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  • 1.
    Campbell, Sarah
    et al.
    The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
    Clark, Andrew
    University of Salford, Manchester, UK.
    Keady, John
    The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Manji, Kainde
    University of Stirling, Stirling, UK.
    Rummery, Kirstein
    University of Stirling, Stirling, UK.
    Ward, Richard
    University of Stirling, Stirling, UK.
    Participatory social network map making with family carers of people living with dementia2019In: Methodological Innovations, ISSN 2059-7991, Vol. 12, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on the use of a participatory social network mapping method with family carers. This is one of a suite of methods developed in a 5-year qualitative multi-centre project exploring how neighbourhoods support, enable or disable people with dementia and their families to live well in their communities. The article considers how mapping provides insights into family support networks, revealing the fluidity of support and care within relationships as well as providing opportunity for individuals to represent the complexities of their relationships with more and less significant others. However, the potential offered by the approach goes beyond those of visual representations of networks and contacts. Paying attention to the co-production process, as well as the reflexive dialogue that emerges in the exchange between researcher, participants, and the maps themselves, we consider how the maps emerge as affective artifacts, weighted with emotion.

  • 2.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Area crime and resident worry of crime -:  a comparative study in a Swedish urban community2008In: 9th World Conference on injury prevention and safety promotion March 15-18 2008, 2008, p. 286-286Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    My Home is my Castle: Residential Well being and Perceived Safety in Different Types of Housing Areas in Sweden2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Safety in the housing environment is a basic human need and may be a prerequisite for health but studies from the perspective of the residents are limited in the literature. Although historically public health research has recognized the housing environment as an important determinant of health, there is a need for more research on how housing conditions influence residential well-being.

    Aim: The overall aim of this thesis was to examine factors and conditions associated with residential well-being and perceived safety in different types of housing areas and to compare safety promotion intervention designs based on residents self-expressed safety needs with corresponding designs developed by local government professionals.

    Materials and methods: A postal survey (response rate 56%, n=2476) and 11 focus groups (57 participants) were conducted among the residents in 3 small-scale housing areas with detached houses and 3 housing areas with blocks of flats in a Swedish municipality. The areas were geographically contiguous as each of the small-scale areas bordered on an area with blocks of flats. The study municipality is a designated member of WHO Safe Community network that have signed up to work in line with the indicators developed by WHO Collaborating Centre on Community Safety Promotion. Narrative data from a postal questionnaire were used to analyze the lay perspective and identify features perceived to be necessary to feel safe by residents in areas with blocks of flats and small-scale housing areas. Quantitative data were used to examine correlates of local safety-related concerns through a factor analysis. Logistic regression analysis examined associations between high-level scores of the safetyrelated dimensions found and area-level crime rate and being a victim of crime, area reputation, gender, age, education, country of birth, household civil status and type of housing. To examine how self-assessed area reputation is associated with social trust and residential well-being, a multilevel logistic regression analysis was performed using quantitative data, controlling for the random effect of neighbourhood- and individual-level socio-demographic factors. Data from focus group interviews were analyzed to identify mechanisms of how neighbourhood reputation was established. The quality function deployment (QFD) technique was used in a case study to integrate residents’ demands into the design of safety promotion interventions in housing areas. The resulting design was then compared with the safety intervention programme designed by professionals at the municipality administrative office. The results from this comparison were then investigated to identify improvements for the indicators for Safe Homes in the Safe Community programme.

    Results: The residents’ narratives showed that a stable social structure in the housing area was perceived to be the central factor in a safety-supportive residential environment. Whereas maintenance of good and reassuring relations was emphasized in small-scale housing areas, support for management of poor or even fear-provoking neighbour relations was requested from areas with blocks of flats. The crime rates were lower and safety-related concerns were less in small-scale housing areas. Three composite dimensions (CD) of perceived residential safety were identified: structural indicators of social disorder (CD 1); contact with disorderly behaviour (CD 2); and existential insecurity (CD 3). Area-level crime rates and individual-level variables were associated with dimensions (CD 1) and (CD 3), but only individuallevel variables were associated with dimension (CD 2). The level of residential well-being and social trust was higher in small-scale areas. The housing area reputation was found to be strongly associated with safety-related concerns, residential well-being and social trust. The area reputation also seemed to be a determinant of position in the local social structure; residents were found to position themselves in a rank order. The QFD analysis showed that the initiation and maintenance of social integrative processes in housing areas were the most highly prioritized interventions among the residents, but the analysis did not highlight the safety needs of several vulnerable groups. The Safe Community programme designed by professionals did not address the social integrative processes, but did cover the vulnerable groups.

    Conclusions: Area reputation is an important and probably underestimated dimension in the development of residential well-being and perceived safety. The QFD technique can be added to the methodological toolbox for residential safety promotion. The technique is particular suitable for providing a quality orientation from the lay perspective on safety promotion in local residential areas. The current Safe Homes concept in the Safe Community programme would benefit from being widened to Safe Housing.

    List of papers
    1. Residents’ perspectives on safety support needs in different types of housing areas
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Residents’ perspectives on safety support needs in different types of housing areas
    2011 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 590-597Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Knowledge about conditions that are understood to support safety is important for planning residential safety promotion in interactions with residents. How residents themselves perceive and reason about their own safety needs has seldom been investigated in Scandinavia. Aim: To identify factors perceived to be necessary to feel safe by residents in areas with blocks of flats and detached houses.

    Methods: Residents in a Swedish municipality were asked an open-ended question on the research topic by a mail survey; 787 residents provided narrative data that were fed into a summative qualitative and quantitative content analysis.

    Results: A stable social structure in the housing area was perceived to be the central factor in a safety-supportive residential environment. Whereas maintenance of good and reassuring relations was emphasized in detached housing areas, support for management of poor or even fear-provoking neighbour relations was requested from areas with blocks of flats. This finding emphasizes the need to reduce the differential exposure to safety-related factors in the living environment.

    Conclusions: The results of our study encourage the continued use of a setting-orientated safety promotion approach in which residents and other stakeholders are involved. The policy recommendation that can be drawn from the study is that both the subjective and objective dimensions of safety should be identified and considered when developing local safety promotion interventions in community contexts.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Sage, 2011
    Keywords
    Safety promotion; resident perspective; housing; neighbourhoods; safety inequalities, content analysis
    National Category
    Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-60158 (URN)10.1177/1403494810395988 (DOI)000293249400005 ()
    Available from: 2010-10-07 Created: 2010-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    2. Correlates of local safety-related concerns in a Swedish Community: a cross-sectional study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correlates of local safety-related concerns in a Swedish Community: a cross-sectional study
    2009 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 9, no 221Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Crime in a neighbourhood has been recognized as a key stressor in the residential environment. Fear of crime is related to risk assessment, which depends on the concentration of objective risk in time and space, and on the presence of subjective perceived early signs of imminent hazard. The aim of the study was to examine environmental, socio-demographic, and personal correlates of safety-related concerns at the local level in urban communities. The specific aim was to investigate such correlates in contiguous neighbourhoods in a Swedish urban municipality. Methods: A cross-sectional study design was used to investigate three neighbourhood settings with two pair-wise conterminous but socially contrasting areas within each setting. Crime data were retrieved from police records. Study data were collected through a postal questionnaire distributed to adult residents (n = 2476) (response rate 56%). Composite dimensions of perceived residential safety were derived through a factor analysis. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine associations between high-level scores of the three safety-related dimensions and area-level crime rate, being a victim of crime, area reputation, gender, age, education, country of birth, household civil status and type of housing. Results: Three composite dimensions of perceived residential safety were identified: (I) structural indicators of social disorder; (II) contact with disorderly behavior; and (III) existential insecurity. We found that area-level crime rates and individual-level variables were associated with the dimensions structural indicators of social disorder and existential insecurity, but only individual-level variables were associated with the dimension contact with disorderly behavior. Self-assessed less favorable area reputation was found to be strongly associated with all three factors. Being female accorded existential insecurity more than being a victim of crime. Conclusion: We have identified environmental, socio-demographic, and personal correlates of safety-related concerns in contiguous neighbourhoods in a Swedish community. The results of this study suggest that residents self-assessed area reputation is an important underlying mechanism of perceived safety. We also found a difference in crime rates and safety-related concerns between areas with blocks of flats compared with small-scale areas although the neighbourhoods were close geographically.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-20757 (URN)10.1186/1471-2458-9-221 (DOI)
    Note
    Original Publication: Agneta Kullberg, Nadine Karlsson, Toomas Timpka and Kent Lindqvist, Correlates of local safety-related concerns in a Swedish Community: a cross-sectional study, 2009, BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, (9), 221. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-9-221 Licensee: BioMed Central http://www.biomedcentral.com/ Available from: 2009-09-19 Created: 2009-09-18 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    3. Does the perceived neighborhood reputation contribute to neighborhood differences in social trust and residential wellbeing?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does the perceived neighborhood reputation contribute to neighborhood differences in social trust and residential wellbeing?
    Show others...
    2010 (English)In: Journal of community psychology (Print), ISSN 0090-4392, E-ISSN 1520-6629, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 591-606Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The authors used a mixed methods approach to examine if the reputation of a housing area has bearing on residential wellbeing and social trust in three pairs of socioeconomically contrasting neighborhoods in a Swedish urban municipality. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were performed to examine associations between area reputation and residential wellbeing and social trust, controlling for the random effect of neighborhood and individual level sociodemographic factors. Qualitative data were analyzed to identify mechanisms of how neighborhood reputations were established. The housing area reputation was found to be strongly associated with wellbeing and social trust. The area reputation also seemed to be a determinant of position in the local social structure; residents were found to position themselves in a rank order The results suggest that area reputation is an important and probably underestimated dimension in the development of residential wellbeing and social trust in housing.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley and Sons, Ltd, 2010
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-58346 (URN)10.1002/jcop.20383 (DOI)000278776400004 ()
    Available from: 2010-08-13 Created: 2010-08-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12
    4. Integrating residents’ demands into the design of safety promotion interventions in housing areas: a case study application of quality function deployment in a Safe Community program
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrating residents’ demands into the design of safety promotion interventions in housing areas: a case study application of quality function deployment in a Safe Community program
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The needs and demands of the residents are rarely considered in community-based design of safety services and planning in housing areas. We therefore set out to compare safety promotion intervention design based on residents’ self-expressed safety needs with interventions designed by local government professionals. A secondary aim was to use the results to suggest improvements for the safety promotion indicators targeting Safe Homes within the Safe Community movement.

    Methods: Case study research methods based on a nested single-case design were used for the study. Data collected from 787 residents in a case study community were analyzed using the quality function deployment (QFD) technique. Quantitative and qualitative data on residents’ self-expressed safety needs were transformed into an intervention design. The resulting design was then compared with the safety intervention program designed by professionals at the municipality administrative office. The results from this comparison were then investigated to identify improvements for the indicators for Safe Homes in the Safe Community program.

    Results: The QFD analysis showed that the initiation and maintenance of social integrative processes in housing areas were the most highly prioritized interventions among the residents, but the analysis did not highlight the safety needs of several vulnerable groups (e.g. the old elderly, infants, and persons with disabilities). The Safe Community program designed by professionals did not address the social integrative processes, but did cover the vulnerable groups. Our results indicate that the current Safe Homes concept in the Safe Community program would benefit from being widened to Safe Housing.

    Conclusions: The QFD technique can be added to the methodological toolbox for residential safety promotion. The technique is particularly suitable for providing a quality orientation from the lay perspective of residents. Residents and professionals can contribute with different perspectives on safety promotion and injury prevention in local residential areas. In developing safe housing, these different views should be identified and considered. Socio-economic differences and social inequalities in safety-related housing conditions between areas also need to be considered in the programs.

    National Category
    Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-60159 (URN)
    Available from: 2010-10-07 Created: 2010-10-07 Last updated: 2013-09-05
  • 4.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Lindqvist, Kent
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Correlates of local safety-related concerns in a Swedish Community: a cross-sectional study2009In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 9, no 221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Crime in a neighbourhood has been recognized as a key stressor in the residential environment. Fear of crime is related to risk assessment, which depends on the concentration of objective risk in time and space, and on the presence of subjective perceived early signs of imminent hazard. The aim of the study was to examine environmental, socio-demographic, and personal correlates of safety-related concerns at the local level in urban communities. The specific aim was to investigate such correlates in contiguous neighbourhoods in a Swedish urban municipality. Methods: A cross-sectional study design was used to investigate three neighbourhood settings with two pair-wise conterminous but socially contrasting areas within each setting. Crime data were retrieved from police records. Study data were collected through a postal questionnaire distributed to adult residents (n = 2476) (response rate 56%). Composite dimensions of perceived residential safety were derived through a factor analysis. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine associations between high-level scores of the three safety-related dimensions and area-level crime rate, being a victim of crime, area reputation, gender, age, education, country of birth, household civil status and type of housing. Results: Three composite dimensions of perceived residential safety were identified: (I) structural indicators of social disorder; (II) contact with disorderly behavior; and (III) existential insecurity. We found that area-level crime rates and individual-level variables were associated with the dimensions structural indicators of social disorder and existential insecurity, but only individual-level variables were associated with the dimension contact with disorderly behavior. Self-assessed less favorable area reputation was found to be strongly associated with all three factors. Being female accorded existential insecurity more than being a victim of crime. Conclusion: We have identified environmental, socio-demographic, and personal correlates of safety-related concerns in contiguous neighbourhoods in a Swedish community. The results of this study suggest that residents self-assessed area reputation is an important underlying mechanism of perceived safety. We also found a difference in crime rates and safety-related concerns between areas with blocks of flats compared with small-scale areas although the neighbourhoods were close geographically.

  • 5.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordqvist, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindqvist, Kent
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Examining quality function deployment in safety promotion in Sweden.2014In: Health Promotion International, ISSN 0957-4824, E-ISSN 1460-2245, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 414-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first-hand needs and demands of laypersons are not always considered when safety promotion programmes are being developed. We compared focal areas for interventions identified from residents' statements of safety needs with focal areas for interventions identified by local government professionals in a Swedish urban community certified by the international Safe Community movement supported by the World Health Organization. Quantitative and qualitative data on self-expressed safety needs from 787 housing residents were transformed into an intervention design, using the quality function deployment (QFD) technique and compared with the safety intervention programme developed by professionals at the municipality administrative office. The outcome of the comparison was investigated with regard to implications for the Safe Community movement. The QFD analysis identified the initiation and maintenance of social integrative processes in housing areas as the most highly prioritized interventions among the residents, but failed to highlight the safety needs of several vulnerable groups (the elderly, infants and persons with disabilities). The intervention programme designed by the public health professionals did not address the social integrative processes, but it did highlight the vulnerable groups. This study indicates that the QFD technique is suitable for providing residential safety promotion efforts with a quality orientation from the layperson's perspective. Views of public health professionals have to be included to ascertain that the needs of socially deprived residents are adequately taken into account. QFD can augment the methodological toolbox for safety promotion programmes, including interventions in residential areas.

  • 6.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordqvist, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindqvist, Kent
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Integrating residents’ demands into the design of safety promotion interventions in housing areas: a case study application of quality function deployment in a Safe Community programManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The needs and demands of the residents are rarely considered in community-based design of safety services and planning in housing areas. We therefore set out to compare safety promotion intervention design based on residents’ self-expressed safety needs with interventions designed by local government professionals. A secondary aim was to use the results to suggest improvements for the safety promotion indicators targeting Safe Homes within the Safe Community movement.

    Methods: Case study research methods based on a nested single-case design were used for the study. Data collected from 787 residents in a case study community were analyzed using the quality function deployment (QFD) technique. Quantitative and qualitative data on residents’ self-expressed safety needs were transformed into an intervention design. The resulting design was then compared with the safety intervention program designed by professionals at the municipality administrative office. The results from this comparison were then investigated to identify improvements for the indicators for Safe Homes in the Safe Community program.

    Results: The QFD analysis showed that the initiation and maintenance of social integrative processes in housing areas were the most highly prioritized interventions among the residents, but the analysis did not highlight the safety needs of several vulnerable groups (e.g. the old elderly, infants, and persons with disabilities). The Safe Community program designed by professionals did not address the social integrative processes, but did cover the vulnerable groups. Our results indicate that the current Safe Homes concept in the Safe Community program would benefit from being widened to Safe Housing.

    Conclusions: The QFD technique can be added to the methodological toolbox for residential safety promotion. The technique is particularly suitable for providing a quality orientation from the lay perspective of residents. Residents and professionals can contribute with different perspectives on safety promotion and injury prevention in local residential areas. In developing safe housing, these different views should be identified and considered. Socio-economic differences and social inequalities in safety-related housing conditions between areas also need to be considered in the programs.

  • 7.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordqvist, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Lindqvist, Kent
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Residents’ perspectives on safety support needs in different types of housing areas2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 590-597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Knowledge about conditions that are understood to support safety is important for planning residential safety promotion in interactions with residents. How residents themselves perceive and reason about their own safety needs has seldom been investigated in Scandinavia. Aim: To identify factors perceived to be necessary to feel safe by residents in areas with blocks of flats and detached houses.

    Methods: Residents in a Swedish municipality were asked an open-ended question on the research topic by a mail survey; 787 residents provided narrative data that were fed into a summative qualitative and quantitative content analysis.

    Results: A stable social structure in the housing area was perceived to be the central factor in a safety-supportive residential environment. Whereas maintenance of good and reassuring relations was emphasized in detached housing areas, support for management of poor or even fear-provoking neighbour relations was requested from areas with blocks of flats. This finding emphasizes the need to reduce the differential exposure to safety-related factors in the living environment.

    Conclusions: The results of our study encourage the continued use of a setting-orientated safety promotion approach in which residents and other stakeholders are involved. The policy recommendation that can be drawn from the study is that both the subjective and objective dimensions of safety should be identified and considered when developing local safety promotion interventions in community contexts.

  • 8.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindqvist, Kent
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Does the perceived neighborhood reputation contribute to neighborhood differences in social trust and residential wellbeing?2010In: Journal of community psychology (Print), ISSN 0090-4392, E-ISSN 1520-6629, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 591-606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors used a mixed methods approach to examine if the reputation of a housing area has bearing on residential wellbeing and social trust in three pairs of socioeconomically contrasting neighborhoods in a Swedish urban municipality. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were performed to examine associations between area reputation and residential wellbeing and social trust, controlling for the random effect of neighborhood and individual level sociodemographic factors. Qualitative data were analyzed to identify mechanisms of how neighborhood reputations were established. The housing area reputation was found to be strongly associated with wellbeing and social trust. The area reputation also seemed to be a determinant of position in the local social structure; residents were found to position themselves in a rank order The results suggest that area reputation is an important and probably underestimated dimension in the development of residential wellbeing and social trust in housing.

  • 9.
    Nilsen, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Hudson, D S
    Socialmedicin Karolinska institutet.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Ekman, R
    Socialmedicin Karolinska institutet.
    Lindqvist, Kent
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Making sense of safety2004In: Injury Prevention, ISSN 1353-8047, E-ISSN 1475-5785, Vol. 10, p. 71-73Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Nilsen, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Hudson, D.S.
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Social Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, FHVC - Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum.
    Ekman, R.
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Social Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden, Swedish Rescue Services Agency, Natl. Ctr. for Lrng. from Accidents, Skövde, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Kent
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Making sense of safety2004In: Injury Prevention, ISSN 1353-8047, E-ISSN 1475-5785, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 71-73Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 11.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland. Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Sweden.
    Ward, Richard
    Faculty of Social Science, University of Stirling, UK.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    'Overjoyed that I can go outside': Using walking interviews to learn about the lived experience and meaning of neighbourhood for people living with dementia.2018In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, article id 1471301218817453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the relationships between people living with dementia and their neighbourhood as they venture out from home on a regular and often routine basis. Here, we report findings from the Swedish field site of an international 5-year project: Neighbourhoods: our people, our places. The aims of this study were to investigate the lived experience of the neighbourhood for people with dementia and through this to better understand the meaning that neighbourhood held for the participants. In this study, we focus on the walking interviews which were conducted with 14 community-dwelling people with dementia (11 men and 3 women) and were analysed using an interpretative phenomenological method. Four themes were revealed from these interviews: life narratives embedded within neighbourhood; the support of selfhood and wellbeing through movement; the neighbourhood as an immediate social context; and restorative connections to nature. These themes were distilled into the 'essence' of what neighbourhood meant for the people we interviewed: A walkable area of subjective significance and social opportunity in which to move freely and feel rejuvenated. We have found that the neighbourhood for community-dwelling people with dementia holds a sense of attachment and offers the potential for freedom of movement. Our research indicates that a dementia diagnosis doesn't necessarily reduce this freedom of movement. The implications for practice and policy are considered: future research should explore and pay closer attention to the diverse living conditions of people living with dementia, and not least the particular challenges faced by people living alone with dementia.

  • 12.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hyden, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    People diagnosed with dementia in Sweden: What type of home care services and housing are they granted? A cross-sectional study2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 229-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: This study aims to examine what types of home care services and housing are granted to people with a dementia diagnosis and how these types are associated with socio-demographic factors (sex, age, marital status, native or foreign born, and regional area).

    METHODS: A cross-sectional study of all people diagnosed with dementia in three Swedish counties was conducted from the medical records in 2012. Logistic regression analysis was carried out to investigate associations between home care services and housing and socio-demographic variables.

    RESULTS: In total, 17,405 people had a dementia diagnosis, and the majority were women, aged 80+ years, and unmarried. Some 72% were living in ordinary housing and 28% lived in special housing. Of those who lived in ordinary housing, 50% did not receive any home care service. Not receiving any type of home care services was less common for older people and was also associated with being married and living in rural municipalities. The most common home care services granted were home help and personal care. Special housing was more common for older people, unmarried persons, and those living in rural municipalities.

    CONCLUSIONS: Most people with a dementia diagnosis were living in ordinary housing, and, surprisingly, half of those did not receive any type of home care service. This knowledge is essential for making the living conditions and needs of people living with dementia more visible and to provide good home care services for people with dementia and their families.

  • 13.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Boendemiljö och grannskap2016In: Att leva med demens / [ed] Ingrid Hellström, Lars-Christer Hydén, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016, 1, p. 87-95Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology in Linköping.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Andrew, Clark
    School of Health and Society, University of Salford, Salford, UK.
    Sarah, Campbell
    Division of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
    Kainde, Manji
    Faculty of Social Science, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK.
    Kirstein, Rummery
    Faculty of Social Science, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK.
    John, Keady
    Division of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
    Richard, Ward
    Faculty of Social Science, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK.
    ‘It's our pleasure, we count cars here’: an exploration of the ‘neighbourhood-based connections’ for people living alone with dementia2019In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 9, p. 1-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extent of social isolation experienced by people living with dementia who reside in the community has been well acknowledged, yet little is known about how people living alone with dementia maintain neighbourhood-based connections. The purpose of this study is to examine the experiences of people with dementia who live alone, focusing upon how they establish social networks and relationships in a neighbourhood context, and how they are supported to maintain this social context within everyday life. Multiple data collection methods were used including, semi-structured interviews, walking interviews, guided home tours and social network mapping, which were conducted with 14 community-dwelling people living alone with dementia (11 women and three men) situated across the three international study sites in England, Scotland and Sweden. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. The analysis revealed four main themes: (a) making the effort to stay connected; (b) befriending by organisations and facilitated friendships; (c) the quiet neighbourhood atmosphere; and (d) changing social connections. The analysis suggests that people with dementia who live alone were active agents who took control to find and maintain relationships and social networks in the neighbourhood. Our findings indicate the need to raise awareness about this specific group in both policy and practice, and to find creative ways to help people connect through everyday activities and by spontaneous encounters in the neighbourhood.

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