liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Huang, Yu-Hsing
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, CSELAB - Cognitive Systems Engineering Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Model of Human-Machine Interaction for Risk Analysis in Road Traffic: A Cognitive Systems Engineering Approach2006In: Proceedings of the 7th Asia-Pacific Conference on Computer Human Interaction, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Huang, Yu-Hsing
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, CSELAB - Cognitive Systems Engineering Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A systemic traffic accident model2005Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Accident models are essential for all efforts in safety engineering. They influence the investigation and analysis of accidents, the assessment of systems and the development of precautions. Looking at accident statistics, the trend for Swedish roads is not pointing towards increased safety. Instead, the number of fatalities and accidents remains stable, and the number of injuries is increasing. This thesis proposes that this deterioration of road safety is due to the utilization of inadequate traffic accident models. The purpose of the thesis is to develop an adequate traffic accident model. This is done in two steps. The first step is to identify a proper type of general accident model. The second step is to adapt the general accident model to road traffic. Two reviews are made for this purpose. The first review identifies different categories of accident models. The second review surveys eleven existing traffic accident models. The results of these surveys suggest that an adequate accident model for modern road safety should be based on the systemic accident model. Future work will focus on the development of a risk assessment method for road traffic based on the systemic accident model.

  • 3.
    Huang, Yu-Hsing
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, CSELAB - Cognitive Systems Engineering Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Having a New Pair of Glassess: Applying Systemic Accident Models on Road Safety2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The main purpose of the thesis is to discuss the accident models which underlie accident prevention in general and road safety in particular, and the consequences of relying on a particular model have for actual preventive work. The discussion centres on two main topics. The first topic is whether the underlying accident model, or paradigm, of traditional road safety should be exchanged for a more complex accident model, and if so, which model(s) are appropriate. From a discussion of current developments in modern road traffic, it is concluded that the traditional accident model of road safety needs replacing. An analysis of three general accident model types shows that the work of traditional road safety is based on a sequential accident model. Since research in industrial safety has shown that such model are unsuitable for complex systems, it needs to be replaced by a systemic model, which better handles the complex interactions and dependencies of modern road traffic.

    The second topic of the thesis is whether the focus of road safety should shift from accident investigation to accident prediction. Since the goal of accident prevention is to prevent accidents in the future, its focus should theoretically be on how accidents will happen rather than on how they did happen. Despite this, road safety traditionally puts much more emphasis on accident investigation than prediction, compared to areas such as nuclear power plant safety and chemical industry safety. It is shown that this bias towards the past is driven by the underlying sequential accident model. It is also shown that switching to a systemic accident model would create a more balanced perspective including both investigations of the past and predictions of the future, which is seen as necessary to deal with the road safety problems of the future.

    In the last chapter, more detailed effects of adopting a systemic perspective is discussed for four important areas of road safety, i.e. road system modelling, driver modelling, accident/incident investigations and road safety strategies. These descriptions contain condensed versions of work which has been done in the FICA and the AIDE projects, and which can be found in the attached papers.

    List of papers
    1. Accident Models for Modern Road Traffic: Changing Times Creates New Demands
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Accident Models for Modern Road Traffic: Changing Times Creates New Demands
    2004 (English)In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics, 2004Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to develop accident models that can be applied to modern road traffic. Several criteria are proposed that a model suitable for the conditions of modern road traffic should fulfil. Four commonly applied general accident models are reviewed, and found to be inadequate in relation to the criteria. Also, the consequences of an underlying structural problem in all four model types, which is the result of regarding the human as a system component, are discussed. To remedy the discovered problems, it is argued that traffic safety should make use of the developments that have been made in the field of industrial safety. Several suggestions are proposed for how a new model could be developed, based on experiences from industrial safety.

    Keywords
    accident models, road traffic safety, accident prevention, accident causation, industrial safety
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14257 (URN)10.1109/ICSMC.2004.1398310 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-02-26 Created: 2007-02-26 Last updated: 2009-05-19
    2. Close Calls on the Road: A Study of Drivers’ Near-misses
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Close Calls on the Road: A Study of Drivers’ Near-misses
    2004 (English)In: Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Traffic and Transportation Psychology, 2004Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Joining a longstanding tradition in the field of industrial accident prevention, traffic accident research has begun to extend the study of accidents and serious incidents to include also near-misses and unsafe conditions. As part of a Swedish project called FICA (FactorsInfluencing the Causation of Incidents and Accidents), a study has been conducted to investigate near-misses, with the aim of clarifying different types and frequencies, as well as possible causes at the blunt and sharp end. The near-miss study made use of an analysis method called Driving Reliability and Error Analysis Method. The purpose of the method is to uncover the main socio-technical MTO factors involved in scenarios leading to traffic accidents. The study resulted in valuable understanding of near-misses in traffic and their aetiology, suggestions for improvements of the analysis method, and a basis for further,more extensive, near-miss studies.

    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14258 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-02-26 Created: 2007-02-26 Last updated: 2009-05-26
    3. MTO Factors Contributing to Road Accidents at Intersections
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>MTO Factors Contributing to Road Accidents at Intersections
    2004 (English)In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Cognitive System Engineering in Process Control, 2004, p. 166-173Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    At present, workin road traffic safety is expanding from injury prevention toinclude also accident prevention. For accident preventive measuresto be effective, knowledge is needed about common causal factorsthat contribute to the occurrence of accidents. This paper aimstowards identification of such common factors for a specific subsetof all road accidents, namely intersection accidents. The data usedfor the study consists of in-depth investigation material fromsixteen intersection accidents that have been investigated by amulti-disciplinary accident investigation team. Data analysis wasperformed using DREAM, a MTO based accident investigation method.The results indicate that cognitive bias, hidden information,inadequate design of traffic environment, and competing task arecommon contributing factors of intersection accidents. Also, thedistribution of factors for different collision path scenarios wasstudied, and several patterns in the distribution were discovered.These patterns were then compared to the results of another studywith a similar aim, but based on database statistics rather thatin-depth data. The conclusion of the comparison is that the DREAMmethod, in combination with in-depth accident data, provides adeeper and more detailed insight into how and why different factorscontribute to accidents, and these insights are well suited foraccident preventive work.

    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14259 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-02-26 Created: 2007-02-26 Last updated: 2009-05-19
    4. A Model of Human-Machine Interaction for Risk Analysis in Road Traffic: A Cognitive Systems Engineering Approach
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Model of Human-Machine Interaction for Risk Analysis in Road Traffic: A Cognitive Systems Engineering Approach
    2006 (English)In: Proceedings of the 7th Asia-Pacific Conference on Computer Human Interaction, 2006Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14260 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-02-26 Created: 2007-02-26
  • 4.
    Huang, Yu-Hsing
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, CSELAB - Cognitive Systems Engineering Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ljung, Mikael
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Factors Influencing the Causation of Accidents and Incidents2003In: The Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Europe Chapter Annual Meeting, X: X , 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Huang, Yu-Hsing
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, CSELAB - Cognitive Systems Engineering Laboratory.
    Ljung, Mikael
    Department of Machine and Vehicle Systems Chalmers University of Technology.
    Factors Influencing the Causation of Accidents and Incidents2004In: Human Factors in Design / [ed] D. de Waard, K.A. Brookhuis, C.M. Weikert, The Netherlands: Shaker Publishing , 2004, p. 25-34Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of this study is to identify and explain the MTO-factors Man, Technology, Organisation affecting the origin and the course of road traffic accidents and incidents. Human factors issues are essential to understand properly the aetiology of road traffic accidents, and in particular the possible mismatch between humans and technology. The study works from the assumption that an effective reduction of accidents and incidents require a reduction of this mismatch, hence the need for identification and control of the factors that cause it. The methodology of this study is based on the principles of cognitive systems engineering, where the driver and hisher vehicle are seen as a joint cognitive system. To analyse the mismatch between the joint driver-vehicle system JDVS and its environment, a detailed description of the course of the accident is necessary. A special investigation team collects data from actual traffic accidents in the Gothenburg area during a six-month period, starting in the fall of 2003. In addition to studying accidents, another team will also collect data on incidents and near misses. The study of incidents can provide a broader perspective on risky driving and unsafe situations, and thereby complements the accident data. The study makes use of a Driver Reliability and Error Analysis Method DREAM, derived from the more generic Cognitive Reliability and Error Analysis Method CREAM. The method has been tailored for this project to uncover the main MTO factors in traffic accidents. The contribution of this study is to provide a model and a method for uncovering MTO factors in road traffic accidents. The method provides a base for system designers to understand in detail traffic accident aetiology, and from that basis to develop either new technology or redesign existing systems to minimise traffic accidents, for instance by preventing certain classes of initiating events form taking place.

  • 6.
    Huang, Yu-Hsing
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, CSE - Cognitive Systems Engineering Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ljung, Mikael
    Chalmers university, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    MTO Factors Contributing to Road Accidents at Intersections2004In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Cognitive System Engineering in Process Control, 2004, p. 166-173Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    At present, workin road traffic safety is expanding from injury prevention toinclude also accident prevention. For accident preventive measuresto be effective, knowledge is needed about common causal factorsthat contribute to the occurrence of accidents. This paper aimstowards identification of such common factors for a specific subsetof all road accidents, namely intersection accidents. The data usedfor the study consists of in-depth investigation material fromsixteen intersection accidents that have been investigated by amulti-disciplinary accident investigation team. Data analysis wasperformed using DREAM, a MTO based accident investigation method.The results indicate that cognitive bias, hidden information,inadequate design of traffic environment, and competing task arecommon contributing factors of intersection accidents. Also, thedistribution of factors for different collision path scenarios wasstudied, and several patterns in the distribution were discovered.These patterns were then compared to the results of another studywith a similar aim, but based on database statistics rather thatin-depth data. The conclusion of the comparison is that the DREAMmethod, in combination with in-depth accident data, provides adeeper and more detailed insight into how and why different factorscontribute to accidents, and these insights are well suited foraccident preventive work.

  • 7.
    Huang, Yu-Hsing
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, CSE - Cognitive Systems Engineering Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ljung, Mikael
    Volvo Cars Safety Centre, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sandin, Jesper
    Department of machine and vehicle systems, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hollnagel, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, CSE - Cognitive Systems Engineering Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Accident Models for Modern Road Traffic: Changing Times Creates New Demands2004In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to develop accident models that can be applied to modern road traffic. Several criteria are proposed that a model suitable for the conditions of modern road traffic should fulfil. Four commonly applied general accident models are reviewed, and found to be inadequate in relation to the criteria. Also, the consequences of an underlying structural problem in all four model types, which is the result of regarding the human as a system component, are discussed. To remedy the discovered problems, it is argued that traffic safety should make use of the developments that have been made in the field of industrial safety. Several suggestions are proposed for how a new model could be developed, based on experiences from industrial safety.

  • 8.
    Ljung, Mikael
    et al.
    Volvo Cars Safety Centre, Traffic Safety Analysis & Requirements, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Huang, Yu-Hsing
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, CSE - Cognitive Systems Engineering Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Åberg, Nina
    Human System Integration, Volvo Technology Corporation, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Emma
    Human System Integration, Volvo Technology Corporation, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Close Calls on the Road: A Study of Drivers’ Near-misses2004In: Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Traffic and Transportation Psychology, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Joining a longstanding tradition in the field of industrial accident prevention, traffic accident research has begun to extend the study of accidents and serious incidents to include also near-misses and unsafe conditions. As part of a Swedish project called FICA (FactorsInfluencing the Causation of Incidents and Accidents), a study has been conducted to investigate near-misses, with the aim of clarifying different types and frequencies, as well as possible causes at the blunt and sharp end. The near-miss study made use of an analysis method called Driving Reliability and Error Analysis Method. The purpose of the method is to uncover the main socio-technical MTO factors involved in scenarios leading to traffic accidents. The study resulted in valuable understanding of near-misses in traffic and their aetiology, suggestions for improvements of the analysis method, and a basis for further,more extensive, near-miss studies.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf