liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 19 of 19
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Felixsson, Emma
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Ingrid A.-L.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Andreas C.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Horse chestnut extract contracts bovine vessels and affects human platelet aggregation through 5-HT(2A) receptors: an in vitro study2010In: Phytotherapy Research, ISSN 0951-418X, E-ISSN 1099-1573, Vol. 24, no 9, p. 1297-1301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extract from seeds and bark of horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum L) is used as an herbal medicine against chronic venous insufficiency. The effect and mechanism of action on veins, arteries, and platelets are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanisms of action of horse chestnut on the contraction of bovine mesenteric veins and arteries, and human platelet aggregation. Contraction studies showed that horse chestnut extract dose-dependently contracted both veins and arteries, with the veins being the most sensitive. Contraction of both veins and arteries were significantly inhibited by the 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist ketanserin. No effect on contraction was seen with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin, the alpha(1) receptor antagonist prazosin or the angiotensin AT(1) receptor antagonist saralasin neither in veins nor arteries. ADP-induced human platelet aggregation was significantly reduced by horse chestnut. A further reduction was seen with the extract in the presence of ketanserin. In conclusion, horse chestnut contraction of both veins and arteries is, at least partly, mediated through 5-HT(2A) receptors. Human platelet aggregation is reduced by horse chestnut. The clinical importance of these findings concerning clinical use, possible adverse effects, and drug interactions remains to be investigated. Copyright (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 2.
    Persson, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology .
    Plant-Derived Substances and Cardiovascular Diseases: Effects of Flavonoids, Terpenes and Sterols on Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme and Nitric Oxide2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Diet has for many years been known to play a key role in the development of chronic diseases. There are clear associations between consumption of vegetables, fruits and berries, and risk of cardiovascular diseases, the number one cause of death in the world. To maintain homeostasis of the vascular wall the balance between angiotensin II, nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species is of great importance in order to affect the development of cardiovascular diseases. Angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor causing cell growth and nitric oxide, a signalling molecule influencing the vascular system as a vasodilatator, inhibiting cell proliferation and reactive oxygen species, are linked together in the renin-angiotensin aldosteron system. Angiotensin-converting enzyme will as a key enzyme in the reninangiotensin aldosteron system convert angiotensin I to form angiotensin II and nitric oxide is known to inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme and act as a scavenger of reactive oxygen species. Plant-derived substances as flavonoids, tocopherols and carotenoids are shown to have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system due to their antioxidative effects. The aims of this study were to investigate beverages, dietary products, herbal medicinal plants, α-tocopherol, β-carotene, sterols and lipidowering drugs on angiotensin-converting enzyme activity and nitric oxide concentrations. This was done to investigate if the sole mechanism of plant-derived substances is their antioxidative properties and to investigate if there is any connection between effect and biosynthesis/structure of plant substances. The tested infusions and extracts containing high amounts of flavonoids, the flavonoids and β-carotene significantly inhibited angiotensin-converting enzyme activity in vitro. The other substances tested did not affect, or in some cases significantly increased, angiotensin-converting enzyme activity. The infusions and extracts containing high amounts of flavonoids, the flavonoids andβ-carotene showed an increase on nitric oxide concentrations in vitro. Oral intake of a single dose of Rooibos tea significantly inhibited angiotensin-converting enzyme activity. A significant inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme activity was seen with the green tea for the angiotensin-converting enzyme genotypes II and ID. A significant inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme activity was also seen with the Rooibos tea for the angiotensin-converting enzyme genotype II.

    Conclusion; flavonoids and β-carotene interact with the cardiovascular system in severalways, by reducing reactive oxygen species (as shown in several studies), increasing nitricoxide concentrations (as shown here and by others) and also by inhibiting angiotensinconvertingenzyme activity (as shown here). Infusions and extracts as tea containing highamounts of flavonoids function as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. Angiotensinconvertingenzyme contains two zink-dependent catalytic domains and angiotensinconvertingenzyme inhibitors are designed to bind to the Zn2+ at the active site. If theinhibitory mechanism of flavonoids on angiotensin-converting enzyme activity is due to theirability to bind to Zn2+ ions then it would be possible for the flavonoids to also inhibit otherzinc metallopeptidases, i.e. endothelin-converting enzyme, matrix metallopeptidases, neutralendopeptidase and maybe insulin-degrading enzyme, thereby exerting several additionalpositive effects on the cardiovascular system.

    List of papers
    1. Tea flavanols inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme activity and increase nitric oxide production in human endothelial cells
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tea flavanols inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme activity and increase nitric oxide production in human endothelial cells
    2006 (English)In: Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology (JPP), ISSN 0022-3573, E-ISSN 2042-7158, Vol. 58, no 8, p. 1139-1144Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A diversity of pharmacological effects on the cardiovascular system have been reported for Camellia sinensis: antioxidative, antiproliferative and anti-angiogenic activity, and nitric oxide synthase activation. The purpose of this study was to investigate if the connection between tea and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and nitric oxide (NO) might be an explanation of the pharmacological effects of tea on the cardiovascular system. Cultured endothelial cells from human umbilical veins (HUVEC) were incubated with extracts of Japanese Sencha (green tea), Indian Assam Broken Orange Pekoe (black tea) and Rooibos tea, respectively. The main flavanols and purine alkaloids in green and black tea were examined for their effects on ACE and NO. After incubation with green tea, black tea and Rooibos tea for 10 min, a significant and dose-dependent inhibition of ACE activity in HUVEC was seen with the green tea and the black tea. No significant effect on ACE was seen with the Rooibos tea. After 10-min incubation with (-)-epicatechin, (-)- epigallocatechin, (-)-epicatechingallate and (-)-epigallocatechingallate, a dose-dependent inhibition of ACE activity in HUVEC was seen for all four tea catechins. After 24-h incubation, a significantly increased dose-dependent effect on NO production in HUVEC was seen for the green tea, the black tea and the Rooibos tea. After 24-h incubation with (-)-epicatechin, (-)-epigallocatechin, (-)-epicatechingallate and (-)-epigallocatechingallate, a dose-dependent increased NO production in HUVEC was seen. In conclusion, tea extracts from C. sinensis may have the potential to prevent and protect against cardiovascular disease. © 2006 The Authors.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-34910 (URN)10.1211/jpp.58.8.0016 (DOI)24032 (Local ID)24032 (Archive number)24032 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Effect of Panax ginseng extract (G115) on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and nitric oxide (NO) production
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of Panax ginseng extract (G115) on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and nitric oxide (NO) production
    2006 (English)In: Journal of Ethnopharmacology, ISSN 0378-8741, E-ISSN 1872-7573, Vol. 105, no 3, p. 321-325Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the effects of the Panax ginseng (Araliaceae) extract G115 on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and nitric oxide (NO) in cultured human endothelial cells from umbilical veins (HUVEC) and bovine mesenteric arteries (BMA). In HUVEC, ACE activity was significantly reduced after 10 min incubation with aqueous extract of ginseng 5.0 and 10 mg/ml. This effect was additative with the inhibition of the traditional ACE inhibitor enalaprilat. No effect was seen on NO production from the cells. Angiotensin I-induced contraction of BMA was significantly attenuated by 0.1 and 0.5 mg/ml ginseng, while no endothelium-dependent or -independent relaxation was seen. In conclusion, extract of Panax ginseng (G115) inhibits ACE activity, but does not affect NO production in HUVEC and BMA. © 2005 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

    Keywords
    Panax ginseng; Angiotensin-converting enzyme; Nitric oxide; HUVEC
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-37111 (URN)10.1016/j.jep.2005.10.030 (DOI)33727 (Local ID)33727 (Archive number)33727 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2018-03-21Bibliographically approved
    3. Effects of Ginkgo biloba extract EGb 761 and its terpenelactones on angiotensin converting enzyme activity and nitric oxide production in human endothelial cells
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Ginkgo biloba extract EGb 761 and its terpenelactones on angiotensin converting enzyme activity and nitric oxide production in human endothelial cells
    2008 (English)In: Journal of traditional medicines, ISSN 1880-1447, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 42-51Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of Ginkga bi/aba (Ginkgoaceae), its terpene-Iactones (ginkgolide A, B, C and bilobalide), biflavonols (quercetin), biflavones (sciadopitysin) and proanthocyanidins (procyanidin) on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and nitric oxlde (NO) production in cultured human endothelial cells from umbilical veins (HUVEC) were investigated. A dose-dependent significant inhibition of the ACE activity was observed arter 10 min incubation with Ginkga bi/aba extract EGb  761 and quercetin. No significant effects due to terpene-Iactones or sciadopitysin were seen. Incubation with Ginkga bi/aba extract, quercetin, sciadopitysin and procyanidin for 24 hr significantly Increased NO production. No significant effects were seen with ginkgollde A, B and C, while bilobalide induced a dose-dependent decrease in NO production. In conclusion, this study shows that Ginkga bi/aba extract Inhibits ACE activlty and increases NO production from HUVEC. A flavonol (quercetin and/or homologs) is the main component responsible for the inhibitory effect ofACE activity. Quercetin and a proanthocyandin (procyanidin) are responsible for the increases seen in NO production. These results may explain the positive effects of Ginkga bi/aba on the cardiovascular system and on cognitive function.

    Keywords
    Angiotensin-converting enzyme; flavonoids; Ginkgo biloba; nitric oxide; terpene-lactones
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-44475 (URN)76784 (Local ID)76784 (Archive number)76784 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2011-01-11Bibliographically approved
    4. Effect of Vaccinium myrtillus and Its Polyphenols on Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Activity in Human Endothelial Cells
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of Vaccinium myrtillus and Its Polyphenols on Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Activity in Human Endothelial Cells
    2009 (English)In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, ISSN 0021-8561, E-ISSN 1520-5118, Vol. 57, no 11, p. 4626-4629Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates if the connection between Vaccinium myrtillus and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) might be an explanation of the pharmacological effects on circulation. Cultured endothelial cells from human umbilical veins were incubated with bilberry 25E extract. The main anthocyanidins combined in myrtillin chloride and separately in cyanidin, delphinidin, and malvidin, respectively, were examined concerning their effects on ACE. After 10 min of incubation with bilberry 25E, a significant, dose-dependent inhibition of ACE activity was seen, and after incubation with myrtillin chloride a significant inhibition was seen. No effect was seen with the anthocyanidins. The effect seems to be dependent on this specific mixture of anthocyanins in the bilberry. V. myrtillus may thus have the potential to prevent and protect against cardiovascular diseases.

    Keywords
    Angiotensin-converting enzyme; Vaccinium myrtillus; anthocyanidins
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-18654 (URN)10.1021/jf900128s (DOI)
    Note

    On the day of the defence date the status of this article was Submitted.

    Available from: 2009-06-03 Created: 2009-06-03 Last updated: 2018-03-27Bibliographically approved
    5. Effects of green tea, black tea and rooibos on angiotensin-converting enzyme activity in healthy volunteers
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of green tea, black tea and rooibos on angiotensin-converting enzyme activity in healthy volunteers
    2009 (English)In: in Planta Medica(ISSN 0032-0943), 2009, Vol. 75, no 9, p. 1030-1030Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tea has been reported to reduce cardiovascular mortality, but the mechanisms behind are largely unknown. The aim of this project was to investigate the effect of green tea (Japanese Sencha), black tea (Indian Assam B.O.P.) and Rooibos on angiotensin-converting enzyme and nitric oxide. Seventeen healthy volunteers received a single oral dose of either 400 ml green tea, black tea or Rooibos tea in a randomized three-phase cross over study. ACE activity and NO concentration were measured (at 0, 30, 60 and 180 minutes) in all phases. ACE activity was analysed with a commercial radioenzymatic assay. Nitrite was analysed as a marker of NO concentration. In addition ACE genotype was determined using a PCR method. Oral intake of a single dose of Rooibos significantly inhibited ACE activity, p<0.01 after 30 min and p<0.05 after 60 min. A significant inhibition of ACE activity was seen with green tea for the ACE genotype II (p<0.05), 30 minutes after intake of the tea and for the ACE genotype ID (p<0.05), 60 minutes after intake. A significant inhibition of ACE activity was also seen with Rooibos for the ACE genotype II (p<0.05), 60 minutes after intake. No significant effect on NO concentration was seen.

    Keywords
    Tea, angiotensin-converting enzyme, nitric oxide
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-20327 (URN)
    Note
    On the day of the defence date the status of this article was Submitted.Available from: 2009-09-04 Created: 2009-09-04 Last updated: 2011-03-31Bibliographically approved
  • 3.
    Persson, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Red wine, white wine, rosé wine, and grape juice inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme in human endothelial cells2013In: International Journal of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases, ISSN 2231-0738, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 17-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Beneficial effects of wine on cardiovascular disease have been shown previously, but the mechanism is still unknown. The renin-angiotensin system is an important mechanism in the body concerning regulation of blood pressure, fluid, and electrolyte balance, and the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a key enzyme in this system. Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of red wine, white wine, rosι wine, and alcohol-free grape juice on somatic ACE-1 activity. The effects of the stilbene resveratrol and its glycoside, resveratrol-3-glycoside were also tested on ACE activity and concentration of nitric oxide (NO). Materials and Methods: Cultured endothelial cells from human umbilical veins (HUVEC) were incubated with wine, grape juice, resveratrol, or resveratrol-3-glycoside. Ethanol was used as control in the corresponding concentration (13%). Results: After incubation, a significant inhibition of ACE activity was seen with all the wines tested and the red grape juice. This inhibition was of a similar magnitude except for a lesser inhibition with the rosι wine. No significant inhibition was seen with the white grape juice, resveratrol, resveratrol-3-glycoside, or ethanol alone, and neither did resveratrol nor resveratrol-3-glycoside affect the concentration of NO. Conclusions: The effect of wine and grape juice on ACE activity in HUVEC is dependent on the amount of flavonoids and not on the content of alcohol or resveratrol.

  • 4.
    Persson, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Växter mot smärta och inflammation2010In: Smärta, no 2, p. 8-10Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Persson, Ingrid A L
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hägg, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Rolf G G
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effects of cocoa extract and dark chocolate on angiotensin-converting enzyme and nitric oxide in human endothelial cells and healthy volunteers--a nutrigenomics perspective.2011In: Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology, ISSN 0160-2446, E-ISSN 1533-4023, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 44-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence suggests that cocoa from the bean of Theobroma cacao L. has beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate if cocoa extract and dark chocolate influence angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and nitric oxide (NO) in human endothelial cells (in vitro) and in healthy volunteers (in vivo). ACE activity was analyzed with a commercial radioenzymatic assay and measured in human endothelial cells from umbilical veins (HUVEC) after 10 minutes of incubation with cocoa extract. NO was measured after 24 hours of incubation. ACE activity and NO were measured at baseline and after 30, 60, and 180 minutes in 16 healthy volunteers after a single intake of 75 g of dark chocolate containing 72% cocoa. Significant inhibition of ACE activity (P < 0.01) and significant increase of NO (P < 0.001) were seen in HUVEC. In the study subjects, a significant inhibition of ACE activity (mean 18%) 3 hours after intake of dark chocolate was seen, but no significant change in NO was seen. According to ACE genotype, significant inhibition of ACE activity was seen after 3 hours in individuals with genotype insertion/insertion and deletion/deletion (mean 21% and 28%, respectively). Data suggest that intake of dark chocolate containing high amount of cocoa inhibits ACE activity in vitro and in vivo.

  • 6.
    Persson, Ingrid A-L
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The Pharmacological Mechanism of Angiotensin-converting Enzyme Inhibition by Green Tea, Rooibos and Enalaprilat - A Study on Enzyme Kinetics2012In: Phytotherapy Research, ISSN 0951-418X, E-ISSN 1099-1573, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 517-521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Green tea (Camellia sinensis L.) and Rooibos (Aspalathus linearis Dahlg.) inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in vitro and in vivo. The ACE inhibitor enalaprilat has been described previously as a competitive inhibitor and sometimes as a non-competitive inhibitor. The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacological mechanism of ACE inhibition of green tea and Rooibos by enzyme kinetics, and to compare this with enalaprilat. A MichaelisMenten kinetics and LineweaverBurk graph showed mean values of Vmax?=?3.73 mu m and Km?=?0.71 mu m for green tea, of Vmax?=?6.76 mu m and Km?=?0.78 mu m for Rooibos, of Vmax?=?12.54 mu m and Km?=?2.77 mu m for enalaprilat, and of Vmax?=?51.33 mu m and Km?=?9.22 mu m for the PBS control. Incubating serum with green tea or Rooibos saturated with zinc chloride did not change the inhibitory effect. Enalaprilat preincubated with zinc chloride showed a decrease in the inhibitory effect. In conclusion, green tea, Rooibos and enalaprilat seem to inhibit ACE activity using a mixed inhibitor mechanism.

  • 7.
    Persson, Ingrid A-L
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hägg, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Andersson, Rolf G G
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effects of green tea, black tea and Rooibos tea on angiotensin-converting enzyme and nitric oxide in healthy volunteers2010In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 730-737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Tea has been reported to reduce cardiovascular mortality, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. The aim of the current project was to investigate the effect of green tea (Japanese Sencha), black tea (Indian Assam B.O.P.) and Rooibos tea (South Africa) on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and nitric oxide (NO). DESIGN: Seventeen healthy volunteers received a single oral dose of 400 ml green tea, black tea or Rooibos tea in a randomized, three-phase, crossover study. ACE activity and NO concentration were measured (at 0, 30, 60 and 180 min) in all phases. ACE activity was analysed by means of a commercial radioenzymatic assay. Nitrite was analysed as a marker of NO concentration. In addition, ACE genotype was determined using a PCR method. RESULTS: Oral intake of a single dose of Rooibos tea significantly inhibited ACE activity after 30 min (P < 0.01) and after 60 min (P < 0.05). A significant inhibition of ACE activity was seen with green tea for the ACE II genotype 30 min after intake of the tea (P < 0.05) and for the ACE ID genotype 60 min after intake (P < 0.05). A significant inhibition of ACE activity was also seen with Rooibos tea for the ACE II genotype 60 min after intake (P < 0.05). No significant effect on NO concentration was seen. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that green tea and Rooibos tea may have cardiovascular effects through inhibition of ACE activity.

  • 8.
    Persson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology.
    Dong, Linda
    Persson, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology.
    Effect of Panax ginseng extract (G115) on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and nitric oxide (NO) production2006In: Journal of Ethnopharmacology, ISSN 0378-8741, E-ISSN 1872-7573, Vol. 105, no 3, p. 321-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the effects of the Panax ginseng (Araliaceae) extract G115 on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and nitric oxide (NO) in cultured human endothelial cells from umbilical veins (HUVEC) and bovine mesenteric arteries (BMA). In HUVEC, ACE activity was significantly reduced after 10 min incubation with aqueous extract of ginseng 5.0 and 10 mg/ml. This effect was additative with the inhibition of the traditional ACE inhibitor enalaprilat. No effect was seen on NO production from the cells. Angiotensin I-induced contraction of BMA was significantly attenuated by 0.1 and 0.5 mg/ml ginseng, while no endothelium-dependent or -independent relaxation was seen. In conclusion, extract of Panax ginseng (G115) inhibits ACE activity, but does not affect NO production in HUVEC and BMA. © 2005 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 9.
    Persson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology.
    Josefsson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology.
    Andersson, Rolf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology.
    Tea flavanols inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme activity and increase nitric oxide production in human endothelial cells2006In: Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology (JPP), ISSN 0022-3573, E-ISSN 2042-7158, Vol. 58, no 8, p. 1139-1144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A diversity of pharmacological effects on the cardiovascular system have been reported for Camellia sinensis: antioxidative, antiproliferative and anti-angiogenic activity, and nitric oxide synthase activation. The purpose of this study was to investigate if the connection between tea and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and nitric oxide (NO) might be an explanation of the pharmacological effects of tea on the cardiovascular system. Cultured endothelial cells from human umbilical veins (HUVEC) were incubated with extracts of Japanese Sencha (green tea), Indian Assam Broken Orange Pekoe (black tea) and Rooibos tea, respectively. The main flavanols and purine alkaloids in green and black tea were examined for their effects on ACE and NO. After incubation with green tea, black tea and Rooibos tea for 10 min, a significant and dose-dependent inhibition of ACE activity in HUVEC was seen with the green tea and the black tea. No significant effect on ACE was seen with the Rooibos tea. After 10-min incubation with (-)-epicatechin, (-)- epigallocatechin, (-)-epicatechingallate and (-)-epigallocatechingallate, a dose-dependent inhibition of ACE activity in HUVEC was seen for all four tea catechins. After 24-h incubation, a significantly increased dose-dependent effect on NO production in HUVEC was seen for the green tea, the black tea and the Rooibos tea. After 24-h incubation with (-)-epicatechin, (-)-epigallocatechin, (-)-epicatechingallate and (-)-epigallocatechingallate, a dose-dependent increased NO production in HUVEC was seen. In conclusion, tea extracts from C. sinensis may have the potential to prevent and protect against cardiovascular disease. © 2006 The Authors.

  • 10.
    Persson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology .
    Lindén, Erica
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Malin
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Persson, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology .
    Effects of Ginkgo biloba extract EGb 761 and its terpenelactones on angiotensin converting enzyme activity and nitric oxide production in human endothelial cells2008In: Journal of traditional medicines, ISSN 1880-1447, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 42-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of Ginkga bi/aba (Ginkgoaceae), its terpene-Iactones (ginkgolide A, B, C and bilobalide), biflavonols (quercetin), biflavones (sciadopitysin) and proanthocyanidins (procyanidin) on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and nitric oxlde (NO) production in cultured human endothelial cells from umbilical veins (HUVEC) were investigated. A dose-dependent significant inhibition of the ACE activity was observed arter 10 min incubation with Ginkga bi/aba extract EGb  761 and quercetin. No significant effects due to terpene-Iactones or sciadopitysin were seen. Incubation with Ginkga bi/aba extract, quercetin, sciadopitysin and procyanidin for 24 hr significantly Increased NO production. No significant effects were seen with ginkgollde A, B and C, while bilobalide induced a dose-dependent decrease in NO production. In conclusion, this study shows that Ginkga bi/aba extract Inhibits ACE activlty and increases NO production from HUVEC. A flavonol (quercetin and/or homologs) is the main component responsible for the inhibitory effect ofACE activity. Quercetin and a proanthocyandin (procyanidin) are responsible for the increases seen in NO production. These results may explain the positive effects of Ginkga bi/aba on the cardiovascular system and on cognitive function.

  • 11.
    Persson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    About using ficion and film in gender education2013In: Journal of Contemporary Medical Education, ISSN 2146-8354, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 100-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gender, male and female has always been of great interest and present in almost all fiction and films, within different perspectives. Ever since the dawn of time, man has taught ethics, morals, values and existential questions using fictional stories in oral and later in written form. The aim of analyzing the concept of male and female from fiction and film is to reach deeper insight and understanding of human beings with special reference to gender in both individual, group and community perspective. The general aim is to create security in our gender and professional roles. Whole or parts of books and films are used, chosen according to the specific learning outcome. Different aspects are then discussed in lectures, seminars or groups. Aspects include projections, culture and behavior. Students learn to reach a deeper insight and understanding of gender regarding behavior, communication, attitudes, values, culture and ethnicity. Peeling off the illusion of male and female created by our social structure, and making our values and prejudices conscious, we might discern the eternally human, the inner core of being human, regardless of sex. Fiction and film make conscious behavior, communication and gender, and merge cognition and emotions. This way of teaching may lead to better treatment of patients by health care personnel

  • 12.
    Persson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fiction and film as teaching instruments in higher health care education2008In: Journal of Further and Higher Education, ISSN 0309-877X, E-ISSN 0013-1326, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 111-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching of the sciences of behaviour in higher health care education is sparse. The authors believe that students with increased knowledge and education of the human mind and soul would have a wider understanding of the human nature. Physiology describes the anatomy and function of the body, but in order to describe life/the living human, they were looking for a tool to describe the mind/soul as well as the body; to describe the connection between the two. Their intention was to teach the knowledge of the human being as an exciting experience and not just as a patient but as a larger concept; a human being in all its dimensions.

    To understand the multidimensional structure of behaviour, as many perspectives as possible are needed. In using film and fiction in education, the authors want the students to use their own sensory systems and emotions to learn about behaviour. As fiction and film expose the microcosmos, the audience will experience the microcosmos in the spotlight. The purpose of this article is to stimulate and inspire other teachers to use these means in higher health care education.

  • 13.
    Persson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Horse Chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum L.)2009In: Recent Progress in Medical Plants, 2009, p. 159-171Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Extract from seeds and bark of the horse chestnut tree Aesculushippocastanum L. (Hippocastanaceae) is today used as herbal medicine in Europe against chronic venous insufficiency (CVI; i.e. varicose veins accompanied with pain, oedema, pruritus and a sense of heaviness). Administration is oral (e.g. Venastat®, Venokan®) or topical (Reparil). Recommended oral dose is 50 mg aescin twice a day. The standardized extract mostly used is D.H.E. (Bernett, Milan, Italy; standardized for 16-22% triterpene saponins). Prior to treatment, other diseases (e.g. venous thrombosis) should be excluded. Oral administration with horse chestnut capsules has in clinical studies been shown to be more effective than placebo and as effective as compression stockings in CVI. The main constituents of horse chestnut are triterpene saponins (i.e. aescin), flavonoids (e.g. quercetin, kaempherol, epicatechin, proanthocyanidin A anthocyanins) and coumarins (e.g. esculin, esculetin). Aescin (also called escin) is actually a mixture of more than 30 different triterpene saponin glycosides of which the main component is suggested to be the active component and is the major content of pharmaceutical products. Mainly three effects of horse chestnut extract on CVI can be identified: anti-oedomatous, anti-inflammatory and venotonic. The anti-inflammatory effect includes free oxygen radical scavenging and decreased vascular permeability. Also, inhibition of elastase, collagenase 2,b-aescin (C55H86O24). b-aescin is and hyaluronidase in the vascular wall has been observed. Adverse effects are few and include gastrointestinal symptoms, nausea, headache, dizziness and allergy. Possible contraindications and drug interactions have not been studied.

     

  • 14.
    Persson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Letter to Editor: The Pharmaceutist in the Roll as Educationalist/informant - Programme Description of Drugpedagogics2010In: International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, ISSN 0975-1491, Vol. 2, no suppl 4, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a description of a 7.5 ECTS credits course in drug-pedagogics suitable for pharmacy students. The aim of this course is to provide the students with skills as informants/communicators concerning drugs and use at individual, group and community levels. The course includes advanced studies in drug-pedagogics from psychological, sociological and pharmacological perspective. The examination consists of an individual implementation of oral drug information to a group.

  • 15.
    Persson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Liquorice, Glycyrrhiza glabra Inhibits angiotensin-converting Enzyme Activity and Increases Nitric Oxide Production in Human Endothelial Cells2009In: Phytopharmacology and Therapeutic Values V: V K Singh och J N Govil (red.), Houston: Studium Press LLC, USA , 2009, 1, p. 171-179Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book contains 27 research and review papers that cover the recent progress in medicinal plant research, e.g. therapeutic efficacy of Bidens pilosa var. radiata and Galinsoga parviflora in experimentally induced diarrhoea in mice, new antioxidant flavonoids from Atriplex lentiformis and analysis of polyphenols with potential antioxidant properties in wines from Croatia.

    Up to 138 more results found for "phytopharmacology AND therapeutic values v''"

  • 16.
    Persson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Plant-Derived Substances as ACE Inhibitors - Biosynthesis-Activity Relationship of Flavonoids, Terpenes and Sterols on Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Activity in Human Endothelial Cells2009In: Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Nova Science Publishers , 2009, 1, Chapter 3, p. 1-31Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flavonoids, carotenoids and tocopherols are antioxidants with alleged positive effect on the cardiovascular system. To investigate other possible pharmacological mechanisms, we examined common substances from these groups and others derived from the same biosynthesis pathway concerning their effect on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity in human endothelial cells.

    Cultered human endothelial cells from umbilical veins (HUVEC) were used and incubated for 10 minutes with flavonoids, terpenes, sterols and precursor molecules. The flavonoids tested were the isoflavone genistein, the flavonol quercetin, the epi-flavan-3-ols epicatechin, epicatechingallate, epigallocatechin, epigallocatechingallate, procyanidin and the biflavan sciadopitysin. The terpenoids tested were the diterpenes α-tocopherol and ginkgolides A, B, C, the sesquiterpene bilobalide, the triterpenes ginsenoside Rb1, Rb2, Rc, Rd, Re, Rf, Rg1 and the tetraterpene β-carotene. The sterols tested were stigmasterol, lanosterol and cholesterol. The biosynthesis precursor molecules tested were mevalonic acid, malonic acid, shikimic acid, chorismic acid and the progenitor squalene. 

     

     

     

  • 17.
    Persson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effect of Vaccinium myrtillus and Its Polyphenols on Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Activity in Human Endothelial Cells2009In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, ISSN 0021-8561, E-ISSN 1520-5118, Vol. 57, no 11, p. 4626-4629Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates if the connection between Vaccinium myrtillus and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) might be an explanation of the pharmacological effects on circulation. Cultured endothelial cells from human umbilical veins were incubated with bilberry 25E extract. The main anthocyanidins combined in myrtillin chloride and separately in cyanidin, delphinidin, and malvidin, respectively, were examined concerning their effects on ACE. After 10 min of incubation with bilberry 25E, a significant, dose-dependent inhibition of ACE activity was seen, and after incubation with myrtillin chloride a significant inhibition was seen. No effect was seen with the anthocyanidins. The effect seems to be dependent on this specific mixture of anthocyanins in the bilberry. V. myrtillus may thus have the potential to prevent and protect against cardiovascular diseases.

  • 18.
    Persson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hägg, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effects of green tea, black tea and rooibos on angiotensin-converting enzyme activity in healthy volunteers2009In: in Planta Medica(ISSN 0032-0943), 2009, Vol. 75, no 9, p. 1030-1030Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tea has been reported to reduce cardiovascular mortality, but the mechanisms behind are largely unknown. The aim of this project was to investigate the effect of green tea (Japanese Sencha), black tea (Indian Assam B.O.P.) and Rooibos on angiotensin-converting enzyme and nitric oxide. Seventeen healthy volunteers received a single oral dose of either 400 ml green tea, black tea or Rooibos tea in a randomized three-phase cross over study. ACE activity and NO concentration were measured (at 0, 30, 60 and 180 minutes) in all phases. ACE activity was analysed with a commercial radioenzymatic assay. Nitrite was analysed as a marker of NO concentration. In addition ACE genotype was determined using a PCR method. Oral intake of a single dose of Rooibos significantly inhibited ACE activity, p<0.01 after 30 min and p<0.05 after 60 min. A significant inhibition of ACE activity was seen with green tea for the ACE genotype II (p<0.05), 30 minutes after intake of the tea and for the ACE genotype ID (p<0.05), 60 minutes after intake. A significant inhibition of ACE activity was also seen with Rooibos for the ACE genotype II (p<0.05), 60 minutes after intake. No significant effect on NO concentration was seen.

  • 19.
    Zuzak, Tycho J,
    et al.
    University of Childrens Hospital Essen, Germany .
    Bonkova, Johanna
    Soc Anthroposoph Med, Czech Republic .
    Careddu, Domenico
    Italian Soc Nat Medical SIMN, Italy .
    Garami, Miklos
    Semmelweis University, Hungary .
    Hadjipanayis, Adamos
    Larnaca Hospital, Cyprus .
    Jazbec, Janez
    University of Medical Centre, Slovenia .
    Merrick, Joav
    QOL Research Centre, Denmark .
    Miller, Joyce
    Bournemouth University, England .
    Ozturk, Candan
    Dokuz Eylul University, Turkey .
    Persson, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Petrova, Guenka
    Medical University of Sofia, Bulgaria .
    Saz Peiro, Pablo
    Fac Med, Spain .
    Schraub, Simon
    University of Strasbourg, France .
    Simoes-Wuest, A Paula
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway .
    Steinsbekk, Aslak
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway .
    Stockert, Karin
    Medical University of Sofia, Bulgaria .
    Stoimenova, Assena
    Medical University of Sofia, Bulgaria .
    Styczynski, Jan
    Nicholas Copernicus University, Poland .
    Tzenova-Savova, Alexandra
    Medical University of Sofia, Bulgaria .
    Ventegodt, Soren
    QOL Research Centre, Denmark .
    Vlieger, Arine M:
    St Antonius Hospital, Netherlands .
    Laengler, Alfred
    Gemeinschaftskrankenhaus Herdecke, Germany .
    Use of complementary and alternative medicine by children in Europe: Published data and expert perspectives2013In: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, ISSN 0965-2299, E-ISSN 1873-6963, Vol. 21, p. S34-S47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Few data document the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in Europe, with even fewer investigating use by children. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: A narrative, non-systematic review of CAM use in Europe was performed by combining data from published surveys with expert perspectives. Limitations created by a lack of representative studies, varying definitions of CAM use, and what qualifies as CAM in different countries was partially overcome by integrating local experts to summarise information available only in the national language and provide their perspectives about CAM availability, quality, use and popularity in their countries using a semi-structured questionnaire. Local and international published surveys were summarised, and the prevalence of CAM use was extrapolated. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Data from 20 European countries were available, representing 69% of the European population. Some data about CAM use by the general population were available for 90% of the examined countries, whereas peer-reviewed published surveys were available for only 60%. We extrapolated that 56% (range: 10-90%, adjusted for population size) of the European population in general had used CAM at least once in the past year. Surveys in CAM use by children were available for 55% of the investigated countries. The extrapolated prevalence of CAM use by children in Europe was 52% (range: 5-90%, adjusted for population size). Paediatric CAM experts reported an increasing awareness for and use of CAM in healthcare institutions. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: This precursor for further surveys indicates that CAM appears to be popular not only among adults in Europe, but also for children. Development of a pan-European definition of CAM use and CAM therapies are required to achieve surveys comparable between European countries. Additionally, more research investigating the efficacy and potential adverse effects of CAM therapies is needed because of increasing CAM use by children in Europe.

1 - 19 of 19
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf