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  • 1.
    Anshelm, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Galis, Vasilis
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    (Re-)constructing Nuclear Waste Management in Sweden: The Involvement of ConcernedGroups, 1970–20102011In: Integrated Waste Management - Volume II / [ed] Sunil Kumar, Rijeka, Croatia: InTech , 2011, 1, p. 401-430Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden constitutes a leading nation concerning developing technological solutions for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The KBS-3 solution that is now to be implemented in Östhammar, northeast of Stockholm, has become a reference concept for the program for sustainable nuclear power within the EU. A common understanding is that the Swedish solution is the outcome of a political culture characterized by consensus making and cooperation. In this paper, we argue that such an understanding is misleading. On the contrary, we show that the Swedish solution is a product of severe conflicts between concerned groups (the antinuclear movement, environmental organizations, local resistance groups, oppositional scientists, journalists, and intellectuals) and the nuclear energy industry. In this paper, we investigate the efforts performed by concerned groups in Sweden and their effects on the KBS-3. The concept of concerned groups describes a dynamic process by which different types of groups transform depending on their negotiability and their participation (or not) in the configuration of technoscientific phenomena. Thus, we also analyze how the critique, actions and research of concerned groups underwent a qualitative transition related to the degree to which they participated in the scientific, technological and political configuration of the final depository for spent nuclear fuel: from radical deconstruction of technoscientific initiatives coming from the nuclear energy industry, to co-construction of the technical solution KBS-3, to a reconstructivist agenda, that is, the production of knowledge and technical solutions potentially usable by nuclear engineers and politicians beyond the research efforts of the nuclear energy industry.

  • 2.
    Anshelm, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Galis, Vasilis
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Politics of High-Level Nuclear Waste Management in Sweden: on Confined Research versus Research in the Wild.2009In: Environmental Policy and Governance, ISSN 1756-932X, Vol. 19, p. 269-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2010, the Swedish nuclear energy industry is expected to announce a proposal for the final storage of high-level nuclear waste in bedrock. The underground storage concept is attracting increasing interest from other countries in Europe. Because of the nature of Swedish political culture, the development of the actual method for final disposal is commonly perceived as resting on consensus and democratic cooperation. However, this paper argues that the aforementioned disposal method instead represents the outcome of intense conflict between the nuclear energy industry and the anti-nuclear movement. Accordingly, any investigation of the technical and political solutions to controversial environmental problems should involve the study of lay people and social movements. The present study does so, employing theoretical notions from science and technology studies that allow the analysis to conceptualize actions and strategies (enactments) of the nuclear energy industry (confined research) and the anti-nuclear movement (research in the wild).

  • 3.
    Galis, Vasilis
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Enacting disability: how can STS inform disability studies2011In: Disability & Society, ISSN 0968-7599, E-ISSN 1360-0508, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 825-838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to discuss how science and technology studies (STS) can inform disability studies and challenge dominant approaches, such as the medical and the social models, in the ordering and representation of disability. Disability studies and STS have followed somewhat parallel paths in the history of ideas. From a positivist approach to their research objects to a strong social constructivism, both disciplines have moved to post-modern conceptualisations of science, technology and disability. In the same manner and challenging the extremes of modernism (either ordering disability as a bodily impairment or locating disability solely in society), this paper brings the conceptual vocabulary of actor-network theory (ANT) to the field of disability studies. ANT enables the ordering of disability as a simultaneous biological, material and semiotic phenomenon. Exchanges of performative agency between these elements determine the disability experience. The focus of the analysis shifts from merely defining disability as an impairment, handicap, or social construction (epistemology) to how disability is experienced and enacted in everyday practices, in policy-making, in socio-technical arenas, in the body, and in the built environment (ontology). This adoption of an ontological approach to disability allows the analysis to not only discuss how disability is done, but also to follow how disability groups and carriers of disability expertise and experience intervene in policy-making by developing ‘research in the wild’ and confronting scientific experts in different fora (ontological politics).

  • 4.
    Galis, Vasilis
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    From Shrieks to Technical Reports: technology, disability and political processes in building Athens metro2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea of building a metro network in Athens dates back to the 1950s. It took almost fifty years for the Greek government to develop plans, secure funds and to carry out an effective procurement process for the construction of the Athens metro. In February 1987 the government announced an invitation to tender for the design and construction of the metro. Thirteen years later, in January 2000 the first two lines began operation. The construction of the metro consisted of numerous preliminary studies, different public organizations which dealt with its development and several controversies concerning its design. One of these controversies referred to the issue whether the metro would be accessible to disabled people or not. Integrating accessibility provisions in the metro design constituted a controversial issue where different actors argued and acted for and against its implementation. This study describes and analyses the process of making the metro accessible.

    The analysis focuses on how questions regarding accessibility/disability were actualized for the first time in the planning and design of the Greek built environment and in particular on the process of building the biggest and most complicated infrastructure project in Greece, the Athens metro. At the same time, the study describes the evolution of disability organizations in Greece: they changed from being weak actors who were unable to influence socio-political configurations to actors that successively gained attention within the public administration, political organs, the Greek Parliament and the company that constructed the metro. The study discusses how disability organizations and the metro were developed and influenced each other and how important forums, where several actors with diverse interests problematized and produced different perspectives on disability, were initiated. These forums constituted public spaces within the public administration and eventually contributed to the construction of an accessible metro network. The analysis is also connected to Athens hosting of the Olympic and Paralympic Games of 2004 which created increasing demands for constructing an accessible built environment, including the metro. Furthermore, the study also draws upon the discussion within the EU on disability and on which kind of consequences this discussion implied for the developing metro. The theoretical basis for this study is located at the intersection of two broad fields, namely science and technology studies (S&TS) and disability studies.

  • 5.
    Galis, Vasilis
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Social Movements and public participation of disabled users in the design of transport systems.: The case of Athens Metro2004In: 4S-EASST Meeting Public Proofs – Science, Technology & Democracy Paris, August 25-28, 2004, Paris, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of social movements in the design process of technologies and technological systems, with societal value, has been appointed, lately, increasing significance. The design, development, and implementation of major projects, on a national or regional level, consider the involvement and participation of users’ groups. Patients’ and disabled people organizations, environmental groups, consumers’ associations, single users, etc, have contributed, with their knowledge, needs and demands, to the realization of public transport systems, complicated computer systems, alternative energy sources, radical medical networks, etc.

     

    The involvement of these groups has a twofold effect: Firstly, the quality and extend of engagement and interaction affects the social role of these movements or individuals and derange their social, political and economic status quo, for better or for worse. Issues of concessive inclusion and exclusion arise, also.

     

    Secondly, the involvement of social movements and users’ groups in the development of science and technology constitutes a major radical innovation for technology policy. The traditional map of producers and policy makers is substituted by extended interaction between users, producers, state policy makers and contributes to the improvement of the political system, in a wider sense, and the stimulation of enhanced techno-scientific solutions. New institutional frameworks and novel policy instruments ensue that consider, establish, and protect interactions between the state, users/interest groups and technology producers.

     

    The paper will attempt to highlight different aspects of disabled users’ participation in the design and implementation of Athens’ new metro. It will also investigate and evaluate public technology procurement (PTP), as a policy designed and implemented by public authorities. Particularly, the article will focus on how PTP fosters and establishes networks and patterns of user-producer interactions, within the framework of the Athens’ case.

  • 6.
    Galis, Vasilis
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Studying the Development of Athens Metro and the GreekDisability Movement: Neutrality, Reflexivity, and Epistemological Choice2007In: Society for Social Studies of Science Annual Meeting October, Montreal, Canada, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Is it really the only task of science and technology studies (S&TS) to observe, deconstruct and criticize? In February 1987 the Greek government announced an invitation to tender for the design and construction of the new Athens metro. Thirteen years later, in January 2000 the first two lines began operation. The construction of the metro consisted of numerous preliminary studies, different public organizations which dealt with its development and several controversies concerning its design. One of these controversies referred to the issue whether the metro would be accessible to disabled people or not.

     

    Studying sociotechnical controversies, such as the implementation of accessibility provision in the new Athens Metro, often implicitly stipulates certain neutrality on the part of the researcher. But what happens to neutrality when the researcher becomes a part of the controversy or sympathizes with one of the opposing sides? The identity of the researcher also influences the choice of an epistemological standpoint. Moreover, the choice of conducting an investigation of the process of developing and applying disability facilities on the Athens metro is in its very nature political. By this I mean that the study contributes to an ongoing debate concerning issues of exclusion and discrimination against disabled people. As a result, the methodological framework of this project also includes elements of an emancipatory research paradigm. An emancipatory paradigm requires strong commitment from the researcher to the interests and needs of disabled people. In this study, disabled people were given an active methodological role. Doing research on disability implied that I undertook research that could be of practical benefit to the self-empowerment of disabled people and/or the appraisal of disabling barriers. At the same time, it would be almost impossible for me to dissociate myself from being viewed by disability organizations as an ally in their struggle. However, I am not a disabled person myself and my able-bodied position does not allow for adopting a disability standpoint in every respect. Several of my disabled informants who were representatives of disability organizations perceived my work as a means to express complaints regarding the oppression that people with disabilities face in Greece, to promote their claims and demands, and to make their voices heard. In other words, these informants attempted to deploy my work in their effort to achieve a better hearing for their claims. This does not signify the capturing of my research since it constitutes a conscious methodological choice that I made in accordance with the emancipatory research paradigm. What I am advocating is more democratic participation in the processes that contribute to the configuration of the built environment and more policy initiatives for reducing disabilities.

  • 7.
    Galis, Vasilis
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Gyberg, Per
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Energy behavior as a collectif: The case of Colonia student dorms at the university of Linköping2008In: 4S-EASST Meeting  Rotterdam, the Netherlands, August 20-23 2008: Acting with Science, Technology and Medicine, Rotterdam, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A household’s energy behaviour consists of several processes and interactions as well as it involve the decisions and functions of several entities. A household constitutes a technical infrastructure where people live, meet, and shape their identities in different ways. This study aims to open the black box energy behaviour and highlight different aspects and entities that influence and shape the way households use energy sources. A household’s energy behaviour is defined by different material and socio-economic objectives/aspects. These objectives often conflict with each other in terms of economic resources, political prioritisations, and technical potentials. For example, the implementation of environmental-friendly provisions in a household implies often costs and distribution of priorities. The most suitable method for highlighting and conceptualising the relationship between energy behaviour and different actors’ engagement is to study the development and construction of infrastructures (such as houses, apartment buildings etc), since infrastructures comprise the complexity of the modern society.

     

    The aim of this study is to reconstruct and follow the process of designing and implementing a construction project, namely Colonia – the new student dorms at the university of Linköping, through the lenses of household’s energy behaviour. Particularly, we aim to investigate how the interaction among different entities, such as constructors, owners, users, ventilators, heaters, climate etc, co-produces energy behavior in the context of residential student buildings and standardizes ways of construction as well as patterns of consumption. In doing so, we intend to reconstruct the households’ everyday experiences/patterns as well as to follow construction and owning practices: How does a household conceptualize its own energy use? What kind of actors influences energy use? How material and natural aspects affect the construction process and the production of behavioural patterns of energy use? How do experts and constructors interact with the built environment? What negotiations take place between actors in the process of configuring a specific construction project regarding energy use and how these negotiations materialize in the context of the project, in terms of efficient energy behaviour/use?

     

    The study treats energy behavior as a hybrid collective (Callon & Law, 1995. ”Agency and the Hybrid Collectif”). Our aim is to follow and reconstruct relations between the components of the collectif. It is the relations and their heterogeneity that are important in this context. The project will attempt to illustrate how everyday choices, experiences and interactions with other actors regarding the energy equipment of a household define the energy identity and behaviour of its members. In other words, to study the processes through which the design and construction of a house regarding electricity, heat, ventilation, water, drain system etc provides evidence concerning the materialisation of energy patterns within a household on an everyday basis.

  • 8.
    Galis, Vasilis
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gyberg, Per
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Energy behaviour as a collectif: The case of Colonia: student dormitories at a Swedish university2011In: Energy Efficiency, ISSN 1570-646X, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 303-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A household’s energy behaviour consists of several processes and interactions and involves the decisions and functions of several entities. The topic of this study is to reconstruct, through narrations, the process of designing and implementing the new student dorms at Linköping University through the lens of household energy behaviour. In particular, we aim to investigate how the interactions between entities such as the builders, landlords, users, ventilators, heaters, climate and so forth co-perform energy behaviour in the setting of residential student buildings. Inspired by the actor-network theory, the study treats energy behaviour as a hybrid collectif. It is the relations and their heterogeneity that are important in this approach. The project studies how heterogeneous relations among everyday practices, human experiences and interactions with nonhumans enact energy use patterns.

  • 9.
    Galis, Vasilis
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gyberg, Per
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Palm, Jenny
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hushållens energibeteende: en forskningsöversikt och metodgenomgång2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna förstudie ska vi analysera tidigare forskning kring hushållens energianvändning och relatera detta till styrmedel och energibeteende, samt bygg- och bostadssektorns aktörers arbete med energieffektivisering och hushållning. Syftet med denna rapport är att få en överblick av forskningen kring byggnader och hushållens energibeteende samt att formulera teoretiska och metodologiska tillvägagångssätt för att undersöka hushållens energibeteende. I denna rapport ska vi diskutera teoretiska och metodologiska angreppssätt inför fortsättningen av projektet och påbörja utvecklingen av en analysram för att förstå energianvändningen i hushåll.

  • 10.
    Galis, Vasilis
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hansson, Anders
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Partisan Scholarship in Technoscientific Controversies: Reflections on Research Experience2012In: Science as Culture, ISSN 0950-5431, E-ISSN 1470-1189, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 335-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several academic traditions have addressed epistemological objectivity and/or partisanship in the study of technoscientific controversies. On the one hand, positivist andrelativist scholars agree that the political commitments of the social researcher should notimpinge on scientific enquiry, while on the other hand, feminist and Marxist scholars notonly take stands in diverse technoscientific debates, but even claim their agendas to bemore credible than those of orthodox scientists. Such perspectives stress that all researchis partisan in one way or another because it involves questions of who controls,manipulates, and establishes decisions, facts, and knowledge. With this in mind, it ispossible to identify different forms of partisan research including capture byparticipants, de facto and overt partisanship, and mercenary scholarship. These differentforms of partisan scholarship are characterised by differences in the motives underlyingepistemological choices of research topic and method, personal commitments to thefields studied, use of research findings in controversies, and positioning of results inwider debates. Two examples help to illustrate partisan scholarship: first, a study of newtechnologies for managing climate change (carbon dioxide capture and storage); andsecond, the construction of the new underground metro system in Athens and itsaccommodation of accessibility standards. Both cases entail partisan positions and raisesimilar concerns about the orthodox epistemological assumptions underpinningsociotechnical systems, especially when it comes to technoscientific controversies.Supporting STS partisan scholarship, therefore, enables greater social and democraticengagement with technoscientific development.

  • 11.
    Galis, Vasilis
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lee, Francis
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A Sociology of Treason: The Case of Athens Metro 1991‐19932011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Galis, Vasilis
    et al.
    The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lee, Francis
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A Sociology of Treason: The Construction of Weakness2014In: Science, Technology and Human Values, ISSN 0162-2439, E-ISSN 1552-8251, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 154-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The process of translation has both an excluding and including character. The analysis of actor networks, the process of mobilizing alliances, and constructing networks is a common and worthwhile focus. However, the simultaneous betrayals, dissidences, and controversies are often only implied in network construction stories. We aim to nuance the construc- tion aspect of actor–network theory (ANT) by shining the analytical searchlight elsewhere, where the theoretical tools of ANT have not yet systematically ventured. We argue that we need to understand every process of translation in relation to its simultaneous process of treason, and to add antonyms for Callon’s problematization, intressement, enrollment, and mobilization. This enables us to describe powerlessness not as a state but as a process. Our case focuses on the network building around mea- sures for disabled people in the construction of the Athens Metro, during the period 1991-1993. The discussion highlights the efforts of disability organizations to intervene in the initial construction works of the metro project and the simultaneous actions of the Greek government to exclude disability organizations from the design process and to disrupt the accessibility-metro actor network. 

  • 13.
    Galis, Vasilis
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lee, Francis
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Destabilizing disability: the case of Athens Metro 1991-19932010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Gyberg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Galis, Vasilis
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Palm, Jenny
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hushållens energibeteende - en arena för förändring2007In: Energianvändning i vardagen idag och i framtiden, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Ottosson, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Galis, Vasilis
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Multiplicity justifies corporate strategy: The case of Stora Enso, 1990-20082011In: Journal of Cultural Economy, ISSN 1753-0350, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 455-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study conducts an analysis of the relationship between strategic theory, industry- or marketwide practices, valuation metrics, and justification rhetoric in performing strategic practice. Indoing this, we refer to Michel Callon on the performativity of economics and Boltanski andThe´venot on the justification of strategic action. The paper introduces an analytical framework forstudying the corporate strategy pragmatics of a forest industry company Stora Enso over the19902008 period. The authors argue that Stora Enso’s corporate strategy is justified by andrepresents the outcome of multiple performances that coexist and interact with each other. Thesemultiple performances, ranging from general strategic management conceptual theories toindustry-wide practices and valuation metrics, may lead to conflict when creating successfulbusinesses.

  • 16.
    Ottosson, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Galis, Vasilis
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Anshelm, Jonas
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Configuring the 'industrial collective':: A controversy on the use of Swedish forests, 1989–20092011In: Paper presented at the 27th EGOS Colloquium Gothenburg 2011: Sub-theme 17: Markets Inside the Ecological Revolution. / [ed] Fabian Muniesa, Peter Karnoe, and Petter Holm, 2011, p. 1-31Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We introduce a theoretical vocabulary highlighting a neglected area in industrial change theory, the outsider role. Industries cannot be fully examined without considering the influence of concerned groups, i.e. actors concerned with the industrial activity. Our empirical focus is a mature, stable, and highly homogeneous industrial sector, namely, the Swedish forest industry. We identify, analyse, and discuss the development and configuration of various truth claims and standpoints regarding the characteristics and potential uses of Sweden’s forest resources, 1989–2009. We follow the translation of the forest industry from producing solely pulp and paper products to producing electricity, heat, and bio-fuels. We argue that, without the pressure of concerned groups and ‘industrialists in the wild’ on the industry, forest industrial activity would never have been reconfigured.       

  • 17.
    Ottosson, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Galis, Vasilis
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Anshelm, Jonas
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Configuring the ‘industrial collective’: a controversyon the use of Swedish forests, 1989–2009Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We introduce a theoretical vocabulary highlighting a neglected area in industrial change theory, the outsider role. Industries cannot be fully examined without considering the influence of concerned groups, i.e. actors concerned with the industrial activity. Our empirical focus is a mature, stable, and highly homogeneous industrial sector, namely, the Swedish forest industry. We identify, analyse, and discuss the development and configuration of various truth claims and standpoints regarding the characteristics and potential uses of Sweden’s forest resources, 1989–2009. We follow the translation of the forest industry from producing solely pulp and paper products to producing electricity, heat, and bio-fuels. We argue that, without the pressure of concerned groups and ‘industrialists in the wild’ on the industry, forest industrial activity would never have been reconfigured.

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