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  • 1.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hjelm, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gustafsson, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Thuresson, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Krook, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Svensson, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ivner, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Miljöteknik: för en hållbar utveckling2011 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Baumann, Henrikke
    et al.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Scandelius, Christina
    Brunel Univ, England.
    Schmidt, Kirsten
    Aalborg Univ, Denmark.
    Sonnemann, Guido
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Preface: Recognizing management in LCM2018In: The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, ISSN 0948-3349, E-ISSN 1614-7502, Vol. 23, no 7, p. 1351-1356Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 3.
    Ben Amor, Mehdi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Laboratory of ECSTRA, Economic Department, HEC of Carthage, Carthage University, Carthage, Tunisia.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Frankelius, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hafedh, Ben Abdennebi
    Laboratory of ECSTRA, Economic Department, HEC of Carthage, Carthage University, Carthage, Tunisia.
    Revisiting Industrial Organization: Product Service Systems Insight2018In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 96, p. 1459-1477Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This literature review puts forward a comparison between the traditional seller, usually represented by classic Industrial Organization (IO) models, and system providers, which are illustrated by Product Service System (PSS) models. A multidisciplinary systematic literature review, that compares PSS and IO models, is conducted, and ends up in to define PSS as a technology. It highlights the differences and similarities between classic IO and classic PSS and evaluate the weakness and strengths of different models. In total, 148 articles from different disciplines have been investigated, and a different understanding of PSS is provided. A new IO framework, that considers classic sellers and PSSs providers, is established to preserve PSS specificities and stress the role of policy maker and competition for PSSs expansion.

  • 4.
    Boks, Casper
    et al.
    Department of Product Design, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Plepys, Andrius
    The International Insitute for Industrial Environmental Economics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    McAloone, Tim
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.
    Jalas, Mikko
    Helsinki School of Economics and Business Administration, Helsinki, Finland.
    Baumann, Henrikke
    Department of Environmental Systems Analysis, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bey, Niki
    The Institute for Product Development, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.
    Nordic Post-Graduate Sustainable Design and Engineering Research from a Supervisor Perspective2008In: Proceedings of NordDesign 2008 / [ed] L. Roosimölder, Tallin, Estonia, 2008, p. 171-180Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The multi- and interdisciplinary field of sustainable product innovation is rapidly expanding as an arena for scientific research. Universities in Nordic countries can be considered as an exponent of this type of research, with active research groups in, among others, Göteborg, Helsinki, Lund, Lyngby, Linköping and Trondheim. In the context of a Nordforsk funded project, seven second generation PhD supervisors from these universities, who have been active in this field for many years, discuss funding, publication, research traditions, education and supervision practices related to PhD research in this field. A number of recommendations to improve current practices are made, including the mapping currently existing differences in different academic institutions, studying the cross-over learning effects between academica and non-academic partners, and the development of ‘quality indicators’ of research in the SPI domain.

  • 5.
    Bolin, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lee, Hui Mien
    Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, Singapore.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    LCA of Biogas Through Anaerobic Digestion from the Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste (OFMSW) Compared to Incineration of the Waste2009In: Proceedings of EcoDesign 2009: 6th International Symposium on Environmentally Conscious Design and Inverse Manufacturing, Sapporo, Japan, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Production of biogas through anaerobic digestion (AD) from the organic fraction of minucipal solid waste (OFMSW) was compared to incineration of the waste. At the moment, almost all of the OFMSW in Singapore is incinerated. Three different scales of biogas plants were compared to incineration: one large-scale biogas plant that can treat half of all OFMSW in Singapore; one medium- scale biogas plant about 15 times smaller than the large one; and one small-scale biogas plant that can treat waste from e.g. a shopping centre or food centre. Two alternatives for utilization of the biogas were also compared, generation of electricity and the use of the biogas in heavy vehicles. The combination of the different scales and the different utilization gives the six different scenarios. By using life cycle assessment (LCA) the different scenarios were compared in terms of global warming potential (GWP), acidification, eutrophication, energy use and land use. The results show that biogas production creates less environmental impact than incineration. The use of the gas as a vehicle fuel creates a bigger decrease of GWP, acidification and eutrophication than when using the gas for electricity generation. The prevention of leakage of biogas during production and upgrading is crucial for the environmental impact on GWP. A leakage of only a few percent of the produced gas will lead to a loss of all the gain in saved GHG-emissions.

  • 6.
    Boonkanit, Prin
    et al.
    King Mongkut Institute of Technology.
    Lin, Han-Hsuan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management.
    Kengpol, Athakorn
    King Mongkut Institute of Technology.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management.
    Industrial activities in EcoDesign - a comparison between Sweden and Thailand2008In: Joint International Congress and Exhibition Electronics Goes Green,2008, Berlin, 2008, p. 503-508Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Brambila-Macias, Sergio A.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nilsson, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Widgren, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Support for Designing Resource Efficient and Effective Solutions: Current Use and Requirements by Swedish Industry: Report from “Product and Service Design Support for REES” Project of Mistra REES program2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This document reports on the results of work packages (WPs) 2.1 and 2.2 in Project 2 (Product and Service Design Support for REES, i.e. resource efficient and effective solutions) of the Mistra REES program (www.mistrarees.se). WP 2.1 and WP 2.2 aim at documenting current use of design support and deriving requirements for design support, respectively. The document only covers results from interviews with companies, while the other reports will cover results, for instance, from scientific literature review (ISRN: LIU‐IEI‐RR‐‐17/00264—SE) and the design session with industry partners in the Mistra REES consortium. The results of this research into industrial practice will be a foundation for WP 2.3, which aims at developing new design support for designers.

    The document describes current use (i.e., “as‐is” status) of product and service design support when designing REES, as well as requirements for product and service design support for REES (i.e., information soon‐to‐be). Both of these are results of analysis in different phases of an early phase of design for REES. Those phases consist of requirement specification, conceptual design, and analysis and evaluation, which can be ordered temporally along the design process.

    Eight Sweden‐based companies that provide products and services in different sectors and work on resource efficiency participated in the interviews. They vary in terms of the size: from small to large. 24 individual interviews were conducted in total with the length being between 54 and 117 minutes (with two additional shorter follow up interviews via phone/skype). The 24 interviews were carried out all with face to face between May and July, 2016. The result from each company is described per section in this report, while cross‐company analysis will be made in a separate document.

  • 8.
    Brambila-Macias, Sergio A.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nilsson, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Widgren, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    State of the Art of Design Methods for Resource Efficient and Effective Solutions: Report from “Product and Service Design Methods for REES” Project of Mistra REES program2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This document reports on the results of work packages (WPs) 2.1 and 2.2 in Project 2 (Product and Service Design Methods for REES, i.e. resource efficient and effective solutions) of the Mistra REES program (www.mistrarees.se). WP 2.1 and WP 2.2 aim at documenting current use of design methods and deriving requirements for design methods, respectively. The document only covers results from the scientific literature review, while other reports to be developed will cover results, for instance, from the interview study and the design session with industry partners in the Mistra REES consortium. The results of the literature review will be a foundation for WP 2.3, which aims at developing new design methods. Note that methods here include frameworks, tools, and support for designers.

    The document describes current use (i.e., “as‐is” status) of product and service design methods when designing REES, as well as requirements for product and service design methods for REES (i.e., information soon‐to‐be). Both of these are results of analysis in different phases of an early phase of design for REES. Those phases consist of requirement specification, conceptual design, and analysis and evaluation, which can be ordered temporally along the design process.

    From the overall analysis, found is a lack of insights about methods for designing REES, although potentially useful methods are available. This means advancement of knowledge is insufficient for industry within the subject, which is relatively new. It may also mean the developed methods are not precisely according to the needs of companies. This shows a high potential of developing new methods in the rest of the project.

    More specifically, in the requirement specification, the literature shows that potentially useful methods include QFD (Quality Function Deployment), the Taguchi method, the Kano model, and data mining, among others. In the conceptual design, numerous methods exist, and most of them were developed in an older context, where REES was not as relevant as today. Those methods include DfX methods (X denotes cost, assembly, etc.), the functional block diagram, the checklist, morphological analysis, and the Fishbone Diagram. Only a few seem to be used widely in industry today. In the analysis and evaluation, available methods include Lifecycle Simulation, Lifecycle Costing, multi‐criteria decision making, and the Analytical Hierarchy Process. Most of the methods or tools available specialise in one area. This is a problem when developing an integrated offering of products and services, because designers need to have a holistic perspective for that.

    Regarding requirements for methods to be developed, the authors analysed literature as follows. In the requirement specification, requirements originating from multiple aspects and actors need to be taken into account. Since an enormous amount of data and information can be collected from products and by technologies implemented today, a huge opportunity is presented for enhancing requirement specification. Yet, there seems to be little insights to take this opportunity. In conceptual design, it is important to identify and involve relevant actors as well as their requirements according to a number of scientific reports. Especially, interaction between the relevant actors seems to be critical to be implemented. In analysis and evaluation, various pieces of earlier research works recommend different features to be implemented in methods. These features include visualization of information and information flows, graphical user interface, multiple users’ participation, and ability to handle environmental information, uncertainty and risk.

  • 9.
    Brambila-Macias, Sergio
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Requirements for REES design support: A survey among large companies and SMEs2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report presents the results of a survey carried out during 2017-2018 among 11 different companies as part of the REES programme (www.mistrarees.se) work package (WP) 2.2 of Project 2 (the project concerning design in the programme). The objective of the survey was to identify the most important requirements for design support that is being developed for REES designers in the manufacturing industry. The survey comprises results from a total of 25 participants from 5 SMEs and 6 large companies, which included 8 participants from SMEs and 17 from large companies. This classification was made according to the EU commission (2015) definition of SMEs (< 250 employees and ≤ EUR 50 million in annual turnover). The results presented are divided into Section 1 where an overview of the survey and the method is presented and section 2 results, where consolidated data and comparison between large companies and SMES is provided.

  • 10.
    Carlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hjelm, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baas, Leenard
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Krook, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sustainability Jam Sessions for vision creation and problem solving2015In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 98, p. 29-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a concept for creating arenas where expertise from certain branches of industry can interact with sustainability professionals and researchers to address and solve sustainability challenges. The concept Sustainability Jam Session (SJS) builds upon the idea of conducting creative meetings between professionals in “jam sessions,” similar to those associated primarily with music and improvisation. Approaches such as these have been used in the IT sector over the past decades, but this is the first attempt to apply it in the area of sustainability. SJS's were tested at the 2012 Greening of Industry Network Conference (GIN2012) and here we report our experiences from arranging six SJS's at the conference.

    A typical process of an SJS includes a preparatory phase, the actual jam, and documentation and follow up. The preparatory phase mainly involves identifying hosts and topics to be addressed at the SJS, followed by attracting participants. The jam is started by an introduction of the topics, a technical visit (if appropriate), and a problem-solving workshop, ending with a wrap-up reporting. Thorough documentation is necessary for following up the results of the SJS and preparing for implementation of the identified solutions.

    We conclude that skill, structure, setting, and surrender of control, as well as finding “red and hot” topics for the jams are the key factors for successful SJS's.

    Based on our experiences from GIN2012, we recommend other research conferences in the sustainability field use SJS's if the intention is to boost the interaction between the conference and the host region or non-academic organizations in general. We also suggest that a similar approach can be used in regional development for creating an infrastructure for learning and transformation towards sustainability and initiatives for open innovation.

  • 11.
    Elfving, Sofi W.
    et al.
    Ericsson AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ericsson – The History from Product to Solution Provider and Challenges and Opportunities in an Evolving Environment2015In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 30, p. 239-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing number of Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) are realizing that their products, earlier the foundation of their success, no longer stand alone in satisfying customer requirements. Customers now demand integration of services and bundling as well as increased active participation of OEMs during the use phase. Ericsson, a Swedish multinational OEM of communications technology and services, is an example of such a company. The objective of this paper is to describe, compare and discuss Ericsson's journey from a product provider to a PSS provider, e.g. by comparison with other industry examples. Furthermore, the paper highlights future challenges and opportunities for instance regarding business models, trends and product design.

  • 12.
    Helldal, Michael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tenne, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Environmental benefits riding the coattails of lean production: can an integration of environmental aspects and lean production result in synergies and a reduced risk of sub-opimisation2009In: Proceedings of EcoDesign 2009: 6th International Symposium on Environmentally Conscious Design and Inverse Manufacturing, Sapporo, Japan, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how work with Lean and environmental aspects affect one another, and if possible and beneficial from a business point-of-view, how they could be integrated into a single model.

    It was found that several of the fundamental concepts concerning Lean and environmental aspects support one another. Further, Lean has the potential to improve the environmental performance of a company, and can contributeto the environmental work by its proactive approach, structured way of operating and long-term way of thinking. The environmental perspective can contribute to Lean with its more holistic view; additional cost savingsand improvements might be found when looking at the operations from an environmental point-of-view.

    The study showed that it is not only possible to integrate Lean and environmental work, but that it also has the potential to be beneficial from both a business and an environmental standpoint. Integration can reduce the risk of sub-optimization, and synergies can be achieved. With this knowledge, the authors composed a model for how Lean and environmental work can be practised and integrated.

  • 13.
    Henriksen, Kristian
    et al.
    Ministry of Business and Growth, Norway.
    Bjerre, Markus
    Danish Enterprise and Construction Authority (EBST), Denmark.
    Damgaard Grann, Emil
    Danish Business Authority, Copenhagen Area, Denmark .
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Suortti, Tuomo
    Tekes, Finland.
    Friðriksson, Karl
    Innovation Center Iceland, Iceland.
    Mühlbradt, Tor
    Innovation Norway, Norway.
    Sand, Henrik
    COWI on behalf of Danish Business Authority, Denmark.
    Green Business Model Innovation: Business case study compendium2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Business Case Studies collection is one of the reports completed within the Green Business Model Innovation project for Nordic Innovation from august 2011 to august 2012. The work is a continuation of a previous project called Green Business Models in the Nordic Region – A key to promote sustainable growth, completed for in 2010.

    The purpose of this compendium is to identify next practice among front runner companies and provide insights into how companies have implemented Green Business Model Innovation.

    The business case companies were identified through experts on business models and green innovation in the private sector. The experts were asked to recommend companies that they perceived as having a green business model with innovative elements. They were also asked to provide initial information on the companies and their business model. Interviews with 41 companies were conducted and business case studies completed for each interview.

    The work has been made possible thanks to funding from Nordic Innovation and the others partners on the project; The Danish Business Authority, VINNOVA, TEKES, Innovation Norway and Innovation Centre Iceland. The Nordic working group which has undertaken the work of this project has representatives of the Nordic innovation agencies and experts working with framework conditions, performance and funding green growth. We would also like to thank the group of experts whom have been interviewed and participated in workshops and discussions.

    The Danish Business Authority has been the project lead, and the team at the Danish Business Authority consisted of: Kristian Henriksen, Special Advisor and project owner, Markus Bjerre, Head of section, Jakob Øster, Head of section, Alexandra-Maria Almasi, research assistant, and Emil Damgaard, research assistant. In addition the consultants Casper Høgenhaven from Hoegenhaven Consult and Tanja Bisgaard from Novitas Innovation have participated in the work, as well as the consultancy COWI. Tanja from Novitas Innovation took on the project management from January 2012.

  • 14.
    Hjelm, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Roles of Academia in Supporting Eco-Design in Small Companies for Better Environmental and Economic Performance2016In: 26TH CIRP DESIGN CONFERENCE, ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV , 2016, Vol. 50, p. 745-750Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development and diffusion of new or improved products and services is key to solve sustainability challenges such as climate change, resource depletion and loss of biodiversity. Small firms are important for developing these new solutions, but because of resource constraints they normally have to seek external support from e.g. academia and consultancy firms. This paper discusses how academia can provide such support (e.g. knowledge transfer, assessments and new perspectives) in an effective and efficient manner. To illustrate this, three examples of firms, two monitored over a long period of time, are described using interviews, previous evaluations and project reports for data collection. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 15.
    Kambanou, Marianna Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A Literature Review of Life Cycle Costing in the Product-Service System Context2016In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 47, p. 186-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A transition from a product-selling to a Product-Service Systems (PSS) business model incurs a transition in costs from customer to provider. Due to this shift in cost ownership, Life Cycle Costing (LCC) is used by providers and customers to better understand the PSS costs spanning from design to end-of-life. Through a literature review the paper determines that there are similarities in the approach to LCC for specific types of PSS e.g. availability type, but further research needs to be undertaken to identify commonalities between different types of PSS. The review also discerned that the terminology for LCC is not consistent and sometimes it is used to identify only the costs incurred by a specific actor. Furthermore, the end-of-life stage and the implications of a second life for a remanufactured PSS in LCC are also yet to be fully understood. A number of challenges associated with obtaining quality data for costing within PSS were identified. These include the lack of availability, the relevancy due to use of pre-PSS data that does not reflect the redesign of products and services to fit in PSS and challenges associated with the design paradox. Finally, a lack of empirical studies is noted.

  • 16.
    Larsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Svensson, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Life cycle assessment of floor care: A comparative study of the Twister™ method and floor care methods using polish and wax2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Today’s society there are a wide variety of floor and floor materials. An extensive range of products and methods are also used to ensure that these floors remain functional. All floor types and products create environmental impact of various kinds and magnitudes.

    This study was initiated by the authors in order to evaluate the Twister™- method’s environmental pros and cons in relation to other traditional floor care methods. This has been ascertained through a Life Cycle Assessment which was conducted within the study. The study has been in co-operation with HTC Sweden AB, the developer of the Twister™- method.

    A Life Cycle Assessment helps to identify and quantify the environmental impact of a product or a service, from a holistic perspective, which incorporates extraction of materials, their manufacture, use and waste management. The software application SimaPRo 7.0 has been used in this study, from which the Eco-indicator 99 method has been selected.

    In the study, the Twister™ method is compared with other floor care methods using polish and wax. The analysis also includes a breakdown of the Twister™ method, as well as a breakdown of the Twister™ pad manufactured by HTC Sweden AB.

    The results show that the elements of the Twister™ method with the greatest environmental impact are the scrubbing machine that is used and the energy consumption that the Twister™ method requires. The results also show that the Twister™ method has a significantly lower environmental impact than floor care methods using polish or wax. The parts of the Twister™ pad that have the greatest environmental impact are the industrial diamonds and the  material that makes up the pad.

  • 17.
    Larsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Svensson, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Livscykelanalys av golvvård: En jämförande studie av Twister™-metoden och golvvårdsmetoder med polish och vax2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I dagens samhälle finns det en stor variation på golv och golvmaterial. Till dessa finns det en stor variation av de produkter och metoder som används för att hålla dessa golv funktionsdugliga. Samtliga golv och produkter ger upphov till miljöpåverkan av olika storlek och sort.

    Denna studie är initierad av författarna för att utvärdera hur Twister™- metoden står sig miljömässigt, jämfört med andra traditionella golvvårdsmetoder. Detta sker genom en livscykelanalys. Arbetet har skett i samarbete med företaget HTC Sweden AB som har utvecklat Twister™-metoden.

    En livscykelanalys ställer en produkt eller tjänst miljöpåverkan utifrån helhetsperspektiv innefattande materialframställning, tillverkning, användning och resthantering. Som hjälp i denna studie har programvaran SimaPro 7.0 använts vari metoden Eco-indikator 99 valts.

    I studien ställs Twister™-metoden mot golvvårdsmetoder innefattande polish och vax. I analysen sker även en nedbrytning av Twister™-metoden likväl en nedbrytning av den Twister™-rondell som HTC Sweden AB tillverkar.

    Resultatet visar att den del av Twister™-metoden som har störst miljöpåverkan är den skurmaskin som används och den energianvändning som Twister™-metoden kräver. Resultatet visar även att Twister™-metoden har signifikant lägre miljöpåverkan än golvvårdsmetoderna polish och vax. De delar av Twister™-rondellen som har störst miljöpåverkan är de industridiamanter och den rondell, som Twister™-rondellen består av.

  • 18.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management.
    Designers' Experience of Design Methods and Tools2004In: IEEE Intl Engineering Management Conference on Innovation and Entrepreneurship for Sustainable Development,2004, Piscataway, NJ08855-1331: Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, Inc. , 2004, p. 903-907Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on an Internet-based questionnaire survey with both qualitative and quantitative questions was selected as the research method in order to collect data about designer-s experience of their used design methods and tools. The result is that the general formal follow-up and reflection on used design methods and tools is experienced as low and this implies a risk that inefficient design methods and tools are used. Even though design method and tool utilization represents more than half of the total working time, the number of different types of utilized design methods and tools are low. Despite the low degree of formal follow up, designers experience that most utilized design methods and tools to a high degree fulfills their experienced needs and contributes in making the final product better. Finally, the reasons why designers use design methods and tools can be concluded in three interlinked major overall reasons for designers to use design methods and tools. The design method or tool must - help to fulfill specified requirements of the prospective product, - reduce the risk that important moments in the product development process are forgotten, - reduce the total calendar time (from start to end) to solve the design task.

  • 19.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Designers' Utilization of and Requirements on Design for Environment (DfE) Methods and Tools2005In: Fourth International Symposium on Environmentally Conscious Design and Inverse Manufacturing, 2005. Eco Design 2005., 2005, p. 224-231Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of this paper are twofold: to identify engineering designers utilization of Design for Environment (DfE) methods and tools, and to investigate what basic design-related requirements a DfE method or tool should fulfill in order to become actively used in industry among engineering designers. Most of the requirements for designers are related to their aims of fulfilling product performance and minimizing development time. There are four major requirements that a DfE method or tool, as well as a common method or tool, must exhibit. First, it must be easy to adopt and implement; second, it must facilitate designers to fulfill specified requirements on the presumptive product. Third, it must reduce the risk that important elements in the product development phase are forgotten. The two latter requirements relate to a method or tool's degree of appropriateness, but also to the fourth requirement, which is considered here the most important: that the use of the method or tool must reduce the total calendar time (from start to end) to solve the task. The conclusion is that DfE methods and tools must be designed to better comply with its main users - in this case the designers

  • 20.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management.
    Engineering designers' experience of design for environment methods and tools - Requirement definitions from an interview study2006In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 487-496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite an increasing number of Design for Environment (DfE) methods and tools, industrial utilization is still limited. Identifying Engineering Designers' requirements is a useful way to increase the utilization of DfE methods and tools. This paper is based on existing literature and a semi-structured interview study at an industrial equipment company. Different reasons why engineering designers utilize methods and tools are presented, as well what makes a method or tool actively utilized. Several engineering designer requirements for methods and tools are identified and described. Several identified requirements that a DfE method ought to fulfill are listed and described. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 21.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hur skapa mervärde med integrerade produkt- och tjänsteerbjudanden.2006Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Product Developers Work with Eco-Design in Swedish Small and Medium-Sized Companies2009In: Proceedings of EcoDesign 2009: 6th International Symposium on Environmentally Conscious Design and Inverse Manufacturing, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the many existing Eco-design methods and tools, their use is still limited. When they are used, these methods and tools are often not integrated in the product development process. The purpose of this research is, given a special focus on Eco-design methods and tools, to increase the knowledge concerning engineering designers’ use of methods and tools. Even though more and more approaches focus on how to perform Eco-design, as well as on what is required for its successful integration, there seems to be a gap between the developers and the presumptive users, e.g. designers. In the study, 12 CEOs, 5 marketing mangers and 12 design managers were questioned.

  • 23.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Utvärdering av Fördel MPU - Miljöanpassad produktutveckling i Östergötland 2002-20042004Report (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekermann, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Structure for Categorization of EcoDesign Methods and Tools2013In: Re-engineering Manufacturing for Sustainability: Proceedings of the 20th CIRP International Conference on Life Cycle Engineering, Singapore 17-19 April, 2013 / [ed] Andrew Y. C. Nee, Bin Song, Soh-Khim Ong, Singapore: Springer, 2013, 1, p. 117-122Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This edited volume presents the proceedings of the 20th CIRP LCE Conference, which cover various areas in life cycle engineering such as life cycle design, end-of-life management, manufacturing processes, manufacturing systems, methods and tools for sustainability, social sustainability, supply chain management, remanufacturing,

  • 25.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hjelm, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Thuresson, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    What could be learned from the utilization of Design for Environment within manufacturing companies?2005In: Fourth International Symposium on Environmentally Conscious Design and Inverse Manufacturing, 2005.: Eco Design 2005., 2005, p. 232-237Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes experiences from several years of DfE studies at different manufacturing companies, as well as their strategies for approaching DfE. The general experience from the authors is that in order to make DfE truly utilized, it must become a "living part" of the company. To reach this point, it is important to obtain a strong commitment not only from the manufacturing company's management, but also from other DfE stakeholders throughout the company, at both the strategic and operational levels. DfE initiatives must be considered as a strategic issue and an investment in increased competitiveness. When summarizing all the experiences presented in this paper, a conclusion is that manufacturing companies often have a need for a general model that focuses on how to make "DfE thinking" a natural part of the company's way of doing business

  • 26.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Larsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Life cycle assessment of floor care: a comparative study of the Twister™ method and floor care methods using polish and wax2009In: Proceedings of EcoDesign 2009: 6th International Symposium on Environmentally Conscious Design and Inverse Manufacturing, Sapporo, Japan, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was initiated by the authors in order to evaluate the Twister™ method’s environmental pros and cons in relation to other traditional floor care methods using polish and wax. This has been ascertained through a Life Cycle Assessment which was conducted within the study. The study has been in co-operation with HTC Sweden AB, the developer of the Twister™ method.

    The results show that the elements of the Twister™ method with the greatest environmental impact are the scrubbing machine that is used and the low energy consumption that the Twister™ method requires. The results also show that the Twister™ method has a significantly lower environmental impact than floor care methods using polish or wax. The parts of the Twister™ pad that have the greatest environmental impact are the industrial diamonds and the material that makes up the pad.

  • 27.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Assembly technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Assembly technology.
    Use of Product-Service Offers within Swedish and Japanese Companies - A report of preliminary findings from the survey2005Report (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Assembly technology.
    Shimomura, Y.
    Shimomura, Y.
    Sakao, T.
    Sakao, T.
    An Interactive Design Model for Service Engineering of Functional Sales Offers2006In: Design 2006,2006, Dubrovnik: Design Society , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management.
    Rydh, Carl Johan
    Tingström, Johan
    Livscykelanalys - en metod för miljöbedömning av produkter och tjänster (Life Assessment - a Method for Environmental Assessment of Products and Services)2004Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Environmental and Economic Contribution of Design Changes in Integrated Product Service Offerings2013In: Product-Service Integration for Sustainable Solutions: Proceedings of the 5th CIRP International Conference on Industrial Product-Service Systems, Bochum, Germany, March 14th - 15th, 2013 / [ed] Horst Meier, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 435-446Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book contains the 5th CIRP International Conference on Industrial Product-Service Systems, and presents current research on product-service systems written by experts in the field.

  • 31.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management.
    State-of-the-art in companies regarding customised offering design2013Report (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Carlsson, Emma
    Actor's and System Maps for Integrated Product Service Offerings: Practical Experience from Two Companies2014In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 16, p. 320-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective is to analyze how proposed Integrated Product Service Offering (IPSO) actors and system maps can be utilized in order to identify and access IPSO-related requirements. Furthermore, the objective is to identify and analyze how IPSO-related requirements are managed and transformed into product-related design aspects. Literature review, interviews and workshops were the primary research methods used. The conclusion is that participating companies have realized that there are several issues within their operations that can be improved, and proposed maps provide support for this. These maps provide useful detailed information compared to other approaches, and are easy to use.

  • 33.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management.
    Hallberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design.
    Ölvander, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design.
    Innovative Customized Offering Design2013Report (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rönnbäck, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Business Implications of Integrated Product Service Offerings and Resulting Potential Engineering Issues2009In: ICED 09 - The 17th International Conference on Engineering Design, vol 4:: Product and Systems Design / [ed] Norell Bergendahl, M.; Grimheden, M.; Leifer, L.; Skogstad, P.; Lindemann, U., The Design Society, 2009, p. 71-82Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years there has been a shift in mechanical industry from a focus on physical products to product-service systems (PSS). The objective of this paper is to map out engineering implications and challenges based on five empirical examples of integrated product-service offerings (IPSOs). The paper is mainly based on case studies at Swedish manufacturing companies of different sizes. The following IPSOs were studied: (1) Lighting Function, (2) Core Plugs, (3) Material Handling, (4) Plate compacting, and (5) Thrust. These examples show that the orientation towards IPSOs implies several important strategic implications for a provider. Based on the examples, a discussion is presented concerning existing and potential engineering issues related to engineering requirements, development process and risks and opportunities with IPSOs.

  • 35.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Shimomura, Yoshiki
    Department of System Design, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan.
    Product/Service Systems Experiences: an International Survey of Swedish, Japanese, Italian and German Manufacturing Companies2009In: Proceedings of the 1st CIRP IPS2 Conference: Industrial Product-Service Systems (IPS2), Cranfield: Cranfield University Press , 2009, p. 74-81Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Product/Service Systems have recently grown in manufacturers’ interest. This paper presents an international survey of manufacturers from Sweden, Japan, Italy and Germany. The results show that customer connection and demands along with increased competition were main driving forces for product/service systems. Also, most product/service systems include physical products, maintenance and repairs. Staff working with product development, marketing and after sales were the major actors in product/service system development. As in traditional product sales, most product/service systems still have the ownership of physical products transferred to the customer/user. Physical products used in product/service systems are seldom adapted for product/service systems.

  • 36.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Business Implications of Integrated Product and Service Offerings2009In: Proceedings of the 1st CIRP Industrial Product-Service Systems (IPS2) Conference / [ed] Rajkumar Roy and Essam Shehab, Cranfield CERES , 2009, p. 165-172Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the business implications of Integrated Product and Service Offerings (IPSOs). The objective is to show examples of the business implications of IPSOs from a supplier’s perspective, and to suggest specifications for supporting methods needed for such an industrial company. The paper is largely based on empirical case studies of 120 Swedish manufacturing companies of all sizes. Results from the case studies show that both small and large companies that conduct the transition towards IPSOs face several important strategic challenges, some of them associated with high risk.

  • 37.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Product Design Considerations for Improved Integrated Product/Service Offerings2013In: Handbook of Sustainable Engineering / [ed] Joanne Kauffman, Kun-Mo Lee, Springer Netherlands, 2013, p. 669-689Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    "The efficient utilization of energy, sustainable use of natural resources, and large-scale adoption of sustainable technologies is the key to a sustainable future. The Handbook of Sustainable Engineering provides tools that will help us achieve these goals". Nobel Prize Winner Dr. R.K. Pauchauri, Chairman, UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change As global society confronts the challenges of diminishing resources, ecological degradation, and climate change, engineers play a crucial role designing and building technologies and products that fulfil our needs for utility and sustainability. The Handbook of Sustainable Engineering equips readers with the context and the best practices derived from both academic research and practical examples of successful implementations of sustainable technical solutions. The handbook's content revolves around the two themes, new ways of thinking and new business models, including sustainable production, products, service systems and consumption while addressing key assets based on new materials, optimized resource management, and new energy sources. Contributions reflect a focus on state-of-the art insights into employing smart materials, recycling e-waste, water utilization, solar cells, product lifecycles, transportation and reverse manufacturing. Supportive of this, underlying issues such as engineering education, consumer behaviour and the regulatory climate complete the handbook's comprehensive treatment of the problems and most promising solutions.

  • 38.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Environmental and economic benefits of Integrated Product Service Offerings quantified with real business cases2014In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 288-296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper quantifies environmental and economic benefits of the Integrated Product Service Offering (IPSO) in real practice from a life cycle perspective, in comparison with its corresponding product-sales type business as a reference. The paper also discusses the engineering activities contributing to those effects, as well as their enablers. To reach this goal, the paper investigates three IPSOs as real-life business cases in industry. Those cases are selected from different sectors and have different characteristics. In addition, the paper calculates and compares environmental impacts and economic costs of different offerings in each case through the use of Life Cycle Assessment and Life Cycle Costing, respectively. In all three cases, IPSOs had environmental and economic advantages in comparison with the product-sales type business. The engineering activities contributing to those advantages under IPSOs were recycling, remanufacturing, reuse, maintenance, and holistic planning and operation. The enablers were found to be high flexibility for realizing products and services and close relationships with relevant actors.

  • 39.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Darmstadt university.
    Shimomura, Yoshiki
    Tokyo Metropolitan University.
    An application of a service design tool at a global warehouse provider2005In: ICED 05: 15th International Conference on Engineering Design: Engineering Design and the Global Economy / [ed] Andrew Samuel and William Lewis, 2005, p. 2967-2978Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of 'sustainable development', introduced for the first time in the report 'Our Common Future' and promoted as a common aim for the entire world, can be defined as 'a development that satisfies the needs of today without compromising the possibility of future generations to fulfill their needs.' Thus far, this concept has been considered as visionary and therefore difficult for companies to implement into concrete plans of action. However, various suggestions have been proposed, such as dematerialization, ecoefficiency and remanufacturing. However, another solution is perhaps more or less a consequence of today's prevalent trend towards a more service-oriented society, and with a focus on the value (satisfaction) that products provide their users through their functionality. The shift from a manufacturing-centered economy towards a service-centered economy have the potential to result in a reduction of the mass consumption of natural resources. Sustainable development is, in a company perspective, not only related directly to environmental issues, as in the definition above, but also in the company's capacity for sustainable market competition. The sharp and rapid increase in global raw material prices, however, is a threat to this; one way to decrease this influence is to reduce the need for raw materials.

  • 40.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Institute of Product Development and Machine Elements, Darmstadt University of Technology, Germany.
    Shimomura, Yoshiki
    Department of System Design, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan.
    An interactive design methodology for service engineering of functional sales concepts: a potential design for environment methodology2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing companies around the globe are striving to increase their revenues and profitability. One way is through Functional Sales, i.e. shifting the focus from the production of products to the production of services. Functional Sales and Design for Environment (DfE) have many common issues, e.g. the life cycle perspective. The paper’s aim is to highlight a proposed interactive design method for Service Engineering of Functional Sales offers and to relate this method to selected DfE methods and tools as well as users’ experiences with these methods and tools.

    The paper concludes that the proposed method has several benefits that are useful in DfE. One benefit is that the method does not focus on products but rather on how needs can be satisfied by increasing service content. Another is the visualization of e.g. validation in order to facilitate communication between different actors in the product development process.

  • 41.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Institute for Product Development and Machine Elements, Darmstadt University of Technology, Germany.
    Shimomura, Yoshiki
    Department of System Design, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan.
    Integrated Product and Service Engineering versus Design for Environment: A Comparison and Evaluation of Advantages and Disadvantages2007In: Advances in Life Cycle Engineering for Sustainable Manufacturing Businesses / [ed] Shozo Takata and Yasushi Umeda, Springer London, 2007, p. 137-142Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Life cycle engineering deals with technologies for shifting the industry from mass production and mass consumption paradigm to closed loop manufacturing paradigm, in which required functions are provided for customers with the minimum amount of production. This subject is discussed from the various aspects, such as life cycle design, design for environment, reduce/reuse/recycle, life cycle assessment, and sustainable business models.

    Advances in Life Cycle Engineering for Sustainable Manufacturing Businesses gathers together papers from the 14th CIRP Life Cycle Engineering Conference. This conference is the longest running annual meeting in the field, in which papers are presented regarding developments of leading edge technologies, proposals of new concepts, and prominent industry case studies.

  • 42.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Shimomura, Yoshiki
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    An outline of an interactive model for service engineering of functional sales offers2006In: DS 36: Proceedings DESIGN 2006, the 9th International Design Conference, Dubrovnik, Croatia / [ed] Marjanovic, D, 2006, p. 897-904Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to present an outline of an interactive design model that can be used for Service Engineering of functional sales concepts. This paper also aims to show how the previous service engineering research relates to this new model. A further aim is also to verify the overall outline of the interactive design model. The proposed model’s overall outline has been confirmed by and discussed with eight companies and further supported by the output from the literature review, and seems to be relevant for different types of functional sales offers. Therefore, the conclusion is that the proposed model gives a relevant image of important lifecycle activities for Service Engineering of functional sales offers.

  • 43.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Öhlund Sandström, Gunilla
    Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Östlin, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Integrated Product and Service Engineering - the IPSE project2006In: Proceedings: Changes to Sustainable Consumption: Workshop of the Sustainable  Consumption Reasearch Exchange (SCORE!), Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH.
    Hur företag bör arbeta i framtagandet av integrerade produkt- och tjänsteerbjudanden2007Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Östlin, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Environmental issues with the remanufacturing industry2006In: Proceedings of the 13th CIRP international conference on Life Cycle Engineering, Leuven: Katholieke Universiteit Leuven , 2006, p. 447-452Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers often regard remanufacturing as an environmentally beneficial end-of-life option. There have been, however, few environmental measurements performed in the area. The aim of this paper is to identify general environmental pros and cons with remanufacturing. This is done through the analysis of practical examples in remanufacturing industries. Life Cycle Assessment methodology has been used for the environmental validations.

    The first conclusion, based on the industrial cases and the literature review, is that remanufacturing is preferable from a material resource perspective when compared with manufacturing of new products. The second conclusion is that remanufacturing is preferable from a more overarching perspective for some of the investigated cases, but it is not possible to draw any general conclusions since the companies studied are few and benefits from remanufacturing are highly context-related.

  • 46.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Östlin, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Concepts and definitions for product recovery: analysis and clarification of the terminology used in academia and industry2006In: Innovation in Life Cycle Engineering and Sustainable Development / [ed] Daniel Brissaud, Serge Tichkiewitch, Peggy Zwolinski, Dordrect, The Netherlands: Springer Verlag , 2006, p. 123-138Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this book is the consideration of environmental issues in engineering process and product design. It presents a selection of 30 papers ensuing from the 12th CIRP International seminar on Life Cycle Engineering. This book is of interest to academics, students and practitioners, specializing in environmental issues in mechanical engineering, design and manufacturing. This volume is recommended as a reference textbook for all researchers in the field.

  • 47.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Östlin, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Concepts and definitions for product recovery: analysis and clarification of the terminology used in academia and industry2006In: Innovation in Life Cycle Engineering and Sustainable Development / [ed] Daniel Brissaud, Serge Tichkiewitch, Peggy Zwolinski, Springer Netherlands, 2006, p. 123-138Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents and clarifies the academic and industrial terminology used in the area of product recovery. It is concluded that there exist many different concepts and definitions in academia and industry, several of which are unclearly defined. Given this, a new way to define product recovery is presented through the use of a model. This model is based on actual industrial product recovery cases, existing academic product recovery concepts and definitions and product design theory. The presentation contains a holistic model that can be used for describing and analyzing different product recovery scenarios. In addition, several industry cases are presented as a verification of the model.

  • 48.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Svensson, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Svensson, Bo
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Industrial cleaning with Qlean Water: a case study of printed circuit boards2013In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 47, p. 19-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many manufacturing companies are looking for ways to substitute environmentally problematic cleaning methods for surface treatments with more environmentally friendly ones. In this paper, one potential solution is described. The Qlean method, based on cleaning with highly pure water (in this paper defined as Qlean Water), is a novel cleaning method. This method, now utilized at one plant at a leading major international electronic company, has substituted previous chemical-based methods for cleaning printed circuit boards prior to lacquering. This paper presents, based on that company's primary data, a comparative study using environmental analysis and economic life cycle cost review between cleaning with Qlean Water and conventional cleaning. The focus is on the environmental and economic performance of the two alternatives. The conclusion is that Qlean Water offers both a significant economic and environmental cost reduction and a better product. This is the case even though all identified economic benefits derived from using Qlean Water, e.g. that the quality and technical lifetime have been extended for the printed circuit boards with the Qlean Water cleaning method, are not considered in the economic analysis.

  • 49.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Department of Technology, University of Kalmar, Sweden.
    Tingström, Johan
    Department of Technology, University of Kalmar, Sweden.
    A small textbook on: Environmental Effect Analysis2001Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s society products are being made and used to a constantly increasing extent. In addition there is also a never-ending flow of new products. Products that earlier generations would have never dreamt of. The new products are constantly trying to fill the needs and demands of our society.

    These products are directly or indirectly causing environmental problems. The growing population’s increasing use of, and need for, these products results in larger and more complex environmental issues.

    A growing knowledge of the connection between products and environmental problems has resulted in an increasing interest in these issues, from both businesses and the public, during the last ten years. To reduce the effects on the environment they try to apply an holistic perspective to the products, i.e. regard the entire life-cycle of the product.

    It is the early phase of the product development that, to the greatest extent, determines the total environmental effect of a product. It is therefore important that the environmental aspects are taken into consideration in this critical phase so that the effects on the environment can be reduced.

    This book presents Environment Effect Analysis (EEA), which is a qualitative method for Design for Environment, DfE. The method is designed for use in the early phases of product development. The advantages with the EEA method are that it is easy to learn, relatively fast to carry out and results in suggestions for concrete environmental improvements.

  • 50.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Department of Technology, University of Kalmar, Sweden.
    Tingström, Johan
    Department of Technology, University of Kalmar, Sweden.
    En liten lärobok om miljöeffektanalys2000 (ed. 2)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I dagens samhälle tillverkas och används produkter i en ständigt ökande omfattning. Det tillkommer även hela tiden mängder med nya produkter som tidigare generationer aldrig skulle kunnat drömma om. De nya produkterna försöker hela tiden uppfylla de behov som finns i samhället.

    Produkterna ger direkt eller indirekt upphov till miljöproblem. Den växande befolkningens ökade användning och behov av produkter gör att miljöproblemen blir allt mer omfattande och komplexa.

    En växande insikt om kopplingen mellan produkter och miljöproblem har resulterat i att samhällets och företagens intresse för dessa frågor ökat starkt  under det senaste decenniet. För att minska miljöpåverkan försöker man se  på produkterna ur ett holistiskt perspektiv, dvs hela produktens livscykel beaktas.

    Det är produktutvecklingens tidiga faser som till största delen bestämmer en produkts totala miljöpåverkan. Det är följaktligen viktigt att miljöaspekterna kommer in i dessa faser så att miljöpåverkan kan minskas.

    Denna bok presenterar Miljöeffektanalys (EEA), som är en kvalitativ metod för miljöanpassad produktutveckling. Metoden är utvecklad för att kunna användas i produktutvecklingens tidiga faser. Fördelarna med EEA metoden är  att den är enkel att lära sig, går relativt snabbt att genomföra och resulterar i förslag på konkreta miljöförbättringar.

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