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  • 1.
    Eriksson, Johanna
    et al.
    Chalmers tekniska högskola, Arkitektur.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Johansson, Madelaine
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Attitudes and experiences of user involvement in early stages of residential projects2012In: ENHR Conference 2012: Housing, Local Welfare and Local Market in a Global Context, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One factor influencing quality development in the building industry is the ability of

    users, such as residents, to identify and express their requirements for the product,

    i.e., the residential building. Drawing on a study of the development of user

    involvement in designing, producing, and managing building projects, this paper

    focuses on user participation in the front-end activities of residential projects. To map

    current perceptions and approaches, building industry actors met in four focus

    groups. Group participants were asked to reflect on the definition of user, how

    communication is handled, how information from users is used, and challenges and

    opportunities in involving the user. Regardless of level of experience, participants

    agreed on the importance and potential of user involvement and on the need for

    specific methods to acquire useful outputs.

  • 2.
    Eriksson, Johanna
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden .
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Madelaine
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    User involvement in Swedish residential building projects: a stakeholder perspective2015In: Journal of Housing and the Built Environment, ISSN 1566-4910, E-ISSN 1573-7772, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 313-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One factor influencing quality in the building industry is the ability of users, such as residents, to identify and express their requirements for the product, i.e. the residential building. However, the handling of communication with users in building projects has been insufficiently specified and studied. Drawing on a study of user involvement in building project design, production, and management, this paper examines user involvement in Swedish residential projects. To map current perceptions and approaches, building industry actors met in four focus groups. Group participants were asked to reflect on the definition of users, communication handling, how information from users is used, and challenges and opportunities in user involvement. Our initial emphasis was front-end activities, but focus group results revealed that user involvement was a continuous process extending from project initiation to evaluating the finished project as a basis for future projects. Discussions indicated confusion about who constituted users in various situations but, regardless of level of experience, focus group participants agreed on the importance and potential of user involvement and on the need for specific methods to acquire useful input.

  • 3.
    Gebremedhin, Alemayehu
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Energy Systems.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    Gustafsson, Stig-Inge
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Energianalys Solna. Forskningsrapport inom programmet Uthållig kommun.2004Report (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    A Low Energy House Concept Transformed in the Phase of Innovation Diffusion2008In: Cooperative Research Centre for Construction Innovation: Third International Concerence: Clients Driving Innovation: Benefiting from Innovation,2008, Gold Coast: CRC Australia , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Aktiviteter för passivhus: En innovations omformning i byggprocesser för energisnåla bostadshus2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores building processes in the south of Sweden with the aim to accomplish low energy housing in accordance with the German standard for passive houses. In this thesis, the passive house is regarded as an innovative en-ergy concept which has been introduced to Sweden and to a conservative sector. The purpose of the study is to provide an understanding of processes in the im-plementation of an innovation for energy-saving dwellings. The process is recon-structed with data from interviews, minutes, articles, reports, etc, and presented as stories of different sequences including how the housing projects were organised, how the energy concept was established among the participants, how decisions were made and what messages were presented about the energy concept in mass media.

    The energy concept is followed in a process of transformation where it was subject to five fundamental acitivites: decomposition, moulding, composition, transportation and storage. The concepts originate from a time-geography per-spective, founded and developed by the Swedish geographer Torsten Hägerstrand. The energy concept was decomposed at a specific local context and transported to another, where it was moulded and composed into a new energy concept. The new energy concept was stored in a new setting. By following the trajectories of peo-ple and technologies, conclusions about the energy concept can be drawn. The building proprietors chose less conventional ways of managing the building proc-ess in order to have more control. The projects were started by people who them-selves had their own experience of passive houses. Solar collectors were loosely coupled to the energy concept and needed technology carriers.

  • 6.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    Aktörer och processer i ett ovanligt bostadsprojekt2004Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bostadens socio-tekniska ekologi2011In: Sammanvävt: det goda livet i vardagsforskningen: en vänbok till Kajsa Ellegård, Linköping: Tema Teknik och Social förändring, Linköpings universitet , 2011, p. 149-164Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kan kunskap om människors vardagliga aktiviteter användas för att nå närmare målet om minskad energiförbrukning i  hushållssektorn?(Kajsa Ellegård: Hushåll, energi och vardagliga aktiviteter, I J Palm & K Ellegård (red), Energi och IT. Carlssons, Stockholm, 2008, s.141-171)Inom ramen för den frågeställning Kajsa Ellegård ställer sig finns två grundläggande definitionsproblem man måste ta ställning till innan man ger sig i kast med forskningen, nämligen aktörsperspektivet som en makro eller mikrofråga och variabeln hushåll i stället för familj. I sin forskning kring energianvändning väljer Kajsa vardagslivet i hemmet som sitt perspektiv och aktiviteter i hushållet som sin analysenhet, dvs. mikroperspektivet på aktiviteter i den grupp individer som lever i samma bostad och är ekonomiskt ansvariga för de aktiviteter som försiggår där. Tillsammans med Kajsa har jag under ett antal år samarbetat i forskningsprojekt kring energieffektivisering i vardagen inom bostadssektorn. Min forskningsfråga har varit formulerad ur ett annat perspektiv på i grunden samma vardagliga aktiviteter, nämligen hur medvetna är hushållsmedlemmar om sin energikonsumtion, vilken kunskap och vilka attityder har man kring sitt energibeteende och med vilka typer av styrmedel kan man öka potentialerna för energieffektivisering i bostaden, dvs. ett aggregerat makroperspektiv på individers aktiviteter. Den kunskap de båda perspektiven ger behövs för att förstå vardagen, men också för att i samhälleliga processer påverka och förändra kunskap, värderingar och beteende kring användningen av energi som ändlig resurs. Jag vill belysa detta genom att närmare diskutera valet av undersökningsenhet, dvs. hushåll och valet av forskningsperspektiv aktörer i mikro- eller makrosammanhang.

  • 8.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Building Trust: The development of a green urban neighbourhood in Sydney2009In: 2009 Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Energy reduction through behavioural changes2012Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    Environmental scarcity and conflict in River Nyando Wetland, Kenya1998Report (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Everyday governance of energy systems2017In: Procedia Engineering, ISSN 1877-7058, E-ISSN 1877-7058, Vol. 180, p. 1612-1621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The proposed transition to a low-carbon society faces challenges, as it is occurring too slowly to achieve the goals set by international and national governmental bodies, and gaps are found between available energy-efficiency technologies and their appropriate use. The governance of domestic energy systems has attracted European research attention, and the findings illustrate how materials, competence, and meaning influence energy productivity in domestic settings and how accountability is enacted by connecting people and technologies. The present research cites Swedish examples of how energy efficiency has been improved by involving multiple local actors, such as consumers, energy utilities, property companies, and local governments. Examples are analysed through the lens of social change and mundane governance theory, illustrating how spaces and places often overlooked as too mundane to be considered in policy prove, when analysed in more detail, to be important for energy efficiency. The results indicate that “governance pairs” (e.g., “households/lighting” and “caretakers/heating systems”) are more or less successfully held together and influence accountability and governance possibilities. The present analyses demonstrate that, while governance is often portrayed in terms of causality, everyday practices involving governance pairs are messier and less predictable than anticipated. These results call for the upgrading of research into everyday life and for bottom–up approaches to energy studies. Accountability – crucial to closing the energy-efficiency gap and understood in the context of mundane governance – can advance our energy-efficiency thinking and action.

  • 12.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Flernivåmodell för innovativa energisparåtgärder i drift, förvaltning och underhåll av byggnader: Slutrapport2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I projektet har viktiga barriärer och drivkrafter för implementering av tekniskt möjliga och samhällsekonomiskt intressanta energisparåtgärder identifierats. De viktigaste resultaten visar att det finns strukturer internt inom fastighetsbolagen och mellan olika aktörer i branschen som motverkar ett mer innovativt klimat.

    För att arbeta med innovativa energisparåtgärder behövs minst fyra olika kompo-nenter: kompetens, energisparmål, strategier/handlingsplaner för att nå målen och implementering/ansvar för förverkligande. I de företag som undersöktes fanns viss kompetens, men inte tillräcklig. Samtliga företag hade energisparmål, men hand-lingsplaner saknades. Ansvar delegerades, men eftersom planen för att nå målen var obefintlig eller hade brister haltade implementeringen. Energisparande hade identifierats som viktigt men ett helhetsgrepp kring frågan saknades. En central grupp som upplevdes som bromskloss för implementeringen var ekonomerna i organisationen. En slutsats är att ekonomerna som arbetar med fastigheter behöver utbildning i möjligheter att arbeta långsiktigt med energisparåtgärder och alterna-tiva ekonomiska kalkyler för att nå målen. En annan grupp som är viktig för att mata in innovationer i fastighetsbolagen när egen kompetens saknas är konsultbo-lagen. Tyvärr upplever inte de tillfrågade fastighetsbolagen att konsulterna tillför kunskap och information om nya innovationer utan att de tenderar att hålla sig till standardiserade lösningar.

    För de vetenskapliga ändamålen har en flernivåmodell använts och delvis revide-rats för att passa förhållanden inom svensk fastighetssektor. I den ursprungliga modellen läggs fokus på tre nivåer: en övergripande ”landskapsnivå”, en företags- och organisationsnivå kallad ”socio-teknisk regimnivå” och en tekniknivå kallad ”tekniska nischer”. De olika nivåerna hänger samman genom att landskapsnivån är svår för enskilda organisationer att påverka medan regimnivån inbegriper orga-nisationer och teknik som ägs och kontrolleras av organisationen. Teknik och or-ganisation är sammanvävt och utgör förutsättningarna för att innovationer ska kunna få fäste. Det är regimnivån i modellen som den här rapporten huvudsakli-gen koncentreras till. Slutsatserna i den här rapporten är att det även finns klara grupperingar inom regimerna, i subregimer, som påverkar utvecklingen. Inom subregimerna finns underregimer som även de påverkar företagens inriktning.

    En innovativ samarbetsmodell mellan universitetet och fastighetsbolag har också prövats i projektet. För de fyra fastighetsbolag som medverkat i projektet har en ”industriforskare” från respektive företag rekryterats för att medverka aktivt i forskningsprojektet. Fastighetsbolagen identifierade själva industriforskarna utef-ter kriteriet att de skulle vara intresserade av forskning. Gruppen LiU-forskare och industriforskare träffades gemensamt en gång i månaden för att rapportera hur projektet fortskred samt planera för framtida aktiviteter. Mellan träffarna arbetade LiU-forskarna och industriforskarna med uppgifter som antingen var individuella eller gemensamma i olika konstellationer. Modellen med industriforskare syftade dels till att göra en brygga mellan universitetet och företagen för att motverka kul-turkrockar och andra hinder för kunskapsöverföring åt båda håll, dels att stärka forskargruppen genom fler medlemmar som kan medverka i det vardagliga forsk-ningsarbetet (forskningsdesign, metodval, datainsamling, analys av data och rap-portskrivande). Samarbetsmodellen behöver utvecklas för att ytterligare stärka banden mellan universitet och företag.

  • 13.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Housing renovation and energy systems: the need for social learning2012In: Building Research & Information, ISSN 0961-3218, E-ISSN 1466-4321, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 274-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Installing new energy systems in housing is claimed to be a way to meet national and international goals for reduced greenhouse gas emissions. A socio-technical approach, based on social learning theory, is used to examine the energy systems of a large Swedish housing project ten years after its renovation. A significant retrofitting measure was the introduction of metering. Important lessons are identified regarding the relationships between tenants, professionals and technical systems. The inappropriate assumptions underpinning the renovation about inhabitants capabilities and demographics meant that the dwellings were not optimally refurbished to meet user requirements, particularly with regard to the choice of technologies and inhabitants interface with them. Many of the installations are hidden from tenants and difficult for inhabitants to discover, explore and use. Occupants did not use the technologies (smart meters, thermostats, etc.) as intended, which lowered performance and also increased occupants dissatisfaction. This was also evident in the high levels of support needed by the inhabitants. Social learning processes are vital for the success of demand reduction strategies. Any demand reduction approach must consider people by investing in the social processes and the required learning for interfacing with technology, not merely the smart technology itself.

  • 14.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    Housing renovation and energy systems: the need for social learning2015In: Socio-technical perspectives on sustainable energy systems / [ed] Anshelm, J., Ellegård, K., Palm, J., Rohracher, H., Linköping: Linköping University , 2015, p. 15-46Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Installing new energy systems in housing is claimed to be a way to meet national and international goals for reducedgreenhouse gas emissions. A socio-technical approach, based on social learning theory, is used to examine the energysystems of a large Swedish housing project ten years after its renovation. A significant retrofitting measure was theintroduction of metering. Important lessons are identified regarding the relationships between tenants, professionalsand technical systems. The inappropriate assumptions underpinning the renovation about inhabitants’ capabilitiesand demographics meant that the dwellings were not optimally refurbished to meet user requirements, particularlywith regard to the choice of technologies and inhabitants’ interface with them. Many of the installations are hiddenfrom tenants and difficult for inhabitants to discover, explore and use. Occupants did not use the technologies (smartmeters, thermostats, etc.) as intended, which lowered performance and also increased occupants’ dissatisfaction. Thiswas also evident in the high levels of support needed by the inhabitants. Social learning processes are vital for thesuccess of demand reduction strategies. Any demand reduction approach must consider people by investing in thesocial processes and the required learning for interfacing with technology, not merely the ‘smart’ technology itself.

  • 15.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    Implementing sustainability in the socio-technical landscape of Sydney - a precinct scale anaysis'2008In: Institute of Australian Geographers: Conference 2008,2008, Hobart: Institute of Australian Geographers , 2008, p. 63-63Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 16.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Implementing Sustainable Systems: A theoretical framework for analysis of socio-technical implementations2009In: Sustainability Conference 2009: The Fifth International Conference on Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    Implementing technology for energy efficiency in housing projects2004In: ENHR 2004 New Researchers Conference,2004, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    Individuell mätning - mjuk reglering för minskad energianvändning i hyreslägenheter2005Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    Individuell mätning: mjuk reglering för minskad energianvändning i hyreslägenheter2008In: Vardagsteknik: energi och it: forskning om hållbar användning av samhällets IT- och energisystem / [ed] Jenny Palm och Kajsa Ellegård, Stockholm: Carlsson , 2008, 1, p. 105-125Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna bok tar upp energi- och IT-användningen i dagens moderna samhälle. Jämförelser mellan järnvägsbyggandet boom och datasamhällets bubbla görs. Hur hanteras elektricitet och demokrati? Vad innebär inrednings- och göra om-program i i-världen för resursförbrukningen? Ett flertal forskare granskar dagens konkreta verklighet ur dessa perspektiv.

  • 20.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lokala fjärrvärmemonopol upplevs hindra utvecklingen2012In: Husbyggaren - Svenska byggingenjörers riksförbund, ISSN 0018-7968, no 5Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Några skäl till att fastighetsbolag inte sparar mer energi än vad de gör är lokala fjärrvärmemonopol, bristen på tid och för slimmade organisationer. Kunderna upplevs också som förvånansvärt passiva. Allt detta enligt uppgifter från fastighetsbolagen själva.

  • 21.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lokala och globala mål för hållbarhet2019In: Samhällsplaneringens teori och praktik / [ed] Gunnel Forsberg, Stockholm: Liber, 2019, 1, p. 70-77Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Samhällsplaneringens teori och praktik beskriver områden med hög relevans för modern samhällsplanering. Läsaren introduceras till planeringens utmaningar och vilka verktyg planerare har att möta dem med. Boken är pedagogiskt utformad, rikt illustrerad och har exempel från olika delar av landet samt internationella utblickar. Den riktar sig i huvudsak till utbildningar i samhällsplanering. Eftersom frågorna är av stort allmänintresse kan boken också vara av värde för såväl praktiskt verkande planerare och offentliga aktörer som för en bred allmänhet med intresse för närmiljöns utformning.

  • 22.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mundane governance of domestic energy systems2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The proposed transition to a low-carbon society still faces major challenges. The speed of this transition is too slow to achieve the goals set by international and national governmental bodies, and gaps are often identified between available energy-productivity technologies and their appropriate use. The governance of mundane domains such as domestic energy systems has recently attracted attention from researchers in the European context (Shove et al. 2012, Woolgar and Neyland 2013). Lessons learnt from this research illustrate how materials, competence, and meaning influence energy productivity in domestic settings (Shove et al. 2012) and how accountability is enacted by connecting people and technologies (Woolgar and Neyland 2013). The research presented here cites Swedish examples of how energy productivity has been improved by involving multiple local actors, such as consumers, energy utilities, property companies, and local governments. The examples are analysed through the lens of social change and mundane governance theories, illustrating how spaces and places often overlooked as too mundane to be considered in policy prove, when analysed in more detail, to be important for energy productivity. The results indicate that “governance pairs” (Woolgar and Neyland 2013) are more or less successfully held together and influence accountability and governance possibilities. Examples of governance pairs are “households/lighting” and “caretakers/heating system”. These analyses demonstrate that, while governance is often portrayed in terms of causality, everyday practices involving various governance pairs are messier and less predictable than anticipated. These results call for the upgrading of research into everyday life and for bottom–up approaches in energy studies. Accountability – an important part of closing the energy-efficiency gap and understood in the context of mundane governance – can advance our energy-productivity thinking and action. 

  • 23.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    Recension av "Miljömanagement"2004Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    Reflections on the 2008 IAG Conference2008In: Institute of Australian Geographers, no 60, p. 25-26Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    Regeneration in the housing stock as techno-economic networks2005In: The 2005 World Sustainable Building Conference,2005, Tokyo: SB05Tokyo Conference Board , 2005, p. 4216-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Social learning and energy systems: Implementing a high energy saving goal in a residential area2011In: Proceedings of the 2011 eceee conference, Hyère, France, European Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    Social Sustainability in the Implementation Process of Low-Energy Houses2008In: Clients Driving Construction Innovation:Benefiting from Innovation, Brisbane: Cooperative Research Centre for Construction Innovation, for Ico. Net Pty Ltd , 2008, 1, p. 219-224Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The

    Clients Driving Construction Innovation book series canvasses the role of clients in facilitating innovation in the

    construction industry. This three part series draws upon cutting-edge research on clients, designers, constructors and

    facility managers to showcase technologies and practices developed by leading practitioners and researchers globally to

    improve industry practice. The books demonstrate that through applied research, innovation continues to be prominent in

    construction, particularly in areas of procurement, sustainability, occupational health and safety, and information and

    communication technologies.

  • 28.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Socio–technical ecology: the ideas of Hägerstrand as an analytical framework for sustainability studies2012In: Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting - Book of Abstracts, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, there is an imperative to apply holistic approaches in research, but weaving parts into a whole is a challenge that few can handle. This paper builds on Hägerstrand’s perspective, what he termed socio–technical ecology, using it as an analytical framework to describe and understand habitat-related issues. Socio–technical ecology offers a foundation for research that draws attention to the material and temporal significance of the built environment for people, nature, and technology. Previous research into the built environment has called for a unified perspective, and I argue here that socio–technical ecology offers such a viable unified approach to sustainability studies of the built environment. My starting point is that research into socio–technical ecology connects people, technology, and nature, making use of theories and concepts that can be obtained from other sources. Our houses are subject to both private considerations and national policy and embody both simple and complex issues. Our identities are formed spiritually and materially in our homes, which are spaces for both solitude and social interaction. Though homes offer protection against natural elements, people often prefer to maintain some contact with nature through a surrounding garden or houseplants, and like to open windows to air out interior stuffiness and let in fresh air. Our homes bring together and interweave the human, natural, and artificial spheres, usually on people’s own terms. This does not, however, imply conflict-free relationships between people, things, and nature.

  • 29.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Socio-technical ecology: the ideas of Hägerstrand as ananalytical framework for sustainability in housing studies2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, there is an imperative to apply holistic approaches in research, but weaving parts into a whole is a challenge that few can handle. This paper builds on Hägerstrand’s perspective, what he termed socio–technical ecology, using it as an analytical framework to describe and understand habitat-related issues. Socio–technical ecology offers a foundation for research that draws attention to the material and temporal significance of housing for people, nature, and technology. Previous research into the housing has called for a unified perspective, and I argue here that socio–technical ecology offers such a viable unified approach to sustainability studies of housing. My starting point is that research into socio–technical ecology connects people, technology, and nature, making use of theories and concepts that can be obtained from other sources. Our houses are subject to both private considerations and national policy and embody both simple and complex issues. Our identities are formed spiritually and materially in our homes, which are spaces for both solitude and social interaction. Though homes offer protection against natural elements, people often prefer to maintain some contact with nature through a surrounding garden or houseplants, and like to open windows to air out interior stuffiness and let in fresh air. Our homes bring together and interweave the human, natural, and artificial spheres, usually on people’s own terms. This does not, however, imply conflict-free relationships between people, things, and nature.

  • 30.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Socio-teknisk ekologi. Hägerstrands idéer som ett analytiskt ramverk för hållbarhetsstudier2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Spaces for waste: Everyday recycling and sociospatial relationships2018In: Scottish Geographical Journal, ISSN 1470-2541, E-ISSN 1751-665X, Vol. 134, no 3-4, p. 141-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recycling of household waste has been proposed on different geographical levels as the key to sustainable resource management. This paper explores the sociospatial relationships of a waste management system at local level in Sweden. In this system, all waste was considered recyclable and tenants were expected to adopt certain recycling practices, although some prerequisites, such as language skills, were lacking. Theoretical approaches from geographies of power and surveillance studies are combined to analyse how spaces for waste at recycling stations were transformed and imbued with political claims of sustainability. The analyses are based on a detailed case study conducted in a neighbourhood of blocks of flats, with a focus on the design and use of recycling stations. In both their design and use, authority strategies were adopted to legitimise actions and influence recycling practices. Control measures were eventually taken and technologies were installed to restrict improper practices. Practices of discrimination were identified together with how recycling excluded some people from participating in the scheme. By using another power strategy, i.e. seduction, it was possible to reach and include more tenants.

  • 32.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stadsplanering i Linköping som ett ekologiskt spel2015In: Geografiska Notiser, ISSN 0016-724X, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 23-32Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The design of energy efficient everyday practices2015In: eceee 2015 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency: First fuel now / [ed] Therese Laitinen Lindström, Daniel Mossberg, Michael Laitinen, Ylva Blume & Jason Erwin, Stockholm: European Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ECEEE), 2015, Vol. 3, p. 1611-1619Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Activity-centred design has been proposed as a way to encourage energy-efficient practices. This approach suggests that “good” designs can improve communication between the sender and receiver of a message, for example, “save energy”. The approach also concerns recent advances in research into how objects can be inscribed to steer users in certain directions. The approach has been expanded to include not only the use of individual things but the practices of everyday life. This paper examines design issues related to everyday practices and reports on findings in three household domains crucial to efforts to influence household behaviour to promote energy-efficient everyday lives: a bright and comfortable home (lighting, heating, and cooling), food and entertainment (storing food, cooking, Internet, and TV), and personal appearance (clothes washing and self-care). The findings are based on qualitative data from Swedish research in which three household domains were explored by visiting 32 homes and conducting 32 in-depth interviews. To complement the user perspective, observations and informal interviews with staff members of a public housing company were also included. Results indicate that conscious designs were seldom used to influence user practices; instead, general written information and regulations were more common tools for addressing users. Written information is not an efficient tool, and regulations are not perceived positively by households, which try to by-pass them. Current designs, instead of communicating energy efficiency, convey random messages unaligned with energy-efficiency objectives. This confuses users and makes it difficult for household members to take the “right” actions in everyday life. Recommendations to housing companies are to focus on both product and organizational designs to better target energy efficiency goals. 

  • 34.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    The implementation process of innovations for energy efficiency - A socio-technical perspective2005In: eceee 2005 Summer Study,2005, Stockholm: eceee , 2005, p. 1349-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    The process behind the project "Houses without heating system" in Göteborg, Sweden2003In: eceee 2003 Summer Study,2003, Stockholm: eceee , 2003, p. 441-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The socio-technical ecology of everyday life and energy systems2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The socio–technical ecology of everyday life and energy systems

    Understanding everyday life is a precondition for introducing and successfully implementing any schemes for major social changes, such as substantial reductions in household energy use. Everyday life involves many different subjects, objects, practices, and activities that are sometimes interconnected and sometimes disconnected from each other. This research focuses on subjects in units, subjects such as households and landlords, and objects constituting interfaces between these units, such as the energy systems for heating, hot water, and electricity.

    This paper presents results of research into the everyday life of ordinary renters. Everyday life is fascinating when examined in detail, and ordinary renters are in many ways extraordinary. The empirical research examines the everyday activities and practices performed by households and by landlord representatives. Thirty-two household members guided the researcher through their homes and were then interviewed about their domestic activities, including the use of energy. Six professional landlord representatives were interviewed at their workplaces, and discussed their jobs in relation to the energy system and renters. While households have routinized many of their domestic activities, their landlords must deal with anomalies and disruptions caused by energy system failures. To become more efficient, landlords also try to routinize their activities and practices in connection with technology failures. The material structure of the household living environment can guide people towards more energy efficient practices. For example, access to a communal laundry room can induce household members to wash full loads of laundry. When professional landlord representatives include renters in some of their work tasks, their jobs become more efficient and renters acquire some basic energy system knowledge.

    The results are analysed using the theoretical framework of socio–technical ecology: “socio-technical” emphasizes the interconnections and reciprocal influence between humans and technology, while “ecology” emphasizes the systemic nature of everyday life and its connections with the environment. Movements in time and space are central to socio–technical ecology, so activities and practices are explored as processes. These processes might be hindered by various constraints, such as physical and mental abilities, access to tools and technology at the right time and place, and lack of control due to rules and regulations. Doing laundry is an everyday activity strongly influenced by how renters and landlord representatives set up physical entities and technology, and how doing laundry is not only routinized but also automatized and largely controlled.

  • 37.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Time geography for planning a sustainable urban life2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    My starting pioint is the importance of taking both culture and nature into account in planning and Hägerstrand's apporoach of geography as an inclusive discipline, coining concepts like all-ecology” or ”socio-technical ecology”.  Another starting point is time-space and pockets of local orders as our units of analysis and methodological approach: study of processes in their contexts. Hägerstrand writes about a game for co-existence, where co-existence is central in the time geography work. The game includes negotiations, adjustments and push outs, and competition for part of the time-space. A description of processes will show who are the players and what resources are used. Micro-level perspective are key and is a base for understanding bigger movements in society. Case study where Initially co-existence seemed impossible but in a long planning process proved co-existence possible. Conclusions show that urban planning must not be rushed. More sustainable solutions might appear with time. Nitty gritty perspectives make up our macro perspectives. Macro lense (photography) – large magnification of smal things – useful metaphore. 

  • 38.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    Translating Sustainable Buildings -The use of networks to implement passive houses in Sweden2008In: the 2008 World Sustainable Buildings Conference in Melbourne,2008, Melbourne: SB08Melbourne National Conference Board , 2008, p. 329-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Travelling Energy Systems: Knowledge Transfer for Energy Efficiency and Conservation – from European to Australian Building Projects2009In: Proceedings eceee 2009 : Act! Innovate! Deliver! Reducing energy demand sustainably, Stockholm: eceee , 2009, p. 5-10Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    Tvärvetenskaplig analys av lågenergihusen i Lindås Park, Göteborg2003Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 41.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Axelsson, Bodil
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Culture, Society and Media Production - KSM. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Höijer, Josefine
    Arbetets museum, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Hot (water) topics: The formation of an energy issue at home2017In: eceee 2017 Summer Study on energy efficiency: Consumption, efficiency and limits / [ed] Therese Laitinen Lindström, Ylva Blume & Margareta Regebro, 2017, p. 2069-2074Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Domestic use of hot water has been identified as an urgent energy issue to address. In this paper, results from focus group interviews, with both residents and staff members, are presented. Results show that hot tap water use is differently shaped depending on whether you are a resident or a staff member. One thing in common was that in the focus groups it was difficult to separate hot tap water use from water use in general. Hot tap water use was not distinguished from use of cold tap water. To explore the issue further, the research on hot water was taken to residents’ homes and through more in-depth qualitative methods by an artist a formation process was started. Residents started to share more detailed stories about how they lived their everyday life in kitchens and bathrooms. These stories contain childhood memories and how past experience has shaped their water use and consequently their energy use patterns. The formation of this topic continued and in the artist’s interpretation of the data, three different artefacts became important: the sink, tub and toilet. These artefacts were placed in a river in the centre of a city as part of an audio walk with voices from the residents talking about their use of water. The exhibition was available during summer 2016 and the audio walk with the voices are planned to be reused and part of an exhibition in 2017.

  • 42.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gramfält, Madelene
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Vallastaden model: alternative urban governance and energy system designs2019In: eceee Summer Study Proceedings 2019, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2017, the new city district Vallastaden hosted an urban planning and housing exhibition to show the innovative and sustainable results of “the Vallastaden model”, a cross-sectoral governance concept and energy system designed at local level in Sweden.The concept cut across sectors such as energy, housing, transport and local businesses. One of the core features of the concept was quality criteria-based land sale. These quality criteria included alternative energy systems such as the design of passive and plus-energy housing, design diversity and renewable construction material, e.g. timber frames.

    This research analyses energy relevant European Union Directives as implemented at local level: the alternative urban governance concept “the Vallastaden model” and resulting diversity and alternative energy designs. Research questions are: how was alternative urban governance possible and how was the “Vallastaden” concept implemented?

    The research is a detailed case study, based on an analysis of public documents from the local council, interviews with stakeholders and field observations. The results show how for several years the concept was part of the political processes at local level, publicly debated and in focus during post-election periods, but survived and was eventually embraced by several political parties along the left-right scale.

    The implementation followed one of the core ideas of the concept: Diversity in architectural design and design of energy systems as well as housing tenure. In contrast to the visible diversity “above ground”, the underground energy system has one single designer: the local publicly owned energy company, which implemented an innovative infrastructure culvert for all basic energy services.

    The conclusion is that, under the pressure of joint challenges such as housing shortages, local economic constraints and low-emission carbon goals, alternative urban governance concepts can emerge which provide long-term commitments and joint efforts across sectors and political party agendas.

  • 43.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    Palm, Jenny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    Establishment and implementation of new sustainable technology in networks - an analyse of the development of passive house in Sweden2007In: VHU-konferensen 6-7 september 2007, Linköping,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Palm, Jenny
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Establishment and implementation of new sustainable technology in networks: an analyse of the development of passive house in Sweden2008In: Science for Sustainable Development. The Social Challenge with Emphasis on the Conditions for Change,: Procceding of the 2nd VHU Conference on Science for Sustainable Development, Sweden 6-7 september 2007, Uppsala: VHU , 2008, p. 141-148Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A passive house may reduce the energy demand for heating in dwellings by 80 percent. So far, Germany has been the main market for the concept, where a limit of 15 kWh per square metre per year has been set for household heating. These buildings are extremely air tight, have thick insulation and rely mainly on passive sources of heating, for example solar heating through window panes and heat surplus from humans and domestic appliances. Since the early 2000's, passive houses have also been established on the Swedish market and this paper shows how this was achieved. Established networks within the building sector became the platform for the implementation of houses incorporating passive houses. An important part of the implementation process was the stakeholders' tactile experiences of the concept. Also, the local urban regime of Göteborg played an important role and provided resources from the municipality, academia and the Göteborg trade and industry. As a consequence, housing companies owned by the municipality were important facilitators for the establishment of passive design in housing.

  • 45.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Reindl, Katharina
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Collaboration for reduced energy use in Swedish rental flats – a socio-technical perspective2012In: Proceedings 11th IAS-STS Annual Conference 7-8 May 2012, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People want to live a good life, what this means varies greatly between people and households, however for all it is important to have a home that is comfortable to live in. It should be warm enough, light and there should be room for mundane activities. However, this requires energy: heating, lighting and household appliances.

    The Swedish Parliament’s goal is to reduce energy use in residential and commercial buildings by 20% in 2020. Research shows that there is a potential in behaviour change among residents in apartment buildings as well as in the operation and maintenance of buildings, which can lead to energy savings between 15 and 30 percent.

    The project is based on a joint responsibility and involvement of researchers and housing company Stångåstaden, based in Linköping, Sweden, and owner of 18,600 flats. It is a 5 year project, where so far one year of research has been completed. The energy efficiency goal of Stångåstaden is 25 % by 2025.

    The aim of the research project is to reduce energy by applying existing and developing new knowledge and new approaches in cooperation with Stångåstaden. The general research approach is socio-technical and case study methodology. Both qualitative and quantitative data collections methods have been used. Tentative results show that it is possible to identify barriers to energy efficiency, both from residents’ and professionals’ perspectives. Conclusions are that socio-technical relationships should be developed with regard to communication, knowledge and technical system.

  • 46.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Reindl, Katharina
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stated energy behaviour in Swedish public housing– a questionnaire study2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on results from an ongoing research project targeting energy behaviour in Swedish public housing. The aim is to map stated energy behaviour in the 18,600 flats owned by the housing company Stångåstaden in Linköping, Sweden.

    Our starting points are that households play a crucial role when it comes to energy efficiency. Energy is mostly used indirectly and is invisible. Many of our daily activities in our household involve the use of energy, referring to routines that we have in our everyday life. People warm or cool their apartments, turn the light on, cook, do laundry or use other appliances – this requires energy. The energy consumption varies greatly between people and households, however for all it is important to have a home that is comfortable to live in. The energy saving potential lies around 15 to 30% regarding behaviour change among residents in apartment buildings as well as in the operation and maintenance of buildings. Stångåstaden recently launched an energy efficiency goal of 25 % by 2025. Earlier, the Swedish Parliament set a goal of 20 % by 2020 for residential and commercial buildings.

    The Stångåstaden residential buildings constitute the case study of this research and have been explored using a paper questionnaire. The questionnaire was mailed to 1200 households in December 2011. The response rate was around 50 %. The focus of the analysis lies at the everyday energy-related behaviour and practices in the households to establish different behaviours in relation to different background variables. Practices that are included are the specific heating, lighting, use of appliances for cooking, washing and entertainment. Conclusions are that there is an energy efficiency potential corresponding to the goals of Stångåstaden, but this is embedded in practices that are more or less difficult to change.

  • 47.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Schmid Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Energy Visualization: Why, What and How2009In: / [ed] Neset, Tina, Johansson, Jimmy & Linnér Björn-Ola, Linköping University Electronic Press, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Thoresson, Josefin
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Energy efficiency learning and practice in housing for youths2011In: Proceedings World Renewable Energy Congress 2011, Volume 3, Energy End‐Use Efficiency Issues / [ed] Moshfegh, Bahram, Linköping University Electronic Press, 2011, p. 937-944Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the energy efficiency learning and practices of youths aged 18–25 years. The studied youths are involved in a project, initiated by a municipally owned housing company, to educate residents and change everyday behaviour, making it more sustainable and energy efficient. This project, which forms our case study, covers socio–technical features such as energy systems and the individual metering and billing of heating, electricity, and hot and cold water. How did the youths perceive and use the systems? Have their attitudes and behaviours concerning energy-related practices changed during the project? The results indicate that a combination of technology (e.g. metering and visualized energy use) and social activities (e.g. educational activities and meeting neighbours and housing company staff) changed some practices involving what was perceived as energy wasting behaviour (e.g. using stand-by modes and taking long hot showers), while other practices (e.g. travelling and heating) were harder to change due to socio–technical barriers. The youths displayed knowledge gaps in relation to the energy system and their basic understanding of energy (the difference between heating and electricity).

  • 49.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Thoresson, Josefin
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    När tiden är mogen. Innovativ energieffektivisering hos fastighetsbolag?: En analys av socio-tekniska regimer2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish housing and service sector accounts for one third of the total energy use in Sweden but has had severe problems to reduce their energy use. It is not likely that the sector will reach the national goal to reduce their energy use by 20 % until 2020. One important area in the housing and service sector is management of buildings, which contains activities related to technical equipment in the building as well as people using it. The area is significant since most buildings are already in place and the greater part of the energy consumed through the lifespan of a building is during operation. Consequently it is a vital issue to turn attention to property owners working with the existing dwelling stock, regarding energy saving measures in the operation, management and maintenance of buildings. The aim of this study is to explore and analyze four property owners that are the cooperation partners in this project, each with a different form of tenure and ownership. Focus is on factors characterising these property owners and their work with energy efficiency, what constraints and incentives they recognize in their work to reduce energy use, and what distinguish them from each other.

    The theoretical framework is based on our understanding of the implementation of innovations for the transition to sustainability. It is based on an interdisciplinary multilevel model, and on analyses of prerequisites on a societal level, an organizational, the building and technology level, and the creation of a structure to define the window of opportunity for implementation of innovations and to reach targets for the energy use. The study is based on 25 interviews with co-workers in four participating companies and with nine representatives in nine reference organisations also working with facility management in order to be able to compare the cooperation partners with other organisations and their energy work.

    Results point out that incentives for the organisations to work with energy efficiency are saving money and to get competitive advantage in order to avoid vacancies in less popular areas. Many co-workers also had a big personal interest for energy issues. Distinct constraints for the work with energy savings were lack of understanding and education in many organisations and among their co-workers about energy saving measures. The organisations also had a shortage of time and a lack of personal resources to be able to work with energy efficiency.

    Conclusions point out that the actors are working with energy efficiency both based on a specific energy and environmental policy with very high and sometimes unreachable goals, as well as on own assumptions. The goals have gained different influence depending on organisation. Tenants and their energy use are identified as important in order to reduce the energy use in buildings. However the organisations do not include their tenants to any larger extent and only one organisation has started energy saving projects that involve tenants and their energy use. Many coworkers are also lacking knowledge and an interest for energy saving and there is only one organisation that has identified the importance of diffusing the knowledge and to create an interest for energy in the whole organisation.

    In general the organisations have a hard time to adopt new innovations and fit them into the existing socio-technical features. They have severe problems to adjust to new innovations in their present work that contains different technological sub regimes with different directions that to a great extent decide which energy measures that the organisation are going to work with. The organisations are also sceptical against academia and technical theoretical approaches regarding energy management.

  • 50.
    Glad, Wiktoria
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Thoresson, Josefin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rules and regimes for energy efficiency work in real estate management2010In: Conference Proceedings 3rd International Scientific Conference on Energy Systems and IT / [ed] Dahlquist, Erik & Palm, Jenny, Malardalen University Press , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 57
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