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  • 1.
    Bergquist, Bjarne
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Garvare, Rickard
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Hallencreutz, Jacob
    Högskolan på Gotland.
    Langstrand, Jostein
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vanhatalo, Erik
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Zobel, Thomas
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Alive and kicking – but will quality management be around tomorrow?: A Swedish academia perspective2012In: Quality Innovation Prosperity, ISSN 1335-1745, E-ISSN 1338-984X, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to describe how Quality Management (QM) is perceived today by scholars at three Swedish universities, and into what QM is expected to develop into in twenty years. Data were collected through structured workshops using affinity diagrams with scholars teaching and performing research in the QM field. The results show that QM currently is perceived as consisting of a set of core of principles, methods and tools. The future outlook includes three possible development directions for QM are seen: [1] searching for a “discipline X” where QM can contribute while keeping its toolbox, [2] focus on a core based on the traditional quality technology toolbox with methods and tools, and [3] a risk that QM, as it is today, may seize to exist and be diffused into other disciplines.

  • 2.
    Brännmark, Mikael
    et al.
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan, Stockholm.
    Langstrand, Jostein
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Johansson, Stina
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Halvarsson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Winkel, Jörgen
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Researching Lean: Methodological implications of loose definitions2012In: Quality Innovation Prosperity, ISSN 1335-1745, E-ISSN 1338-984X, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 35-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, Lean Production (Lean) has become a prevailing management concept in Sweden. However, previous research seems to show that the Lean concept and the impact of Lean vary considerably between organizations. This paper illustrates some key methodological issues that need to be considered when researching loosely defined management concepts such as Lean. The paper is based on a review of the literature and five comparative Swedish cases studies. Our study indicates that Lean has changed over time and that operationalization and interpretations of the concept vary considerably. This study concludes that future Lean studies should include a thorough assessment of the Lean interventions, study settings, and in particular non-Lean factors mediating the outcomes of Lean-inspired change programs.

  • 3.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Division of Ergonomics, Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Pettersen, Jostein
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Elg, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bolling, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Interactive research for production and work development2008In: The 40th Nordic Ergonomics Society Annual Conference: Ergonomics is a lifestyle, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Interactive research performed as a collaborative approach in conjunction with organizations is considered a new and promising alternative to other research approaches. The purpose of this paper is to describe how interactive research could be used in the interaction between researchers and organizations when running projects to develop production systems and work performed in these systems. It also aims to identify advantages and disadvantages when applying interactive research. Two long term interactive research projects, organised in collaboration with the partnership of Helix Vinn Excellence Centre at Linköping University were performed and data were collected from documentation of interactive seminars, from notes and from interviews with key actors. Interactive research offers several advantages in comparison with traditional research approaches, foremost higher practitioner involvement and validation opportunities of the results. There are also several difficulties, foremost the need of extensive resources and competencies for the research. The overall experiences from participating practitioners were that they considered that the discussions had been useful, stimulating and interesting, and that the fast feedback from data collection was appreciated. One crucial issue is to what extent this interactive research approach may contribute to high quality research, or to what extent the pressure from the practitioners for actionable practical results will take over.

  • 4.
    Elg, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Langstrand, Jostein
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Balanced Scorecard as Organizational Practice: A multi-perspective analysis2010Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Much academic attention has been directed towards management models, but there is limited research into the details of how these models are put to use in organizations. In this paper, we employ a multi-theoretical process perspective on the introduction of Balanced Scorecard in a Swedish healthcare organization. Through the application of actor-network theory, behavior setting theory and distributed cognition, we have identified a set of complementary observations and conclusions. First, we claim that a critical mass of actors is needed to support the change effort. We also emphasize the need for a problematization process in which critical voices are given room to influence the introduction. Further, we stress the importance of aligning the physical environment with organizational goals, and argue that well-designed feedback mechanisms may prevent undesired decoupling of managerial practice.

  • 5.
    Engström, Jon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Langstrand, Jostein
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Quality Management in Health Care: A Literature ReviewManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this article is to provide input to the discussion of quality management (QM) research in health care through a problematization of its defining characteristics, and to identify historical and contemporary trends regarding QM in the scientific discourse on health care.

    Design/methodology/approach – This article is based on a literature review of leading journal articles concerning quality management in health care. Articles have been selected based on citation in Scopus and ISI/Web of Science, with a total of 36 articles.

    Findings – The review has shown that there are two logics to quality management and improvement work in health care. Dominating the field is an ambition to standardize the provision of health care through an evidence based approach. The other approach is based on a system based logic, aiming to enforce organizational competence and system wide improvement. Unlike the general discourse on quality management is the customer perspective is rather weakly represented in the reviewed literature.

    Research limitations/implications – This article provides some insights that may contribute to a better understanding of the conditions for doing research and improvement in health care.

    Originality/value – The article provides an overview of the defining characteristics of Quality Management in health care, along with a historical perspective on the theoretical development of Quality related topics in health care research. This provides important input to management researchers entering the health care field. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first review on this topic.

  • 6.
    Fitzpatrick, Maeve
    et al.
    Univeristy of Limerick.
    Camps, Oriol
    Technical University of Catalonia.
    Pettersen, Jostein
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management . Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Quality Training in Europe: Current Situation, Future Challenges and e-Learning Opportunities2009In: International Conference on Quality and Service Sciences: 12th QMOD and Toulon-Verona Conference, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An analysis of the current offer of Quality Training programmes in several European countries has been performed, as well as a bibliographical search on future challenges of European Quality Training. From the results of both inquiries, conclusions on elearning suitability for Quality Training are discussed.

  • 7.
    Fitzpatrick, Maeve
    et al.
    University of Limerick.
    Murphy, Eamonn
    University of Limerick.
    Pettersen, Jostein
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management . Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Equipping the future quality practitioner given expert characteristics and future manufacturing and e learning developments2008In: The 11th International QMOD Conference, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:

    This paper reports on an investigation undertaken across five countries to elicit what the perceived traits and characteristics of an expert in Quality and in conjunction with these traits, to understand what role technology may play in the provision of education of quality experts in the future.

    Methodology/Approach

    : A questionnaire which investigated what quality practitioners and managers in Small to Medium Size firms perceive to be an ‘expert’ in quality was developed. A semi structured interview based on this questionnaire was the method of deployment in twenty Small to medium size organisations from Spain, Poland, Greece, Sweden and Ireland. The questionnaires were translated into the national language for each participating country and the results were then reverse translated back into English.

    Findings:

    Most surprisingly perhaps the expert characteristics that defined an expert quality professional were significantly biased towards soft or networking building skills as opposed to skills with an analytical base. This will have a significant impact both on how quality professionals work and in how training is delivered.

    Research limitation/Implication:

    The survey results indicate that a ‘Pareto flip’ in the provision and focus of education is required. Given how the manufacturing environment is expected to change, provision of tools and techniques that will facilitate employees learning the skills required to deploy quality in a virtual and networked learning and manufacturing environment is critical.

    Originality:

    This paper researched what the possible futures in both manufacturing and e-learning are to understand what environment the quality professional will be operating in and possible modes of deploying these requisite skills.

  • 8.
    Jörn Dahlgaard, Jens
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pettersen, Jostein
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mi Dahlgaard-Park, Su
    Lund University.
    Quality and lean health care: a system for assessing and improving the health of healthcare organisations2011In: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 673-689Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to present and discuss the development of a system for assessing and improving healthcare organisations. The system components comprise (1) a framework or model for assessing, measuring, diagnosing and improving healthcare organisations, (2) a simple methodology for data collection, data analysis and prioritising improvement areas and (3) an index named ILL (innovativeness, learning and lean) for measuring the level of excellence (the health level of the organization) and the potentials to increase that level. The system has been based on a simplified excellence model called the 4P Excellence Model which contains both intangible systemic factors (Leadership, People Management and Partnerships) and more logical tangible factors (Processes and Product/Service Results). The suggested system can be used for assessing the existing organisational culture in relation to ILL and for identifying necessary improvement areas. The suggested system has originally been developed for healthcare organisations, but also been used within other types of organisations such as manufacturing and service companies. This article will only show and discuss the use of the suggested system within healthcare organisations.

  • 9.
    Langstrand, Jostein
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    An introduction to value stream mapping and analysis2016Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Value stream mapping (VSM) is a method for illustrating and analyzing the logic of a production process. The terminology stems  from the metaphor of the production process as a steady stream of products where value is added for each step that the products take down stream. This metaphor and the  terminology also strengthen the notion of continuous flow as the ultimate form of production–at least in terms of efficiency...

  • 10.
    Langstrand, Jostein
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Exploring organizational translation: A case study of changes toward Lean Production2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean Production has received massive attention during recent years, and many organizations attempt to introduce it with an ambition to reach the radical improvement effects that are promised in the popular management literature. However, introducing a management concept can be a very challenging task, and research has shown that the majority of such initiatives fail. A common observation is that the outcome of a change initiative differs from its initial intentions, which indicates that the content of the change is somehow transformed during the process. This kind of transformation can be described as organizational translation.

    The purpose of the thesis is to provide an account of how processes of organizational translation transpire and to analyze and identify the main determinants of their outcome.

    The thesis is based on a longitudinal case study that has focused on the introduction of the management concept Lean in a large Swedish manufacturing company. The study has been performed in two phases. In the first phase, a series of retrospective interviews have been performed with employees at all hierarchical levels within the company. The second phase of the study has been based on a prospective approach. This phase has comprised a combination of interviews, observations and document studies, with focus on a pilot project within the company. The study was performed between 2007 and 2011 and covers events between 2003 and 2011.

    By analyzing the changes from a translation perspective, the thesis contributes to explore the meaning of organizational translation and the mechanisms through which Lean is materialized and developed into organizational practice.

    Three types of organizational translation are presented in the thesis. These are defined as the activities and processes through which Lean is translated to a local set of ideas, practices and objects, respectively. It is suggested that these three entities and the corresponding forms of translation interact and together influence how people behave, which in turn will affect the results of the change initiative. This implies that all three types of organizational translation need to be addressed for a change initiative to be successful. Further, the suggested change must be translated so that it is represented in physical objects, people’s understanding and organizational practice. Lack of alignment between these three entities will create tension, which will likely hinder change and increase the risk of failure.

    List of papers
    1. Defining lean production: some conceptual and practical issues
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Defining lean production: some conceptual and practical issues
    2009 (English)In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274X, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 127-142Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the definition of lean production and the methods and goals associated with the concept as well as how it differs from other popular management concepts. '

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on a review of the contemporary literature on lean production, both journal articles and books.

    Findings – It is shown in the paper that there is no consensus on a definition of lean production between the examined authors. The authors also seem to have different opinions on which characteristics should be associated with the concept. Overall it can be concluded that lean production is not clearly defined in the reviewed literature. This divergence can cause some confusion on a theoretical level, but is probably more problematic on a practical level when organizations aim to implement the concept. This paper argues that it is important for an organization to acknowledge the different variations, and to raise the awareness of the input in the implementation process. It is further argued that the organization should not accept any random variant of lean, but make active choices and adapt the concept to suit the organization's needs. Through this process of adaptation, the organization will be able to increase the odds of performing a predictable and successful implementation.

    Originality/value – This paper provides a critical perspective on the discourse surrounding lean production, and gives an input to the discussion of the implementation of management models.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Bingley, UK: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2009
    Keywords
    Lean Production, Quality Management, Definition
    National Category
    Business Administration
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-18419 (URN)10.1108/17542730910938137 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-05-26 Created: 2009-05-26 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Quality Improvement activities in Swedish industry: drivers, approaches and outcomes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quality Improvement activities in Swedish industry: drivers, approaches and outcomes
    Show others...
    2010 (English)In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 206-216Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper aims to present and discuss the current state of quality-improvement activities in Swedish companies. The paper focuses on the drivers for quality improvement; types of approaches, tools and techniques, and organizational aspects influenced by quality improvement; and potential areas for improvement.

    Design/methodology/approach – This paper presents results from a survey on quality improvement work in Swedish industry. Data for this paper were collected using a web-based questionnaire that was distributed to 800 production managers working in Swedish service and manufacturing organizations. Of the 800 questionnaires sent, a total of 118 questionnaires were filled out, which resulted in a response rate of 16 percent.

    Findings – The result shows that the major drivers for quality improvement work in Swedish industry are economical aspects as the need for cost reduction, the need to become more competitive and the wish to increase market share. Drivers such as pressure from shareholders and trends in management have a minor role. The underlying approaches for quality improvement work are standards such as ISO 9000 and ISO 14000. A total of 72 percent of respondents stated that they work with quality management systems; 59 percent, with environmental management systems. The aspects that were most positively influenced by the improvement work were employee motivation, customer satisfaction, employee satisfaction, product/service quality, and flow in internal processes.

    Research limitations/implications – Empirical results obtained in Sweden may differ to some extent in other countries.

    Practical implications – This paper is intended as a source of inspiration for researchers, consultants, and managers who are interested in the current trends and future developments in the quality field.

    Originality/value – The paper provides valuable insights into the current state of quality improvement activities in Swedish industry, as seen from the perspective of the production manager.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Emerald, 2010
    Keywords
    Quality improvement, Quality standards, Total quality management
    National Category
    Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-62694 (URN)10.1108/17566691011057366 (DOI)
    Available from: 2010-12-02 Created: 2010-12-02 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    3. Non-human resistance in changes towards lean
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Non-human resistance in changes towards lean
    2012 (English)In: Journal of Organizational Change Management, ISSN 0953-4814, E-ISSN 1758-7816, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 853-866Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The importance of social issues is well established in the literature on resistance to change. However, much can be gained by including physical objects in the analysis. Using actor-network theory, this paper aims to explore the resistance of non-human actors in organizational change and contribute to an expanded understanding of resistance to change. Design/methodology/approach: The article is based on a longitudinal case study of the introduction of lean in a large Swedish manufacturing company. The empirical basis consists of interviews, observations and document studies. Actor-network theory is used as a theoretical lens to identify non-human resistance to change. Findings: The paper proposes that non-human actors can inhibit change through a lack of alignment with the overall change initiative. This may cause large variation in the interpretation of the proposed change and a lengthy process of construction and negotiation. The paper provides examples of four different types of non-human resistance that result from this lack of alignment. Practical implications: It is proposed that change initiatives need to be aligned with existing practice and anchored in objects that are integrated in organizational routines. The four types of non-human resistance presented in the paper may be used as a checklist to reduce the risk of failure. Originality/value: The predominant focus on social issues tends to disregard the impact of the physical environment in change processes. Actor-network theory and the inclusion of the physical environment will help to expand and improve the understanding of resistance to change.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2012
    Keywords
    Actor-network theory; Change; Change management; Lean production; Manufacturing industries; Resistance; Sociotechnical change; Sweden
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-75353 (URN)10.1108/09534811211280609 (DOI)
    Note

    On the day of the defence day the status of this article was: Manuscript

    Available from: 2012-02-27 Created: 2012-02-27 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    4. Balanced Scorecard as Organizational Practice: A multi-perspective analysis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Balanced Scorecard as Organizational Practice: A multi-perspective analysis
    2010 (English)Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Much academic attention has been directed towards management models, but there is limited research into the details of how these models are put to use in organizations. In this paper, we employ a multi-theoretical process perspective on the introduction of Balanced Scorecard in a Swedish healthcare organization. Through the application of actor-network theory, behavior setting theory and distributed cognition, we have identified a set of complementary observations and conclusions. First, we claim that a critical mass of actors is needed to support the change effort. We also emphasize the need for a problematization process in which critical voices are given room to influence the introduction. Further, we stress the importance of aligning the physical environment with organizational goals, and argue that well-designed feedback mechanisms may prevent undesired decoupling of managerial practice.

    Place, publisher, year, pages
    Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2010
    Keywords
    Management models, change, process studies, multiple interpretations
    National Category
    Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-75049 (URN)
    Note
    Working paper.Available from: 2012-02-16 Created: 2012-02-15 Last updated: 2015-02-05Bibliographically approved
  • 11.
    Langstrand, Jostein
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Practice what you preach: Quality of education in education on quality2012In: , 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Langstrand, Jostein
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Practise what you preach: Quality of education in education on quality2012In: : How may organizations use Learning, Creativity and Innovation in realizing their dreams of excellence and recover from the economic crisis? / [ed] Su Mi Dahlgaard-Park, Jens J. Dahlgaard & Adam Hamrol, 2012, p. 855-867Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Langstrand, Jostein
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Practise what you preach: quality of education in education on quality2015In: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 26, no 11-12, p. 1202-1212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The quality of teaching should be the central theme in the education on quality management (QM). Delivering bad courses about QM would reduce the legitimacy of the subject, since we do not practise what we preach. The purpose of this paper is to discuss how the quality of education can be enhanced through effective course design based on quality thinking and higher education theory. The study covers three university courses in the field of QM; an introductory course in QM, and courses in Six Sigma and Lean Production, respectively. Each course has been analysed and described in terms of factors affecting student learning and the perceived quality of the courses. The impact of course design on examination results and student evaluation has been studied and compared to historical data. The study demonstrates that course design can have a profound impact on student learning as well as course evaluation. Analysis of the three examples provided in this paper indicates that the QM principles can effectively be used in course design processes. Attention to the principles presented in this paper facilitates the design of courses that enhance learning and ensure higher student satisfaction. The application of QM principles in higher education has a long theoretical tradition. This paper provides three strong examples of how this can be done in practise.

  • 14.
    Langstrand, Jostein
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Drotz, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The rhetoric and reality of Lean: A multiple case study2016In: Total quality management and business excellence (Online), ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 27, no 3-4, p. 398-412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we analyse the similarities and differences between the descriptions of Lean found in the extant literature and how it is applied in practice. Using a multiple case study with seven cases from different sectors, we offer seven propositions about Lean as applied in reality and its relation to descriptions in literature. Our results indicate that organisations adopt the general rhetoric, and repeat the message conveyed by Lean proponents, in terms of the rationale for, and expected outcomes of, applying Lean. Furthermore, we see that the decision to implement Lean often precedes the identification of problems in the organisation, which causes a risk of an unfocused change process. Lean initiatives also tend to have a rather narrow scope, which contradicts the holistic view advocated in the literature. This, together with the variation in operationalisation, makes it difficult to predict the outcomes of a Lean initiative. Our study suggests that our findings do not depend on organisation size, sector or industry.

  • 15.
    Langstrand, Jostein
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eklund Teivik, Rebecca
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kvalitet i upphandling: En studie vid tekniska kontoret i Norrköpings kommun2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Offentlig upphandling syftar till att genom konkurrensutsättning av inköp i offentlig verksamhet generera goda affärer med skattefinansierade medel. Uppföljning av offentliga upphandlingsavtal är dock eftersatt hos många upphandlande myndigheter. Otydliga och otillräckliga krav på anbudsgivare, resursbrist samt bristande rutiner bidrar till bristande uppföljning och detta får allvarliga konsekvenser eftersom uppföljning av de krav som ställts i upphandlingar är förutsättningar för att erhålla god upphandlingskvalitet.

    Denna studie undersöker hur upphandlingskvaliteten i offentlig upphandling kan säkerställas och förbättras samt hur uppföljningen av denna kvalitet kan understödja detta arbete. Rapporten undersöker även hur användning av nyckeltal kan understödja uppföljningarbetet och därmed bidra en bättre upphandlingskvalitet. Flertalet intervjuer har använts för att samla djupgående information från upphandlingsverksamheten, vilka faktorer som är viktiga att ta hänsyn till i upphandlingarna för att generera god kvalitet och vilka problem som finns. En enkätundersökning har också genomförts för att styrka de argument som framkom vid intervjuerna.

    Med stöd i den litteraturstudie som genomförts identifierades flera faktorer som påverkar kvaliteten i offentliga upphandlingar. Centralt är att möjliggöra för en optimal användning av de resurser som finns och att prioritera uppföljningsarbetet i större utsträckning. Detta kräver fler stickprov för att samla information från upphandlingarna och för att återfå kontroll över upphandlingsavtalen. Fler stickprovskontroller kan i sin tur generera en direkt positiv påverkan på kvaliteten i upphandlingarna eftersom incitamenten för leverantörerna att hålla en god kvalitet på sitt arbete därmed blir fler. Med fler kontroller följer också värdefull information om processen som kan användas internt för att öka det organisatoriska lärandet samt inleda en god spiral som möjliggör kontinuerliga förbättringar av såväl upphandlingskvalitet som uppföljningsarbete.

    Utifrån detta har förslag på tio konkreta nyckeltal tagits fram. Nyckeltalen relateras till fyra mätperspektiv vilka kallas Goda affärer, Relationer, Interna processer samt Lärande och utveckling. Mätetalen bör sammanställas på regelbunden basis, exempelvis varje vecka eller månad. Dessa nyckeltal kompletterar varandra och flera av dem kan med fördel presenteras tillsammans vid jämförelser över tid för att illustrera resultatet av förändringar och för att skapa motivation genom visualisering av åstadkomna förbättringar.

  • 16.
    Langstrand, Jostein
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Elg, Mattias
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Non-human resistance in changes towards lean2012In: Journal of Organizational Change Management, ISSN 0953-4814, E-ISSN 1758-7816, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 853-866Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The importance of social issues is well established in the literature on resistance to change. However, much can be gained by including physical objects in the analysis. Using actor-network theory, this paper aims to explore the resistance of non-human actors in organizational change and contribute to an expanded understanding of resistance to change. Design/methodology/approach: The article is based on a longitudinal case study of the introduction of lean in a large Swedish manufacturing company. The empirical basis consists of interviews, observations and document studies. Actor-network theory is used as a theoretical lens to identify non-human resistance to change. Findings: The paper proposes that non-human actors can inhibit change through a lack of alignment with the overall change initiative. This may cause large variation in the interpretation of the proposed change and a lengthy process of construction and negotiation. The paper provides examples of four different types of non-human resistance that result from this lack of alignment. Practical implications: It is proposed that change initiatives need to be aligned with existing practice and anchored in objects that are integrated in organizational routines. The four types of non-human resistance presented in the paper may be used as a checklist to reduce the risk of failure. Originality/value: The predominant focus on social issues tends to disregard the impact of the physical environment in change processes. Actor-network theory and the inclusion of the physical environment will help to expand and improve the understanding of resistance to change.

  • 17.
    Langstrand, Jostein
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundqvist, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Att leda förändring: från förhandling till realisering2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Att leda förändring är bland de svåraste uppgifterna en ledare kan ta sig an, och ungefär två tredjedelar av alla förändringsinitiativ misslyckas. Vår ambition med den här rapporten är att bidra till att förmedla några råd som vi har hämtat från erfarna förändringsledare och därmed bidra till att hjälpa presumtiva förändringsledare att förutse och planera för de utmaningar som kommer under förändringsarbetets gång.

    Rapporten bygger på en intervjustudie där 14 erfarna förändringsledare har delat med sig av sina erfarenheter av att leda förändringsprocesser i olika verksamheter – både offentligt och privat. Vi har identifierat gemensamma mönster i deras beskrivningar och sammanfattat dessa genom att beskriva en generisk förändringsprocess som bestående av fyra olika faser som vi har kallat initiering, förankring, genomförande och uppföljning.

    En central slutsats från den här studien är att ledarbeteenden behöver anpassas till den fas som förändringsarbetet befinner sig i. Detta innebär att förändringsarbete kräver ledare som är flexibla i sitt ledarskap och har en förmåga att ta olika roller allt eftersom förändringen fortskrider. Till exempel krävs ett konsensussökande ledarskap inledningsvis, och senare i processen går kraven över till ett mer resultatorienterat och ibland auktoritärt ledarskap.

    Vi presenterar en modell som ger en övergripande beskrivning av vilka ledarbeteenden som bör kopplas till respektive förändringsfas. Modellen är tänkt att fungera som ett verktyg för att uppmärksamma vilka situationer som kan uppkomma i en förändringsprocess och vilka roller och ledarbeteenden som en ledare bör vara beredd på. Vår modell kan därmed hjälpa ledare att bli bättre förberedda för förändringsarbetet, och förhoppningsvis bidra till att öka sannolikheten för lyckade förändringsinsatser.

  • 18.
    Pettersen, Jostein
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Managing Mobility for Learning, Health and Innovation (HELIX). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Defining lean production: some conceptual and practical issues2009In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274X, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 127-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the definition of lean production and the methods and goals associated with the concept as well as how it differs from other popular management concepts. '

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on a review of the contemporary literature on lean production, both journal articles and books.

    Findings – It is shown in the paper that there is no consensus on a definition of lean production between the examined authors. The authors also seem to have different opinions on which characteristics should be associated with the concept. Overall it can be concluded that lean production is not clearly defined in the reviewed literature. This divergence can cause some confusion on a theoretical level, but is probably more problematic on a practical level when organizations aim to implement the concept. This paper argues that it is important for an organization to acknowledge the different variations, and to raise the awareness of the input in the implementation process. It is further argued that the organization should not accept any random variant of lean, but make active choices and adapt the concept to suit the organization's needs. Through this process of adaptation, the organization will be able to increase the odds of performing a predictable and successful implementation.

    Originality/value – This paper provides a critical perspective on the discourse surrounding lean production, and gives an input to the discussion of the implementation of management models.

  • 19.
    Pettersen, Jostein
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Defining Lean Production: Some conceptual and practical issues2008In: 11th QMOD Conference: Quality Management and Organizational Development Attaining Sustainability From Organizational Excellence to SustainAble Excellence / [ed] Su Mi Dahlgaard-Park, Su Mi, Jens J. Dahlgaard, Linköping, Sweden: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2008, p. Art.no. 025-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This paper aims to investigate the definition of Lean Production and the methods and goals associated with the concept as well as how it differs from other popular management concepts. Methodology/Approach - The paper is based on a review of the contemporary literature on Lean Production, both journal articles and books. Findings - It is shown in the paper that there is no consensus on a definition of Lean Production between the examined authors. The authors also seem to have different opinions on which characteristics that should be associated with the concept. Overall it can be concluded that Lean Production is not clearly defined in the reviewed literature. This divergence can cause some confusion on a theoretical level, but is probably more problematic on a practical level when organizations aim to implement the concept. This paper argues that it is important for an organization to acknowledge the different variations, and to raise the awareness of the input in the implementation process. It is further argued that the organization should not accept any random variant of Lean, but make active choices and adapt the concept to suit the organization-s needs. Through this process of adaptation, the organization will be able to increase the odds of performing a predictable and successful implementation. Originality/Value - This paper provides a critical perspective on the discourse surrounding Lean Production, and gives an input to the discussion of the implementation of management models. Keywords - Lean Production, Definition, Construct Validity, Total Quality Management Paper type - Conceptual paper 

  • 20.
    Pettersen, Jostein
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, HELIX. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Implementing Lean Production: Lost in Translation?2008In: 40th Annual Conference on the Nordic Ergonomics Society, Reykjavik, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizational change is sometimes assumed to be a linear and predictive process, but the majority of change initiatives end in failure (cf. Beer, 2003). The results of the change initiative often differ from the initial ambitions, indicating that theories of translation may be useful in analyses of change processes.

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate and analyze the early stages of implementing a lean-type production system in a large Swedish manufacturing company. Representatives from all organizational levels within the studied company have been interviewed. The interviews have been analyzed from an Actor-network perspective, using translation as a key component.

    The company has not achieved the results that were expected, and in certain areas, the focus of the initial ideas has shifted in unforeseen directions. The analysis shows that this is a result of the translation of the core ideas of the new production concept (lean production).

    A key finding is that the implementation process has allowed too much room for translation, thereby increasing the risk of change failure. The paper shows that people in managerial positions can benefit from taking the processes of translation into account in their work. Considerable efforts should be directed towards understanding the actors’ frames of reference and design information that suits the actors’ needs.

    The paper uses Michel Callon’s framework for sociology of translation in the context of organizational change and on various levels of abstraction. The paper shows how the a translation perspective can be useful in researching processes of organizational change.

  • 21.
    Pettersen, Jostein
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lean Production. Universallösning eller modefluga?: En kritisk granskning av Lean-konceptets innehåll och retorik2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean Production firar sitt 20 års jubileum i år. Trots den långa tiden och kopplingen till Toyotas produktionssystem (TPS) finns fortfarande en hel del förvirring kring konceptets syfte och innehåll.

    Syftet med föreliggande rapport är att försöka klara upp en del av denna förvirring och föra en diskussion kring konceptet och den retorik som omger konceptet.

    Diskussionerna som förs i rapporten bygger på en litteraturstudie som omfattar den mest centrala litteraturen som rör Lean Production.

    Diskussionerna förs i tre steg. Först görs en analys av konceptets homogenitet och huruvida Lean Production kan ses som ett enhetligt koncept. Därefter görs en bedömning av konceptets egenart genom en jämförelse med dess närmsta släkting, Total Quality Management. Slutligen förs en diskussion kring några praktiska frågor kring förutsättningar och konsekvenser för införande av Lean Production i en organisation.

  • 22.
    Pettersen, Jostein
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, HELIX. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Quality Management in Swedish Industry: Concepts, Practices and Knowledge Base2009In: The 12th international QMOD conference, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to identify different strategies in the application of Quality Management in Swedish industry. This purpose is divided into two questions; (1) what kind of management practices are applied in relation to which management concepts and (2) where do the organizations turn to seek knowledge about the applied concepts.

    Methodology/Approach: A questionnaire survey was performed, where production managers in Swedish industry were requested to rate their rate of application of various management concepts and practices as well as their use of various information sources. Principal Component Analysis was applied to find patterns in the data, and cluster analysis was performed on the principal component loadings to identify groups of information sources, concepts and practices.

    Findings: The analysis shows that three distinctive approaches to Quality Management can be identified, based on TQM/Six Sigma, TPS/Lean Production and ISO9000 respectively. In terms of seeking knowledge, there are also three distinct strategies: (1) a formal approach, focusing on external sources of information, such as university courses and professional networks; (2) an informal approach, focusing on easily accessible information in journals and the Internet; (3) a consultant based approach, seeking information mainly from management consultants. The consultant based approach seems to apply to all management concepts, whereas the two other approaches seem to be independent of the choice of concept.

    Implications: This paper provides an empirical basis for classification of management concepts and practices, thereby providing support for practitioners aiming to select and implement a strategy for organizational change.

  • 23.
    Pettersen, Jostein
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management .
    The implementation of lean: Lost in translation?2008In: 40th Annual Conference on the Nordic Ergonomics Society,2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 24.
    Pettersen, Jostein
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, HELIX. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Translating Lean Production: From Managerial Discourse to Organizational Practice2009Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The majority of organizational change efforts end in failure. These failures can often be ascribed to lack of understanding of the translation processes that accompany the implementation of management concepts. Translation becomes evident when the initial ambitions of an implementation process are changed as they are communicated through the organization, often leading to unwanted results.

    This thesis deals with the translation of management concepts. The ambition is to contribute to the body of knowledge that is concerned with this theoretical direction through demonstrating how the currently dominating management concept Lean Production is translated as it is passed between contexts.

    The thesis is based on three studies of management concepts at various levels of abstraction. The first study is based on a review of the major literature on Lean Production. The second study is based on a survey among Swedish production managers on their application of management methods and concepts. The third study comprises a series of interviews within a large Swedish industrial organization, focusing on how Lean Production has been translated during the implementation process.

    The results show that Lean Production is far from well defined or unequivocal. There is always room for translation as the concept is passed between actors within an organization. It is therefore unreasonable to expect the concept to provide certain results. The results are determined by the way the concept is interpreted and translated within the organization that seeks to implement it. It is argued that insufficient translation competence will increase the risk of an uncontrolled and potentially ineffective translation process, leading to unexpected and undesirable results.

    Through combining these results with existing theories within the management field, the author presents a tentative model for analyzing the translation of management concepts all the way from the general managerial discourse to the practice that can be observed at the factory floor of a company. It is proposed that this model may be used as a conceptual framework for further studies of the translation of management concepts.

    List of papers
    1. Defining lean production: some conceptual and practical issues
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Defining lean production: some conceptual and practical issues
    2009 (English)In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274X, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 127-142Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the definition of lean production and the methods and goals associated with the concept as well as how it differs from other popular management concepts. '

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on a review of the contemporary literature on lean production, both journal articles and books.

    Findings – It is shown in the paper that there is no consensus on a definition of lean production between the examined authors. The authors also seem to have different opinions on which characteristics should be associated with the concept. Overall it can be concluded that lean production is not clearly defined in the reviewed literature. This divergence can cause some confusion on a theoretical level, but is probably more problematic on a practical level when organizations aim to implement the concept. This paper argues that it is important for an organization to acknowledge the different variations, and to raise the awareness of the input in the implementation process. It is further argued that the organization should not accept any random variant of lean, but make active choices and adapt the concept to suit the organization's needs. Through this process of adaptation, the organization will be able to increase the odds of performing a predictable and successful implementation.

    Originality/value – This paper provides a critical perspective on the discourse surrounding lean production, and gives an input to the discussion of the implementation of management models.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Bingley, UK: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2009
    Keywords
    Lean Production, Quality Management, Definition
    National Category
    Business Administration
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-18419 (URN)10.1108/17542730910938137 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-05-26 Created: 2009-05-26 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Implementing Lean Production: Lost in Translation?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Implementing Lean Production: Lost in Translation?
    2008 (English)In: 40th Annual Conference on the Nordic Ergonomics Society, Reykjavik, 2008Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizational change is sometimes assumed to be a linear and predictive process, but the majority of change initiatives end in failure (cf. Beer, 2003). The results of the change initiative often differ from the initial ambitions, indicating that theories of translation may be useful in analyses of change processes.

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate and analyze the early stages of implementing a lean-type production system in a large Swedish manufacturing company. Representatives from all organizational levels within the studied company have been interviewed. The interviews have been analyzed from an Actor-network perspective, using translation as a key component.

    The company has not achieved the results that were expected, and in certain areas, the focus of the initial ideas has shifted in unforeseen directions. The analysis shows that this is a result of the translation of the core ideas of the new production concept (lean production).

    A key finding is that the implementation process has allowed too much room for translation, thereby increasing the risk of change failure. The paper shows that people in managerial positions can benefit from taking the processes of translation into account in their work. Considerable efforts should be directed towards understanding the actors’ frames of reference and design information that suits the actors’ needs.

    The paper uses Michel Callon’s framework for sociology of translation in the context of organizational change and on various levels of abstraction. The paper shows how the a translation perspective can be useful in researching processes of organizational change.

    Keywords
    Actor-network theory, sociology of translation, lean production, implementation, organizational change
    National Category
    Business Administration Other Mechanical Engineering
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-18421 (URN)
    Available from: 2009-05-26 Created: 2009-05-26 Last updated: 2015-02-05Bibliographically approved
    3. Quality Management in Swedish Industry: Concepts, Practices and Knowledge Base
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quality Management in Swedish Industry: Concepts, Practices and Knowledge Base
    2009 (English)In: The 12th international QMOD conference, 2009Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to identify different strategies in the application of Quality Management in Swedish industry. This purpose is divided into two questions; (1) what kind of management practices are applied in relation to which management concepts and (2) where do the organizations turn to seek knowledge about the applied concepts.

    Methodology/Approach: A questionnaire survey was performed, where production managers in Swedish industry were requested to rate their rate of application of various management concepts and practices as well as their use of various information sources. Principal Component Analysis was applied to find patterns in the data, and cluster analysis was performed on the principal component loadings to identify groups of information sources, concepts and practices.

    Findings: The analysis shows that three distinctive approaches to Quality Management can be identified, based on TQM/Six Sigma, TPS/Lean Production and ISO9000 respectively. In terms of seeking knowledge, there are also three distinct strategies: (1) a formal approach, focusing on external sources of information, such as university courses and professional networks; (2) an informal approach, focusing on easily accessible information in journals and the Internet; (3) a consultant based approach, seeking information mainly from management consultants. The consultant based approach seems to apply to all management concepts, whereas the two other approaches seem to be independent of the choice of concept.

    Implications: This paper provides an empirical basis for classification of management concepts and practices, thereby providing support for practitioners aiming to select and implement a strategy for organizational change.

    Keywords
    Lean, TQM, Six Sigma, ISO9000, Knowledge base, Principal Component Analysis, Cluster analysis
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-18423 (URN)
    Available from: 2009-05-26 Created: 2009-05-26 Last updated: 2015-02-05Bibliographically approved
  • 25.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pettersen, Jostein
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Elg, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Quality Improvement activities in Swedish industry: drivers, approaches and outcomes2010In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 206-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper aims to present and discuss the current state of quality-improvement activities in Swedish companies. The paper focuses on the drivers for quality improvement; types of approaches, tools and techniques, and organizational aspects influenced by quality improvement; and potential areas for improvement.

    Design/methodology/approach – This paper presents results from a survey on quality improvement work in Swedish industry. Data for this paper were collected using a web-based questionnaire that was distributed to 800 production managers working in Swedish service and manufacturing organizations. Of the 800 questionnaires sent, a total of 118 questionnaires were filled out, which resulted in a response rate of 16 percent.

    Findings – The result shows that the major drivers for quality improvement work in Swedish industry are economical aspects as the need for cost reduction, the need to become more competitive and the wish to increase market share. Drivers such as pressure from shareholders and trends in management have a minor role. The underlying approaches for quality improvement work are standards such as ISO 9000 and ISO 14000. A total of 72 percent of respondents stated that they work with quality management systems; 59 percent, with environmental management systems. The aspects that were most positively influenced by the improvement work were employee motivation, customer satisfaction, employee satisfaction, product/service quality, and flow in internal processes.

    Research limitations/implications – Empirical results obtained in Sweden may differ to some extent in other countries.

    Practical implications – This paper is intended as a source of inspiration for researchers, consultants, and managers who are interested in the current trends and future developments in the quality field.

    Originality/value – The paper provides valuable insights into the current state of quality improvement activities in Swedish industry, as seen from the perspective of the production manager.

  • 26.
    Ugochukwu, Paschal
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Engström, Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Langstrand, Jostein
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lean in the supply chain: A literature review2012In: Management and Production Engineering Review, ISSN 2082-1344, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 87-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    “Lean” is a management philosophy that enhances customer value through waste elimination and continuous improvement in a system, by applying lean principles, practices and techniques. The focus on lean implementations and research had been on a single company without extension to the entire supply chain. When the lean concept is implemented across the entire supply chain, however, it is referred to as a lean supply chain. The purpose of this paper is to review literature on lean in the supply chain and identify research trends and issues within the field. The paper involves a comprehensive review of articles on lean in the supply chain using structured content analysis. The reviewed articles were classified based on the basic characteristics and contextual issues of the articles.The researchers in the field agree that the identified benefits of lean in the supply chain, which include reduced cost, improved quality, faster delivery and flexibility, are linked to the implementation of certain lean principles, practices and techniques in the supply chain. Most of the reviewed articles are case studies, and evidence for the benefits of lean in the supply chain is anecdotal. While the empirical work done in the field is encouraging, quantitative studies to substantiate the claims for the efficiency of lean in the supply chain are lacking. In the reviewed articles, the manufacturing sector received much attention, while the service sector received little attention from researchers in the field. It was generally suggested that the supply chain members, suppliers and manufacturers should be considered in the implementation of lean in the supply chain, while the inclusion of distributors and end customers was not discussed in detail in many of the reviewed articles.

1 - 26 of 26
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