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  • 1.
    Andrén, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Don't laugh!: socialization of laughter and smiling in pre-school and school settings2017In: Children's knowledge-in-interaction: studies in Conversation Analysis / [ed] Amanda Bateman, Amelia Church, Singapore: Springer, 2017, p. 127-147Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although laughter and smiling is generally thought of in terms of positive emotions and values, this is not always the case. In this paper we analyze situations where children’s smiling and laughter are treated as undesirable by other participants—peers and teachers—in preschool and school settings. Participants’ treatment of children’s laughs and smiles as accountable, even sanctionable, provides one piece of the larger puzzle of how emotional expressions form an emerging social competence, negotiated and co-constructed in and through social interaction. The analysis shows how emotional expressions such as laughter and smiling are part of, and subject to, processes of socialization, i.e., social knowledge about embodied moral norms

  • 2.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Barn och ungdomsvetenskap, Stockholms universitet.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Activity contracts and directives in everyday family politics2011In: Discourse & Society, ISSN 0957-9265, E-ISSN 1460-3624, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In theorizing on family life, childrens agency is a feature of a modern type of family, marked by free choice and inter-generational negotiations rather than parental authority. A video ethnography of Swedish everyday family life documents directive sequences and inter-generational negotiations, including what is here called activity contracts: agreements that form a type of inter-generational account work around target activities (e.g. cleaning ones room). Within local family politics, contracts and revised contracts emerge as parts of such account work. The analyses focus on how contracts emerge within successive downgradings and upgradings of parental directives. Activity contracts regulate mutual rights and obligations, invoking family rule statements and local moral order, drawing on an array of verbal and nonverbal resources, ranging from parents mitigated requests and childrens time bargaining to nonverbal escape strategies and gentle shepherding.

  • 3.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Stockholms universitet, Barn och ungdomsvetenskap.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Förhandlingar mellan föräldrar och barn2009In: Barn, barndom och föräldraskap, Carlssons , 2009, 1, p. 136-154Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Thunqvist Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Getting things done in family life. Directive trajectories and moral order2007In: 10th International Pragmatics Conferece,2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Thunqvist Cekaite, AstaLinköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Skämt, lek och språkövningar. Om deltagande och andraspråkslärande i en förberedelseklass.2006Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Bergnehr, Disa
    et al.
    School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Čekaitė, Asta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Adult-initiated touch and its functions at a Swedish preschool: controlling, affectionate, assisting and educative haptic conduct2018In: International Journal of Early Years Education, ISSN 0966-9760, E-ISSN 1469-8463, Vol. 28, no 1, article id 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines adult–child touch and its functions in a Swedish preschool (for 1 to 5-year-old children). The data are naturalistic observations and video-recorded data of everyday preschool activities. The study describes the frequently occurring functions of educators’ haptic conduct (control, affectionate, affectionate-control, assisting and educative touch), discussing them in relation to the children's age, gender and type of the preschool activity. It reveals the complexity of touch, demonstrating that physical contact is used for a variety of purposes in the educators’ daily work. The educators employed touch without force, and the children did not respond with explicit and forceful resistance (such as pushing back or otherwise protesting). Adult-initiated haptic behaviour served a continuum of social purposes – from social–relational work, such as establishing and building affectively positive, caring, social relations, to practical and educative organisational efforts to manage the complex and busy preschool life. The distribution of adult–child touch categories brings attention to the bodily aspects of the early childhood educational setting and highlights some of the ways in which the requirements of the Swedish curriculum for Preschool and its focus on educare are actualised in the educators’ embodied conduct.

  • 7.
    Björk-Willén, Polly
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Skolpraktiker och kamratsamtal i förskola och skola: Om lärande som social praktik2003In: Språk och lärande ASLA,2002, Uppsala: ASLA/FUMS , 2003, p. 282-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Affective stances in teacher-novice student interactions: Language, embodiment, and willingness to learn in a Swedish primary classroom2012In: Language in society (London. Print), ISSN 0047-4045, E-ISSN 1469-8013, Vol. 41, p. 641-670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study explores a child, language, and cultural novices affective and moral socialization during her first year in a Swedish first-grade classroom. Within the language socialization framework, it focuses on the lexico-grammatical and embodied organization of the novices affectively charged noncompliant responses to (teacher) instructional directives, and the teachers socializing responsive moves (contextualizing them within local and wider societal values and ideologies). The methods adopted combine a microanalytic approach with ethnographic analyses of socialization within a classroom community.<br><br>Longitudinal tracking of the novices stances demonstrated a trajectory across which socialization into normatively predictable cultural patterns did not occur. As shown, the students affective stances and the teachers socializing responses were consequential for the emergence of her "bad subject," that is, her socioculturally problematic identity (from a "resigned" to an "oppositional" student who was "unwilling" to learn). Such deviant cases, it is argued, provide insights into the contested and dynamic aspects of second language socialization and demonstrate how affective (and moral) stances are mobilized as resources in the indexing of institutional identities.

  • 9.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Att minnas och lära med stavningsprogram2011In: Lärande och minnande: som social praktik / [ed] Roger Säljö, Stockholm: Norstedts , 2011, p. 161-180Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Minnesfunktioner är något som det forskas intensivt om. Flera traditioner existerar parallellt. När det gäller minne i kombination med lärande är idag det socialpsykologiska perspektivet på frammarsch. Det går i korthet ut på att inget lärande sker som något isolerat utan alltid i samspel med andra människor och det sker också i samspel med allehanda hjälpmedel eller artefakter. Hur går lärande och minnande till? Vad är det egentligen? Det är detta denna bok försöker besvara. För att förstå det har en tvärvetenskaplig grupp samlats under Roger Säljös ledning för att utforska lärande och minnande. Varför är det viktigt att veta? Den nya kunskap som presenteras i denna bok får konsekvenser för framtida undervisning, för utformande av kommunikation av varierande slag och av artefakter. Vad är "minnande"? Det är en aktiv form av att minnas, minnande är något man lär sig, alltså ingen statisk förmåga. Det sker i samspel med andra människor och artefakter. Minnande är en del av lärandet och vice versa. Man kan inte lära något om man inte samtidigt minns. När man lär något sker ett minnande. Dessa tankar om minnande och lärande grundar sig alla medverkande författare på när de berättar om sina respektive forskningsprojekt. Deras berättelser spänner över många mänskliga områden, från hur tolvåringar arbetar med naturvetenskapliga experiment via dataspelande till polisförhör och från specialpedagogik via kontroverser till minnande och lärande i arkitektur.

  • 10.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Child pragmatic development2012In: The encyclopedia of applied linguistics / [ed] Carol A. Chapelle, Wiley-Blackwell, 2012, 1, p. 1-7Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This ground-breaking reference work, available online or as a 10-volume print set, is a comprehensive resource covering the highly diverse field of applied linguistics.  Truly global in scope, and led by General Editor Carol A.

  • 11.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Children's discourse: Person, space and time across languages.2006In: Language in society (London. Print), ISSN 0047-4045, E-ISSN 1469-8013, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 750-753Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Collaborative corrections with spelling control2009In: International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning, ISSN 1556-1607, E-ISSN 1556-1615, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 319-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study has explored how pairs of students deployed digital tools (spelling software) as resources in spontaneously occurring corrections of spelling errors. Drawing on the sociocultural theory of learning and ethnomethodological (Conversation Analytic) insights into social interaction, it has identified a range of consistent practices and uses of the spelling tools that were emergent in the everyday educational activities. As demonstrated, technology-assisted error corrections constituted a complex situation, where a number of socioculturally significant factors (goals of the task, properties of the software, and physical access to computer applications) shaped the trajectories of joint work. The present analysis shows in detail how the students approached the visually manifested language production errors by using two kinds of software resources, spelling lists, and a diagnostic tool. The inherent conceptual distinctions, characteristic of these tools, configured joint interpretative work and efforts to correct the errors in different ways. Recurrently, the students’ technology-based corrections were designed as autonomous, stepwise, locally improvised problem solutions, which were subsequently submitted for the evaluation of the diagnostic software. Overall, the study shows that the under-specification of the software’s instructions opened a space for the students’ creative engagement. The potentials of joint spelling software-assisted corrections for collaborative learning are discussed.

  • 13.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Developing conversational skills in a second language: Language learning affordances in a multiparty classroom setting2008In: Second language acquisition and the young learner: child's play?, John Benjamins , 2008, 1, p. 105-130Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This new volume of work highlights the distinctiveness of child SLA through a collection of different types of empirical research specific to younger learners. Characteristics of children's cognitive, emotional, and social development distinguish their experiences from those of adult L2 learners, creating intriguing issues for SLA research, and also raising important practical questions regarding effective pedagogical techniques for learners of different ages. While child SLA is often typically thought of as simple (and often enjoyable and universally effortless), in other words, as “child's play”, the complex portraits of young second language learners which emerge in the 16 papers collected in this book invite the reader to reconsider the reality for many younger learners. Chapters by internationally renowned authors together with reports by emerging researchers describe second and foreign language learning by children ranging from pre-schoolers to young adolescents, in home and school contexts, with caregivers, peers, and teachers as interlocutors.

  • 14.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Emotional stances and interactional competence: learning to disagree in a second language2016In: Talking emotion in multilingual settings / [ed] Matthew T. Prior, Gabriele Kasper, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2016, p. 131-152Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Härma, skoja, retas: repetition som ett sätt att förhandla sociala positioner i ett flerspråkigt klassrum2009In: Den väsentliga vardagen, Carlssons , 2009, 1, p. 244-255Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Här ger arton forskare som alla varit doktorander till professor Karin Aronsson sin beskrivning av olika former av vardagliga fenomen. Det handlar om hur människor i olika sammanhang samspelar och skapar mening. Gemensamt för de författare som bidrar i boken är att de är eller har varit doktorander vid Institutionen Barn och tema Kommunikation, vid Linköpings universitet. Sedan mitten av 1980-talet har institutionen erbjudit en dynamisk forskningsmiljö för personer med intresse för samtal, kulturella uttryck och socialt liv i och utanför institutionella sammanhang.

  • 16.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Kommunikationsstrategier i undervisningssituationen1999In: Den Fjerde Nordiske Konference om Nordiske sprog som Andre sprog,1998, Köbenhavn: Danmarks Lärerhöjskole , 1999, p. 151-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Shepherding the child: embodied directive sequences in parent-child interactions2010In: TEXT and TALK, ISSN 1860-7330, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 1-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study explores how directives are constituted in and through situated verbal, bodily, and spatial practices. The foci are parental directives requesting routine family tasks to be carried out in an immediate situational context and necessitating the childs locomotion from one place to another (e.g., to take a bath, brush his/her teeth). As documented, such directive sequences were designed with what is here called parental shepherding moves, that is, "techniques of the body" (Mauss 1973 [1935]) that monitor the childs body for compliance. Body twist, a form of tactile intervention, was deployed to terminate the childs prior activity and initiate a relevant activity by perceptually reorienting the child in the lived architecture of the home. Tactile and non-tactile steering constituted means for monitoring and controlling the direction, pace, and route of the childs locomotion. Overall, these embodied directives served as multifunctional cultural tools that scaffolded the child into reflexive awareness of the dialogic and embodied characteristics of social action and accountability.

  • 18.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Socializing emotionally and morally appropriate peer group conduct through classroom discourse2013In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 511-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adopting a socioculturally informed perspective on emotions, the present study explores institutional practices for socializing first grade students’ emotionally and morally appropriate peer group conduct. The methods adopted combine an ethnographic fieldwork and interaction analyses of language socialization. The study examines teacher-solicited children's reports on peer group events (similar to Sharing time narratives), their design features, and the teachers’ evaluative responses in primary school classroom interactions. The analysis shows that event descriptions and narratives were imbued with moral and emotional meanings, constituting the primary discursive site where participants engaged in ‘emotion talk’ and oriented to a range of (mostly negative) emotions. The teachers inculcated the understanding of emotions as relational phenomena with moral and social consequences. Children participated actively, negotiated and resisted specific versions of events and their moral and emotional consequences. In all, the study shows that these discursive practices served as multifaceted socializing sites for (i) learning how to evaluate the moral aspects of actions and emotions; (ii) practicing how to discursively present oneself as a morally responsible person.

  • 19.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Soliciting teacher attention in an L2 classroom: Affective displays, classroom artefacts, and embodied action2009In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450X, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 26-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores L2 novices’ ways of soliciting teacherattention, more specifically, their summonses. The data arebased on detailed analyses of video recordings in a Swedishlanguage immersion classroom. The analyses illuminate the lexicalshape of summonses in conjunction with prosody, body posture,gestures, and classroom artefacts. As demonstrated, a simplestructure of summoning provided a handy method for solicitingand establishing the teacher's attention, and facilitated thenovices’ participation in classroom activities from earlyon. Importantly, however, the local design of the summonseswas influenced by the competitive multiparty classroom setting.The analyses illustrate how the novices upgraded their summonsesby displaying a range of affective stances. Different aspectsof the students’ embodied actions were employed as waysof indexing affective stances, for example ‘tired’,‘resigned’, or ‘playful’, that in thelocal educational order created methods that invited the teacher'sattention and conversational uptake. These locally availableresources allowed children to upgrade their summonses and toindicate their communicative projects, in spite of their limitedSwedish (L2) resources. The findings are discussed in termsof their implications for understanding participation in L2classroom interactions as being a matter of delicately calibratedcollaborative accomplishments.

  • 20.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Tattling and dispute resolution: Moral order, emotions, and embodiment in teacher-mediated disputes of young second language learners2012In: Disputes in everyday life: Social and moral orders of children and young people / [ed] Susan Danby & Maryanne Theobald, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2012, 1, p. 165-193Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

    • Introduction : disputes in everyday life : social and moral orders of children and young people / Susan Danby, Maryanne Theobald -- Category relations, omnirelevance, and children's disputes / Stephen Hester, Sally Hester -- Will, you've got to share : disputes during family mealtime / Gillian Busch -- Responding to directives : what can children do when a parent tells them what to do? / Alexandra Kent -- "Pretend I was Mummy" : children's production of authority and subordinance in their pretend play interaction during disputes / Charlotte Cobb-Moore -- Being doggy : disputes embedded in preschoolers' family role-play / Polly Björk-Willén -- Working towards trouble : some categorial resources for accomplishing disputes in a correctional youth facility / Jakob Cromdal, Karin Osvaldsson -- Tattling and dispute resolution : moral order, emotions and embodiment in the teacher-mediated disputes of young second language learners / Asta Cekaite -- Challenging and orienting to monolingual school norms in Turkish American children's peer disputes and classroom negotiations at a U.S. Turkish Saturday school / Seyda Deniz Tarim, Amy Kyratzis -- "A problem of versions" : laying down the law in the school playground / Maryanne Theobald, Susan Danby -- Conditional threats in young children's peer interaction / Amelia Church, Sally Hester -- When verbal disputes get physical / Amanda Bateman -- School bullying and the micro-politics of girls' gossip disputes / Ann-Carita Evaldsson, Johanna Svahn -- The logic of conflict : practices of social control among inner city Neapolitan girls / Heather Loyd -- When "yes" turns to "no" : young children's disputes during computer game playing in the home / Christina Davidson -- Disputes, stakes and game involvement : facing death in computer gaming / Björn Sjöblom, Karin Aronsson.

    Volume 15 of Sociological Studies of Children and Youth investigates the interactional procedures used by children and young people as disputes arise in varying contexts of their everyday life. Disputes are a topic of angst and anxiety for children, young people and adults alike, and yet are important times for interactional matters to be addressed. A particular intention of the book is its ethnomethodological focus, bringing a fine-grained analysis and understanding to disputes and related interactional matters. Such analysis highlights the in situ competency of children and young people as they manage their social relationships and disputes to offer insight into how children arrange their social lives within the context of school, home, neighbourhood, correctional, club and after school settings. This volume offers a contemporary understanding of the relational matters of childrens peer cultures to better understand and address the complex nature of children and young peoples everyday lives in todays society.

  • 21.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Coordination of Talk and Touch in Adults Directives to Children: Touch and Social Control2015In: Research on Language and Social Interaction, ISSN 0835-1813, E-ISSN 1532-7973, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 152-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adults sometimes accompany the directives they issue to children about their actions and movements with bodily contact (for example, shoving, guiding, or pushing). This article explores the interactional uses and meanings of such combinations of spoken directive and bodily contact that involves touch in data from families and primary educational settings in Sweden. The focus is on how the timing and coordination of haptics (communicative acts of touch), speech, and contextual factors produce communicative meanings. Findings reveal how touch and talk are synchronized to achieve the childs compliance to directives. Laminated (that is, multimodal) directives combine concurrent use of imperatives with adults own haptic acts, signaling and enforcing the onset and/or trajectory of the required movement. They constitute the prevalent pattern of use, as compared to the use of control touch without accompanying verbalization. Haptic control formats are usually responsive to the child recipients noncompliant responses. The data are in Swedish with English translation.

  • 22.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    "Titta, jag klar". Rhetorical devices in an immersion classroom2004In: ASLA,2003, Uppsala: ASLA , 2004, p. 178-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Touch as social control: Haptic organization of attention in adult-child interactions2016In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 92, p. 30-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the interactional organization of sustained (temporally extended) control touch, deployed in adult child encounters in Swedish primary school and family settings. The detailed analysis shows that sustained touches are employed by adults to manage and monitor childrens participation, usually calling for appropriate displays of attention to particular activities. Sustained touch sets the evolving limits on the childs postural orientation and movements by establishing a sensorial, corporeal contact and is instrumental in arranging the childs bodily positioning into a particular participation framework. Retrospectively, it orients to the child recipients inattentiveness and inappropriate participation. Prospectively, it solicits and sustains the childs coordinated and attentive participation in activities that constitute a state of talk, e.g. interactionally big packages (Sacks, 1995), i.e., adults extended instructions or disciplining. In multi-tasking situations, sustained touch works to manage the multiple overlapping participation frameworks. The adult, already engaged in a talk-based activity, constrains the touch recipients conversational contribution, or puts it on hold, using sustained touch as a prosthetic resource to signal her/his prospective attention. In all, the interactional analysis of interpersonal touch shows how the situational conditions, social roles and relations inform and shape body behavior. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 24.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    What makes a child a good language learner?: Interactional competence, identity and immersion in a Swedish language classroom2017In: Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0267-1905, E-ISSN 1471-6356, Vol. 37, p. 45-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The research presented here is an examination of how child language novices (zero beginners) develop interactional competences and repertoires in a Swedish as a second language classroom. Two 7-year-old girls’ learning trajectories are the focus in a yearlong study of their second language (L2) development. The girls’ transition from highly repetitious and formulaic production to formally and semantically more diverse discourse is documented, along with a broadening of the girls’ classroom interactional repertoires. They initiated and took part in interactions with teachers and peers and participated in a growing range of classroom discursive activities. The longitudinal analysis also documents the differences in their two learning trajectories, particularly in terms of their L2 resources and pragmatic skills, as well as their identities as successful or unsuccessful language learners (as ascribed to them by the teachers). The study illustrates an intricate and synergistic, rather than unidirectional, relationship between these two child novice learners’ competences, L2 features, and identities.

  • 25.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andrén, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Childrens Laughter and Emotion Sharing With Peers and Adults in Preschool2019In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates how laughter features in the everyday lives of 3-5-year old children in Swedish preschools. It examines and discusses typical laughter patterns and their functions with a particular focus on childrens and intergenerational (child-adult/educator) laughter in early education context. The research questions concern: who laughs with whom; how do adults respond to childrens laughter, and what characterizes the social situations in which laughter is used and reciprocated. Theoretically, the study answers the call for sociocultural approaches that contextualize childrens everyday social interaction, e.g., in different institutions or homes, to study the diverse conditions society forms for learning, sociality, and socialization and development of shared norms. Methodologically, the study makes use of mixed methods: it uses descriptive statistics that identify prevalent patterns in laughter practices and, on the basis of these results, examines social-interactional situations of childrens laughter in detail. It was found that childrens laughter tended to be directed to children and adults laughter tended to be directed to adults. Eighty seven percent of childrens laughter was directed to other children, and adults directed their laughter to other adults 2.7 times as often as to children. The qualitative interaction analysis shows that children and adults exhibited different patterns of laughter. Children primarily sought and received affiliation through laughter in the peer group, and the adults were often focused on the institutional and educational goals of the preschool. Overall, the study shows that intergenerational reciprocal laughter was a rare occurrence and suggests that laughter between generations is interesting in that it can be seen as indicative of how children and adults handle alterity in their everyday life. By deploying multiple methods, the present study points to the importance of viewing emotion and normsharedness in social interaction not just as a matter of communicating an emotion from one person to another, but as an intricate process of inviting the others into or negotiating the common emotional and experiential ground.

  • 26.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bergnehr, Disa
    Univ Boras, Sweden.
    Affectionate touch and care: embodied intimacy, compassion and control in early childhood education2018In: European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, ISSN 1350-293X, E-ISSN 1752-1807, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 940-955Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Relational care, interpersonal intimacy and emotional attunement are crucial for childrens development and wellbeing in ECEC. The present study examines how they are enacted in a Swedish preschool (for 1-5-year-olds) through recurrent adult-child physical conduct, i.e. affectionate and affectionate-controlling touch. The data consist of 24 hours of video-recorded observations of everyday activities. The study shows that educators Affectionate-Comforting touch was used for emotion regulation as compassionate response to childrens distress; Amicable touch engaged children in spontaneous affection; and, Affectionate-Controlling touch was used to mildly control and direct the childs bodily conduct and participation in preschool activities, or to mitigate the educators verbal disciplining. The study demonstrates the emotional complexity of ECEC enacted through the practices of haptic sociality. It supports the holistic policies arguing that embodied relational care should be integrated in ECEC, contrary to ideas that connect professionalism with emotional distance and lack of physical contact.

  • 27.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Björk-Willén, Lena
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cromdal, Jakob
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Känslouttryck och samspel i flerspråkiga miljöer: Om affekt som social praktik2004In: Ett vardagsliv med flera språk / [ed] Jakob Cromdal och Ann-Carita Evaldsson, Stockholm: Liber , 2004, 1, p. 130-152Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Flerspråkighet bland barn är ett aktuellt ämne i Norden, såväl för forskare som inom skolans värld. Men synen på flerspråkighet präglas fortfarande i mångt och mycket av en enspråkig världsåskådning, där tvåspråkiga individer ses som "dubbelt enspråkiga".Denna nordiska antologi förhåller sig kritisk till den enspråkiga normen. Genom att i detalj studera hur barn och ungdomar i flerspråkiga miljöer samspelar i vardagliga situationer på skolgården och i klassrummet, visar författarna hur flerspråkighet kan förstås som en social praktik, som något människor använder i sin vardag för en rad olika syften

  • 28.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Björk-Willén, Polly
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Att lära svenska som andraspråk i förskolan: lek och lärarledda aktiviteter2017In: Förskolan och barns utveckling / [ed] Lindgren, Anne-Li, Pramling, Nicklas; Säljö, Roger, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2017, 1, p. 125-140Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Björk-Willén, Polly
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Enchantment in storytelling: Co-operation and participation in childrens aesthetic experience2018In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 48, p. 52-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In early childhood education, storytelling has traditionally been seen as a learning activity that lays the groundwork for childrens vocabulary and literacy development. The present study uses video-recorded storytelling events to examine young childrens emotional involvement and aesthetic experiences during adult storytelling in a regular Swedish preschool for 1- to 3.5-year-olds. By adopting a multimodal interactional perspective on human sense-making, socialization, and literacy (Goodwin, 2017), it contributes to research examining multimodality in early childhood literacy (Kyratzis amp; Johnson, 2017). The analytical focus is on co-operation in aesthetic experience: the teachers ways of organizing an entertaining, affectively valorized and enchanting storytelling, and the children audiences verbal and nonverbal participation (Goodwin amp; Goodwin, 2004). The study shows that teachers used lighthouse gaze, props, marked prosody and pauses to invite the child audience to participate, join the attentive multiparty participation frameworks and share the affective layering of story. The young children exploited the recognizability of the story and contributed by co-participating through bodily repetitions, choral completions, elaborating or volunteering anticipatory contributions, and pre-empting the upcoming story segment. The study suggests that through adult-child co-operation, the embodied telling becomes a site for childrens affective and aesthetic literacy socialization. (C) 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  • 30.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Björk-Willén, Polly
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Peer group interactions in multilingual educational settings: Co-constructing social order and norms for language use2013In: International Journal of Bilingualism, ISSN 1367-0069, E-ISSN 1756-6878, Vol. 17, no 2SI, p. 174-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study explores peer group interactions in early multilingual educational settings, specifically focusing on children's language-related episodes. Highlighting the multifaceted work of these interactional practices, it demonstrates in detail how children's corrective actions, targeting, assessing and criticizing of the other's language use were utilized in building the peer group identities and relations, while simultaneously indexing local norms for conduct and language use. Designed as outright disagreements with the prior speaker, corrections highlighted the contrast between the recipient's error and the speaker's remedy and entailed (a) the disagreement with the prior speaker (e.g. linguistic polarity marker 'no'), (b) the explicit identification of the trouble source ('this is not x') and (c) the instruction as to the correct replacement ('this is x'). Similarly, word searches in the peer group were resolved so as to index the asymmetry in knowledge between the peers. In the production of corrections, the children displayed and recognized the relevance of appropriate use of the lingua franca (e.g. Swedish) as part of their situated production of local social order. Language expertise was an issue for negotiations and redefinitions in multilingual peer group's interactions and was one of the factors organizing social relations in multilingual educational settings.

  • 31.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Blum-Kulka, Shoshana
    Hebrew University .
    Gröver, Vibeke
    Oslo University.
    Teubal, Eva
    D. Yellin's Teacher College, Jerusalem.
    Children's peer talk and learning: Uniting discursive, social and cultural facetsof peers' interaction2014In: Children's peer talk: Learning from each other / [ed] Cekaite Asta, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014, 1, p. 3-20Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Blum-Kulka, ShoshanaHebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel.Grøver, VibekeInstitutt for pedagogikk, Oslo University, Norway.Teubal, EvaDavid Yellin Academic College of Education, Jerusalem, Israel.
    Children’s peer talk: learning from each other2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Inside and outside the classroom, children of all ages spend time interacting with their peers. Through these early interactions, children make sense of the world and co-construct their childhood culture, while simultaneously engaging in interactional activities which provide the stepping stones for discursive, social and cognitive development. This collection brings together an international team of researchers to document how children's peer talk can contribute to their socialization and demonstrates that if we are to understand how children learn in everyday interactions we must take into account peer group cultures, talk, and activities. This book will be of interest to students and researchers in the fields of language acquisition, sociolinguistics, pragmatics and discourse analysis, and related disciplines. It examines naturally occurring talk of children aged from three to twelve years from a range of language communities, and includes ten studies documenting children's interactions and a comprehensive overview of relevant research.

  • 33.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ekström, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Emotion Socialization in Teacher-Child Interaction: Teachers Responses to Childrens Negative Emotions2019In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 1546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines 1- to 5-year-old childrens emotion socialization in an early childhood educational setting (a preschool) in Sweden. Specifically, it examines social situations where teachers respond to childrens negative emotional expressions and negatively emotionally charged social acts, characterized by anger, irritation, and distress. Data consisted of 14 h of video observations of daily activities, recorded in a public Swedish preschool, located in a suburban middle-class area and include 35 children and 5 preschool teachers. By adopting a sociocultural perspective on childrens development and socialization, the study examines the communicative practices through which the expressions of negative emotions are responded to and the norms and values that are communicated through these practices. The data are analyzed by using multimodal analysis of interaction that provides a tool for detailed analysis of participants verbal and embodied actions and sense-making. The analyses show that teachers responded to childrens negatively charged emotional expressions as social acts (that were normatively evaluated), and the adults instructed children how to modify their social conduct (rather than deploying explicit discussions about emotions). The teachers used communicative genres that prioritized general moral principles and implemented the non-negotiability of norms over individual childrens emotional-volitional perspectives and individual preferences. The teachers instructive socializing activities were characterized by movement between multiple temporal horizons, i.e., general (emotional) discourse that transcended the hereand-now, and specific instructions targeting the childrens conduct in a current situation. The study discusses how emotion socialization can be related to the institutional characteristics and collective participatory social conditions of early childhood education.

  • 34.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Evaldsson, Ann-Carita
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Language policies in play: Learning ecologies in multilingual preschool interactions among peers and teachers2017In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communiciation, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 451-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we argue that a focus on language learning ecologies, that is, situations for participation in various communicative practices, can shed on the intricate processes through which minority children develop or are constrained from acquiring cultural and linguistic competencies (here, of a majority language). The analysis draws on a language socialization approach to examine the micro-level contexts of an immigrant childs preschool interactions with peers and teachers, and the interplay between these and macro-level language and educational policies. It was found that, in contrast to institutional and curricular policy aspirations concerning the positive potentials of childrens play as a site associated with core learning affordances, the language learning ecology created in the multilingual peer group interactions was limited. Social relations in the peer group, the novices marginal social position, and the childs rudimentary knowledge of the lingua franca, Swedish, precluded her from gaining access to shared peer play activities. The current study thus corroborates prior research showing that peer interactions in second language settings may pose a challenge to children who have not already achieved some competence in the majority language and that more support and interactions with the teachers can be useful.

  • 35.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Evaldsson, Ann-Carita
    Uppsala universitet, Institution för pedagogik.
    Staging linguistic identities and negotiating monolingual norms in multhiethnic school settings2008In: International Journal of Multilingualism, ISSN 1479-0718, E-ISSN 1747-7530, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 177-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on children's language alternation practices in two primary school settings. More specifically we explore how participants (children and teachers) in episodes of language alternation invoke linguistic and social identities, thereby 'talking into being' language and educational ideologies. The present study is based on multi-sited ethnography in two multiethnic educational settings where classroom activities are primarily in Swedish. Theoretically, it draws on sequential identity-related approaches to language alternation practices (Gafaranga, 2001). As demonstrated, both children and teachers draw on a range of linguistic varieties, and refrained from involving in polylingual practices. In so doing, they were actively engaged in producing and resisting a range of locally valued identities (i.e. monolingual, bilingual, and polylingual student). Simultaneously a monolingual norm was brought into being and, importantly, the children appropriated and exploited the monolingual norms-in being for organising their social relations. Overall the study highlights the links between social and linguistic identities, language choice, and language and educational ideologies. We argue that an understanding of children's polylingual practices in multilingual settings is provided by a close analysis of the local processes of identity work located within the wider sociocultural context (e.g. language and educational ideologies)

  • 36.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Holm Kvist, Malva
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Correction: The Comforting Touch: Tactile Intimacy and Talk in Managing Childrens Distress (vol 50, pg 109, 2017)2017In: Research on Language and Social Interaction, ISSN 0835-1813, E-ISSN 1532-7973, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 326-326Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 37.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Holm Kvist, Malva
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Comforting Touch: Tactile Intimacy and Talk in Managing Childrens Distress2017In: Research on Language and Social Interaction, ISSN 0835-1813, E-ISSN 1532-7973, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 109-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines young childrens distress management in situ, focusing on situations of crying and caregivers embodiedhapticsoothing responses in preschools in Sweden. The adults responses to crying involve embraces, stroking, and patting. Haptic soothing is managed by calibrating the bodily proximity and postural orientations between the participants, including hapticembracing or face-to-faceformations that are coordinated with particular forms of talk. Haptic formations configure specific affordances for embodied participation by actualizing the availability of tactile, aural, and visual modalities. The interactional organization of soothing in an embracing formation involves: an initiation/invitation and response, submergence of two bodies into a close haptic contact, and coordinated withdrawal from haptic contact. The embracing formation temporarily suspends the requirements for the distressed person to act like a responsive listener and speaker. The caregiver uses the face-to-face formation to reestablish conditions for the childs interactional co-presence. Data are in Swedish and English translation.

  • 38.
    Cekaite Thunqvist, Asta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    A child's development of interactional competence in a Swedish L2 classroom2007In: The Modern language journal, ISSN 0026-7902, E-ISSN 1540-4781, Vol. 91, no 1, p. 45-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores a child's emergent second language (L2) interactional competence during her first year in a Swedish immersion classroom. Within the theoretical framework of situated learning, it focuses on how she acquires expertise in a specific classroom practice: multiparty classroom talk. The data cover three periods (the early, middle, and late phases) of her first school year. The methods adopted combine a microanalytic approach with ethnographic fieldwork analyses of L2 socialization within a classroom community. The analyses revealed systematic changes in the novice's interactional engagements. An interplay of language skills and turn-taking skills influenced her participation in multiparty talk during the three periods, casting her as (a) a silent child, (b) a noisy and loud child, and (c) a skillful student. These changes indicate that learning cannot be seen as the unilinear development of a single learner identity. It is argued that a detailed longitudinal analysis may provide important insights into the relationship between participation and L2 learning. Instead of unilinear development of a single learner identity, we may find different participation patterns linked to distinct language learning affordances over time. © 2007 The Modern Language Journal.

  • 39.
    Cekaite Thunqvist, Asta
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Language play, peer group improvisations, and L2 learning2014In: Children’s peer talk: learning from each other / [ed] Asta Cekaite, Shoshana Blum-Kulka, Vibeke Grøver, Eva Teubal, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014, p. 194-213Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Evaldsson, Ann-Carita
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    " SCHWEDIS HE CANT EVEN SAY SWEDISH" - SUBVERTING AND REPRODUCING INSTITUTIONALIZED NORMS FOR LANGUAGE USE IN MULTILINGUAL PEER GROUPS2010In: PRAGMATICS, ISSN 1018-2101, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 587-604Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study explores how minority schoolchildren in multilingual peer group interactions act upon dominant educational and linguistic ideologies as they organize their everyday emerging peer culture. The data draw from ethnographies combined with detailed analysis (CA) of video recordings in two primary monolingual school settings in Sweden. Bakhtins processual view of how linguistic norms are used for overcoming the heteroglossia of language is used as a framework for understanding how monolingualism is talked-into-being in multilingual peer groups. As will be demonstrated, the children recurrently participate in corrective practices in which they playfully exploit multiple linguistic resources (syntactic, lexical and phonetic features) and the turn structure of varied activities (conflicts, accusations, insults, classroom discourse) to play with and consolidate a collective critical view of not-knowing correct Swedish. Moreover, they transform faulty talk (repeating structural elements, recycling arguments, using parodic imitations, joint laughter, code-switching) to display their language competence, assert powerful positions and strengthen alliances in the peer group. It is argued that such forms of playful heteroglossic peer group practices are highly ambiguous and paradoxically tend to enforce power hierarchies and values associated with different social languages and codes, thus co-constructing the monolingual ideology.

  • 41.
    Evaldsson, Ann-Carita
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sweden.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Syskonskap, samspel och lärande i vardagligt familjeliv2013In: Familjeliv och lärande / [ed] Liselott Aarsand, Pål Aarsand, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 1, p. 65-80Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I dagens diskussioner kring lärande återkommer frågan om vad som händer vid sidan av etablerade utbildningar och institutioner. Vilket lärande äger rum utanför den organiserade undervisningen och vad kännetecknar detta lärande?

    Familjeliv och lärande tar steget ut från klassrummen och placerar familjen i centrum. Med utgångspunkt i tre teman – identitetsaktiviteter, studieaktiviteter och fritidsaktiviteter – analyserar författarna olika praktiker där barn och vuxna ingår, samt sätter in familjen i ett lärandeperspektiv. Varje tema illustreras och problematiseras genom ett antal kapitel som utifrån angelägna frågor bidrar med värdefull inblick och kritiska reflektioner kring familjers sociala samspel.

    Boken vänder sig till blivande och verksamma lärare samt andra pedagoger. Alla som intresserar sig för små och stora människors lärande i vardagen kan hitta kunskap och inspiration här.

  • 42.
    Goodwin, Marjorie
    et al.
    Department of anthropology, University of California, Los Angeles, United States of America.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Calibration in directive/response sequences in family interaction2013In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 46, p. 122-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the context of parent–child interaction we examine the syntactic, prosodic and embodied shape of directive response sequences used to launch, choreograph, monitor, and stall the ongoing progress of a routine communicative project (Linell, 1998) occurring across temporal and spatial dimensions. We explore directive/response usage in the goal-oriented routine activity (Weisner, 1998) of getting children ready for bed, a temporally anchored project that involves the movement of bodies through social space and transitions from one activity to another (Cekaite, 2010; M.H. Goodwin, 2006a and Goodwin, 2006b). Dialogic and embodied characteristics of social action and accountability are demonstrated (1) through alternative grammatical formats for directives (declaratives, imperatives, interrogatives (formatted as noun phrases produced with rising intonation)) (2) as well as through the systematic ways in which participants overlay action within directive sequences with alternative forms of affect, touch, and mobility.

  • 43.
    Goodwin, Marjorie
    et al.
    Dept. of Anthropology, University of California, Los Angeles.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Orchestrating directive trajectories in communicative projects in family interaction2014In: Requesting in social interaction / [ed] Paul Drew, Elisabeth Couper-Kuhlen, Amsterdam: John Benjamins , 2014, 1, p. 185-214Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exploring the entanglement of resources (facial expressions, gesture, gaze, and intonation) that mutually elaborate each other in the production of social action, across the life of a particular communicative project in family interactions (getting children to bed), we investigate the ways in which participants calibrate actions with reference to each other’s actions. Our specific concern is the choreographing of directive response sequences. While directives are commonly thought of as “doing things with words”, in face -to-face interaction they frequently entail doing things with bodies as well. Thus, along with a consideration of action formation, syntactic formats, and prosody used to construct directives and build responses, we examine the haptic forms that overlay verbal directive forms, as well as configurations of bodies in lived social space. Compliance may take the shape of nonverbal responses such as willing movement towards the target space indexed by the directive, minimal verbal agreement – plaintive, reluctant, or joyful – with a parent’s directive, or response cries, e.g. exasperation or disgruntled disbelief. As agents with projects of their own, children can respond to directives with considerable resistance. Very different types of affective landscapes are created in the midst of interaction. People in interaction form environments for each other, either ones displaying deference and accountability for one’s actions or alternatively displaying outright antagonism and disdain. Examples in this study are drawn from video recordings of naturally occurring interaction in middle class families who were part of the project of UCLA’s Center on Everyday Lives of Families and Sweden’s sister project.

  • 44.
    Goodwin, Marjorie
    et al.
    University of California, Los Angeles, United States of America.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Goodwin, Charles
    University of California, Los Angeles, United States of America.
    Emotion as stance2012In: Emotion in interaction / [ed] Anssi Peräkylä & Marja-Lena Sorjonen, Oxford: Oxford University Press , 2012, p. 16-41Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of emotion in everyday interactions has become a central topic of research in a wide variety of disciplines, including linguistics, sociology, social psychology, anthropology, and communication. Emotion in Interaction offers a collection of original studies that explore emotion in naturally occurring spoken interaction. The articles examine both the verbal and non-verbal resources for expressing emotional stance (lexicon, syntax, prosody, laughter, crying, facial expression), the emotional aspects of action sequences (e.g. news delivery and conflicts), and the role of emotions in institutional interaction (medical consultations, psychotherapy, health visiting and helpline calls). What unites the articles is an understanding of the expression of emotion and the construction of emotional stances as a process that both shapes and is shaped by the interactional context.

  • 45.
    Goodwin, Marjorie
    et al.
    University of California, Los Angeles, USA.
    Čekaitė, Asta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Embodied family choreography: Practices of control, care and mundane creativity2018 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Embodied Family Choreography documents the lived and embodied practices employed to establish, maintain, and negotiate intimate social relationships in the family, examining forms of control, care, and creativity. Making use of the extensive video archives of family interaction in the US and Sweden, it presents the first investigation of how touch and interaction between bodies, in conjunction with talk, constitute a primary means of orchestrating activities through directives, thus creating rich relationships through supportive interchanges, and engaging in playful explorations of the world. Through close investigation of the sequential and simultaneous engagement of bodies interacting with other bodies, this book makes visible the important role touch plays in the context of contemporary Western middle class family life and is pioneering in its analysis of how the visual, aural, and haptic senses (usually analysed separately) mutually elaborate one another. As such, Embodied Family Choreography will appeal to scholars of child development, the sociology of the family and ethnomethodology and conversation analysis.

  • 46.
    Kheirkhah, Mina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Language Maintenance in a Multilingual Family: Informal Heritage Language Lessons in Parent-Child Interactions2015In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communiciation, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 319-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study explores language socialization patterns in a Persian-Kurdish family in Sweden and examines how "one-parent, one-language" family language policies are instantiated and negotiated in parent-child interactions. The data consist of video-recordings and ethnographic observations of family interactions, as well as interviews. Detailed interactional analysis is employed to investigate parental language maintenance efforts and the childs agentive orientation in relation to the recurrent interactional practices through which parents attempt to enforce a monolingual, heritage language "context" for parent-child interaction. We examine the interactional trajectories that develop in parents requests for translation that target the focus childs (a 7-year-old girls) lexical mixings. These practices resembled formal language instruction: The parents suspended the ongoing conversational activity, requested that the child translate the problematic item, modeled and assessed her language use. The instructional exchanges were asymmetrically organized: the parents positioned themselves as "experts", insisting on the childs active participation, whereas the childs (affectively aggravated) resistance was frequent, and the parents recurrently accommodated the child by terminating the language instruction. The study argues that an examination of childrens agency, and the social dynamics characterizing parental attempts to shape childrens heritage language use, can provide significant insights into the conditions for language maintenance

  • 47.
    Kheirkhah, Mina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Siblings as language socialization agents in bilingual families2017In: International Multilingual Research Journal, ISSN 1931-3152, E-ISSN 1931-3160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines the siblings’ contribution to shaping the language practices and language environment of immigrant families. The data consist of interviews, observations, and video recordings of everyday family interactions and sibling play in five Iranian families residing in Sweden. Detailed interaction analyses show that siblings targeted various aspects of each other’s language use (heritage languages, Swedish, and English). They corrected each other’s language use and choices and requested and provided language instructions when language-related problems occurred. However, the main language of siblings’ talk was Swedish. The siblings addressed the multifaceted linguistic demands of Swedish society and helped to develop each other’s multiple languages. Simultaneously, however, by primarily using Swedish, they were contributing to language shift. The study broadens the focus of family language policy studies (i.e., parents’ views on family language planning or parent-child dyadic interactions) and adds to the underresearched area of family bilingualism and heritage language maintenance.

  • 48.
    Musk, Nigel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Modern Languages. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mobilising distributed memory resources in English project work2017In: Memory practices and learning: interactional, institutional and sociocultural perspectives / [ed] Åsa Mäkitalo, Per Linell, Roger Säljö, Charlotte: Information Age Publishing, 2017, p. 145-174Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Tholander, Michael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cekaite Thunqvist, Asta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Konversationsanalys2009In: Handbok i kvalitativ analys / [ed] Andreas Fejes & Robert Thornberg, Liber, 2009, 1, p. 154-177Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta är en oumbärlig handbok för dig som ska skriva en akademisk uppsats baserad på kvalitativ datainsamling som exempelvis kvalitativa intervjuer, detaljerade observationer av samtal, textdokument eller fältstudier. Här får du konkreta råd och en gedigen genomgång av grundläggande aspekter av kvalitativ forskning samt redskap för att analysera data. Boken redogör för olika former av kvalitativ analys och går därutöver även igenom forskarens roll, forskningsprocessen, metoder för datainsamling samt vilken metodansats som kan vara lämplig att välja

  • 50.
    Tholander, Michael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Cekaite Thunqvist, Asta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Konversationsanalys2015In: Handbok i kvalitativ analys / [ed] Andreas Fejes & Robert Thornberg, Liber, 2015, 2, p. 194-217Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta är en oumbärlig handbok för dig som ska skriva en akademisk uppsats baserad på kvalitativ datainsamling som exempelvis kvalitativa intervjuer, detaljerade observationer av samtal, textdokument eller fältstudier. Här får du konkreta råd och en gedigen genomgång av grundläggande aspekter av kvalitativ forskning samt redskap för att analysera data. Boken redogör för olika former av kvalitativ analys och går därutöver även igenom forskarens roll, forskningsprocessen, metoder för datainsamling samt vilken metodansats som kan vara lämplig att välja

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