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  • 1.
    Adell, Gunnar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Hong
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Decreased tumor cell proliferation as an indicator of the effect of preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer2001In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, ISSN 0360-3016, E-ISSN 1879-355X, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 659-663Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Rectal cancer is a common malignancy, with significant local recurrence and death rates. Preoperative radiotherapy and refined surgical technique can improve local control rates and disease-free survival.

    PURPOSE: To investigate the relationship between the tumor growth fraction in rectal cancer measured with Ki-67 and the outcome, with and without short-term preoperative radiotherapy.Method: Ki-67 (MIB-1) immunohistochemistry was used to measure tumor cell proliferation in the preoperative biopsy and the surgical specimen.

    MATERIALS: Specimens from 152 patients from the Southeast Swedish Health Care region were included in the Swedish rectal cancer trial 1987-1990.

    RESULTS: Tumors with low proliferation treated with preoperative radiotherapy had a significantly reduced recurrence rate. The influence on death from rectal cancer was shown only in the univariate analysis. Preoperative radiotherapy of tumors with high proliferation did not significantly improve local control and disease-free survival. The interaction between Ki-67 status and the benefit of radiotherapy was significant for the reduced recurrence rate (p = 0.03), with a trend toward improved disease-free survival (p = 0.08). In the surgery-alone group, Ki-67 staining did not significantly correlate with local recurrence or survival rates.

    CONCLUSION: Many Ki-67 stained tumor cells in the preoperative biopsy predicts an increased treatment failure rate after preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer.

  • 2.
    Evertsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bartik, Zsuzsa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Hong
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Apoptosis in relation to proliferating cell nuclear antigen and Dukes' stage in colorectal adenocarcinoma1999In: International Journal of Oncology, ISSN 1019-6439, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 53-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colorectal cancer is a disease that is associated with default in the balance of apoptotic regulation. In the present study apoptosis was examined in 158 colorectal adenocarcinomas using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated digoxigenin nick end labeling (TUNEL) method. The median apoptotic index (AI) was 0.95% (range 0-6. 68%). Eighty-two tumours exhibited AI 0.95%. We revealed a positive correlation between apoptosis and proliferation determined as the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, p=0.002). The frequency of apoptosis increased from Dukes' stage A, B, C to D (p=0.01). No correlations were found between apoptosis and the patients' sex, age, tumour location, growth pattern, differentiation, prognosis, bcl-2, p53 or K-ras. Our findings suggest that we should further investigate the relationship between apoptosis and cellular proliferative activity in colorectal cancer to evaluate whether this might provide additional information in the selection of patients for effective adjuvant therapy.

  • 3.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holmlund, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ferraud, Lilianne
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rutqvist, Lars Erik
    Clinic of Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Skoog, Lambert
    Division of Cytology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Expression of COX-2 and steroid converting enzymes in breast cancer2006In: Oncology Reports, ISSN 1021-335X, E-ISSN 1791-2431, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 219-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    COX-2 is upregulated in many breast tumors, and one of the products of COX-2 is PGE2 that is suggested to upregulate aromatase through cAMP signaling in breast cancer. Although aromatase can increase the estrogen levels in tumors, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17HSD) activity is finally needed for the estrone/estradiol regulation. The aim of this study was to investigate if the protein expression of enzymes involved in estrogen synthesis shows covariation with the expression of COX-2. We also wanted to correlate these results with prognosis. We analyzed the expression of COX-2, aromatase, 17HSD1 and 17HSD2 with immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays composed of 356 primary breast tumors. In the present study COX-2 was correlated to aromatase (P<0.00001), 17HSD1 (P=0.0073), and 17HSD2 (P<0.00001). Patients with ER positive tumors expressing low amounts of 17HSD2 had decreased breast cancer survival (P=0.013). Elevated expression of COX-2 and aromatase was more frequent among larger tumors (P=0.017 and P=0.013). COX-2 expression correlates with the levels of the examined steroid converting enzymes and may contribute to increased estrogen levels in the tumor. In breast cancer cells, the regulatory function of 17HSD2 could be lost, and in the present study patients with low or non-detectable levels of 17HSD2 had worse prognosis than had breast cancer patients with higher levels of the enzyme.

  • 4.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Jerevall, Piiha-Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Karl
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Olsson, Birgit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Amplification of HSD17B1 has prognostic significance in postmenopausal breast cancer2008In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 108, no 1, p. 35-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In situ synthesis of estrogens is believed to be of great importance for the progression of breast cancer. In postmenopausal women most estrogens are synthesized in peripheral hormone-target tissues from circulating precursor steroids, by the enzymes involved in formation of active estrogens. One of the enzymes involved in this process is 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD) type 1. This enzyme catalyzes the interconversion of estrone (E1) to the biologically more potent estradiol (E2). The gene coding for 17β-HSD type 1 (HSD17B1) is located at 17q12-21. The aim of this study was to investigate altered gene copy number of HSD17B1 in breast cancer. We used real-time PCR and examined 387 postmenopausal breast tumors for amplification of HSD17B1, and if an increased mRNA level of this enzyme is associated with amplification of the gene. We also investigated whether amplification of HSD17B1 has a prognostic value. There was a significant correlation between gene copy number of HSD17B1 and mRNA expression level (P = 0.00002). ER-positive patients with amplification of HSD17B1 showed lower breast cancer survival than patients without amplification (P = 0.025). Among ER-negative patients there was no significant correlation between increased gene copy number of HSD17B1 and prognosis. Furthermore, we found that amplification of the gene had prognostic significance in multivariate analysis adjusting for other clinicopathological variables. © 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  • 5.
    Hilborn, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gacic, Jelena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Androgen receptor expression predicts beneficial tamoxifen response in oestrogen receptor-alpha-negative breast cancer2016In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 114, no 3, p. 248-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although the androgen receptor (AR) is frequently expressed in breast cancer, its relevance in the disease is not fully understood. In addition, the relevance of AR in determining tamoxifen treatment efficiency requires evaluation. Purpose: To investigate the tamoxifen predictive relevance of the AR protein expression in breast cancer. Methods Patients were randomised to tamoxifen 40 mg daily for 2 or 5 years or to no endocrine treatment. Mean follow-up was 15 years. Hazard ratios were calculated with recurrence-free survival as end point. Results: In patients with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumours, expression of AR predicted decreased recurrence rate with tamoxifen (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.34; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.14-0.81; P = 0.015), whereas the opposite was seen in the AR- group (HR = 2.92; 95% CI = 1.16-7.31; P = 0.022). Interaction test was significant P &lt; 0.001. Patients with triple-negative and AR+ tumours benefitted from tamoxifen treatment (HR = 0.12; 95% CI = 0.014-0.95 P = 0.044), whereas patients with AR- tumours had worse outcome when treated with tamoxifen (HR = 3.98; 95% CI = 1.32-12.03; P = 0.014). Interaction test was significant P = 0.003. Patients with ER+ tumours showed benefit from tamoxifen treatment regardless of AR expression. Conclusions: AR can predict tamoxifen treatment benefit in patients with ER- tumours and triple-negative breast cancer.

  • 6.
    Hilborn, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sivik, Tove
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    C-X-C ligand 10 and C-X-C receptor 3 status can predict tamoxifen treatment response in breast cancer patients2014In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 145, no 1, p. 73-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To investigate the expression levels of CXCL10 and CXCR3 in tumors from breast cancer patients randomized to adjuvant tamoxifen treatment or no endocrine treatment, in order to further study the connection to prognosis and prediction of tamoxifen treatment outcome. Immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays from 912 breast cancer patients randomized to tamoxifen or no endocrine treatment. CXCR3 status was found to be a prognostic tool in predicting distant recurrence, as well as reduced breast cancer-specific survival. In patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors, tumors with strong CXCL10 levels had improved effect of tamoxifen treatment in terms of local recurrence-free survival [risk ratio (RR) 0.46 (95 % CI 0.25-0.85, P = 0.01)] compared with patients with tumors expressing weak CXCL10 expression. Further, patients with ER-positive tumors with strong CXCR3 expression had an improved effect of tamoxifen in terms of breast cancer-specific survival [RR 0.34 (95 % CI 0.19-0.62, P less than 0.001)] compared with the group with weak CXCR3 levels [RR 1.33 (95 % CI 0.38-4.79, P = 0.65)]. We show here for the first time that CXCL10 and CXCR3 expression are both predictors of favorable outcome in patients treated with tamoxifen.

  • 7. Iacopetta, B
    et al.
    Russo, A
    Bazan, V
    Dardanoni, G
    Gebbia, N
    Soussi, T
    Kerr, D
    Elsaleh, H
    Soong, R
    Kandioler, D
    Janschek, E
    Kappel, S
    Lung, M
    Leung, C-S S
    Ko, J M
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Shorthouse, AJ
    Silverman, ML
    Kato, S
    Ishioka, C
    Functional categories of TP53 mutation in colorectal cancer: results of an International Collaborative Study2006In: Annals of Oncology, ISSN 0923-7534, E-ISSN 1569-8041, Vol. 17, p. 842-847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

         

  • 8.
    Jansson , Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    17Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes and breast cancer2009In: JOURNAL OF STEROID BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY, ISSN 0960-0760 , Vol. 114, no 1-2, p. 64-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sex steroids play an important role in the development and differentiation in several tissues. Biologically active hormones that are locally converted in endocrine organs in the tissue where they exert their effects without release into extracellular space is a field of endocrinology that has been called intracrinology. In pre-menopausal women the ovary is the main source of estrogens, but in post-menopausal women the estrogen production as main site of synthesis moves to peripheral tissues and almost all of the sex steroids are synthesised from precursors of adrenal origin. In breast cancer 60-80% of the tumors express high levels of oestrogen receptor (ER) alpha which gives estrogen a proliferative effect. Breast tumors tend to have a higher intratumoral estrogen concentration than normal breast tissue and plasma, and in situ synthesis and the metabolism of estrogens is believed to be of great importance for the development and progression of the disease. The activity of estrogen metabolizing enzymes in breast are mainly aromatase, estrone sulfatases and 17HSD enzymes. 17HSD1 and 17HSD2 are the family members known to be of main importance in breast cancer. High expression of 17HSD1 has been associated to poor prognosis in breast cancer and late relapse among patients with ER-positive tumors. One of the mechanisms behind high 17HSD1 expression is gene amplification. Low or absent expression of 17HSD2 is associated to decreased survival in ER-positive breast cancer. 17HSD14 is one of the latest discovered 17HSD enzymes, transfection of 17HSD14 in human breast cancer cells significantly decreased the levels of estradiol in the culture medium. Low expression of 17HSD14 mRNA expression in breast cancer was correlated to decreased survival.

    The understanding of intratumoral synthesis of sex steroids in breast cancer is crucial to understand the disease both in pre- and post-menopausal women. Further studies are desirable to state the direct role of these enzymes in breast cancer and which patients that may benefit from new therapeutic strategies targeting 17HSD enzymes. The new inhibitors targeting 17HSD1 have shown promising results in preclinical studies to have clinical potential in the future.

  • 9.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Molecular alterations in colorectal cancer2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common causes to death due to cancer in the world. It is important to understand the molecular mechanisms behind tumour development for both prognostic and therapeutic applications. In this thesis, we have focused on genes and proteins related to tumour suppressor function, apoptosis and DNA repair in patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas. In Paper I, the pattern of mutations affecting the tumour suppressor p53 was investigated in 75 cases in order to determine whether there were any specific mutations in the cases with p53 accumulated in the cytoplasm. We found that the frequency and pattern of mutation were similar to those with nuclear p53 expression, suggesting that the prognostic importance of cytoplasmic p53 accumulation may depend on both mutational and non-mutational mechanisms. In Paper II we investigated the protein expression of the pro-apoptotic gene Bax from normal mucosa to primary tumour and to regional lymph node metastases in 135 patients. We further examined Bax mutations and the microsatellite status in the primary tumours. Bax expression was stronger from normal to tumour tissue, but decreased in the metastases. The matched cases with lower expression in the metastastases than in the primary tumour showed a more infiltrative growth pattern and more distal metastases. In paper III the mRNA expression of the pro-apoptotic gene Noxa was examined with real-time PCR and mutations searched for in 94 colorectal tumours and the corresponding normal mucosa. Noxa mRNA expression was weak in 9% and strong in 2% of the tumours and decreased in 9% and increased in 16% of the tumours compared to the normal mucosa. The expression was not related to clinicopathological features. We did not find any mutations in the gene. In Paper IV we studied the biological and clinicopathological importance of protein expression of the mismatch repair genes hMLHJ, hMSH2, hMSH3 and hMSH6 individually or combined in 301 colorectal cancers. When analysed individually, hMLH1 and hMSH2 were more important and the combined groups were more related to the mutator pathway, suggesting that the combined deficiencies of the proteins are more efficiently involved in the mutator pathway. Our result from comparing weak versus strong staining may suggest that the intensity of staining should be considered in future studies on the expression of mismatch repair proteins.

    List of papers
    1. p53 mutations are present in colorectal cancer with cytoplasmic p53 accumulation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>p53 mutations are present in colorectal cancer with cytoplasmic p53 accumulation
    2001 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 92, no 3, p. 338-341Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have shown that nuclear p53 over-expression is an indicator of p53 mutations whereas cytoplasmic p53 accumulation is related to wild-type p53 in several kinds of tumors. Cytoplasmic p53 accumulation has been demonstrated to be an independent prognostic factor in colorectal adenocarcinomas. The purpose was to examine whether mutations occur in cases with p53 accumulated in the cytoplasm and whether there are any differences in the frequency and characteristics of p53 mutations in different staining patterns. In the present study, we identified p53 mutations using PCR single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and DNA sequencing in 75 primary colorectal adenocarcinomas with different staining patterns (negative, nucleus, cytoplasm, nucleus and cytoplasm). The results show that the frequency and nature of mutations in tumors with cytoplasmic p53 accumulation were similar to those with nuclear p53 expression. However, the tumors with accumulation in both the nucleus and cytoplasm demonstrated a higher mutation rate. We suppose that the role of cytoplasmic p53 accumulation in predicting prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer may be dependent on both mutational and non-mutational mechanisms.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-25033 (URN)10.1002/ijc.1189 (DOI)9456 (Local ID)9456 (Archive number)9456 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Bax expression decreases significantly from primary tumor to metastasis in colorectal cancer
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bax expression decreases significantly from primary tumor to metastasis in colorectal cancer
    2002 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 811-816Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Bax is a proapoptotic member of the bcl-2 family. Previous studies about Bax have shown that the expression increases from normal to tumor tissue, but the clinical significance is contradictory. Our aims were to analyze the expression of Bax from normal mucosa to primary tumor and to metastases in colorectal cancer patient. We further investigated whether low Bax expression in the primary tumor or changed expression from normal mucosa to primary tumor and to metastases had biologic and clinical significance.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study included 135 patients with primary colorectal adenocarcinoma, of whom 31 had metastases in the lymph nodes and 75 had normal mucosa. Immunohistochemistry, DNA sequencing, and microsatellite analysis were used to detect Bax expression, mutations, and microsatellite instability.

    RESULTS: The protein was observed in 132 of 135 tumors, all normal epithelial cells and metastases. The frequencies of weak expression were greater from well/moderately to poorly differentiated and to mucinous carcinomas. Bax expression was stronger from normal to tumor tissue, but subsequently decreased in metastases. The matched cases with lower expression in the metastases than in the primary tumor showed a more infiltrative growth pattern and more distal metastases.

    CONCLUSION: The association of Bax expression with tumor differentiation/histologic types and a decreased expression in the metastases, suggests that Bax expression may be involved in tumor differentiation/histologic types and metastatic progression. We also propose the novel notion that changed Bax expression in the metastases compared with the primary tumors might provide information to determine the clinicopathologic characteristics of the tumor.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-25112 (URN)10.1200/JCO.20.3.811 (DOI)9545 (Local ID)9545 (Archive number)9545 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    3. The BH3-only member Noxa may not be involved in the development of unselected colorectal cancer
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The BH3-only member Noxa may not be involved in the development of unselected colorectal cancer
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Noxa is an BH3-only member of the Bcl-2 family, upregulated by p53 as a response to DNA damage. Mutations in the BH3-only region of other BH3-only members lead to an inactive protein. We have investigated the mRNA expression of Noxa with real-time PCR in 94 unselected colorectal adenocarcinomas and the corresponding normal mucosa. Further, we searched for mutations in the Noxa gene using single stranded conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. The mRNA expression of Noxa was weak in 9% and strong in 2% of the tumours and decreased in 9% and increased in 16% of the tumours compared to the normal mucosa, but these changes did not have any clinical or pathological significance. We did not find any mutations in the gene. Thus, our observations suggest that the variations in Noxa gene may not be of particular importance in the development of unselected colorectal cancer.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-81663 (URN)
    Available from: 2012-09-20 Created: 2012-09-20 Last updated: 2012-09-20Bibliographically approved
    4. Combined deficiency of hMLH1, hMSH2, hMSH3 and hMSH6 is an independent prognostic factor in colorectal cancer
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Combined deficiency of hMLH1, hMSH2, hMSH3 and hMSH6 is an independent prognostic factor in colorectal cancer
    2003 (English)In: International Journal of Oncology, ISSN 1019-6439, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 41-49Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We examined biological and clinicopathological significance of individual and combined hMLH1, hMSH2, hMSH3 and hMSH6 expression with immunohistochemistry in 301 unselected colorectal cancers. Weak hMLH1 expression was correlated to microsatellite instability (P=0.04), negative p53 expression (P=0.005) and mucinous carcinomas (P=0.02). Weak hMSH2 expression was related to negative ras (P<0.001) and p53 expression (P=0.005), and better survival (P=0.03). hMSH2, hMSH3 and hMSH6, as well as hMLH1, hMSH2, hMSH3 and hMSH6, were combined into a 'functional' and a 'less-functional' group, respectively. Both 'less-functional' groups were/tended to be associated with microsatellite instability, negative ras and p53 expression, and better survival. In summary, hMLH1 and hMSH2 were more important when investigated individually, and the combined groups were more related to the mutator pathway, suggesting that combined deficiencies of the proteins are more efficiently involved in the mutator pathway. Our result from weak versus strong staining may suggest that the intensity of staining should be considered in future studies on mismatch repair proteins.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-25113 (URN)12469183 (PubMedID)9546 (Local ID)9546 (Archive number)9546 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
  • 10.
    Jansson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology.
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    mRNA and protein expression of PUMA in sporadic colorectal cancer.2004In: Oncology Reports, ISSN 1021-335X, E-ISSN 1791-2431, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 1245-1249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PUMA is a BH3-only member of the Bcl-2 family, up-regulated by p53 as a response to DNA damage. We have investigated the mRNA expression of PUMA with real-time PCR in 94 colorectal adenocarcinomas and the corresponding normal mucosa. Among them PUMA protein expression was investigated with immunohistochemistry in 23 tumours and 17 corresponding normal mucosa samples. The mRNA expression of PUMA decreased in 4% and increased in 4% of the tumours compared with the normal mucosa. The protein expression of PUMA decreased in 6% and increased in 29% of the tumours compared with the normal mucosa. Decreased PUMA expression in the tumour compared with the corresponding mucosa was correlated with the distal colon and rectum (P=0.02). We did not find any other relationship to clinical or pathological features. We suggest that the changes in PUMA expression may be of minor importance in the development of colorectal cancer.

  • 11.
    Jansson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Department of Surgery, Vrinnevi Hospital Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Zhang, Hong
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Combined deficiency of hMLH1, hMSH2, hMSH3 and hMSH6 is an independent prognostic factor in colorectal cancer2003In: International Journal of Oncology, ISSN 1019-6439, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 41-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined biological and clinicopathological significance of individual and combined hMLH1, hMSH2, hMSH3 and hMSH6 expression with immunohistochemistry in 301 unselected colorectal cancers. Weak hMLH1 expression was correlated to microsatellite instability (P=0.04), negative p53 expression (P=0.005) and mucinous carcinomas (P=0.02). Weak hMSH2 expression was related to negative ras (P<0.001) and p53 expression (P=0.005), and better survival (P=0.03). hMSH2, hMSH3 and hMSH6, as well as hMLH1, hMSH2, hMSH3 and hMSH6, were combined into a 'functional' and a 'less-functional' group, respectively. Both 'less-functional' groups were/tended to be associated with microsatellite instability, negative ras and p53 expression, and better survival. In summary, hMLH1 and hMSH2 were more important when investigated individually, and the combined groups were more related to the mutator pathway, suggesting that combined deficiencies of the proteins are more efficiently involved in the mutator pathway. Our result from weak versus strong staining may suggest that the intensity of staining should be considered in future studies on mismatch repair proteins.

  • 12.
    Jansson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Olsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Storm, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Margolin, Sara
    Department of Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital/ Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Genetics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenmark Askmalm, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Lindblom, Annika
    Department of Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Persson, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A new polymorphism in the coding region of exon four in HSD17B2 in relation to risk of sporadic and hereditary breast cancer2007In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 106, no 1, p. 57-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In situ synthesis of oestrogens is of great importance in the development and progression of breast cancer. 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17HSD) type 2 catalyses oxidation from oestradiol to oestrone, and thereby protects the breast epithelial cells from oestradiol. Low expression of 17HSD type 2 has been associated with decreased survival in breast cancer, but no studies have investigated the mechanism behind the low expression. The 17HSD type 2 gene (HSD17B2) was screened for mutations with Single Stranded Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP)-DNA sequencing in 59 sporadic breast cancer cases, 19 hereditary breast cancer cases and seven breast cancer cell lines. DNA samples from 226 healthy individuals were used to identify if changes were previously unknown polymorphisms. No mutation was detected and therefore mutations in HSD17B2 do not explain why some breast tumours exhibit low 17HSD type 2 expression. However, a previously unknown polymorphism was found in exon four (Met226Val). Using molecular modelling, we found that the substituted residue is located at the outer part of the steroid binding site, probably causing minor alterations in the substrate binding. We further studied if the polymorphism contributes to breast cancer susceptibility in a larger material, but did not find an increased risk in the group of 317 sporadic breast cancer patients, 188 breast cancer patients with two close relatives with breast cancer or 122 hereditary breast cancer patients, compared to the healthy control group. We suggest that the detected polymorphism does not contribute to a higher risk of developing breast cancer.

  • 13.
    Jansson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Delander, Lovisa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Skoog, Lambert
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Ratio of 17HSD1 to 17HSD2 protein expression predicts the outcome of tamoxifen treatment in postmenopausal breast cancer patients.2009In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 15, no 10, p. 3610-3616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Estrogens have great significance in the development of breast cancer. After menopause, most estrogen biosynthesis is done in peripheral tissue, and the main enzymes involved in balancing the amount of estrone against estradiol are 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17HSD). The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic and tamoxifen predictive values of 17HSD1 and 17HSD2 expression. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Tumors from low-risk breast cancer patients randomized to adjuvant tamoxifen therapy or no adjuvant treatment were analyzed with immunohistochemistry to investigate protein expression of 17HSD1 and 17HSD2 in 912 cases. All patients had lymph node-negative breast cancer and were postmenopausal at the time of diagnosis. RESULTS: Low 17HSD1 expression was associated with significant benefit from tamoxifen treatment among patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors (P < 0.001). For patients with a 17HSD1 score not exceeding that of 17HSD2, tamoxifen increased the rate of distant recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.23-0.60) and breast cancer-specific survival (hazard ratio, 0.30; 95% confidence interval, 0.16-0.54), whereas no apparent effect was observed when the 17HSD1 score was higher than that of 17HSD2. The interaction was significant for both distant recurrence-free survival (P = 0.036) and breast cancer-specific survival (P = 0.014). In the cohort of systemically untreated patients, no prognostic importance was observed. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report that clearly distinguishes between the prognostic and predictive importance of 17HSD1 and 17HSD2 in ER-positive breast cancer treated with or without tamoxifen. Our data suggest that the 17HSD1/17HSD2 ratio might be useful as a predictive factor for tamoxifen treatment in ER-positive breast cancer patients.

  • 14.
    Jansson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology.
    Emterling, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology.
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology.
    Noxa in colorectal cancer: A study on DNA, mRNA and protein expression2003In: Oncogene, ISSN 0950-9232, E-ISSN 1476-5594, Vol. 22, no 30, p. 4675-4678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Noxa is a BH3-only member of the Bcl-2 family, upregulated by p53 as a response to DNA damage. Mutations in the BH3-only region of other BH3-only members lead to an inactive protein. We have investigated the mRNA expression of Noxa with real-time PCR in 94 unselected colorectal adenocarcinomas and the corresponding normal mucosa. Among them, Noxa protein expression was investigated with immunohistochemistry in 16 tumors and six corresponding normal mucosa samples. Further, we searched for Noxa mutations in all the cases using single-stranded conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. The mRNA expression of Noxa was weak in 9% and strong in 2% of the tumors, and decreased in 9% and increased in 16% of the tumors compared with the normal mucosa, however, these changes did not have any clinical or pathological significance. The protein level in most of the cases investigated was correlated with the mRNA level. We did not find any mutations in the Noxa gene. Thus, we suggest that Noxa may not be of importance in the development of colorectal cancer.

  • 15.
    Jansson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gentile, Massamiliano
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    p53 mutations are present in colorectal cancer with cytoplasmic p53 accumulation2001In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 92, no 3, p. 338-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have shown that nuclear p53 over-expression is an indicator of p53 mutations whereas cytoplasmic p53 accumulation is related to wild-type p53 in several kinds of tumors. Cytoplasmic p53 accumulation has been demonstrated to be an independent prognostic factor in colorectal adenocarcinomas. The purpose was to examine whether mutations occur in cases with p53 accumulated in the cytoplasm and whether there are any differences in the frequency and characteristics of p53 mutations in different staining patterns. In the present study, we identified p53 mutations using PCR single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and DNA sequencing in 75 primary colorectal adenocarcinomas with different staining patterns (negative, nucleus, cytoplasm, nucleus and cytoplasm). The results show that the frequency and nature of mutations in tumors with cytoplasmic p53 accumulation were similar to those with nuclear p53 expression. However, the tumors with accumulation in both the nucleus and cytoplasm demonstrated a higher mutation rate. We suppose that the role of cytoplasmic p53 accumulation in predicting prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer may be dependent on both mutational and non-mutational mechanisms.

  • 16.
    Jansson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Cohen, Maja
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sivik, Tove
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 14 affects estradiol levels in breast cancer cells and is a prognostic marker in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer2006In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 66, no 23, p. 11471-11477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Estrogens have an important role in the progression of breast cancer. The 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17HSD) family has been identified to be of significance in hormone-dependent tissues. 17HSD1 and 17HSD2 are the main 17HSD enzymes involved in breast cancer investigated this far, but it is possible that other hormone-regulating enzymes have a similar role. 17HSD5 and 17HSD12 are associated with sex steroid metabolism, and 17HSD14 is a newly discovered enzyme that may be involved in the estrogen balance. The mRNA expression of 17HSD5, 17HSD12, and 17HSD14 were analyzed in 131 breast cancer specimens by semiquantitative real-time PCR. The results were compared with recurrence-free survival and breast cancer-specific survival of the patients. The breast cancer cell lines MCF7, SKBR3, and ZR75-1 were transiently transfected with 17HSD14 to investigate any possible effect on estradiol levels. We found that high 17HSD5 was related to significantly higher risk of late relapse in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive patients remaining recurrence-free later than 5 years after diagnosis (P = 0.02). No relation to 17HSD12 expression was found, indicating that 17HSD12 is of minor importance in breast cancer. Patients with ER-positive tumors with high expression levels of 17HSD14 showed a significantly better prognosis about recurrence-free survival (P = 0.008) as well as breast cancer-specific survival (P = 0.01), confirmed by multivariate analysis (P = 0.04). Transfection of 17HSD14 in the human breast cancer cells MCF7 and SKBR3 significantly decreased the levels of estradiol, presenting an effect of high expression levels of the enzyme. ©2006 American Association for Cancer Research.

  • 17.
    Jansson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Proliferative responses to altered 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17HSD) type 2 expression in human breast cancer cells are dependent on endogenous expression of 17HSD type 1 and the oestradiol receptors2006In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 875-884Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary source of oestrogen in premenopausal women is the ovary but, after menopause, oestrogen biosynthesis in peripheral tissue is the exclusive site of formation. An enzyme group that affects the availability of active oestrogens is the 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17HSD) family. In breast cancer, 17HSD type 1 and type 2 have been mostly investigated and seem to be the principal 17HSD enzymes involved thus far. The question whether 17HSD type 1 or type 2 is of greatest importance in breast tumour development is still not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate how the loss of 17HSD type 2 expression, using siRNA in the non-tumour breast epithelial cells HMEC (human mammal epithelial cells) and MCF10A, and gain of 17HSD type 2 expression, using transient transfection in the breast cancer derived cell lines MCF7 and T47D, affect oestradiol conversion and proliferation rate measured as S-phase fraction. We further investigated how this was related to the endogenous expression of 17HSD type 1 and oestradiol receptors in the examined cell lines. The oestradiol level in the medium changed significantly in the MCF7 transfected cells and the siRNA-treated HMEC cells, but not in T47D or MCF10A. The S-phase fraction decreased in the 17HSD type 2-transfected MCF7 cells and the siRNA-treated HMEC cells. The results seemed to be dependent on the endogenous expression of 17HSD type 1 and the oestradiol receptors. In conclusion, we found that high or low levels of 17HSD type 2 affected the oestradiol concentration significantly. However, the response was dependent on the endogenous expression of 17HSD type 1. Expression of 17HSD type 1 seems to be dominant to 17HSD type 2. Therefore, it may be important to investigate a ratio between 17HSD type 1 and 17HSD type 2.

  • 18.
    Jansson, Agneta K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Emterling, Anna M.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Department of Surgery, Vrinnevi Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The BH3-only member Noxa may not be involved in the development of unselected colorectal cancerManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Noxa is an BH3-only member of the Bcl-2 family, upregulated by p53 as a response to DNA damage. Mutations in the BH3-only region of other BH3-only members lead to an inactive protein. We have investigated the mRNA expression of Noxa with real-time PCR in 94 unselected colorectal adenocarcinomas and the corresponding normal mucosa. Further, we searched for mutations in the Noxa gene using single stranded conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. The mRNA expression of Noxa was weak in 9% and strong in 2% of the tumours and decreased in 9% and increased in 16% of the tumours compared to the normal mucosa, but these changes did not have any clinical or pathological significance. We did not find any mutations in the gene. Thus, our observations suggest that the variations in Noxa gene may not be of particular importance in the development of unselected colorectal cancer.

  • 19.
    Jansson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bax expression decreases significantly from primary tumor to metastasis in colorectal cancer2002In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 811-816Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Bax is a proapoptotic member of the bcl-2 family. Previous studies about Bax have shown that the expression increases from normal to tumor tissue, but the clinical significance is contradictory. Our aims were to analyze the expression of Bax from normal mucosa to primary tumor and to metastases in colorectal cancer patient. We further investigated whether low Bax expression in the primary tumor or changed expression from normal mucosa to primary tumor and to metastases had biologic and clinical significance.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study included 135 patients with primary colorectal adenocarcinoma, of whom 31 had metastases in the lymph nodes and 75 had normal mucosa. Immunohistochemistry, DNA sequencing, and microsatellite analysis were used to detect Bax expression, mutations, and microsatellite instability.

    RESULTS: The protein was observed in 132 of 135 tumors, all normal epithelial cells and metastases. The frequencies of weak expression were greater from well/moderately to poorly differentiated and to mucinous carcinomas. Bax expression was stronger from normal to tumor tissue, but subsequently decreased in metastases. The matched cases with lower expression in the metastases than in the primary tumor showed a more infiltrative growth pattern and more distal metastases.

    CONCLUSION: The association of Bax expression with tumor differentiation/histologic types and a decreased expression in the metastases, suggests that Bax expression may be involved in tumor differentiation/histologic types and metastatic progression. We also propose the novel notion that changed Bax expression in the metastases compared with the primary tumors might provide information to determine the clinicopathologic characteristics of the tumor.

  • 20.
    Jansson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Ki-67 expression in relation to clinicopathological variables and prognosis in colorectal adenocarcinomas1997In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 105, no 9, p. 730-734Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ki-67 is a protein associated with cell proliferation which is expressed in all phases of the cell cycle except Go. In the present study, Ki-67 expression in 255 human colorectal adenocarcinomas was examined using immunohistochemistry with the monoclonal antibody MIB-1. One hundred and fifty-seven (62%) cases had more than 50% positive tumour cells and 98 (38%) cases less than 50%. The tumours showed a wide range of Ki-67 expression, from 13% to 90%, which indicated a variation in proliferative activity. There was no significant relationship between Ki-67 expression and sex, age, tumour location, Dukes' stage, growth pattern, differentiation, DNA content, S-phase fraction or survival (p > 0.05). In conclusion, the proliferative activity as measured by Ki-67 antibody was not related to clinicopathology and prognosis in colorectal cancer.

  • 21.
    Jerevall, Piiha-Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Department of Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Skoog, Lambert
    Department of Clinical Pathology and Cytology, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Predictive relevance of HOXB13 protein expression for tamoxifen benefit in breast cancer2010In: Breast Cancer Research, ISSN 1465-5411, E-ISSN 1465-542X, Vol. 12, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The HOXB13:IL17BR index has been identified to predict clinical outcome in the setting of adjuvant tamoxifen monotherapy of breast cancer. Further studies have shown that HOXB13 in particular can indicate benefit of prolonged tamoxifen treatment. Patients with high-expressing tumors did not benefit from prolonged treatment, suggesting that HOXB13 might be involved in tamoxifen resistance. No studies have been made regarding the HOXB13 protein levels in breast cancer. The aim of our study was to investigate whether tamoxifen benefit can be correlated to different levels of HOXB13 protein expression. METHODS: We used immunohistochemistry to analyze protein levels of HOXB13 in tumor samples from 912 postmenopausal node-negative breast cancer patients randomized to adjuvant tamoxifen therapy or no endocrine treatment. RESULTS: Tamoxifen-treated patients with estrogen receptor-positive tumors expressing none or low levels of HOXB13 had a clear benefit from tamoxifen in terms of longer distant recurrence-free survival (DRFS) (hazard ratio = 0.38, 95% confidence interval = 0.23 to 0.60, P = 0.000048). However, for patients with a high or intermediate HOXB13 tumor expression, tamoxifen did not prolong the DRFS compared with the untreated patients (hazard ratio = 0.88, 95% confidence interval = 0.47 to 1.65, P = 0.69). Interaction between HOXB13 expression and benefit from tamoxifen was statistically significant for DRFS (P = 0.035). No prognostic value could be ascribed to HOXB13 among systemically untreated patients. CONCLUSIONS: A high HOXB13 expression was associated with decreased benefit from tamoxifen, which indicates that HOXB13 protein level may be used as a predictive marker for tamoxifen treatment.

  • 22.
    Jerevall, Piiha-Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Källström, Ann-Christine
    Department of Surgery, Helsingborg hospital, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Landberg, Göran
    Center for Molecular Pathology, Lund University, Malmö University hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Fernö, Mårten
    Divison of Oncology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Homeobox B13 protein expression in a randomized tamoxifen trial of premenopausal breast cancerManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Homeobox B13 (HOXB13), part of the two-gene expression index HOXB13:IL17BR, has proven its capacity as a predictive factor of tamoxifen benefit in breast cancer. HOXB13 mRNA expression, as well as protein levels, have shown predictive value in postmenopausal patients. High levels were associated with decreased tamoxifen benefit and may indicate endocrine resistance. Here, we have analyzed HOXB13 protein expression in premenopausal breast cancer. We quantified the levels of HOXB13 with immunohistochemistry in tumor samples from 487 patients on tissue microarrays. Patients were diagnosed with stage II invasive breast cancer and randomized to tamoxifen or no endocrine treatment. HOXB13 protein analysis was successful for 367 patients. Data were correlated with clinicopathological variables. Investigation of tamoxifen benefit in patients with tumors expressing estrogen receptor (ER) α, progesterone receptor, or both, showed that patients with high HOXB13 levels had benefit from tamoxifen (hazard ratio for recurrences 0.43, 95% CI: 0.28-1.01, p=0.053). Corresponding numbers for the low HOXB13 group were 0.69 (95% CI: 0.44-1.07, p=0.10). For further analysis, we stratified the patients based on tumor ERβ status, which may function as a modifier of the performance of HOXB13 as a treatment predictive factor. For the ERβ positive subset of patients, there was a tendency towards a low HOXB13 expression associated with a better tamoxifen response. However, an increased benefit from tamoxifen, in terms of a longer recurrence-free survival (RFS), was associated with high HOXB13 expression in the ERβ negative group. The interaction between HOXB13 and treatment effect for RFS in the ERβ-negative group was significant in a multivariate model (p=0.04). In conclusion, in our study cohort, ERβ seems to be an additional determinant to HOXB13 protein expression for endocrine treatment prediction in premenopausal breast cancer. To identify patients less likely to respond to tamoxifen therapy, both HOXB13 and ERβ status should be taken into account.

  • 23.
    Jerhammar, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Not Found:Linkoping Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Clin and Expt Med, Div Otorhinolaryngol and Head and Neck Surg, Linkoping, Sweden .
    Ceder, Rebecca
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Welander, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grafstrom, Roland C.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden VTT Technical Research Centre Finland, Finland .
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    YAP1 is a potential biomarker for cetuximab resistance in head and neck cancer2014In: Oral Oncology, ISSN 1368-8375, E-ISSN 1879-0593, Vol. 50, no 9, p. 832-839Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Targeted therapy against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) only variably represents a therapeutic advance in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). This study addresses the need of biomarkers of treatment response to the EGFR-targeting antibody cetuximab (Erbitux (R)). Materials and Methods: The intrinsic cetuximab sensitivity of HNSCC cell lines was assessed by a crystal violet assay. Gene copy number analysis of five resistant and five sensitive cell lines was performed using the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 platform. Quantitative real-time PCR was used for verification of selected copy number alterations and assessment of mRNA expression. The functional importance of the findings on the gene and mRNA level was investigated employing siRNA technology. The data was statistically evaluated using Mann-Whitney U-test and Spearmans correlation test. Results: Analysis of the intrinsic cetuximab sensitivity of 32 HNSCC cell lines characterized five and nine lines as cetuximab sensitive or resistant, respectively. Gene copy number analysis of five resistant versus five sensitive cell lines identified 39 amplified protein-coding genes, including YAP1, in the genomic regions 11q22.1 or 5p13-15. Assessment using qPCR verified that YAP1 amplification associated with cetuximab resistance. Amplification of YAP1 correlated to higher mRNA levels, and RNA knockdown resulted in increased cetuximab sensitivity. Assessment of several independent clinical data sets in the public domain confirmed YAP1 amplifications in multiple tumor types including HNSCC, along with highly differential expression in a subset of HNSCC patients. Conclusion: Taken together, we provide evidence that YAP1 could represent a novel biomarker gene of cetuximab resistance in HNSCC cell lines.

  • 24.
    Jerhammar, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Welander, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    YAP1 Gene Amplification is a Marker for Cetuximab Resistance in Head and Neck CancerManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is commonly overexpressed in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). The monoclonal antibody cetuximab (Erbitux®) inhibits its signaling and has been approved for treatment of HNSCC. However, since many patients do not benefit from cetuximab treatment, predictive biomarkers of cetuximab response are required. The present study aims at finding novel markers of cetuximab resistance.

    The intrinsic cetuximab sensitivity of 35 HNSCC cell lines was determined, and revealed a great variation in the response between cell lines. Five cell lines (14%) were cetuximab sensitive, and 12 (34%) were resistant. Interestingly, two cell lines proliferated after cetuximab treatment.

    10 cell lines (five cetuximab sensitive and five cetuximab resistant) were selected for gene copy number array analysis on the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 platform. 39 protein coding genes were amplified in cetuximab resistant cells and normal in sensitive cells, all present on genomic regions 11q22.1 or 5p13-15. Five genes were selected for quantitative PCR  verification, namely, YAP1 and TRPC6 (11q22.1) and PDCD6, TPPP, and PTGER4 (5p13-15). An extended panel of totally 10 cetuximab resistant and 10 sensitive cell lines verified that YAP1 amplified cells are cetuximab resistant.

    YAP1 gene amplification was highly correlated to the YAP1 mRNA expression, which was significantly higher in cetuximab resistant cells than in sensitive. YAP1 downregulation resulted in increased cetuximab sensitivity in one of two cetuximab resistant cell lines investigated and growth inhibition in another. We conclude that YAP1 is a marker for cetuximab resistance in head and neck cancer.

  • 25.
    Olsson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holmlund, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Genetics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Methods for evaluating HER2 status in breast cancer: comparison of IHC, FISH, and real-time PCR analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue2013In: Pathology and Laboratory Medicine International, ISSN 1179-2698, Vol. 5, p. 31-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 gene (HER2) is amplified in approximately 15%–20% of all breast cancers. This results in overexpression of the HER2 protein, which is associated with worse clinical outcomes in breast cancer patients. Several studies have shown that trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody that interferes with the HER2/neu receptor, can improve overall survival in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. Immunohistochemistry (IHC), combined with different methods for in situ hybridization, is currently used for routine assessment of HER2 status. The aim of the present study was to determine whether real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can serve as a supplementary method for evaluation of HER2 status in primary breast cancer. For this purpose, 145 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded primary breast cancer samples were tested by real-time PCR amplification of HER2, using amyloid precursor protein as a reference. The results were compared with HER2 status determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and IHC. The specificity, sensitivity, and reproducibility of real-time PCR were evaluated, and a comparison of formalin-fixed and fresh-frozen samples was performed. This showed concordance of 93% between real-time PCR and FISH, and 86% between real-time PCR and IHC. Therefore, we suggest that real-time PCR can be a useful supplementary method for assessment of HER2 status.

  • 26.
    Sivik, Tove
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Genetics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Skoog, Lambert
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 14 is a predictive marker for tamoxifen response in oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 7, p. e40568-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17βHSDs) are important enzymes regulating the pool of bioactive steroids in the breast. The current study was undertaken in order to evaluate implications of 17βHSD14 in breast cancer, measuring 17βHSD14 protein expression in breast tumours.

    Methods: An antibody targeting the 17βHSD14 antigen was generated and validated using HSD17B14-transfected cells and a peptide-neutralising assay. Tissue microarrays with tumours from 912 post-menopausal women diagnosed with lymph node-negative breast cancer, and randomised to adjuvant tamoxifen or no endocrine treatment, were analysed for 17βHSD14 protein expression with immunohistochemistry.

    Results: Results were obtained from 847 tumours. Patients with oestrogen positive tumours with high 17βHSD14 expression had fewer local recurrences when treated with tamoxifen (HR 0.38; 95% C.I. 0.19–0.77, p = 0.007) compared to patients with lower tumoural 17βHSD14 expression, for whom tamoxifen did not reduce the number of local recurrences (HR 1.19; 95% C.I. 0.54–2.59; p = 0.66). No prognostic importance of 17βHSD14 was seen for systemically untreated patients.

    Conclusions: Using a highly specific validated antibody for immunohistochemical analysis of a large number of breast tumours, we have shown that tumoural expression levels of 17βHSD14 can predict the outcome of adjuvant tamoxifen treatment in terms of local recurrence-free survival in patients with lymph node-negative ER+ breast cancer. The results need be verified to confirm any clinical relevance.

  • 27.
    Sivik, Tove
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hakkarainen, Janne
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Hilborn, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Developmental Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Fuping
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Poutanen, Matti
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Characterisation of Hsd17b14 knockout miceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    17β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17βHSD) enzymes catalyse the stereospecific oxidation/reduction at carbon 17β of androgens and oestrogens and thereby regulate the pool of bioactive sex hormones. 17βHSD type 14 (17βHSD14) catalyses the inactivation of 17β-hydroxysteroids into their less bioactive 17-keto formation in vitro, however, as the catalytic efficiency of this reaction is relatively low, the question is whether this reaction is the biological role of the enzyme in vivo, or if the enzyme additionally or altogether acts within alternative metabolic pathways. To investigate the role of 17βHSD14 in vivo, we studied the phenotype of a mouse model in which the Hsd17b14 gene had been targeted through homologous recombination. Tissues from male and female mice sacrificed at 3-4 months of age were collected and analysed with regards to gene expression of Hsd17b14 and Hsd17b2 and histological appearance of selected organs. Wild type animals expressed Hsd17b14 in a large number of tissues, peaking in reproductive tissues. Mice globally lacking Hsd17b14 were grossly morphologically identical to their WT counterparts. The histological examination however, revealed impaired mammary gland branching and increased hepatocellular vacuolisation in Hsd1714 knockout animals compared with their WT counterparts. In conclusion, while phenotypical aberrances were absent in most tissues, which may be the result of genetic redundancy or possibly an indication that the gene in question is only modulatory, the main differences, primarily a mammary gland phenotype in female KO mice, implicate disturbed hormonal homeostasis, and thus a role for Hsd17b14 in steroidogenesis in vivo.

  • 28.
    Sivik, Tove
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Progesterone and levonorgestrel regulate expression of 17 beta HSD-enzymes in progesterone receptor positive breast cancer cell line T47D2012In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 422, no 1, p. 109-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of combined hormone replacement therapy (HAT) with oestrogens and progestins in postmenopausal women has been associated with an increased risk for developing breast cancer. The reasons are not fully understood, but influence of HRT on endogenous conversion of female sex hormones may be involved. The expression of 17 beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17 beta HSD), which are enzymes catalysing the conversion between more or less potent oestrogens, may partly be regulated by progestins. The breast cancer cell lines T47D, MCF7 and ZR75-1 were treated with progesterone, medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) or levonorgestrel for 48 and 72 h at 10(-7) and 10(-9) M to investigate influence on 17 beta HSD1, 17 beta HSD2 and 17 beta HSD5 mRNA expression measured by real time PCR. The expression of 17 beta HSD1 increased in progesterone and levonorgestrel treated T47D cells (48 h 10(-7) M P = 0.002; P andlt; 0.001) and 17 beta HSD5 increased after progesterone treatment (48 h 10(-7) M P = 0.003), whereas the expression of 17 beta HSD2 decreased after the (48 h 10(-7) M P = 0.003; P andlt; 0.001). Similar, but less prominent effects were seen in MCF7 and ZR75-1. The progestin effects on 17 beta HSD-expression were lost when T47D cells were co-treated with progestins and the progesterone receptor (PgR) inhibitor mifprestone. We show that both reductive (17 beta HSD1 and 17 beta HSD5) and oxidative (17 beta HSD2) members of the 17 beta HSD-family are under control of progesterone and progestins in breast cancer cell lines. This is most clear in T47D cells which have high PgR expression. 17 beta HSD-enzymes are important players in the regulation of sex steroids locally in breast tumours and tumoural expression of various 17 beta HSD-enzymes have prognostic and treatment predictive relevance. We propose a mechanism for increased breast cancer risk after HRT in which hormone replacement affects the expression of 17 beta HSD-enzymes, favouring the expression of reductive enzymes, which in turn could increase levels of bioactive and mitogenic estrogens in local tissue, e.g. breast tissue.

  • 29.
    Sivik, Tove
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Fornander, T
    Karolinska Institute.
    Skoog, L
    Karolinska Institute.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Significance of 17bHSD Type 14 as a Predictive Factor for Adjuvant Tamoxifen Treatment Response in Breast Cancer in CANCER RESEARCH, vol 69, issue 24, pp 596S-597S2009In: CANCER RESEARCH, 2009, Vol. 69, no 24, p. 596S-597SConference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 30.
    Sivik, Tove
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vikingsson, Svante
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Greén, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A validated and rapid high-performance liquidchromatography method for the quantification ofconversion of radio-labelled sex steroids2010In: Hormone Molecular Biology and Clinical Investigation, ISSN 1868-1891, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 375-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 17b -hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes modify the availability of potent sex steroids and have thus attracted interest in the study of several steroid-dependent pathologies including breast, endometrial and prostate cancers. An increased awareness of the importance of steroidogenic enzymes has brought forth a demand for efficient assays to study the effects of individual enzymes on steroid levels. Methods used for assessing steroid conversion are often laborious and frequently involve hazardous sample preparation steps. We developed and validated an optimised simple method for sample preparation of sex steroids using protein precipitation by the addition of zinc sulphate/sodium hydroxide. The interconversion of radio-labelled oestrogens and androgens was quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography separation of oestrone, oestradiol, androstenedione and testosterone followed by online radiometric flow scintillation analysis. The method, which can be applied for assessing, e.g., the efficacy of inhibitors of steroidogenic enzymes, was successfully used for evaluating oestrogenic interconversion in breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and T-47D.

  • 31.
    Sivik, Tove
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vikingsson, Svante
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gréen, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Expression Patterns of 17β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase 14 in Human Tissues2012In: Hormone and Metabolic Research, ISSN 0018-5043, E-ISSN 1439-4286, Vol. 44, no 13, p. 949-956Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    17βHSD enzymes catalyze the stereospecific oxidation/reduction at carbon 17β of androgens and estrogens, and are important players in intracrine sex hormone synthesis. The biological relevance of 17βHSD14, first named retSDR3, is largely unknown. We generated and validated an antibody targeting the 17βHSD14 antigen and used this for immunohistochemical evaluation of expression patterns in 33 healthy human tissues. Furthermore, sex steroid conversional activity in HSD17B14 overexpressing HEK293 and MCF10A cells was investigated by assessing interconversion products of estrone, estradiol, androstenedione, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone. Immunohistochemical staining patterns of 17βHSD14 with the enzyme being primarily expressed in glandular epithelial tissue reveal an enzyme with possible implications in the secretion or conversion of externally derived compounds. A role for 17βHSD14 in sex steroid metabolism is supported by the finding that 17HSD14 oxidizes both estradiol and testosterone into less bioactive steroid metabolites estrone and androstenedione, respectively.

  • 32.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Zhang, Hong
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Heat shock protein 72/73 in relation to cytoplasmic p53 expression and prognosis in colorectal adenocarcinomas1997In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 74, no 6, p. 600-604Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heat shock proteins (hsp) are molecular chaperones that are increased by various environmental and patho-physiological stimuli. Hsp can bind to mutant/wild-type p53 in tumors and, consequently, could not only regulate p53 accumulation or localization but also modulate its biological effects on cells. However, there is little information available on the significance of hsp expression in colorectal cancer. The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship of hsp to p53 expression, clinico-pathological factors and prognosis in a series of 256 patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas, using immuno-histochemistry. Seventy-five cases exhibited hsp expression in the cytoplasm, with 11 presenting both cytoplasmic and nuclear staining. Hsp expression was related positively to cytoplasmic p53 expression but not to nuclear p53 expression. In the subgroup of rectal tumors, hsp over-expression appeared to predict unfavorable survival, though its prognostic value diminished using multivariate analysis. There were no significant relationships of hsp with patient sex or age, tumor site, Duke's stage, growth pattern or differentiation.

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