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  • 1.
    Berner, Boel
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kruse, CorinnaLinköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Knowledge and evidence: investigating technologies in practice2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This collection of articles by scholars linked to the Department of Tech­nology and Social Change at Linköping University gives new insights into the constructed and contested nature of technoscientific knowledge.

    The articles give detailed analyses of a broad range of social practices within science, medicine, education, and work. In focus are investigations of how knowledge and evidence are created, contested, and understood. Technologies covered include, among others, CNC-machines, brain scans, Viagra pills, carbon storage techniques, and educational packages.

    The collection will be of interest to sociologists, anthropologists and researchers with science-and-technology studies. It presents new perspec-tives on the co-construction of social relations, knowledge, and evidence, and on the political nature – in a broad sense – of how technoscience is developed and put into use.

  • 2.
    Kruse, Corinna
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Being a crime scene technician in Sweden2015In: A World of Work: Imagined Manuals for Real Jobs / [ed] Ilana Gershon, Cornell University Press, 2015, p. 86-101Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ever wondered what it would be like to be a street magician in Paris? A fish farmer in Norway? A costume designer in Bollywood? This playful and accessible look at different types of work around the world delivers a wealth of information and advice about a wide array of jobs and professions. The value of this book is twofold: For young people or middle-aged people who are undecided about their career paths and feel constrained in their choices, A World of Work offers an expansive vision. For ethnographers, this book offers an excellent example of using the practical details of everyday life to shed light on larger structural issues. Each chapter in this collection of ethnographic fiction could be considered a job manual. Yet not any typical job manual-to do justice to the ways details about jobs are conveyed in culturally specific ways, the authors adopt a range of voices and perspectives. One chapter is written as though it was a letter from an older sister counseling her brother on how to be a doctor in Malawi. Another is framed as a eulogy for a well-loved village magistrate in Papua New Guinea who may have been killed by sorcery. Beneath the novelty of the examples are some serious messages that Ilana Gershon highlights in her introduction. These ethnographies reveal the connection between work and culture, the impact of societal values on the conditions of employment. Readers will be surprised at how much they can learn about an entire culture by being given the chance to understand just one occupation.

  • 3.
    Kruse, Corinna
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    CSI och den absoluta sannningen2010In: Kriminalteknik, ISSN 1653-6169, no 2, p. 10-11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Kruse, Corinna
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Forensic Evidence: Materializing Bodies, Materializing Crimes2013In: Knowledge and evidence: investigating technologies in practice / [ed] Boel Berner and Corinna Kruse, Linköping: Department of Thematic Studies, Linköping University , 2013, p. 9-26Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on an ethnographic study of fingerprint and DNA evidence practices in the Swedish judicial system, this article analyses the materialization of forensic evidence. It argues that forensic evidence, while popularly understood as firmly rooted in materiality, is inseparably technoscientific and cultural. Its roots in the material world are entangled threads of matter, technoscience and culture that produce particular bodily constellations within and together with a particular sociocultural context. Forensic evidence, it argues further, is co-materialized with crimes as well as with particular bodily and social constellations. Consequently, the article suggests that an analysis of how forensic evidence is produced can contribute to feminist understandings of the inseparability of sex and gender: understanding bodies as ongoing technoscientific-material-cultural practices of materialization may be a fruitful approach to analysing their complexity, and the relationships in which they are placed, without surrendering to either cultural or biological determinism. Taking a theoretical point of departure not only in an STS-informed approach, but also in material feminist theorizations, the article also underlines that the suggested theoretical conversations across borders of feminist theory and STS should be understood as a two-way-communication where the two fields contribute mutually to each other.

  • 5.
    Kruse, Corinna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    Forensic Evidence: Materializing Bodies, Materializing Crimes2010In: The European Journal of Women's Studies, ISSN 1350-5068, E-ISSN 1461-7420, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 363-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on an ethnographic study of fingerprint and DNA evidence practices in the Swedish judicial system, this article analyses the materialization of forensic evidence. It argues that forensic evidence, while popularly understood as firmly rooted in materiality, is inseparably technoscientific and cultural. Its roots in the material world are entangled threads of matter, technoscience and culture that produce particular bodily constellations within and together with a particular sociocultural context. Forensic evidence, it argues further, is co-materialized with crimes as well as with particular bodily and social constellations. Consequently, the article suggests that an analysis of how forensic evidence is produced can contribute to feminist understandings of the inseparability of sex and gender: understanding bodies as ongoing technoscientific-material-cultural practices of materialization may be a fruitful approach to analysing their complexity, and the relationships in which they are placed, without surrendering to either cultural or biological determinism. Taking a theoretical point of departure not only in an STS-informed approach, but also in material feminist theorizations, the article also underlines that the suggested theoretical conversations across borders of feminist theory and STS should be understood as a two-way-communication where the two fields contribute mutually to each other.

  • 6.
    Kruse, Corinna
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Incorporating Machines into Laboratory Work: Concepts of Humanness and Machineness2010In: Technology and Medical Practice: Blood, Guts and Machines / [ed] Ericka Johnson and Boel Berner, London: Ashgate , 2010, p. 161-178Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    "Modern medicine is highly technological, with advanced technologies being used in diagnosis and care to provide knowledge about the patient, define bodily states and structure everyday medical interventions and divisions of labour. Whilst supporting and making medical practices possible, however, their design and use may also conflict with established traditions of medicine and care. What happens to the patient in a technologized medical environment? How are doctors', nurses' and medical scientists' practices changed when artefacts are involved? How is knowledge negotiated, or relations of power reconfigured?" "Technology and Medical Practice addresses these developments and dilemmas, focusing on various practices with technologies within hospitals and sociotechnical systems of care. Technologies are discussed as part of the sociotechnical environment of everyday medical practices, alongside the emotions of trust and distrust, fear, relief and compassion which they involve."

  • 7.
    Kruse, Corinna
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Legal storytelling in pre-trial investigations: arguing for a wider perspective on forensic evidence2012In: New genetics and society (Print), ISSN 1463-6778, E-ISSN 1469-9915, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 299-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forensic evidence, and most prominently DNA evidence, is often understood as particularly reliable and "objective." However, just as other evidence, forensic evidence must be interpreted and thus made meaningful in order to "say" something about a defendants culpability. This paper discusses how meaning is created from and around forensic evidence: in criminal trials, evidence is placed in legally meaningful narratives that draw upon well-known cultural scripts and categories and that associate (or disassociate) a defendant with legal categories and consequences. The paper will demonstrate that these stories are not only told in court as a means of arguing a case, but are also continuously told and re-shaped during pre-trial investigations, as evidence in a case is assembled and assessed. Consequently, I argue that, in order to understand forensic evidence, it is just as important to pay attention to pre-trial investigations as it is to study forensic laboratories and courtroom interactions.

  • 8.
    Kruse, Corinna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    Making it work - Balancing uncertainty and resources in genetic research2004In: Lychnos, ISSN 0076-1648, p. 151-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Based on pilot studies in two different laboratories, this article illuminates how uncertainty is managed in genetic research in order to convert samples into reliable data. the laboratory staff achieved this conversion by using their skill to balance uncertainty and resources, establishing and re-establishing a precarious certainty.

  • 9.
    Kruse, Corinna
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Producing Absolute Truth: CSI Science as Wishful Thinking2010In: American Anthropologist, ISSN 0002-7294, E-ISSN 1548-1433, Vol. 112, no 1, p. 79-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forensic science has come to be assigned an important role in contemporary crime fiction. In this article, I analyze the cultural repertoire of forensic science conveyed by the popular television show Crime Scene Investigation (CSI). I argue that CSI science, in delivering an absolute "truth" about how and by whom crimes have been committed, is equated with justice, effectively superseding nonfictional forensic science as well as nonfictional judicature as a whole. Thus, CSI as a cultural performance adds to the mediascape a repertoire of wishful-thinking science with which to think about perceptions of and desires for crime and justice in nonfictional society. This repertoire seems to be considered relevant enough to nonfictional society to cause concern about the judicial system, as expressed in discussions of the so-called "CSI effect.".

  • 10.
    Kruse, Corinna
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Teknisk bevisning - hur går det till?: en kriminalteknisk resa genom rättsväsendet2012Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Kruse, Corinna
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Bayesian approach to forensic evidence: Evaluating, communicating, and distributing responsibility2013In: Social Studies of Science, ISSN 0306-3127, E-ISSN 1460-3659, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 657-680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article draws attention to communication across professions as an important aspect of forensic evidence. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in the Swedish legal system, it shows how forensic scientists use a particular quantitative approach to evaluating forensic laboratory results, the Bayesian approach, as a means of quantifying uncertainty and communicating it accurately to judges, prosecutors, and defense lawyers, as well as a means of distributing responsibility between the laboratory and the court. This article argues that using the Bayesian approach also brings about a particular type of intersubjectivity; in order to make different types of forensic evidence commensurable and combinable, quantifications must be consistent across forensic specializations, which brings about a transparency based on shared understandings and practices. Forensic scientists strive to keep the black box of forensic evidence - at least partly - open in order to achieve this transparency.

  • 12.
    Kruse, Corinna
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Evidence That Doesn't Lie: CSI and Real-Life Forensic Evidence2013In: Anthropology Now, ISSN 1942-8200, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Kruse, Corinna
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Making of Valid Data: People and Machines in Genetic Research Practice2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation explores a central step in scientific practices: how samples are turned into data that is considered valid and useful by the research community. Based on multi-sited fieldwork, with observations and interviews at laboratories involved in genetic research, the study focuses on how the laboratory staff’s professional skill, norms, and ideals of scientific research formed their practices of making valid data. As machines were essential for this research, the study also investigates the forms of agency that humans and machines were seen as contributing to the making of valid data; validity being interpreted as reproducibility by the scientists involved.

    Drawing upon notions of representations as well as Latour’s concepts of inscriptions and immutable mobiles, the study analyzes the practices of transforming samples into valid data as a two-step process. The samples were first turned into raw data, which was subsequently interpreted as data. During the first step, the staff’s central concern was to battle uncertainty in materials and procedures and establish certainty of results, whereas in the second step it was of vital importance to eliminate subjectivity and make objective interpretations of the raw data.

    Central tools for eliminating uncertainty and subjectivity were the laboratory staff’s professional skill and the use of machines. Certainty and objectivity of results, i.e. valid data, were expected to occur with the help of machines. Drawing upon e.g. Barad’s framework of agential realism, the study analyzes the various understandings of notions of humanness and machineness which shaped scientists’ practices and made the creation of valid data possible.

  • 14.
    Kruse, Corinna
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The social life of forensic evidence2016Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In The Social Life of Forensic Evidence, Corinna Kruse provides a major contribution to understanding forensic evidence and its role in the criminal justice system. Arguing that forensic evidence can be understood as a form of knowledge, she reveals that each piece of evidence has a social life and biography. Kruse shows how the crime scene examination is as crucial to the creation of forensic evidence as laboratory analyses, the plaintiff, witness, and suspect statements elicited by police investigators, and the interpretations that prosecutors and defense lawyers bring to the evidence. Drawing on ethnographic data from Sweden and on theory from both anthropology and science and technology studies, she examines how forensic evidence is produced and how it creates social relationships as cases move from crime scene to courtroom. She demonstrates that forensic evidence is neither a fixed entity nor solely material, but is inseparably part of and made through particular legal, social, and technological practices.

  • 15.
    Toom, Victor
    et al.
    Goethe University of Frankfurt, Germany.
    Wienroth, Matthias
    Northumbria University, England.
    Mcharek, Amade
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Prainsack, Barbara
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Williams, Robin
    Northumbria University, England.
    Duster, Troy
    UC Berkeley Sociol, CA USA.
    Heinemann, Torsten
    University of Hamburg, Germany.
    Kruse, Corinna
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Machado, Helena
    University of Coimbra, Portugal.
    Murphy, Erin
    NYU, NY 10003 USA.
    Letter: Approaching ethical, legal and social issues of emerging forensic DNA phenotyping (FDP) technologies comprehensively: Reply to Forensic DNA phenotyping: Predicting human appearance from crime scene material for investigative purposes by Manfred Kayser in FORENSIC SCIENCE INTERNATIONAL-GENETICS, vol 22, issue , pp E1-E42016In: Forensic Science International: Genetics, ISSN 1872-4973, E-ISSN 1878-0326, Vol. 22, p. E1-E4Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

1 - 15 of 15
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