and Gd-EOB-DTPA in healthy subjects
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography with Gd-BOPTA and Gd-EOB-DTPA in healthy subjects
    Show others...
    2007 (English)In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 362-368Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the biliary enhancement dynamics of the two gadolinium chelates Gd-BOPTA (MultiHance) and Gd-EOB-DTPA (Primovist) in normal healthy subjects. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten healthy volunteers were evaluated with both agents by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 1.5T using a breath-hold gradient-echo T1-weighted VIBE sequence. The relative signal intensity (SI) differences between the common hepatic duct (CHD) and liver parenchyma were measured before and 10, 20, 30, 40, 130, 240, and 300 min after contrast medium injection. RESULTS: Biliary enhancement was obvious 10 min post-injection for Gd-EOB-DTPA and was noted at 20 min for Gd-BOPTA. At 40 min delay, Gd-BOPTA reached its peak biliary enhancement, but at neither 30 nor 40 min delay was there any significant difference compared with that of Gd-EOB-DTPA. At later delays, the contrast between CHD and liver continued to increase for Gd-EOB-DTPA, whereas it decreased for Gd-BOPTA. CONCLUSION: The earlier onset and longer duration of a high contrast between CHD and liver for Gd-EOB-DTPA facilitates examination of hepatobiliary excretion. Therefore, Gd-EOB-DTPA may provide adequate hepatobiliary imaging within a shorter time span than Gd-BOPTA and facilitate scheduling at the MR unit. Further studies in patients are required to compare the imaging advantages of Gd-EOB-DTPA and Gd-BOPTA in clinical practice.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Informa Healthcare, 2007
    Keywords
    Bile ducts; biliary; comparative studies; intravenous contrast agents; liver; MR imaging
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17916 (URN)10.1080/02841850701196922 (DOI)000246782700002 ()
    Note

    This is an electronic version of an article published in: Nils Dahlström, Anders Persson, Nils Albiin, Örjan Smedby and Torkel Brismar, Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography with Gd-BOPTA and Gd-EOB-DTPA in healthy subjects, 2007, Acta Radiologica, (48), 4, 362-368. Acta Radiologica is available online at informaworldTM: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02841850701196922 Copyright: Taylor & Francis http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/default.asp

    Available from: 2009-04-24 Created: 2009-04-24 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Liver Vessel Enhancement by Gd-BOPTA and Gc-EOB-DTPA – a Comparison in Healthy Volunteers.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Liver Vessel Enhancement by Gd-BOPTA and Gc-EOB-DTPA – a Comparison in Healthy Volunteers.
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 50, no 7, p. 709-715Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A thorough understanding of magnetic resonance (MR) contrast media dynamics makes it possible to choose the optimal contrast media for each investigation. Differences in visualizing hepatobiliary function between Gd-BOPTA and Gd-EOB-DTPA have previously been demonstrated, but less has been published regarding differences in liver vessel visualization.Purpose: To compare the liver vessel and liver parenchymal enhancement dynamics of Gd-BOPTA (MultiHance®) and Gd-EOB-DTPA (Primovist®). Material and Methods: The signal intensity of the liver parenchyma, the common hepatic artery, the middle hepatic vein, and a segmental branch of the right portal vein, was obtained in 10 healthy volunteers before contrast media administration, during arterial and portal venous phases, and 10, 20, 30, 40 and 130 minutes after intravenous contrast medium injection, but due to scanner limitations not during the hepatic venous phase. Results: Maximum enhancement of liver parenchyma was observed from the portal venous phase until 130 minutes after Gd-BOPTA administration and from 10 minutes to 40 minutes after Gd-EOB-DTPA. There was no difference in maximum enhancement of liver parenchyma between the two contrast media. When using Gd-BOPTA, the vascular contrast enhancement was still apparent 40 minutes after injection, but had vanished 10 minutes after Gd-EOB-DTPA injection. The maximum difference in signal intensity between the vessels and the liver parenchyma was significantly greater with Gd-BOPTA than with Gd-EOB-DTPA (p<0.0001). Conclusion: At the dosage used in this study Gd-BOPTA yields higher maximum enhancement of the hepatic artery, portal vein and middle hepatic vein during the arterial and the portal venous phase and during the delayed phases than Gd-EOB-DTPA does, whereas there is no difference in liver parenchymal enhancement between the two contrast agents.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Informa Healthcare, 2009
    Keywords
    Gd-BOPTA, Gd-EOB-DTPA, MRI, liver, contrast dynamics
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17917 (URN)10.1080/02841850903055603 (DOI)000270458500002 ()
    Available from: 2009-04-24 Created: 2009-04-24 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
  • 11.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Quantitative Evaluation of Contrast Agent Dynamics in Liver MRI2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The studies presented here evaluate the biliary, parenchymal and vascular enhancement effects of two T1-shortening liver-specific contrast agents, Gd-BOPTA and Gd-EOB-DTPA, in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of healthy subjects and of patients.

    Ten healthy volunteers were examined with both contrast agents in a 1.5 T MRI system using three-dimensional gradient echo sequences for dynamic imaging until five hours after injection. The enhancement of the common hepatic duct in contrast to the liver parenchyma was analyzed in the first study. This was followed by a study of the image contrasts of the hepatic artery, portal vein and middle hepatic vein versus the liver parenchyma.

    While Gd-EOB-DTPA gave an earlier and more prolonged enhancement and image contrast of the bile duct, Gd-BOPTA achieved higher maximal enhancement and higher image contrast for all vessels studied during the arterial and portal venous phases. There was no significant difference in the maximal enhancement obtained in the liver parenchyma.

    In a third study, another 10 healthy volunteers were examined with the same protocol in another 1.5 T MRI system. Using signal normalization and a more quantitative, pharmacokinetic analysis, the hepatocyte-specific uptake of Gd-EOB-DTPA and Gd-BOPTA was calculated. A significant between-subjects correlation of the uptake estimates was found and the ratio of these uptake rates was of the same magnitude as has been reported in pre-clinical studies. The procedure also enabled quantitative analysis of vascular enhancement properties of these agents. Gd-BOPTA was found to give higher vessel-to-liver contrast than Gd-EOB-DTPA when recommended doses were given.

    In the final study, retrospectively gathered datasets from patients with hepatobiliary disease were analyzed using the quantitative estimation of hepatic uptake of Gd-EOB-DTPA described in the third study. The uptake rate estimate provided significant predictive ability in separating normal from disturbed hepatobiliary function, which is promising for future evaluations of regional and global liver disease.

    In conclusion, the differing dynamic enhancement profiles of the liver-specific contrast agents presented here can be beneficial in one context and challenging in another. Diseases of the liver and biliary system may affect the vasculature, parenchyma or biliary excretion, or a combination of these. The clinical context in terms of the relative importance of vascular, hepatic parenchymal and biliary processes should therefore determine the contrast agent for each patient and examination. A quantitative approach to analysis of contrast-enhanced liver MRI examinations is feasible and may prove valuable for their interpretation.

    List of papers
    1. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography with Gd-BOPTA and Gd-EOB-DTPA in healthy subjects
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography with Gd-BOPTA and Gd-EOB-DTPA in healthy subjects
    Show others...
    2007 (English)In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 362-368Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the biliary enhancement dynamics of the two gadolinium chelates Gd-BOPTA (MultiHance) and Gd-EOB-DTPA (Primovist) in normal healthy subjects. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten healthy volunteers were evaluated with both agents by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 1.5T using a breath-hold gradient-echo T1-weighted VIBE sequence. The relative signal intensity (SI) differences between the common hepatic duct (CHD) and liver parenchyma were measured before and 10, 20, 30, 40, 130, 240, and 300 min after contrast medium injection. RESULTS: Biliary enhancement was obvious 10 min post-injection for Gd-EOB-DTPA and was noted at 20 min for Gd-BOPTA. At 40 min delay, Gd-BOPTA reached its peak biliary enhancement, but at neither 30 nor 40 min delay was there any significant difference compared with that of Gd-EOB-DTPA. At later delays, the contrast between CHD and liver continued to increase for Gd-EOB-DTPA, whereas it decreased for Gd-BOPTA. CONCLUSION: The earlier onset and longer duration of a high contrast between CHD and liver for Gd-EOB-DTPA facilitates examination of hepatobiliary excretion. Therefore, Gd-EOB-DTPA may provide adequate hepatobiliary imaging within a shorter time span than Gd-BOPTA and facilitate scheduling at the MR unit. Further studies in patients are required to compare the imaging advantages of Gd-EOB-DTPA and Gd-BOPTA in clinical practice.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Informa Healthcare, 2007
    Keywords
    Bile ducts; biliary; comparative studies; intravenous contrast agents; liver; MR imaging
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17916 (URN)10.1080/02841850701196922 (DOI)000246782700002 ()
    Note

    This is an electronic version of an article published in: Nils Dahlström, Anders Persson, Nils Albiin, Örjan Smedby and Torkel Brismar, Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography with Gd-BOPTA and Gd-EOB-DTPA in healthy subjects, 2007, Acta Radiologica, (48), 4, 362-368. Acta Radiologica is available online at informaworldTM: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02841850701196922 Copyright: Taylor & Francis http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/default.asp

    Available from: 2009-04-24 Created: 2009-04-24 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Liver vessel enhancement by Gd-BOPTA and Gd-EOB-DTPA- a comparison in healthy volunteers
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Liver vessel enhancement by Gd-BOPTA and Gd-EOB-DTPA- a comparison in healthy volunteers
    Show others...
    2006 (English)In: ISMRM 2006,2006, 2006Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-34967 (URN)24315 (Local ID)24315 (Archive number)24315 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2014-06-27
    3. Quantifying differences in hepatic uptake of the liver specific contrast agents Gd-EOB-DTPA and Gd-BOPTA: a pilot study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quantifying differences in hepatic uptake of the liver specific contrast agents Gd-EOB-DTPA and Gd-BOPTA: a pilot study
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 642-653Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives   To develop and evaluate a procedure for quantifying the hepatocyte-specific uptake of Gd-BOPTA and Gd-EOB-DTPA using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. Methods   Ten healthy volunteers were prospectively recruited and 21 patients with suspected hepatobiliary disease were retrospectively evaluated. All subjects were examined with DCE-MRI using 0.025 mmol/kg of Gd-EOB-DTPA. The healthy volunteers underwent an additional examination using 0.05 mmol/kg of Gd-BOPTA. The signal intensities (SI) of liver and spleen parenchyma were obtained from unenhanced and enhanced acquisitions. Using pharmacokinetic models of the liver and spleen, and an SI rescaling procedure, a hepatic uptake rate, K Hep, estimate was derived. The K Hep values for Gd-EOB-DTPA were then studied in relation to those for Gd-BOPTA and to a clinical classification of the patient’s hepatobiliary dysfunction. Results   K Hep estimated using Gd-EOB-DTPA showed a significant Pearson correlation with K Hep estimated using Gd-BOPTA (r = 0.64; P < 0.05) in healthy subjects. Patients with impaired hepatobiliary function had significantly lower K Hep than patients with normal hepatobiliary function (K Hep = 0.09 ± 0.05 min-1 versus K Hep = 0.24 ± 0.10 min−1; P < 0.01). Conclusions   A new procedure for quantifying the hepatocyte-specific uptake of T 1-enhancing contrast agent was demonstrated and used to show that impaired hepatobiliary function severely influences the hepatic uptake of Gd-EOB-DTPA. Key Points   • The liver uptake of contrast agents may be measured with standard clinical MRI.Calculation of liver contrast agent uptake is improved by considering splenic uptake.Liver function affects the uptake of the liver-specific contrast agent Gd-EOB-DTPA.Hepatic uptake of two contrast agents (Gd-EOB-DTPA, Gd-BOPTA) is correlated in healthy individuals.This method can be useful for determining liver function, e.g. before hepatic surgery

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2012
    Keywords
    Gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid – Gadobenate Dimeglumine – Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI – Pharmacokinetics – Liver
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-73624 (URN)10.1007/s00330-011-2302-4 (DOI)000299768000018 ()21984449 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, VR/M 2007-2884Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS), 12621Linköpings universitet
    Note

    The previous status of this article was Manuscript and the working titles was Liver Specific Gd-EOB-DTPA vs. Gd-BOPTA Uptake in Healthy Subjects: A Novel and Quantitative MRI Analysis of Hepatic Uptake and Vascular Enhancement and Hepatic Uptake of Gd-EOB-DTPA in Patients with Varying Degree of Hepatobiliary Disease.

    Available from: 2012-01-10 Created: 2012-01-10 Last updated: 2019-06-14
  • 12.
    Dahlström, Nils
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brismar, Torkel
    Karolinska institutet.
    Sandström, P
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Leverfunktionsundersökning med leverspecifikt MR-kontrastmedel2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Dahlström, Nils
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Quick, Petter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dual-Energy CT Detects Standard-Dose Gd-EOB-DTPA in the Hepatobiliary and Renal Systems of Patients Having Undergone Liver MRI2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Dahlström, Nils
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Brismar, Torkel
    Karolinska Huddinge.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Quantified hepatobiliary Gd-EOB-DTPA uptake rate reflects hepatobiliary function in patients2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Dahlström, Nils
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Albiin, Nils
    Karolinska Institutet, CLINTEC, Röntgenavdelningen, Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset Huddinge.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Brismar, Torkel
    Karolinska Institutet, CLINTEC, Röntgenavdelningen, Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset Huddinge.
    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography with Gd-BOPTA and Gd-EOB-DTPA in healthy subjects2007In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 362-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the biliary enhancement dynamics of the two gadolinium chelates Gd-BOPTA (MultiHance) and Gd-EOB-DTPA (Primovist) in normal healthy subjects. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten healthy volunteers were evaluated with both agents by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 1.5T using a breath-hold gradient-echo T1-weighted VIBE sequence. The relative signal intensity (SI) differences between the common hepatic duct (CHD) and liver parenchyma were measured before and 10, 20, 30, 40, 130, 240, and 300 min after contrast medium injection. RESULTS: Biliary enhancement was obvious 10 min post-injection for Gd-EOB-DTPA and was noted at 20 min for Gd-BOPTA. At 40 min delay, Gd-BOPTA reached its peak biliary enhancement, but at neither 30 nor 40 min delay was there any significant difference compared with that of Gd-EOB-DTPA. At later delays, the contrast between CHD and liver continued to increase for Gd-EOB-DTPA, whereas it decreased for Gd-BOPTA. CONCLUSION: The earlier onset and longer duration of a high contrast between CHD and liver for Gd-EOB-DTPA facilitates examination of hepatobiliary excretion. Therefore, Gd-EOB-DTPA may provide adequate hepatobiliary imaging within a shorter time span than Gd-BOPTA and facilitate scheduling at the MR unit. Further studies in patients are required to compare the imaging advantages of Gd-EOB-DTPA and Gd-BOPTA in clinical practice.

  • 16.
    Dahlström, Nils
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Quick, Petter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Kalra, Mannudeep K.
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA .
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dual-Energy CT: Uncovering and Troubleshooting New Pitfalls and Artefacts. Educational Exhibit2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Dahlström, Nils
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Woisetschläger, Mischa
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Singh, S
    Boston, MA/US.
    Digumarthy, M
    Kalra, Mannudeep
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Role of Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction(Safire) technique in image quality and radiation dose reduction for chest CT examinations2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Darras, Kathryn E.
    et al.
    Univ British Columbia, Canada; Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    de Bruin, Anique B. H.
    Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Nicolaou, Savvas
    Univ British Columbia, Canada.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    van Merrienboer, Jeroen
    Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Forster, Bruce B.
    Univ British Columbia, Canada.
    Is there a superior simulator for human anatomy education? How virtual dissection can overcome the anatomic and pedagogic limitations of cadaveric dissection2018In: Medical teacher, ISSN 0142-159X, E-ISSN 1466-187X, Vol. 40, no 7, p. 752-753Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Educators must select the best tools to teach anatomy to future physicians and traditionally, cadavers have always been considered the "gold standard" simulator for living anatomy. However, new advances in technology and radiology have created new teaching tools, such as virtual dissection, which provide students with new learning opportunities. Virtual dissection is a novel way of studying human anatomy through patient computed tomography (CT) scans. Through touchscreen technology, students can work together in groups to "virtually dissect" the CT scans to better understand complex anatomic relationships. This article presents the anatomic and pedagogic limitations of cadaveric dissection and explains what virtual dissection is and how this new technology may be used to overcome these limitations.

  • 19.
    Engellau, Lena
    et al.
    Department of Radiology, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Albrechtsson, U.
    Department of Radiology, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Department of Radiology, Hudiksvall Hospital, Hudiksvall Sweden.
    Norgren, L.
    Department of Vascular Diseases, Lund University, Malmo University Hospital, Malmo, Sweden.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Larsson, E.-M.
    Department of Radiology, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Measurements before endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms: MR imaging with MRA vs. angiography and CT2003In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 177-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: 1) To compare measurements obtained with MR imaging (MRI)/contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE MRA) with measurements obtained with angiography (DSA) and CT, for stent-graft sizing of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). 2) To compare MRA measurements obtained with the two post processing techniques MIP (maximum intensity projection) and VRT (3D volume rendering technique).

    Material and Methods: The prospective study included 20 consecutive patients with AAA identified by DSA and CT as suitable for endovascular repair. For the study, MRI/CE MRA was performed. Five measurement variables for stent-graft sizing were chosen. Comparisons were made between MRI/CE MRA, DSA and CT, and between observers. Comparisons were also made between MIP and VRT.

    Results: Significantly shorter lengths were obtained with MRA-MIP than with DSA. Three out of six diameter measurements were significantly smaller on MRI/CE MRA than on DSA and CT. No significant differences were found between the observers. One diameter measurement was significantly smaller on MIP than on VRT, while the other measurements showed no significant differences.

    Conclusion: The length measurements obtained with MRA-MIP were probably more correct than those with DSA. For more reliable diameter measurements with CE MRA, improvements of the technique, including VRT reconstructions and a standardized determination of the vessel boundaries, are needed.

  • 20.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Brismar, Torkel
    Department of Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    The First Human Whole Body Pharmacokinetic Minimal Model for the Liver Specific Contrast Agent Gd-EOB-DTPA2011In: Proc. Intl. Soc. Mag. Reson. Med. 19 (2011), 2011, p. 3016-3016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Physiologically Realistic and Validated Mathematical Liver Model Revels Hepatobiliary Transfer Rates for Gd-EOB-DTPA Using Human DCE-MRI Data2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 0095700-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Diffuse liver disease (DLD), such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NASH) and cirrhosis, is a rapidly growing problem throughout the Westernized world. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), based on uptake of the hepatocyte-specific contrast agent (CA) Gd-EOB-DTPA, is a promising non-invasive approach for diagnosing DLD. However, to fully utilize the potential of such dynamic measurements for clinical or research purposes, more advanced methods for data analysis are required. Methods: A mathematical model that can be used for such data-analysis was developed. Data was obtained from healthy human subjects using a clinical protocol with high spatial resolution. The model is based on ordinary differential equations and goes beyond local diffusion modeling, taking into account the complete system accessible to the CA. Results: The presented model can describe the data accurately, which was confirmed using chi-square statistics. Furthermore, the model is minimal and identifiable, meaning that all parameters were determined with small degree of uncertainty. The model was also validated using independent data. Conclusions: We have developed a novel approach for determining previously undescribed physiological hepatic parameters in humans, associated with CA transport across the liver. The method has a potential for assessing regional liver function in clinical examinations of patients that are suffering of DLD and compromised hepatic function.

  • 22.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Karlsson, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Whole Body Mechanistic Minimal Model for Gd-EOB-DTPA Contrast Agent Pharmacokinetics in Evaluation of Diffuse Liver Disease2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Aiming for non-invasive diagnostic tools to decrease the need for biopsy in diffuse liver disease and to quantitatively describe liver function, we applied a mechanistic pharmacokinetic modelling analysis of liver MRI with Gd-EOB-DTPA. This modelling method yields physiologically relevant parameters and was compared to previously developed methods in a patient group with diffuse liver disease. Materials and Methods: Using data from healthy volunteers undergoing liver MRI, an identifiable mechanistic model was developed, based on compartments described by ordinary differential equations and kinetic expressions, and validated with independent data including Gd-EOB-DTPA concentration measurements in blood samples. Patients (n=37) with diffuse liver disease underwent liver biopsy and MRI with Gd-EOB-DTPA. The model was used to derive pharmacokinetic parameters which were then compared with other quantitative estimates in their ability to separate mild from severe liver fibrosis. Results: The estimations produced by the mechanistic model allowed better separation between mild and severe fibrosis than previously described methods for quantifying hepatic Gd-EOB-DTPA uptake. Conclusions: With a mechanistic pharmacokinetic modelling approach, the estimation of liver uptake function and its diagnostic information can be improved compared to current methods.

  • 23.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andregård, O.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Prospective evaluation of liver steatosis comparing stereological point-counting biopsy analysis and 1H MRS2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ignatova, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Model-inferred mechanisms of liver function from magnetic resonance imaging data: Validation and variation across a clinically relevant cohort2019In: PloS Computational Biology, ISSN 1553-734X, E-ISSN 1553-7358, PLOS COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY, Vol. 15, no 6, article id e1007157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Estimation of liver function is important to monitor progression of chronic liver disease (CLD). A promising method is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with gadoxetate, a liver-specific contrast agent. For this method, we have previously developed a model for an average healthy human. Herein, we extended this model, by combining it with a patient-specific non-linear mixed-effects modeling framework. We validated the model by recruiting 100 patients with CLD of varying severity and etiologies. The model explained all MRI data and adequately predicted both timepoints saved for validation and gadoxetate concentrations in both plasma and biopsies. The validated model provides a new and deeper look into how the mechanisms of liver function vary across a wide variety of liver diseases. The basic mechanisms remain the same, but increasing fibrosis reduces uptake and increases excretion of gadoxetate. These mechanisms are shared across many liver functions and can now be estimated from standard clinical images.

    Author summary

    Being able to accurately and reliably estimate liver function is important when monitoring the progression of patients with liver disease, as well as when identifying drug-induced liver injury during drug development. A promising method for quantifying liver function is to use magnetic resonance imaging combined with gadoxetate. Gadoxetate is a liver-specific contrast agent, which is taken up by the hepatocytes and excreted into the bile. We have previously developed a mechanistic model for gadoxetate dynamics using averaged data from healthy volunteers. In this work, we extended our model with a non-linear mixed-effects modeling framework to give patient-specific estimates of the gadoxetate transport-rates. We validated the model by recruiting 100 patients with liver disease, covering a range of severity and etiologies. All patients underwent an MRI-examination and provided both blood and liver biopsies. Our validated model provides a new and deeper look into how the mechanisms of liver function varies across a wide variety of liver diseases. The basic mechanisms remain the same, but increasing fibrosis reduces uptake and increases excretion of gadoxetate.

  • 25.
    Kalra, Mannudeep K.
    et al.
    Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA .
    Woisetschläger, Mischa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Sing, Sarabjeet
    Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA .
    Lindblom, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Choy, Garry
    Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA .
    Quick, Petter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Schmidt, Bernhard
    Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany.
    Sedlmair, Martin
    Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany.
    Blake, Michail A.
    Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Radiation Dose Reduction with Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction Technique for abdominal Computer Tomography2012In: Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography, ISSN 0363-8715, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 339-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to assess the effect of Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction (SAFIRE) and filtered back-projection (FBP) techniques on abdominal computed tomography (CT) performed with 50% and 75% radiation dose reductions.

    Methods: Twenty-four patients (mean age, 64 ± 14 years; male-female ratio, 10:14) gave informed consent for an institutional review board–approved prospective study involving acquisition of additional research images through the abdomen on 128-slice multi–detector-row CT (SOMATOM Definition Flash) at quality reference mAs of 100 (50% lower dose) and 50 (75% lower dose) over a scan length of 10 cm using combined modulation (CARE Dose 4D). Standard-of-care abdominal CT was performed at 200 quality reference mAs, with remaining parameters held constant. The 50- and 100-mAs data sets were reconstructed with FBP and at 4 SAFIRE settings (S1, S2, S3, S4). Higher number of SAFIRE settings denotes increased strength of the algorithm resulting in lower image noise. Two abdominal radiologists independently compared the FBP and SAFIRE images for lesion number, location, size and conspicuity, and visibility of small structures, image noise, and diagnostic confidence. Objective noise and Hounsfield units (HU) were measured in the liver and the descending aorta.

    Results: All 43 lesions were detected on both FBP and SAFIRE images. Minor blocky, pixelated appearance of 50% and 75% reduced dose images was noted at S3 and S4 SAFIRE but not at S1 and S2 settings. Subjective noise was suboptimal in both 50% and 75% lower-dose FBP images but was deemed acceptable on all SAFIRE settings. Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction images were deemed acceptable in all patients at 50% lower dose and in 22 of 24 patients at 75% lower dose. As compared with 75% reduced dose FBP, objective noise was lower by 22.8% (22.9/29.7), 35% (19.3/29.7), 44.3% (16.7/29.3), and 54.8% (13.4/29.7) on S1 to S4 settings, respectively (P < 0.001).

    Conclusions: Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction–enabled reconstruction provides abdominal CT images without loss in diagnostic value at 50% reduced dose and in some patients also at 75% reduced dose.

  • 26.
    Kalra, Mannudeep K.
    et al.
    Division of Thoraic Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA .
    Woisetschläger, Mischa
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Singh, Sarabjeet
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA .
    Digumarthy, Subbarao
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA .
    Do, Synho
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA .
    Pien, Homer
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA .
    Quick, Petter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Schmidt, Bernhard
    Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany..
    Sedlmair, Martin
    Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany.
    Shepard, Jo-Anne O.
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA .
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Sinogram-Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction of Low-Dose Chest CT: Effect on Image Quality and Radiation Dose2013In: American Journal of Roentgenology, ISSN 0361-803X, E-ISSN 1546-3141, Vol. 201, no 2, p. W235-W244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study is to compare sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) and filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction of chest CT acquired with 65% radiation dose reduction.

    SUBJECTS AND METHODS. In this prospective study involving 24 patients (11 women and 13 men; mean [+/- SD] age, 66 +/- 10 years), two scan series were acquired using 100 and 40 Quality Reference mAs over a 10-cm scan length in the chest with a 128-MDCT scanner. The 40 Quality Reference mAs CT projection data were reconstructed with FBP and four settings of Safire (S1, S2, S3, and S4). Six image datasets (FBP with 100 and 40 Quality Reference mAs, and S1, S2, S3, S4 with 40 Quality Reference mAs) were displayed on a DICOM-compliant 55-inch 2-megapixel monitor for blinded evaluation by two thoracic radiologists for number and location of lesions, lesion size, lesion margins, visibility of small structures and fissures, and diagnostic confidence. Objective noise and CT values were measured in thoracic aorta for each image series, and the noise power spectrum was assessed. Data were analyzed with analysis of variance and Wilcoxon signed rank tests.

    RESULTS. All 186 lesions were seen on 40 Quality Reference mAs SAFIRE images. Diagnostic confidence on SAFIRE images was higher than that for FBP images. Except for the minor blotchy appearance on SAFIRE settings S3 and S4, no significant artifacts were noted. Objective noise with 40 Quality Reference mAs S1 images (21.1 +/- 6.1 SD of HU) was significantly lower than that for 40 Quality Reference mAs FBP images (28.5 +/- 8.1 SD of HU) (p andlt; 0.001). Noise power spectra were identical for SAFIRE and FBP with progressive noise reduction with higher iteration SAFIRE settings.

    CONCLUSION. Iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) allows reducing the radiation exposure by approximately 65% without losing diagnostic information in chest CT.

  • 27.
    Karlsson, Markus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ignatova, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Liver R2*is affected by both iron and fat: A dual biopsy-validated study of chronic liver disease2019In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 325-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Liver iron content (LIC) in chronic liver disease (CLD) is currently determined by performing an invasive liver biopsy. MRI using R2* relaxometry is a noninvasive alternative for estimating LIC. Fat accumulation in the liver, or proton density fat fraction (PDFF), may be a possible confounder of R2* measurements. Previous studies of the effect of PDFF on R2* have not used quantitative LIC measurement. Purpose To assess the associations between R2*, LIC, PDFF, and liver histology in patients with suspected CLD. Study Type Prospective. Population Eighty-one patients with suspected CLD. Field Strength/Sequence 1.5 T. Multiecho turbo field echo to quantify R2*. PRESS MRS to quantify PDFF. Assessment Each patient underwent an MR examination, followed by two needle biopsies immediately following the MR examination. The first biopsy was used for conventional histological assessment of LIC, whereas the second biopsy was used to quantitatively measure LIC using mass spectrometry. R2* was correlated with both LIC and PDFF. A correction for the influence of fat on R2* was calculated. Statistical Tests Pearson correlation, linear regression, and area under the receiver operating curve. Results There was a positive linear correlation between R2* and PDFF (R = 0.69), after removing data from patients with elevated iron levels, as defined by LIC. R2*, corrected for PDFF, was the best method for identifying patients with elevated iron levels, with a correlation of R = 0.87 and a sensitivity and specificity of 87.5% and 98.6%, respectively. Data Conclusion PDFF increases R2*. Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2019;50:325-333.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-09-13 14:26
  • 28.
    Karlsson, Markus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Leinhard Dahlqvist, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Diffuse Liver Disease: Measurements of Liver Trace Metal Concentrations and R2* Relaxation Rates2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Over the past decade, several methods for measuring of liver iron content (LIC) non-invasively with MRI have been developed and verified. The most promising methods uses relaxometry, measuring either R2- or R2* relaxation rate in the liver1,2. For instance, several studies have shown that there seems to be a linear relationship between R2* and LIC1. However, few of these studies have measured the liver content of other metals, which could also affect the relaxation rates. The goal of this study was to investigate if any trace metals, other than iron could affect the R2* relaxation rate in liver tissue in a patients with diffuse liver disease.

    Subjects and methods

    75 patients with suspected diffuse liver disease underwent an MRI examination followed by a liver biopsy the same day. The R2* relaxation rate of the water protons in the liver was measured using an axial 3D multi-slice fat-saturated multi-echo turbo field echo sequence (TE=4.60/9.20/13.80/18.40/23.00ms). Regions of interest (ROI) were drawn and R2* was estimated by fitting the mean signal intensity from the ROIs to a mono-exponential decay model. The biopsies were freeze dried and the concentrations of iron, manganese, copper, cobalt and gadolinium were measured using Inductively Coupled Plasma Sector Field Mass Spectrometry (ICP-SFMS). A multiple linear regression analysis was applied to determine which of the measured metals significantly affected the relaxation rate.

    Results

    A linear regression with the LIC and R2* showed a reasonable fit (Figure 1). The multiple linear regression analysis (Table 1) showed that iron as well as manganese had a significant affect on R2*. Unlike iron however, the regression coefficient of manganese was negative, meaning that an increasing manganese concentration gave a shorter R2* relaxation rate. The same trend can be seen when plotting the manganese concentration against R2* (Figure 2).

  • 29.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kalra, Mannudeep
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    De Geer, Jakob
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rönn, Martin
    ContextVision, Linköping.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olofsson, Fredrik
    ContextVision, Linköping.
    Bäck, Anni
    ContextVision, Linköping.
    Applying 2D and 3D Postprocessing Algorithms to MR Images: Does Image Quality Improve? Can MR Imaging Duration Be Reduced?2010In: In Proceedings of RSNA 2010, SSM22, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Lundberg, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Ignatova, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Leinhard Dahlqvist, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Kvantifiering av leversteatos: diagnostisk utvärdering av protonmagnetresonansspektroskopi jämfört med histologiska metoder2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund

    Leversteatos är den vanligaste manifestationen av leversjukdom i västvärlden. Leverbiopsi med semikvantitativ histologisk gradering är referensmetod vid gradering av leversteatos. Med protonmagnetsresonansspektroskopi (1H-MRS), en metod som föreslagits ersätta leverbiopsi för värdering av steatos, kan leverns innehåll av triglycerider mätas icke-invasivt. Triglyceridinnehåll >5,00 % används ofta som ett diagnostiskt kriterium för leversteatos vid undersökning med 1H-MRS. Syftet med studien var att jämföra 1H-MRS med semikvantitativ histologisk steatosgradering och kvantitativ histologisk steatosmätning.

    Metod

    Patienter remitterade för utredning av förhöjda leverenzymer in-kluderades i studien. Samtliga patienter genomgick klinisk undersökning, laboratorieprovtagning samt 1H-MRS direkt följd av leverbiopsi. För konventionell histologisk semikvantitativ gradering av steatos användes kriterierna utarbetade av Brunt och medarbetare. Kvantitativ mätning av fett i biopsierna utfördes genom att med hjälp av stereologisk punkträkning (SPC) mäta andelen av ytan som innehöll fettvakuoler.

    Resultat

    I studien inkluderades 94 patienter, varav 37 hade icke-alkoholor-sakad fettleversjukdom (NAFLD), 49 hade andra leversjukdomar och 8 hade normal leverbiopsi. En stark korrelation noterades mel-lan 1H-MRS och SPC (r=0,92, p<0,0001; к=0.82). Korrelationen mellan 1H-MRS och Brunts kriterier (к=0.26) samt mellan SPC och Brunts kriterier (к=0.38) var betydligt sämre. När patologens gradering (Brunts kriterier) användes som referensmetod för diag-nos av leversteatos så hade alla patienter med triglyceridinnehåll >5,00 % mätt med 1H-MRS steatos (specificitet 100 %). Emellertid hade 22 av 69 patienter med triglyceridinnehåll ≤5,00 % också le-versteatos enligt Brunts kriterier (sensitivitet 53 %). Motsvarande siffror när man använde gränsvärdet 3,02 % var sensitivitet 79 % och specificitet 100 %. Vid ytterligare reduktion av gränsvärdet för triglyceridinnehåll till 2,00 % ökade sensitiviteten till 87 % med upprätthållande av hög specificitet (94 %).

    Slutsats

    1H-MRS och SPC uppvisade en mycket hög korrelation vid kvantifiering av leversteatos. SPC borde därför föredras framför Brunts kriterier när noggrann histologisk kvantifiering av leversteatos är önskvärd. Många patienter kan ha histologisk leversteatos trots triglyceridinnehåll ≤5,00 % mätt med 1H-MRS. Gränsvärdet för diagnostisering av leversteatos med 1H-MRS bör därför reduceras.

  • 31.
    Lundberg, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Karlsson, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Leinhard Dahlqvist, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Mechanistic modeling of qDCE-MRI data reveals increased bile excretion of Gd-EOB-DTPA in diffuse liver disease patients with severe fibrosis2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Over the past decades, several different non-invasive methods for staging hepatic fibrosis have been proposed. One such method is dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) using the contrast agent (CA) Gd-EOB-DTPA. Gd-EOB-DTPA is liver specific, which means that it is taken up specifically by the hepatocytes via the OATP3B1/B3 transporters and excreted into the bile via the MRP2 transporter. Several studies have shown that DCE-MRI and Gd-EOBDTPA can separate patients with advanced (F3-F4) from mild (F0-F2) hepatic fibrosis by measuring the signal intensity, where patients with advanced fibrosis have a lower signal intensity than the mild fibrosis cases.1 However, none of the studies up to date have been able to differentiate if the reduced signal intensity in the liver is because of an decreased uptake of CA or an increased excretion. Analyzing the DCE-MRI data with mechanistic mathematical modelling has the possibility of investigating such a differentiation.

    Subjects and methods

    88 patients with diffuse liver disease were examined using DCE-MRI (1.5 T Philips Achieva, two-point Dixon, TR=6.5 ms, TE=2.3/4.6 ms, FA=13) after a bolus injection of Gd-EOB-DTPA, followed by a liver biopsy. Regions of interest were placed within the liver, spleen and veins and a whole-body mechanistic pharmacokinetic model2 was fitted to the data. The fitted parameters in the model correspond to the rate of CA transport between different compartments, e.g. hepatocytes, blood plasma, and bile (Fig. 1).

    Results

    As can be seen in Fig. 2, the parameter corresponding to the transport of CA from the blood plasma to the hepatocytes, kph, is lower for patients with advanced fibrosis (p=0.01). Fig. 3 shows that the parameter corresponding to the CA excretion into the bile, khb, is higher for patients with advanced fibrosis (p<0.01).

    Discussion/Conclusion

    This work shows that the decreased signal intensity in DCE-MRI images in patients with advanced fibrosis depends on both a decreased uptake of CA in the hepatocytes and an increased excretion into the bile. Similar results have also been observed in a rat study3. In that study, rats with induced cirrhosis had a higher MRP2-activity than the healthy control rats.

    References

    1Norén et al: Eur. Radiol, 23(1), 174-181, 2013.

    2Forsgren et al: PloS One, 9(4): e95700, 2014.

    3Tsuda & Matsui: Radiol, 256(3): 767-773, 2010.

  • 32.
    Nasr, Patrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Forsgren, Mikael F.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Wolfram MathCore AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ignatova, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Using a 3% Proton Density Fat Fraction as a Cut-off Value Increases Sensitivity of Detection of Hepatic Steatosis, Based on Results from Histopathology Analysis2017In: Gastroenterology, ISSN 0016-5085, E-ISSN 1528-0012, Vol. 153, no 1, p. 53-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is possible to estimate hepatic triglyceride content by calculating the proton density fat fraction (PDFF), using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (less thansuperscriptgreater than1less than/superscriptgreater thanH-MRS), instead of collecting and analyzing liver biopsies to detect steatosis. However, the current PDFF cut-off value (5%) used to define steatosis by magnetic resonance was derived from studies that did not use histopathology as the reference standard. We performed a prospective study to determine the accuracy of less thansuperscriptgreater than1less than/superscriptgreater thanH-MRS PDFF in measurement of steatosis using histopathology analysis as the standard. We collected clinical, serologic, less thansuperscriptgreater than1less than/superscriptgreater thanH-MRS PDFF, and liver biopsy data from 94 adult patients with increased levels of liver enzymes (6 months or more) referred to the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Linköping University Hospital in Sweden from 2007 through 2014. Steatosis was graded using the conventional histopathology method and fat content was quantified in biopsy samples using stereological point counts (SPCs). We correlated less thansuperscriptgreater than1less than/superscriptgreater thanH-MRS PDFF findings with SPCs (r = 0.92; P less than.001). less thansuperscriptgreater than1less than/superscriptgreater thanH-MRS PDFF results correlated with histopathology results (ρ = 0.87; P less than.001), and SPCs correlated with histopathology results (ρ = 0.88; P less than.001). All 25 subjects with PDFF values of 5.0% or more had steatosis based on histopathology findings (100% specificity for PDFF). However, of 69 subjects with PDFF values below 5.0% (negative result), 22 were determined to have steatosis based on histopathology findings (53% sensitivity for PDFF). Reducing the PDFF cut-off value to 3.0% identified patients with steatosis with 100% specificity and 79% sensitivity; a PDFF cut-off value of 2.0% identified patients with steatosis with 94% specificity and 87% sensitivity. These findings might be used to improve non-invasive detection of steatosis.

  • 33.
    Norén, Bengt
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Prospective Evaluation of a Novel Quantification Method for the Discrimination of Mild and Severe Hepatic Fibrosis Using Gd-EOB-DTPA2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Norén, Bengt
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Wirell, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Visual assessment of biliary excretion of Gd-EOB-DTPA in patients with suspected diffuse liver disease – a biopsy-controlled prospective study2015In: European Journal of Radiology Open, ISSN 2352-0477, Vol. 2, p. 19-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To qualitatively evaluate late dynamic contrast phases, 10, 20 and 30 min, after administration of Gd-EOB-DTPA with regard to biliary excretion in patients presenting with elevated liver enzymes without any clinical signs of cirrhosis or hepatic decompensation and to compare the visual assessment of contrast agent excretion with histo-pathological fibrosis stage, contrast uptake parameters and blood tests.

    Methods: 29 patients were prospectively examined using 1.5-T MRI. The visually assessed presence (1) or absence (0) of contrast agent for each of five anatomical regions in randomly reviewed time-series was summarised on a four grade scale. The scores, including a total visual score, were related to the histo-pathological findings, the quantitative contrast agent uptake parameters and blood tests

    Results: No relationship between the fibrosis grade or contrast uptake parameters expressed as KHep or LSC_N could be established. A negative correlation between the visual assessment and ALP was found. Comparing a sub-group of cholestatic patients with fibrosis score and Gd-EOB-DTPAdynamic parameters did not add any additional significant correlation.

    Conclusions: In this prospective study with a limited number of patients we were not able to demonstrate a correlation between visually assessed biliary excretion of Gd-EOB-DTPA and  histo-pathological or contrast uptake parameters.

  • 35.
    Norén, Bengt
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Separation of advanced from mild hepatic fibrosis by quantification of the hepatobiliary uptake of Gd-EOB-DTPA2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Norén, Bengt
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Quantification of the hepatobiliary uptake of Gd-EOB-DTPA can separate advanced from mild fibrosis2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Norén, Bengt
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Forsgren, Mikael Fredrik
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Separation of advanced from mild hepatic fibrosis by quantification of the hepatobiliary uptake of Gd-EOB-DTPA2013In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 174-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    To apply dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI on patients presenting with elevated liver enzymes without clinical signs of hepatic decompensation in order to quantitatively compare the hepatocyte-specific uptake of Gd-EOB-DTPA with histopathological fibrosis stage.

    Methods

    A total of 38 patients were prospectively examined using 1.5-T MRI. Data were acquired from regions of interest in the liver and spleen by using time series of single-breath-hold symmetrically sampled two-point Dixon 3D images (non-enhanced, arterial and venous portal phase; 3, 10, 20 and 30 min) following a bolus injection of Gd-EOB-DTPA (0.025 mmol/kg). The signal intensity (SI) values were reconstructed using a phase-sensitive technique and normalised using multiscale adaptive normalising averaging (MANA). Liver-to-spleen contrast ratios (LSC_N) and the contrast uptake rate (KHep) were calculated. Liver biopsy was performed and classified according to the Batts and Ludwig system.

    Results

    Area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUROC) values of 0.71, 0.80 and 0.78, respectively, were found for KHep, LSC_N10 and LSC_N20 with regard to severe versus mild fibrosis. Significant group differences were found for KHep (borderline), LSC_N10 and LSC_N20.

    Conclusions

    Liver fibrosis stage strongly influences the hepatocyte-specific uptake of Gd-EOB-DTPA. Potentially the normalisation technique and KHep will reduce patient and system bias, yielding a robust approach to non-invasive liver function determination.

  • 38.
    Persson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Brismar, Torkel
    Karolinska Institutet, CLINTEC, Röntgenavdelningen, Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset Huddinge.
    Lundström, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Othberg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Standardized volume rendering for magnetic resonance angiography measurements in the abdominal aorta2006In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 172-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To compare three methods for standardizing volume rendering technique (VRT) protocols by studying aortic diameter measurements in magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) datasets.

    Material and Methods: Datasets from 20 patients previously examined with gadolinium-enhanced MRA and with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for abdominal aortic aneurysm were retrospectively evaluated by three independent readers. The MRA datasets were viewed using VRT with three different standardized transfer functions: the percentile method (Pc-VRT), the maximum-likelihood method (ML-VRT), and the partial range histogram method (PRH-VRT). The aortic diameters obtained with these three methods were compared with freely chosen VRT parameters (F-VRT) and with maximum intensity projection (MIP) concerning inter-reader variability and agreement with the reference method DSA.

    Results: F-VRT parameters and PRH-VRT gave significantly higher diameter values than DSA, whereas Pc-VRT gave significantly lower values than DSA. The highest interobserver variability was found for F-VRT parameters and MIP, and the lowest for Pc-VRT and PRH-VRT. All standardized VRT methods were significantly superior to both MIP and F-VRT in this respect. The agreement with DSA was best for PRH-VRT, which was the only method with a mean error below 1 mm and which also had the narrowest limits of agreement (95% of cases between 2.1 mm below and 3.1 mm above DSA).

    Conclusion: All the standardized VRT methods compare favorably with MIP and VRT with freely selected parameters as regards interobserver variability. The partial range histogram method, although systematically overestimating vessel diameters, gives results closest to those of DSA.

  • 39.
    Persson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Department of Radiology, Hudiksvall Hospital, Sweden.
    Engellau, Lena
    Department of Radiology, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Department of Radiology, Lund University Hospital.
    Brismar, Torkel B.
    Center for Surgical Sciences, Division of Radiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Volume rendering compared with maximum intensity projection for magnetic resonance angiography measurements of the abdominal aorta2004In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 453-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To compare the volume rendering technique (VRT) with maximum intensity projection (MIP) for aortic diameter measurements in MR angiography (MRA) data sets.

    Material and Methods: Existing contrast-enhanced 3-dimensional MRA and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) data sets from 20 patients were analyzed. In each MRA data set, two aortic diameters were measured using MIP and VRT. Agreement with DSA measurements, dependence on rendering parameters, and interobserver agreement were assessed.

    Results: Diameters measured on MIP with fixed parameters showed no significant difference compared with DSA and with freely selected parameters a slight overestimation relative to DSA. Diameters measured on VRT were larger than on DSA. For both MIP and VRT, the measurements depended on the chosen parameters. The error relative to DSA was larger for VRT than for MIP with fixed parameters but not with freely chosen parameters. Interobserver agreement did not differ significantly.

    Conclusions: VRT is not suitable for diameter measurements of the abdominal aorta with fixed parameter settings but may be useful with user-selected settings.

  • 40.
    Persson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Department of Radiology, Hudiksvall Hospital, Sweden .
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Brismar, T. B.
    Division of Radiology, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden .
    Three-dimensional drip infusion CT cholangiography in patients with suspected obstructive biliary disease: a retrospective analysis of feasibility and adverse reaction to contrast material2006In: BMC Medical Imaging, ISSN 1471-2342, E-ISSN 1471-2342, Vol. 6, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Computed Tomography Cholangiography (CTC) is a fast and widely available alternative technique to visualise hepatobiliary disease in patients with an inconclusive ultrasound when MRI cannot be performed. The method has previously been relatively unknown and sparsely used, due to concerns about adverse reactions and about image quality in patients with impaired hepatic function and thus reduced contrast excretion. In this retrospective study, the feasibility and the frequency of adverse reactions of CTC when using a drip infusion scheme based on bilirubin levels were evaluated.

    Methods

    The medical records of patients who had undergone upper abdominal spiral CT with subsequent three-dimensional rendering of the biliary tract by means of CTC during seven years were retrospectively reviewed regarding serum bilirubin concentration, adverse reaction and presence of visible contrast media in the bile ducts at CT examination. In total, 153 consecutive examinations in 142 patients were reviewed.

    Results

    Contrast media was observed in the bile ducts at 144 examinations. In 110 examinations, the infusion time had been recorded in the medical records. Among these, 42 examinations had an elevated bilirubin value (>19 umol/L). There were nine patients without contrast excretion; 3 of which had a normal bilirubin value and 6 had an elevated value (25–133 umol/L). Two of the 153 examinations were inconclusive. One subject (0.7%) experienced a minor adverse reaction – a pricking sensation in the face. No other adverse effects were noted.

    Conclusion

    We conclude that drip infusion CTC with an infusion rate of the biliary contrast agent iotroxate governed by the serum bilirubin value is a feasible and safe alternative to MRC in patients with and without impaired biliary excretion.

    In this retrospective study the feasibility and the frequency of adverse reactions when using a drip infusion scheme based on bilirubin levels has been evaluated.

  • 41.
    Persson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Brismar, T B
    Lundström, C
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Automatic parameter setting for volume rendering of MR angiography2005In: Radiological Society of North America Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Persson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Department of Radiology, Hudiksvall Hospital, Sweden.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Brismar, T.B.
    Department of Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Volume rendering of three-dimensional drip infusion CT cholangiography in patients with suspected obstructive biliary disease: a retrospective study2005In: British Journal of Radiology, ISSN 0007-1285, E-ISSN 1748-880X, Vol. 78, no 936, p. 1078-1085Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic potential of prolonged drip infusion CT cholangiography (DIC-CT) using meglumine iotroxate (Biliscopin®) and 3D volume rendering in patients with suspected obstructive biliary disease. From a material of 142 patients who had undergone a drip infusion CT, all cases with a verified surgical or endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) diagnosis (n=33) were selected. Age-matched controls were selected from the remaining examinations. Three radiologists reviewed all 66 examinations in retrospect, independently as well as in consensus. The image quality and the estimated diagnostic quality were rated as good or moderate in 91% of the 198 reviews. The consensus sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing biliary stones was 88% and 94%, respectively (with sensitivities ranging from 88% to 94% for individual observers, and specificities from 86% to 96%). Two out of three strictures were observed. No false positive strictures were described. The use of volume rendering technique (VRT) improved diagnostic certainty in 28/198 (14%) of the evaluations. The visualization of ductal stones was improved in 18/48 (38%). No differences in diagnostic quality between single and multislice CT were observed. We conclude that a detailed image of the biliary tree with good sensitivity and specificity can be obtained by means of bilirubin-governed infusion time DIC-CT with volume rendering reconstruction.

  • 43.
    Persson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Kalra, Mannudeep K.
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA .
    Quick, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Sandborg, Michael
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Singh, Sarabjeet
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA .
    Use of iterative reconstruction in image space (IRIS) to improve accetability of 50 and 100 mAs abdominal CT: comparison of standrad of care 200 mAs filtered back projection CT images2010In: SSK15-04, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Romu, Thobias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Camilla, Vavruch
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Tallberg, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Heglind, Mikael
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Lidell, Martin
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Enerbäck, Sven
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    A randomized trial of cold-exposure on energy expenditure and supraclavicular brown adipose tissue volume in humans2016In: Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, ISSN 0026-0495, E-ISSN 1532-8600, Vol. 65, no 6, p. 926-934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To study if repeated cold-exposure increases metabolic rate and/or brown adipose tissue (BAT) volume in humans when compared with avoiding to freeze.

    Design

    Randomized, open, parallel-group trial.

    Methods

    Healthy non-selected participants were randomized to achieve cold-exposure 1 hour/day, or to avoid any sense of feeling cold, for 6 weeks. Metabolic rate (MR) was measured by indirect calorimetry before and after acute cold-exposure with cold vests and ingestion of cold water. The BAT volumes in the supraclavicular region were measured with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    Results

    Twenty-eight participants were recruited, 12 were allocated to controls and 16 to cold-exposure. Two participants in the cold group dropped out and one was excluded. Both the non-stimulated and the cold-stimulated MR were lowered within the group randomized to avoid cold (MR at room temperature from 1841 ± 199 kCal/24 h to 1795 ± 213 kCal/24 h, p = 0.047 cold-activated MR from 1900 ± 150 kCal/24 h to 1793 ± 215 kCal/24 h, p = 0.028). There was a trend towards increased MR at room temperature following the intervention in the cold-group (p = 0.052). The difference between MR changes by the interventions between groups was statistically significant (p = 0.008 at room temperature, p = 0.032 after cold-activation). In an on-treatment analysis after exclusion of two participants that reported ≥ 8 days without cold-exposure, supraclavicular BAT volume had increased in the cold-exposure group (from 0.0175 ± 0.015 l to 0.0216 ± 0.014 l, p = 0.049).

    Conclusions

    We found evidence for plasticity in metabolic rate by avoiding to freeze compared with cold-exposure in a randomized setting in non-selected humans.

  • 45.
    Romu, Thobias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fat Water Classification of Symmetrically Sampled Two-Point Dixon Images Using Biased Partial Volume Effects2011In: Proceedings of the annual meeting of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM 2011), 2011., 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Romu, Thobias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Robust Water Fat Separated Dual-Echo MRI by Phase-Sensitive Reconstruction2017In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, ISSN 0740-3194, E-ISSN 1522-2594, Vol. 78, no 3, p. 1208-1216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a robust water-fat separation method for T1-weighted symmetric two-point Dixon data.

    Methods: A method for water-fat separation by phase unwrapping of the opposite-phase images by phase-sensitive reconstruction (PSR) is introduced. PSR consists of three steps; 1, identification of clusters of tissue voxels; 2, unwrapping of the phase in each cluster by solving Poisson’s equation; 3, find the correct sign of each unwrapped opposite-phase cluster, so that the water-fat images are assigned the correct identities. The robustness was evaluated by counting the number of water-fat swap artifacts in a total of 733 image volumes. The method was also compared to commercial software.

    Results: In the water-fat separated image volumes, the PSR method failed to unwrap the phase of one cluster and misclassified 10. One swap was observed in areas affected by motion and was constricted to the affected area. Twenty swaps were observed surrounding susceptibility artifacts, none of which spread outside the artifact affected regions. The PSR method had fewer swaps when compared to commercial software.

    Conclusion: The PSR method can robustly produce water-fat separated whole-body images based on symmetric two-echo spoiled gradient echo images, under both ideal conditions and in the presence of common artifacts.

  • 47.
    Sandström, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Freij, Anna
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brismar, Torkel
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Upptag i levern av kontrastmedlet Gd-EOB-DTPA påverkas kraftigt av leverfunktionen2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48. Sarabjeet, Singh
    et al.
    Pourjabbar, Sarvenaz
    Khawaja, Ranish
    Padole, Atul
    Choy, Garry
    Kalra, Mannudeep
    Woisetschläger, Mischa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Prospectively Acquired Low Doses in Abdominal CT and Role of Sinogram Affirmed Iterative REconstruction2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessment of the effect of Sinogram Affirmed iterative reconstruction (Safire) and Filtered Back Projection (FBP) technique on abdominal CT examination acquired at 200 mAs, 100 mAs, and 50 mAs.METHOD AND MATERIALS24 patients (mean age 64 ± 14 years, M:F 10 :14) gave informed consent for an IRB approved prospective study for additional research images through the abdomen on 128 slice MDCT (Siemens Flash) at 100 mAs and 50 mAs over a scan length of 10 cm using combined modulation technique. Images through entire abdomen were acquired at 200 mAs. The 50 and 100 mAs datasets were each reconstructed with FBP and four settings of Safire (S1, S2, S3, S4). The FBP 200 mAs images were compared side-by-side with FBP and Safire images from 50 and 100 mAs. The number and location of lesions, lesion size, lesion conspicuity, visibility of small structures were assessed by two experienced abdominal radiologists. The diagnostic acceptability was recorded on a four point scale (1= fully acceptable, 4= unacceptable). Objective noise and HU values were measured in liver and the descending aorta. The noise power spectrum was analyzed for FBP and different Safire settings.RESULTSA total of 43 lesions were detected on both FBP and Safire images. Minor blocky or pixilated appearance of 50 and 100 mAs images was noted at S3 and S4 Safire settings. No significant artifacts were noted on S1 and S2 Safire images. Image noise was suboptimal in FBP 100 and 50 mAs images, whereas noise was acceptable with S1, S2 and S3 and better than average on S4 setting. Safire could render 100 mAs images as fully acceptable for diagnostic confidence but 50 mAs Safire images were deemed to have lower diagnostic confidence compared to 200 mAs. As compared to 50 mAs FBP, objective noise was lower by 22.8% (22.9/29.7) on S1, 35% (19.3/29.7) on S2, 44.3% on S3 (16.7/29.3) and 54.8% (13.4/29.7) on S4 (p<0.001). Noise power spectrum analysis showed that Safire retains the noise power spectral signature similar to FBP, in spite of progressive noise reduction with higher iteration settingsCONCLUSIONSafire enabled reconstruction provides diagnostically acceptable abdominal CT images acquired at 100 mAs (50% reduced dose) but 50 mAs Safire images are not completely diagnostically acceptable despite reduced image noiseCLINICAL RELEVANCE/APPLICATIONRadiation dose reduction down to 100 mAs is achievable with Safire enabled abdominal CT examinations

  • 49.
    Smedby, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Othberg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Brismar, T
    Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Stockholm.
    Maximum-likelihood VRT - a new way to visualize MRA datasets2005In: 17th International Workshop on MR Angiography,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Smedby, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Othberg, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Brismar, T
    Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Stockholm.
    Maximun-likelihood VRT - a new way to visualize MRA datasets2006In: Int´l Workschop on MR angiography,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
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  • asciidoc
  • rtf