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  • 1.
    Englund, Rickard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hotz, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ynnerman, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Touching Data: Enhancing Visual Exploration of Flow Data with Haptics2018In: Computing in science & engineering (Print), ISSN 1521-9615, E-ISSN 1558-366X, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 89-100Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 2.
    Flint, Jennifer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Schönborn, Konrad
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Höst, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Investigating an Immersive Virtual Nanoscience Simulation for Learning: Students' Interaction, Understanding, Attitudes and System Usability2014In: AERA Online Paper Repository, 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid nanoscientific development in a myriad of applied fields compels educational structures to develop curricular nanoknowledge for a future citizenry capable of contributing skills to a nano-workforce and in acquiring a nano-literacy. This study investigated ten Swedish upper-secondary students' interactions with a virtual reality nanoworld and sought to illuminate: 1) how students link to and support their understanding of prior science knowledge, 2) students' attitudes towards the benefits and risks of nanotechnology, and 3) the usability of the system. Analyzed videotaped and written data elicited cognitive mechanisms underlying interaction with the virtual reality environment for promoting understanding, the influence of the interactive experience on students' attitudes to nanophenomena, and system features that could be applied in real science classrooms.

  • 3.
    Forsslund, Jonas
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm Sweden.
    Sallnäs, Eva-Lotta
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm Sweden.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A User Centered Designed FOSS Implementation of Bone Surgery Simulations2009In: Proceedings - 3rd Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, World Haptics 2009, Piscataway, NJ, USA: IEEE , 2009, p. 391-392Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Different aspects of bone surgery simulation has been a popular topic in haptics research field. This demonstration paper has two major results: a Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) implementation of a well known algorithm for tool-bone interaction force estimation, and an evaluation conducted as part of a suggested User-centered design approach for creation of a surgery simulator targeting Oral Surgery in particular.

  • 4.
    Forsslund, Jonas
    et al.
    Kungliga Tekniska högskolan, KTH, Stockholm.
    Sallnäs Pysander, Eva-Lotta
    Kungliga Tekniska högskolan, KTH, Stockholm.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Design of Perceptualization Applications in Medicine2011In: Proceedings of Engineering Interactive Computing Systems for Medicine and Health Care, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Höst, Gunnar E.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Schönborn, Konrad J.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Case-Based Study of Students' Visuohaptic Experiences of Electric Fields around Molecules: Shaping the Development of Virtual Nanoscience Learning Environments2013In: Education Research International, ISSN 2090-4002, E-ISSN 2090-4010, Vol. 2013, article id 194363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent educational research has suggested that immersive multisensory virtual environments offer learners unique and exciting knowledge-building opportunities for the construction of scientific knowledge. This paper delivers a case-based study of students’ immersive interaction with electric fields around molecules in a multisensory visuohaptic virtual environment. The virtual architecture presented here also has conceptual connections to the flourishing quest in contemporary literature for the pressing need to communicate nanoscientific ideas to learners. Five upper secondary school students’ prior conceptual understanding of electric fields and their application of this knowledge to molecular contexts, were probed prior to exposure to the virtual model. Subsequently, four students interacted with the visuohaptic model while performing think-aloud tasks. An inductive and heuristic treatment of videotaped verbal and behavioural data revealed distinct interrelationships between students’ interactive strategies implemented when executing tasks in the virtual system and the nature of their conceptual knowledge deployed. The obtained qualitative case study evidence could serve as an empirical basis for informing the rendering and communication of overarching nanoscale ideas. At the time of composing this paper for publication in the current journal, the research findings of this study have been put into motion in informing a broader project goal of developing educational virtual environments for depicting nanophenomena.

  • 6.
    Höst, Gunnar E.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Schönborn, Konrad J.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Studenters bedömning av kemisk polaritet: En utvärdering av två konventionella och en ny visuell representationsform2011In: Nordiskt forskarsymposium om undervisning i naturvetenskap: naturvetenskap som kunskap och kultur : 14 - 16 juni 2011 i Linköping, Linköpings universitet , 2011, p. 18-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Höst, Gunnar E.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Schönborn, Konrad J.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Students' Use of Three Different Visual Representations To Interpret Whether Molecules Are Polar or Nonpolar2012In: Journal of Chemical Education, ISSN 0021-9584, E-ISSN 1938-1328, Vol. 89, no 12, p. 1499-1505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Visualizing molecular properties is often crucial for constructing conceptual understanding in chemistry. However, research has revealed numerous challenges surrounding students' meaningful interpretation of the relationship between the geometry and electrostatic properties of molecules. This study explored students' (n = 18) use of three visual representations of electrostatic potential to interpret whether molecules are polar or nonpolar. The representations consisted of red and blue 'lobes' (termed RB) indicating regions of negative and positive potential, a color gradient mapping electrostatic potential on a molecular surface (MAP), and a rendering of the interface between regions of positive and negative potential (ISO). Data on students' accuracy, time-on-task, and evaluation related to the three visual modes were collected via a Web-based questionnaire. ANOVA indicated that students were significantly more accurate in interpreting ISO representations, although almost half evaluated this mode as the most difficult to use. Furthermore, students took significantly longer to interpret complex molecules than simple molecules using ISO and RB. The results indicate that there may be possible pedagogical benefits in using unconventional visual representations that reduce visual complexity by making molecular relationships explicit. Hence, this has implications for future work on the role of cognitively mapping between different instructional visualizations in the development of fundamental chemical concepts.

  • 8.
    Höst, Gunnar E.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Schönborn, Konrad J.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Palmerius, Karljohan L.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Investigating the effectiveness and efficiency of three visual representational systems for assigning chemical polarity2010In: Proceedings of EDULEARN10: International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies / [ed] L. Gómez Chova, D. Martí Belengue, & I. Candel Torres, Valencia: International Association of Technology, Education and Development (IATED) , 2010, p. 941-947Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to investigate students’ assignment of chemical polarity using three visual modes representing electrostatic potential. The modes consisted of coloured lobes that indicate regions of negative (red) and positive (blue) potential, a colour gradient that maps the potential on the molecular surface and a novel representation that uses green surface(s) to show the interface between regions of positive and negative potential. Students’ ability to assign polarity using the three visual modes was evaluated using a web-questionnaire. Mean scores indicated that students were able to successfully assign polarity to molecules using all the modes. However, students were less successful in identifying polar molecules in comparison with non-polar molecules using the map mode. A possible explanation for the lower scores for this mode is that the representational power of the map as a polarity assignment tool could be compromised by the visual complexity of the colour gradient, especially when a molecule is polar. The green surface representation was found to be a sensitive visual tool for assigning polarity to molecules, an encouraging finding since students were exposed to this visual mode for the first time. Given the possible perceptual constraints associated with the map mode, the results of this study might serve as a basis for uncovering the best conditions for pursuing a multiple representations approach to teaching chemical polarity.

  • 9.
    Kocak, Umut
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cooper, Matthew
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    An Error Analysis Model for Adaptive Deformation Simulation2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With the widespread use of deformation simulations in medical applications, the realism of the force feedback has become an important issue. In order to reach real-time performance with sufficient realism the approach of adaptivity, solution of different parts of the system with different resolutions and refresh rates, has been commonly deployed. The change in accuracy resulting from the use of adaptivity, however, has been been paid scant attention in the deformation simulation field. Presentation of error metrics is rare, while more focus is given to the real-time stability. We propose an abstract pipeline to perform error analysis for different types of deformation techniques which can consider different simulation parameters. A case study is also performed using the pipeline, and the various uses of the error estimation are discussed.

  • 10.
    Kocak, Umut
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cooper, Matthew
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Anisotropic Virtual Coupling with Energy-Based Deflection for Palpating Inhomogeneous Compliant Objects2013In: Proceedings of the IEEE World Haptics Conference, IEEE , 2013, p. 115-120Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Virtual coupling, a spring-damper system between the haptic probe and its virtual representation, the proxy, is one of the most common approaches for haptic rendering. We have extended the virtual coupling by updating the spring stiffness, sometimes used to simulate compliance of a material, depending on the direction between the proxy and the probe. This anisotropic variation of the stiffness is used in exploring inhomogeneities beneath the surface allowing detection of rigid structures even when they are obscured by another structure beneath the surface. In addition, we also compensate for the energy variation of the spring to maintain passivity and increase realism. User studies were performed to survey the success rate in the detection of obscured rigid bodies beneath the surface with the modified virtual coupling algorithm and the improvement of shape perception for sub-surface objects with the additional energy compensation term providing gradient information. We also discuss potential benefits of the proposed methods as basic extensions to well-known haptic rendering algorithms which are both simpler and yield improved performance over traditional deformation simulationtechniques.

  • 11.
    Kocak, Umut
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cooper, Matthew
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    High Resolution Enhancement in Deformation via Anisotropic Virtual Coupling2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Achieving sufficient realism in deformation simulations requires consideration  of complex physical properties. The computational burden of modelling these properties requires the use of low resolution meshes to attain real time interactive performance. Medical data such as MR and CT, on the other hand, have much higher resolutions than can be practically used in deformation simulations. This results in significant amount of information loss, degenerating the ability to perceive variations in the data, especially inhomogeneities. In this paper, we address this issue by employing surfacerendering algorithms which can provide high resolution information from beneath the surface. An experiment was performed in a scenario simulating inhomogeneities of bone structure under the skin. Results have shown significant improvement for detecting inhomogeneities within deformable data while palpating the surface.

  • 12.
    Kocak, Umut
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Forsell, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ynnerman, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cooper, Matthew
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Analysis of the JND of Stiness in Three Modesof Comparison2011In: HAID'11 Proceedings of the 6th international conference on Haptic and audio interaction design / [ed] Cooper, E., Brewster, S., Ogawa, H., Kryssanov, V.K., Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, p. 22-31Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding and explaining perception of touch is a non-trivial task. Even seemingly trivial differences in exploration may potentially have a significant impact on perception and levels of discrimination. In this study, we explore different aspects of contact related to stiffness perception and their effects on the just noticeable difference (JND) of stiffness are surveyed. An experiment has been performed on non-deformable, compliant objects in a virtual environment with three different types of contact: Discontinuous pressure, continuous pressure and continuous lateral motion. The result shows a significantly better discrimination performance in the case of continuous pressure (a special case of nonlinearity), which can be explained by the concept of haptic memory. Moreover, it is found that the perception is worse for the changes that occur along the lateral axis than the normal axis.

  • 13.
    Kocak, Umut
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cooper, Matthew
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dynamic Deformation Using Adaptable, Linked Asynchronous FEM Regions2009In: Spring Conference on Computer Graphics / [ed] Helwig Hauser and Stephen N. Spencer, New York: ACM , 2009, p. 197-204Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to simulate both physically and visually realistic soft tissue deformations, the Finite Element Method (FEM) is the mostpopular choice in the literature. However it is non-trivial to modelcomplex behaviour of soft tissue with sufficient refresh rates, especiallyfor haptic force feedback which requires an update rate ofthe order of 1 kHz. In this study the use of asynchronous regions isproposed to speed up the solution of FEM equations in real-time. Inthis way it is possible to solve the local neighborhood of the contactwith high refresh rates, while evaluating the more distant regions atlower frequencies, saving computational power to model complexbehaviour within the contact area. Solution of the different regionsusing different methods is also possible. To attain maximum efficiencythe size of the regions can be changed, in real-time, in responseto the size of the deformation.

  • 14.
    Kocak, Umut
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Forsell, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cooper, Matthew
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The Effect of the Stiffness Gradient on the Just Noticeable Difference between Surface Regions2012In: Haptics: Perception, Devices, Mobility, and Communication: International Conference, EuroHaptics 2012, Tampere, Finland, June 13-15, 2012. Proceedings, Part I / [ed] Poika Isokoski, Jukka Springare, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2012, p. 282-292Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book and its companion volume, LNCS 7282 and 7283, constitute the refereed proceedings of the 8th International Conference, EuroHaptics 2012, held in Tampere, Finland, in June 2012. The 99 papers (56 full papers, 32 short papers, and 11 demo papers) presented were carefully reviewed and selected from 153 submissions. Part I contains the full papers whereas Part II contains the short papers and the demo papers.

  • 15.
    Kocak, Umut
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ynnerman, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A framework for Soft-tissue Deformation2009In: Proceedings of SIGRAD Conference 2009, 2009, p. 27-29Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For the simulation of soft tissue deformation Finite ElementMethod (FEM) has been the technique which achieves most physicallyrealistic behaviour. However to provide stable force feedback,high refresh rates are needed which makes the use of FEMnon-trivial.To solve the challenge of the compromise between speed and realism,asynchronous regions which solves different parts of the modelwith different frequencies and different resolutions are used. Thelocal neighbourhood of the contact is solved with higher frequencyand resolution while the more remote regions are solved with lowerfrequency and resolutions. Different solution methods, implicit andexplicit, can be used to solve different regions and the size of theregions can be adapted depending on the strain to maximize theefficiency.

  • 16.
    Lundberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Josefsson, Billy
    LFV Air Nav Serv Sweden, Sweden.
    Urban Air Traffic Management (UTM) Implementation In Cities - Sampled Side-Effects2018In: 2018 IEEE/AIAA 37TH DIGITAL AVIONICS SYSTEMS CONFERENCE (DASC), IEEE , 2018, p. 400-406Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drone-based services in cities will most likely result in high traffic densities (especially during peak hours). Basic unmanned/urban (air) traffic management (UTM) tools and interventions to cope with traffic issues are now well-known (e.g. geofences, layers). There can however be interdependencies between issues and solutions when combined. This paper presents sampled side-effects of using basic unmanned traffic management interventions in an airspace with autonomous point-to-point drone traffic. The samples are based on an interactive simulation and consists of statistics and synthetic images of the simulated situations. We have for instance sampled traffic proximate to a geofenced airport, and traffic from/to proximate logistics hubs. Consequences for UTM development in cities, for the European development of U-space U3 and U4, are discussed.

  • 17.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Adding Tangential Forces in Lateral Exploration of Stiffness Maps2011In: Haptic and Audio Interaction Design: 6th International Workshop, HAID 2011, Kusatsu, Japan, August 25-26, 2011. Proceedings / [ed] Eric W. Cooper, Victor V. Kryssanov, Hitoshi Ogawa, Stephen Brewster, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, Vol. 6851, p. 1-10Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We believe that the lateral exploration of surfaces with varying stiffness, stiffness maps, using computer generated haptics is an underestimated and important procedure with impact in many application areas. Feeling the change of stiffness while sweeping the haptic probe over a surface can potentially give an understanding of the spatial distribution of this stiffness, however current algorithms lack tangential cues of stiffness changes. This introduces energy sources and sinks that potentially affects the stability of the system, apart from being physically incorrect and thus unrealistic. We discuss the forces and effects involved in the exploration of stiffness maps and propose an energy-based algorithm for tangential forces that augments the feedback from the map, in particular during lateral exploration. The algorithm is based on basic physical principles and has the potential to increase both realism and stability. A user study was conducted to analyze the effect of this algorithm on stiffness perception.

  • 18.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Combining Vibrotactile and Kinaesthetic Cues in Haptic Volume Visualization2011In: Proceedings of the IEEE World Haptics Conference / [ed] Cagatay Basodogan, Seungmoon Choi, Matthias Harders, Lynette Jones, Yasuyoshi Yokokohji, IEEE , 2011, p. 511-515Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Haptics has in earlier work shown the potential to assist in the understanding of an otherwise overwhelming amount of information in scientific and medical visualization. In the typical scientific data, with many different properties such as pressure, temperature, strain, etc, the user is required to switch between what data to represent through the haptic feedback. In this paper we explore the possibility to simultaneously represent, in a comprehensive way, more than one property through the haptic feedback by dividing the feedback into the two components of the haptic sense. Two vibrotactile metaphors for scalar data are described, roughness and transition cue, that can be used in combination with a kinaesthetic representation of either scalar or vector data. The paper also presents an evaluation that shows that the individual cues from the two haptic metaphors can be discriminated, and that the combined feedback can be used to find combinations of features in data.

  • 19.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Direct Volume Haptics for Visualization2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Visualization is the process of making something perceptible to the mind or imagination. The techniques for producing visual imagery of volumetric data have advanced immensely during the last decades to a point where each produced image can include an overwhelming amount of information. An increasingly viable solution to the limitations of the human sense of visual perception is to make use of not only vision, but also additional senses.

    This thesis presents recent work on the development of principles and algorithms for generating representations of volumetric data through the sense of touch for the purpose of visualization. The primary idea introduced in this work is the concept of yielding constraints, that can be used to provide a continuous set of shapes as a representation of features of interest in various types of volumetric data. Some of the earlier identified standard human exploratory procedures can then be used which enables natural, intuitive and effective interaction with the data. The yielding constraints concept is introduced, and an algorithm based on haptic primitives is described, which forms a powerful yet versatile implementation of the yielding constraints. These methods are also extended to handle time-varying, moving and low quality data. A framework for multimodal visualization has been built on the presented methods, and this is used to demonstrate the applicability and versatility of the work through several example applications taken from different areas.

    List of papers
    1. Proxy-based Haptic Feedback from Volumetric Density Data
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Proxy-based Haptic Feedback from Volumetric Density Data
    2002 (English)In: Proceedings of the Eurohaptics Conference, 2002, p. 104-109Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper a new approach to volume haptics is presented. The developed method makes use of a proxy that is constrained by ‘virtual surfaces’, defined by the local gradient at the proxy position, and not by iso-values as in other approaches to volume haptics. By using a proxy, material properties like friction, stiffness and surface penetrability can be implemented. These material properties are controlled by user defined transfer functions. At the same time, using the gradient to define surfaces, rendering of infinitesimally close virtual surfaces that can be penetrated, is made possible. The algorithm exhibits very high stability, is fast and represents fine details accurately. Compared to earlier techniques, less artifacts occur and higher configurability is provided.

    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14403 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-05-14 Created: 2007-05-14 Last updated: 2015-09-22
    2. Haptic Visualization of Computational Fluid Dynamics Data Using Reactive Forces
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Haptic Visualization of Computational Fluid Dynamics Data Using Reactive Forces
    2005 (English)In: International Conference on Visualization and Data Analysis, San Jose, USA, 2005, p. 95-102Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Datasets from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) can be post-processed and visualized to aid understanding of the flow phenomena present. Visualization of CFD data, however, often suffers from problems such as occlusion and cluttering when methods such as glyphing and volume rendering are applied. In this paper we present a case study where new modes for haptic interaction are used to enhance the exploration of CFD data. A VR environment with interactive graphics and an integrated graphical user interface has been implemented. In contrast to previous work on haptic interaction with CFD data we employ a 'reactive' haptic scheme as opposed to direct force maping. The reactive approach not only generates more stable feedback but also provides clearer and more intuitive cues about the underlying data. Two haptic modes are used to enhance the understanding of different features in the flow data: One presents the orientation of the data and also guides the user to follow the stream as it flows around the aircraft fuselage. The other provides a haptic representation of vortex data. This mode enables the user to perceive and so follow tendencies of vorticity and vortices.

    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14404 (URN)10.1117/12.587029 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-05-14 Created: 2007-05-14 Last updated: 2015-09-22
    3. General Proxy-based Haptics for Volume Visualization
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>General Proxy-based Haptics for Volume Visualization
    2005 (English)In: Eurohaptics Conference, 2005 and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, 2005., 2005, p. 557-560Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a general, proxy-based approach to volume haptics founded upon the notion of 'haptic primitives'. Haptic modes each representing a different aspect of volumetric data, are created by defining sets of haptic primitives which reflect the local properties of the data. The proxy position for every time-frame in the haptic loop is found by balancing the force feedback in the haptic instrument with the force from the haptic primitives involved. The presented general framework allows for rapid development of haptic feedback modes for volumetric data. The approach also allows, in contrast to previous work on proxy-based volume haptics, combination of non-orthogonal constraints and thus allows free combination of various modes in haptic exploration of multivariate data. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach through the implementation of five different haptic modes.

    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14405 (URN)10.1109/WHC.2005.62 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-05-14 Created: 2007-05-14 Last updated: 2015-09-22
    4. The Orthogonal Constraints Problem with the Constraint Approach to Proxy-based Volume Haptics and a Solution
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Orthogonal Constraints Problem with the Constraint Approach to Proxy-based Volume Haptics and a Solution
    2005 (English)In: SIGRAD 2005, Lund, Sweden, 2005, p. 45-49Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently the constraint approach to proxy-based volume haptics was introduced which provided a stable and effective means of conveying information about volumetric data through a haptic instrument. In this paper we present a proof that the approach is incapable of handling nonorthogonal constraints and discuss the implications of this restriction in detail. We also describe how full utilization of haptics applications in which multiple properties are used to enhance the understanding of complex data requires the use of non-orthogonal constraints. We then show how proxybased volume haptics can be modified to allow for general constraints through the introduction of haptic primitives used to model the constraints. By balancing the forces exerted by the primitives on the proxy continuously, nonorthogonal constraints can be handled.

    Keywords
    Proxy-based volume haptics, orthogonal constraints, haptic primitives
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14406 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-05-14 Created: 2007-05-14 Last updated: 2015-09-22
    5. Enabling Haptic Interaction with Volumetric MRI Data Through Knowledge-based Tissue Separation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enabling Haptic Interaction with Volumetric MRI Data Through Knowledge-based Tissue Separation
    2006 (English)In: Proceedings of Volume Graphics, 2006, p. 75-78Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Direct volume haptics can provide both guidance and extra information during exploration of volumetric data. In this paper we present a novel approach to volume haptics enabling haptic exploration of tissue shape, borders and material properties in data despite low contrast and low signal to noise ratio, as is common in medical MRI data or low dose CT data. The method uses filtering based on implicit knowledge and addresses the problem of overlapping scalar ranges through the introduction of fuzzy classification and corresponding transfer functions for material properties as well as classification-based distance masking for haptic force direction.

    Keywords
    volume haptics, MRI, classification
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14407 (URN)10.2312/VG/VG06/075-078 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-05-14 Created: 2007-05-14 Last updated: 2015-09-22
    6. Enabling design and interactive selection of haptic modes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enabling design and interactive selection of haptic modes
    Show others...
    2007 (English)In: Virtual Reality, ISSN 1359-4338, E-ISSN 1434-9957Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The ever increasing size and complexity of volumetric data in a wide range of disciplines makes it useful to augment volume visualization tools with alternative modalities. Studies have shown that introducing haptics can significantly increase both exploration speed and precision. It is also capable of conveying material properties of data and thus has great potential to improve user performance in volume data exploration. In this paper we describe how recent advances in volume haptics can be used to build haptic modes-building blocks for haptic schemes. These modes have been used as base components of a toolkit allowing for more efficient development of haptic prototypes and applications. This toolkit allows interactive construction, configuration and fine-tuning of both visual and haptic representations of the data. The technology is also used in a pilot study to determine the most important issues and aspects in haptic volume data interaction and exploration, and how the use of haptic modes can facilitate the implementation of effective haptic schemes.

    Keywords
    Volume haptics, Haptic modes, Toolkit, User study
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-35498 (URN)10.1007/s10055-006-0033-7 (DOI)27168 (Local ID)27168 (Archive number)27168 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    7. Fast and High Precision Volume Haptics
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fast and High Precision Volume Haptics
    2007 (English)In: EuroHaptics Conference, 2007 and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems. World Haptics 2007. Second Joint, Los Alamitos, CA, USA: IEEE Computer Society, 2007, p. 501-506Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Volume haptics has shown itself an effective way of enhancing precision and speed in interaction with medical or scientific visualization. This paper presents a mixed solver approach for the primitive-based volume haptics problem, to provide the best performance for every volume haptics application. For situations where the constraints are orthogonal we present a fast and high precision analytical solver. For complex configurations requiring support for non-orthogonal constraints we allow for fall-back on a numerical solver. The results show significantly improved performance with the analytical solver, allowing for higher stiffness and thus feedback of higher quality, while still allowing for transparent support for non-orthogonal constraints.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Los Alamitos, CA, USA: IEEE Computer Society, 2007
    National Category
    Computer Engineering
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14409 (URN)10.1109/WHC.2007.51 (DOI)000246105200083 ()0-7695-2738-8 (ISBN)
    Conference
    2nd Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, Tsukuba, Japan, 22-24 March 2007
    Available from: 2007-05-14 Created: 2007-05-14 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    8. Haptic Rendering of Dynamic Volumetric Data
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Haptic Rendering of Dynamic Volumetric Data
    2008 (English)In: IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, ISSN 1077-2626, E-ISSN 1941-0506, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 263-276Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    With current methods for volume haptics in scientific visualization, features in time-varying data can freely move straight through the haptic probe without generating any haptic feedback-the algorithms are simply not designed to handle variation with time but consider only the instantaneous configuration when the haptic feedback is calculated. This article introduces haptic rendering of dynamic volumetric data to provide a means for haptic exploration of dynamic behavior in volumetric data. We show how haptic feedback can be produced that is consistent with volumetric data moving within the virtual environment and with data that, in itself, evolves over time. Haptic interaction with time-varying data is demonstrated by allowing palpation of a computerized tomography sequence of a beating human heart.

    Keywords
    data visualisation, haptic interfaces, natural sciences computing, rendering (computer graphics), virtual reality, computerized tomography sequence, dynamic volumetric data, haptic feedback, haptic rendering, human heart, scientific visualization, time-varying data, virtual environment
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14410 (URN)10.1109/TVCG.2007.70409 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-05-14 Created: 2007-05-14 Last updated: 2017-12-13
  • 20.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Norrköping Visualization and Interaction Studio, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Fast and High Precision Volume Haptics2007In: EuroHaptics Conference, 2007 and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems. World Haptics 2007. Second Joint, Los Alamitos, CA, USA: IEEE Computer Society, 2007, p. 501-506Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Volume haptics has shown itself an effective way of enhancing precision and speed in interaction with medical or scientific visualization. This paper presents a mixed solver approach for the primitive-based volume haptics problem, to provide the best performance for every volume haptics application. For situations where the constraints are orthogonal we present a fast and high precision analytical solver. For complex configurations requiring support for non-orthogonal constraints we allow for fall-back on a numerical solver. The results show significantly improved performance with the analytical solver, allowing for higher stiffness and thus feedback of higher quality, while still allowing for transparent support for non-orthogonal constraints.

  • 21.
    Lundin (Palmerius), Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Naturlig haptisk kraftåterkoppling från volymdata2001Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree)Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As the volumes are entering the world of computer graphics the pure volume visualisation becomes a more important tool in for example research and medical applications. But the advance in haptics --- force feedback from the computer --- is behind. In volume haptics no equal to the proxy method so popular in surface haptics has yet emerged. Some implementations of volume haptics even use surfaces as intermediate representations so that surface haptics can be used.

    The intention of this work was to create natural feeling haptic feedback from volumetric density data using pure volume haptics. The haptic algorithm would be implemented in Reachin API for the Reachin Desktop Display, together with other parts to build up a usable volume visualisation environment.

    To achieve the feeling of stiffness and friction dependent on tissue type, a proxy based method was developed. In the volume the proxy is constrained by virtual surfaces defined by the local gradient. This algorithm was implemented in a volume haptics node and for visualisation a volume renderer node was implemented. These nodes can be used to setup different volume visualisation environments using VRML.

  • 22.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Volume Haptics Technologies and Applications2008In: Sigrad,2008, 2008, p. 15-16Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baravdish, George
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Higher precision in volume haptics through subdivision of proxy movements2008In: Haptics: Perception, Devices and Scenarios: 6th International Conference, EuroHaptics 2008 Madrid, Spain, June 10-13, 2008 Proceedings / [ed] Manuel Ferre, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2008, 1, no 5024, p. 694-699Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Volume haptics has become an increasingly popular way of adding guidance and improving information bandwidth in scientific visualization. State-of-the-art methods, however, use linear equations, which allows for a precision that can be insufficient in some circumstances. This paper describes how step-length subdivision can be used to improve precision even though these methods do not use integration steps in its usual meaning.

  • 24.
    Lundin (Palmerius), Karljohan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cooper, Matthew
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Evestedt, Daniel
    SenseGraphics AB.
    Ynnerman, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Enabling design and interactive selection of haptic modes2007In: Virtual Reality, ISSN 1359-4338, E-ISSN 1434-9957Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ever increasing size and complexity of volumetric data in a wide range of disciplines makes it useful to augment volume visualization tools with alternative modalities. Studies have shown that introducing haptics can significantly increase both exploration speed and precision. It is also capable of conveying material properties of data and thus has great potential to improve user performance in volume data exploration. In this paper we describe how recent advances in volume haptics can be used to build haptic modes-building blocks for haptic schemes. These modes have been used as base components of a toolkit allowing for more efficient development of haptic prototypes and applications. This toolkit allows interactive construction, configuration and fine-tuning of both visual and haptic representations of the data. The technology is also used in a pilot study to determine the most important issues and aspects in haptic volume data interaction and exploration, and how the use of haptic modes can facilitate the implementation of effective haptic schemes.

  • 25.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cooper, Matthew
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ynnerman, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Flow Field Visualization Using Vector Field Perpendicular Surfaces2009In: Proceedings of Spring Conference on Computer Graphics, Bratislava: Comenius University , 2009, p. 27-34Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces Vector Field Perpendicular Surfaces as a means to represent vector data with special focus on variations across the vectors in the field. These surfaces are a perpendicular analogue to streamlines, with the vector data always being parallel to the normals of the surface. In this way the orientation of the data is conveyed to the viewer, while providing a continuous representation across the vectors of the field. This paper describes the properties of such surfaces including an issue with helicity density in the vector data, an approach to generating them, several stop conditions and special means to handle also fields with non-zero helicity density.

  • 26.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cooper, Matthew
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ynnerman, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Haptic Rendering of Dynamic Volumetric Data2008In: IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, ISSN 1077-2626, E-ISSN 1941-0506, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 263-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With current methods for volume haptics in scientific visualization, features in time-varying data can freely move straight through the haptic probe without generating any haptic feedback-the algorithms are simply not designed to handle variation with time but consider only the instantaneous configuration when the haptic feedback is calculated. This article introduces haptic rendering of dynamic volumetric data to provide a means for haptic exploration of dynamic behavior in volumetric data. We show how haptic feedback can be produced that is consistent with volumetric data moving within the virtual environment and with data that, in itself, evolves over time. Haptic interaction with time-varying data is demonstrated by allowing palpation of a computerized tomography sequence of a beating human heart.

  • 27.
    Lundin (Palmerius), Karljohan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cooper, Matthew
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ynnerman, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The Orthogonal Constraints Problem with the Constraint Approach to Proxy-based Volume Haptics and a Solution2005In: SIGRAD 2005, Lund, Sweden, 2005, p. 45-49Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently the constraint approach to proxy-based volume haptics was introduced which provided a stable and effective means of conveying information about volumetric data through a haptic instrument. In this paper we present a proof that the approach is incapable of handling nonorthogonal constraints and discuss the implications of this restriction in detail. We also describe how full utilization of haptics applications in which multiple properties are used to enhance the understanding of complex data requires the use of non-orthogonal constraints. We then show how proxybased volume haptics can be modified to allow for general constraints through the introduction of haptic primitives used to model the constraints. By balancing the forces exerted by the primitives on the proxy continuously, nonorthogonal constraints can be handled.

  • 28.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Forsell, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The impact of feedback design in haptic volume visualization2009In: Third Joint EuroHaptics conference, 2009 and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems. World Haptics 2009., Piscataway, New Jersey, USA: IEEE , 2009, p. 154-159Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enhancing volume visualization with additional cues from our sense of touch has shown the potential to increase both speed and accuracy in the data exploration. Research in the area display a wide array of modes of interaction and many of these have been evaluated to demonstrate their capabilities. There are, however, few studies performed that compare different approaches for their strengths and weaknesses and there is a lack of guidelines on how the haptic feedback should be designed to allow for best performance. This paper describes a study on the influence of the basic principle chosen for data representation on the ability to identify faint structures in the data. Three metaphors are compaired, two types of shape metaphors and one force metaphor. Based on statistical analysis on evaluation data, interviews and observations a set of guidelines on the design of haptic visualization is described.

  • 29.
    Lundin (Palmerius), Karljohan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gudmundsson, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Digital Media. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ynnerman, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    General Proxy-based Haptics for Volume Visualization2005In: Eurohaptics Conference, 2005 and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, 2005., 2005, p. 557-560Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a general, proxy-based approach to volume haptics founded upon the notion of 'haptic primitives'. Haptic modes each representing a different aspect of volumetric data, are created by defining sets of haptic primitives which reflect the local properties of the data. The proxy position for every time-frame in the haptic loop is found by balancing the force feedback in the haptic instrument with the force from the haptic primitives involved. The presented general framework allows for rapid development of haptic feedback modes for volumetric data. The approach also allows, in contrast to previous work on proxy-based volume haptics, combination of non-orthogonal constraints and thus allows free combination of various modes in haptic exploration of multivariate data. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach through the implementation of five different haptic modes.

  • 30.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Havre, Roald Flesland
    Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Norway.
    Gilja, Odd Helge
    Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Norway.
    Ivan, Viola
    Department of Informatics, University of Bergen, Norway.
    Ultrasound Palpation by Haptic Elastography2011In: Proceedings of Computer-Based Medical Systems, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Höst, Gunnar E.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Schönborn, Konrad J.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    An Interactive and Multi-sensory Learning Environment for Nano Education2012In: Haptic and Audio Interaction Design: 7th International Conference, HAID 2012, Lund, Sweden, August 23-24, 2012. Proceedings / [ed] Charlotte Magnusson; Delphine Szymczak; Stephen Brewster, Berlin Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2012, Vol. 7468, p. 81-90Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Haptic and Audio Interaction Design, HAID 2012, held in Lund, Sweden, in August 2012. The 15 full papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from numerous submissions. The papers are organized in topical sections on haptics and audio in navigation, supporting experiences and activities, object and interface, test and evaluation.

  • 32.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Johansson, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Höst, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Schönborn, Konrad
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    An Analysis of the Influence of a Pseudo-haptic Cue on the Haptic Perception of Weight2014In: Haptics: Neuroscience, Devices, Modeling, and Applications: 9th International Conference, EuroHaptics 2014, Versailles, France, June 24-26, 2014, Proceedings, Part I, Springer, 2014, Vol. 8618/8619, p. 117-125Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Haptics provides powerful cues about forces but cannot easily be integrated in all relevant applications, such as education. Pseudo-haptic cues, visual information that simulate haptic sensations, have been raised as an alternative. It is, however, largely unknown how (or even if) pseudo-haptic cues are perceived by the haptic sensory modality. In this paper we present an approach that applies theories on multimodal integration to testing if a pseudo-haptic cue is triggering haptic perception. This approach is subsequently applied in designing an experiment that tests a pseudo-haptic cue based on a visual force-causes-displacement metaphor, similar to a rubber band.

  • 33.
    Lundin (Palmerius), Karljohan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Cooper, Matthew
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ynnerman, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Enabling Haptic Interaction with Volumetric MRI Data Through Knowledge-based Tissue Separation2006In: Proceedings of Volume Graphics, 2006, p. 75-78Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Direct volume haptics can provide both guidance and extra information during exploration of volumetric data. In this paper we present a novel approach to volume haptics enabling haptic exploration of tissue shape, borders and material properties in data despite low contrast and low signal to noise ratio, as is common in medical MRI data or low dose CT data. The method uses filtering based on implicit knowledge and addresses the problem of overlapping scalar ranges through the introduction of fuzzy classification and corresponding transfer functions for material properties as well as classification-based distance masking for haptic force direction.

  • 34.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schönborn, Konrad
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Visualization of Heat Transfer Using Projector-Based Spatial Augmented Reality2016In: Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality, and Computer Graphics: Third International Conference, AVR 2016, Lecce, Italy, June 15-18, 2016. Proceedings, Part I / [ed] Lucio Tommaso De Paolis, Antonio Mongelli, Springer, 2016, Vol. 9768, p. 407-417Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal imaging cameras, commonly used in application areas such as building inspection and night vision, have recently also been introduced as pedagogical tools for helping students visualize, interrogate and interpret notoriously challenging thermal concepts. In this paper we present a system for Spatial Augmented Reality that automatically projects thermal data onto objects. Instead of having a learner physically direct a hand-held camera toward an object of interest, and then view the display screen, a group of participants can gather around the display system and directly see and manipulate the thermal profile projected onto physical objects. The system combines a thermal camera that captures the thermal data, a depth camera that realigns the data with the objects, and a projector that projects the data back. We also apply a colour scale tailored for room temperature experiments.

  • 35.
    Lundin (Palmerius), Karljohan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sillén, Mattias
    SAAB AB.
    Cooper, Matthew
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ynnerman, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Haptic Visualization of Computational Fluid Dynamics Data Using Reactive Forces2005In: International Conference on Visualization and Data Analysis, San Jose, USA, 2005, p. 95-102Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Datasets from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) can be post-processed and visualized to aid understanding of the flow phenomena present. Visualization of CFD data, however, often suffers from problems such as occlusion and cluttering when methods such as glyphing and volume rendering are applied. In this paper we present a case study where new modes for haptic interaction are used to enhance the exploration of CFD data. A VR environment with interactive graphics and an integrated graphical user interface has been implemented. In contrast to previous work on haptic interaction with CFD data we employ a 'reactive' haptic scheme as opposed to direct force maping. The reactive approach not only generates more stable feedback but also provides clearer and more intuitive cues about the underlying data. Two haptic modes are used to enhance the understanding of different features in the flow data: One presents the orientation of the data and also guides the user to follow the stream as it flows around the aircraft fuselage. The other provides a haptic representation of vortex data. This mode enables the user to perceive and so follow tendencies of vorticity and vortices.

  • 36.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ynnerman, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gudmundsson, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Digital Media. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Proxy-based Haptic Feedback from Volumetric Density Data2002In: Proceedings of the Eurohaptics Conference, 2002, p. 104-109Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper a new approach to volume haptics is presented. The developed method makes use of a proxy that is constrained by ‘virtual surfaces’, defined by the local gradient at the proxy position, and not by iso-values as in other approaches to volume haptics. By using a proxy, material properties like friction, stiffness and surface penetrability can be implemented. These material properties are controlled by user defined transfer functions. At the same time, using the gradient to define surfaces, rendering of infinitesimally close virtual surfaces that can be penetrated, is made possible. The algorithm exhibits very high stability, is fast and represents fine details accurately. Compared to earlier techniques, less artifacts occur and higher configurability is provided.

  • 37.
    Olofsson, Ida
    et al.
    ReachIn Technologies, Sweden.
    Lundin, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cooper, Matthew
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kjäll, Per
    Elekta AB, Sweden.
    Ynnerman, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A haptic interface for dose planning in stereo-tactic radio-surgery2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Pettersson, Johanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tillander, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Simulation of Patient Specific Cervical Hip Fracture Surgery With a Volume Haptic Interface2008In: IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, ISSN 0018-9294, E-ISSN 1558-2531, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 1255-1265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interest for surgery simulator systems with anatomical models generated from authentic patient data is growing as these systems evolve.With access to volumetric patient data, e.g., from a computer tomography scan, haptic and visual feedback can be created directly from this dataset. This opens the door for patient specific simulations. Hip fracture surgery is one area where simulator systems is useful to train new surgeons and plan operations. To simulate the drilling procedure in this type of surgery, a repositioning of the fractured bone into correct position is first needed. This requires a segmentation process in which the bone segments are identified and the position of the dislocated part is determined. The segmentation must be automatic to cope with the large amount of data from the computer tomography scan. This work presents the first steps in the development of a hip fracture surgery simulation with patient specific models. Visual and haptic feedback is generated from the computer tomography data by simulating fluoroscopic images and the drilling process. We also present an automatic segmentation method to identify the fractured bone and determine the dislocation. This segmentation method is based on nonrigid registration with the Morphon method.

  • 39.
    Rydmark, Martin
    et al.
    Mednet Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborg University.
    Sabe, Emelie
    Linköping University.
    Dreifalt, Ulrika
    Interaction Design Centre Limerick University.
    Goude, Daniel
    Mednet Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborg University.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Physical Assistance in Games for Stroke Rehabilitation through Passive and Active Haptic Guidance2008In: Cyber Therapy,2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 40.
    Samini, Ali
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A perspective geometry approach to user-perspective rendering in hand-held video see-through augmented reality2014In: VRST '14 Proceedings of the 20th ACM Symposium on Virtual Reality Software and Technology, SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN , 2014, p. 207-208Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Video see-through Augmented Reality (V-AR) displays a video feed overlaid with information, co-registered with the displayed objects. In this paper we consider the type of V-AR that is based on a hand-held device with a fixed camera. In most of the VA-R applications the view displayed on the screen is completely determined by the orientation of the camera, i.e., the device-perspective rendering; the screen displays what the camera sees. The alternative method is to use the relative pose of the user's view and the camera, i.e., the user-perspective rendering. In this paper we present an approach to the user perspective V-AR using 3D projective geometry. The view is adjusted to the user's perspective and rendered on the screen, making it an augmented window. We created and tested a running prototype based on our method.

  • 41.
    Samini, Ali
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A study on improving close and distant device movement pose manipulation for hand-held augmented reality2016In: VRST '16 Proceedings of the 22nd ACM Conference on Virtual Reality Software and Technology, ACM Press, 2016, p. 121-128Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hand-held smart devices are equipped with powerful processing units, high resolution screens and cameras, that in combination makes them suitable for video see-through Augmented Reality. Many Augmented Reality applications require interaction, such as selection and 3D pose manipulation. One way to perform intuitive, high precision 3D pose manipulation is by direct or indirect mapping of device movement.

    There are two approaches to device movement interaction; one fixes the virtual object to the device, which therefore becomes the pivot point for the object, thus makes it difficult to rotate without translate. The second approach avoids latter issue by considering rotation and translation separately, relative to the object's center point. The result of this is that the object instead moves out of view for yaw and pitch rotations.

    In this paper we study these two techniques and compare them with a modification where user perspective rendering is used to solve the rotation issues. The study showed that the modification improves speed as well as both perceived control and intuitiveness among the subjects.

  • 42.
    Samini, Ali
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Device Registration for 3D Geometry-Based User-Perspective Rendering in Hand-Held Video See-Through Augmented Reality2015In: AUGMENTED AND VIRTUAL REALITY, AVR 2015, SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN , 2015, Vol. 9254, p. 151-167Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    User-perspective rendering in Video See-through Augmented Reality (V-AR) creates a view that always shows what is behind the screen, from the users point of view. It is used for better registration between the real and virtual world instead of the traditional device-perspective rendering which displays what the camera sees. There is a small number of approaches towards user-perspective rendering that over all improve the registration between the real world, the video captured from real world that is displayed on the screen and the augmentations. There are still some registration errors that cause misalignment in the user-perspective rendering. One source of error is from the device registration which, based on the used tracking method, can be the misalignment between the camera and the screen and also the tracked frame of reference that the screen and the camera are attached to it. In this paper we first describe a method for the user perspective V-AR based on 3D projective geometry. We then address the device registration problem in user perspective rendering by presenting two methods: First, for estimating the misalignment between the camera and the screen. Second, for estimating the misalignment between the camera and the tracked frame.

  • 43.
    Samini, Ali
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Popular Performance Metrics for Evaluation of Interaction in Virtual and Augmented Reality2017In: 2017 International Conference on Cyberworlds (CW) (2017), IEEE Computer Society, 2017, p. 206-209Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Augmented and Virtual Reality applications provide environments in which users can immerse themselves in a fully or partially virtual world and interact with virtual objects or user interfaces. User-based, formal evaluation is needed to objectively compare interaction techniques, and find their value in different use cases, and user performance metrics are the key to being able to compare those techniques in a fair and effective manner. In this paper we explore evaluation principles used for or developed explicitly for virtual environments, and survey quality metrics, based on 15 current, important publications on interaction techniques for virtual environments. We check, categorize and analyze the formal user studies, and establish and present baseline performance metrics used for evaluation on interaction techniques in VR and AR.

  • 44.
    Samini, Ali
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wand-Like Interaction with a Hand-Held Tablet Device: A study on Selection and Pose Manipulation Techniques2019In: Information Science and Technology, ISSN 2078-2489, E-ISSN 2078-2489, Vol. 10, no 4, article id 152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current hand-held smart devices are supplied with powerful processors, high resolution screens, and sharp cameras that make them suitable for Augmented Reality (AR) applications. Such applications commonly use interaction techniques adapted for touch, such as touch selection and multi-touch pose manipulation, mapping 2D gestures to 3D action. To enable direct 3D interaction for hand-held AR, an alternative is to use the changes of the device pose for 6 degrees-of-freedom interaction. In this article we explore selection and pose manipulation techniques that aim to minimize the amount of touch. For this, we explore and study the characteristics of both non-touch selection and non-touch pose manipulation techniques. We present two studies that, on the one hand, compare selection techniques with the common touch selection and, on the other, investigate the effect of user gaze control on the non-touch pose manipulation techniques.

  • 45.
    Schönborn, Konrad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Höst, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Interactive Visualization for Learning and Teaching Nanoscience and Nanotechnology2016In: Global Perspectives of Nanoscience and Engineering Education, Part II / [ed] Kurt Winkelmann, Bharat Bhushan, Basel: Springer, 2016, p. 195-222Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nano education involves tackling the difficult task of conceptualizing imperceptibly small objects and processes. Interactive visualization serves as one potential solution for providing access to the nanoworld through active exploration of nanoscale concepts and principles. This chapter exposes and describes a selection of interactive visualizations in the literature, and reviews research findings related to their educational, perceptual and cognitive influence. In closing, we offer implications of interactive visualization for learning and teaching nano.

  • 46.
    Schönborn, Konrad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Höst, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Interaktiv visualisering av nanovärlden stödjer lärande2016In: Resultatdialog 2016, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2016, p. 135-140Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Projektets övergripande vision var att dels utveckla en virtuell miljö för att förmedla begrepp inom nanovetenskap och nanoteknik (vilket härefter kommer att benämnas med samlingstermen nano), och dels att undersöka vilken effekt interaktion med systemet har på lärande av vetenskapliga begrepp och uppfattningar kring fördelar och risker med nano hos elever och besökare vid ett science center. Utifrån detta övergripande syfte gavs projektet följande specifika mål:

    • Formge, utveckla och implementera en immersiv miljö för virtuell verklighet grundad i naturvetenskap, för kommunikation av grundläggande nanovetenskapliga begrepp.
    • Studera elevers och besökares interaktion med den virtuella nanomiljön som ett verktyg för utveckling av grundläggande vetenskaplig kunskap.

    Projektet resulterade i utvecklingen av en miljö där gester kan användas för att styra en virtuell verklighet som möjliggör lärande om nano, samt en version av systemet som är anpassad för traditionella datorer (PC) utrustade med skärm och mus. Empiriska undersökningar av användares interaktion med den virtuella miljön visar att den erbjuder möjligheter för att förstå nanobegrepp genom att stödja kognition, kroppsliga erfarenheter, motivation, och generell användbarhet. Resultaten tyder på att immersiva virtuella miljöer kan ge stöd för att användare baserat på sina interaktiva upplevelser ska kunna utveckla kunskap om vetenskapliga kärnbegrepp, samt utveckla sådan kunskap som krävs för att bedöma upplevda möjligheter och risker med nano.

  • 47.
    Schönborn, Konrad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Höst, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Measuring understanding of nanoscience and nanotechnology: development and validation of the nano-knowledge instrument (NanoKI)2015In: Chemistry Education Research and Practice, ISSN 1756-1108, E-ISSN 1756-1108, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 346-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the application of nanotechnology in everyday life impacts society, it becomes critical for citizens to have a scientific basis upon which to judge their perceived hopes and fears of ‘nano’. Although multiple instruments have been designed for assessing attitudinal and affective aspects of nano, surprisingly little work has focused on developing tools to evaluate the conceptual knowledge dimension of public understanding. This article reports the validation of an instrument designed to measure conceptual knowledge of nanoscience and nanotechnology. A sample of 302 participants responded to a 28-item questionnaire designed around core nano-concepts. Factor analysis revealed a single latent variable representing the construct of nano-knowledge. Cronbach's alpha was 0.91 indicating a high internal consistency of the questionnaire items. The mean test score was 15.3 out of 28 (54.5%) with item difficulty indices ranging from 0.19 to 0.89. Obtained item discrimination values indicate a high discriminatory power of the instrument. Taken together, the psychometric properties of the Nano-Knowledge Instrument (NanoKI) suggest that it is a valid and reliable tool for measuring nano-related knowledge. Preliminary qualitative observations of citizens' incorrect and correct response patterns to the questionnaire indicate potential conceptual challenges surrounding relative size of the nanoscale, random motion of nano-objects, and nanoscale interactions, although these are hypotheses that require future investigation. Application of the NanoKI could support efforts directed to an agenda for evaluating and designing science communication and education initiatives for promoting understanding of nano.

  • 48.
    Schönborn, Konrad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Höst, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nano education with interactive visualization2016In: Nano Today, ISSN 1748-0132, E-ISSN 1878-044X, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 543-546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Future societal and economic impacts of nanoscience and nanotechnology raise the demand for a nano-literate public as well as a nano-competent workforce. This translates into the urgent need for nano education interventions in schools and informal learning contexts. In seeking to meet this mandate, we have developed and investigated a virtual reality environment that induces immersive presence (feeling as being ‘in’ the virtual world) and exploits bodily movements (e.g. hand gestures to control virtual objects) for students and citizens to learn nano concepts. In this article, we argue that such scientifically-informed immersive and interactive visualizations have a unique potential in communicating nanoscale ideas to students as well as the general public.

  • 49.
    Schönborn, Konrad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Höst, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Flint, Jennifer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Development of an Interactive Immersion Environment for Engendering Understanding about Nanotechnology: Concept, Construction, and Implementation2014In: International Journal of Virtual and Personal Learning Environments, ISSN 1947-8518, E-ISSN 1947-8526, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 40-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The advent of nanoscientific applications in modern life is swiftly in progress. Nanoscale innovation comes with the pressing need to provide citizens and learners with scientific knowledge for judging the societal impact of nanotechnology. In rising to the challenge, this paper reports the developmental phase of a research agenda concerned with building and investigating a virtual environment for communicating nano-ideas. Methods involved elucidating core nano-principles through two purposefully contrasting nano “risk” and “benefit” scenarios for incorporation into an immersive system. The authors implemented the resulting 3D virtual architecture through an exploration of citizens’ and school students’ interaction with the virtual nanoworld. Findings suggest that users’ interactive experiences of conducting the two tasks based on gestural interaction with the system serve as a cognitive gateway for engendering nano-related understanding underpinning perceived hopes and fears and as a stimulating pedagogical basis from which to teach complex science concepts.

  • 50.
    Schönborn, Konrad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Höst, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Flint, Jennifer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Development of an interactive immersion environment for engendering understanding about nanotechnology: concept, construction, and implementation2016In: Web Design and Development: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications / [ed] M. Khosrow-Pour, Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2016, p. 519-536Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The advent of nanoscientific applications in modern life is swiftly in progress. Nanoscale innovation comes with the pressing need to provide citizens and learners with scientific knowledge for judging the societal impact of nanotechnology. In rising to the challenge, this paper reports the developmental phase of a research agenda concerned with building and investigating a virtual environment for communicating nano-ideas. Methods involved elucidating core nano-principles through two purposefully contrasting nano “risk” and “benefit” scenarios for incorporation into an immersive system. The authors implemented the resulting 3D virtual architecture through an exploration of citizens' and school students' interaction with the virtual nanoworld. Findings suggest that users' interactive experiences of conducting the two tasks based on gestural interaction with the system serve as a cognitive gateway for engendering nano-related understanding underpinning perceived hopes and fears and as a stimulating pedagogical basis from which to teach complex science concepts.

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