liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Örulv, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Feedback and common ground in conversational storytelling involvning people with Alzheimer's disease2012In: Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders/Equinox, ISSN 2040-5111, E-ISSN 2040-512X, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 211-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article focuses on feedback in storytelling involving people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and how feedback is related to the ways participants establish a common ground (Clark 1996) in interaction. The establishment of common ground is important in all kinds of interaction and becomes an especially intricate process if participants have AD, since the achievement of common ground requires the ability to draw from knowledge and experiences relating to past as well as present events; an ability that is often hampered by the disease. Analyses show that other aspects than the actual content of the conversation are important for the participants – for instance being together, supporting the positive identities both presented in the story and embodied in the socially rewarding activity that they manage to engage in, implying that the participants create and sustain a common ground not so much about the story-layer as of the storytelling activity.

  • 2.
    Jansson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Taking a shower. Managing a potentially imposing activity in dementia care2014In: Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders/Equinox, ISSN 2040-5111, E-ISSN 2040-512X, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 27-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on an activity routinely carried out in elderly care: taking a shower. The care setting is two nursing homes in Sweden hosting elderly people with dementia. The data consist of transcriptions of three caregivers’ interaction with their residents prior to, and during the performance of the shower task. While the shower routinely is rejected by the care recipient in these settings, the article demonstrates alternative ways of performing the task that are less imposing for the elderly person and that may maintain the care recipient’s dignity and sense of autonomy. The way opposition occurs during the course of the activity depends on how the care worker frames the performance of the task. When physical action is embedded and aligned with the care recipient’s concerns, the washing of the body progresses more smoothly. The article highlights the importance of allowing the care recipient to feel that her priorities form the basis for how the activity should proceed. The implications of this study for the care system are discussed in terms of providing opportunities for caregivers and elderly persons to build relationships of mutual trust and support.

  • 3.
    Norén, Niklas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, ChristinaLinköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.Plejert, CharlottaLinköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Aided Communication in Everyday Interaction2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book argues for the importance of the participants' perspective within both theory and practice on the function of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) aids in everyday talk-in-interaction. Interactional approaches such as Conversation Analysis (CA) and Topical episode analysis are used to analyze and demonstrate.

  • 4.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    To fix what’s not broken: repair strategies in non-native and native english conversation2004Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis investigates conversations involving native speakers and non-nativespeakers of English. The non-native speakers partaking in the study have a welldeveloped knowledge of the foreign language. The study is particularly concernedwith the function and interactional relevance of repair strategies that interlocutorsemploy when they talk to each other. The results of the analyses highlight issuessuch as participants’ self-representations as competent speakers, the notion “nonnativeness”,and language learning, relating to current developments within conversationanalytic research on second/foreign language conversations. Comparisonsbetween non-native and native speakers are made, highlighting similarities as wellas di¡erences in participants’ use of repair strategies.

    The study adopts a conversation analytic framework but is also in¤uenced bystudies of second/foreign language acquisition. Conversation analytic research has,until recently, dealt with conversations involving non-native speakers who have alimited or intermediate command of the second/foreign language. Repair behavioursof advanced foreign language users are thus a little investigated area. Whereasnon-native speakers with limited experience in using the second/foreign languageoften employ repair in order to solve problems that are related to their linguisticknowledge, such as ¢nding or knowing words and constructing utterances that areunderstandable in the context in which they occur, this thesis shows how an increasedknowledge of the foreign language involves a shift in focus as repair is carriedout, i.e. repair is used to address problems of a linguistic as well as of a socialnature. Since an increased knowledge of a foreign language is accompanied by an increasein the range of jobs that repair strategies do, “doing repair” is an importantpart of the development of non-native speakers’ interactional and linguistic competence.

  • 5.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication.
    Aijmer red, Karin
    Gothenburgh University.
    Olinder red, Britta
    Gothenburgh University.
    Repair, learning and foreign language talk-in-interaction: A conversation analytic approach2003In: 8th Nordic conference on English studies,2001, Gothenburgh: Acta universitatis Gothoburgensis , 2003, p. 87-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Antelius, Eleonor
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Majlesi, Ali Reza
    Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Flerspråkiga möten vid minnesklinik2016In: Att leva med demens / [ed] Ingrid Hellström, Lars-Christer Hydén, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016, 1, p. 133-142Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Antelius, Eleonor
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    YazdanPanah, Maziar
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nielsen, T. Rune
    Memory Disorders Research Group, Neuroscience Centre, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    'There is a letter called ef': on challanges and repair in interpreter-mediated tests of cognitive functioning in dementia.2015In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology, ISSN 0169-3816, E-ISSN 1573-0719, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 163-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Scandinavian countries Sweden, Denmark, Norway, and Finland, the number of first generation migrants reaching an old age, who will be in need of age-related health-care, is rapidly increasing. This situation poses new demands on health-care facilities, such as memory clinics, where patients with memory problems and other dementia symptoms are referred for examination and evaluation. Very many elderly people with a foreign background require the assistance of an interpreter in their encounter with health-care facilities. The use of, and work by an interpreter is crucial in facilitating a smooth assessment. However, interpreters, clinicians, as well as patients and their companions, may be faced with many challenges during the evaluation procedure. The aim of this case-study is to highlight some of the challenges that occur in relation to a specific activity within the dementia evaluation, namely the test of cognitive functioning. Special attention will be paid to the phenomenon 'repair', i.e., participants' joint attempts to solve upcoming difficulties during the course of interaction. Results show that sources of trouble may be related to the lack of cultural, linguistic, and educational adaptation of the test to the patient, and to interpreter and clinician practises. Findings will be discussed in terms of test-validity, clinician and interpreter training, and the institutional goals and constraints of the dementia evaluation. The methodology Conversation Analysis has been used to conduct a highly detailed analysis of participants' practices and actions during the administration of the test.

  • 8.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jansson, Gunilla
    Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Yazdan Panah, Maziar
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Response Practices in Multilingual Interaction with an Older Persian Woman in a Swedish Residential Home2014In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology, ISSN 0169-3816, E-ISSN 1573-0719, Vol. 29, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present case study, a care encounter between an older multilingual (Farsi/Swedish/English) Persian woman and staff in an ordinary, Swedish residential home is investigated. The woman is perceived as suffering from dementia symptoms, but has not received any formal diagnosis of the disease. More specifically, the study focuses on how the womans contributions in her mother tongue, Farsi, are responded to by a carer, who is also multilingual and speaks Swedish as a second language (L2), but has a very limited knowledge of Farsi. The data consists of recorded material from a mundane morning activity in the residential home, as the woman is undressed and prepared to go to the shower. The method employed is conversation analysis, and the study addresses the interactional outcome of this type of multilingual encounters, highlighting the way the establishment of mutual understanding is negatively affected by the fact that the participants do not or only to a limited extent share a common language. Analysis of the data shows that most of the womans contributions in Farsi are responded to in L2-Swedish by the carer, primarily by means of seven different response practices: soothing talk, instrumental talk, minimal responses, explicit expressions of understanding, mitigating talk, questions, and appraisal. The findings are discussed in light of new demands on Swedish (and Western) care- and health care systems to adapt to the increasing number of multilingual, older people, who will become residents in care facilities and attend day centers within the coming years.

  • 9.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Language development in normal children and in disease: An interactional approach to typical language development and children with language impairment2012In: Handbook of growth and growth monitoring in health and disease / [ed] Victor R. Preedy, New York: Springer , 2012, 1, p. 1363-1378Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Growth is one of the human body’s most intricate processes: each body part or region has its own unique growth patterns. Yet at the individual and population levels, growth patterns are sensitive to adverse conditions, genetic predispositions, and environmental changes. And despite the body’s capacity to compensate for these developmental setbacks, the effects may be far-reaching, even life-long. The Handbook of Growth and Growth Monitoring in Health and Disease brings this significant and complex field together in one comprehensive volume: impact of adverse variables on growth patterns; issues at different stages of prenatal development, childhood, and adolescence; aspects of catch-up growth, endocrine regulation, and sexual maturation; screening and assessment methods; and international perspectives. Tables and diagrams, applications to other areas of health and disease, and summary points help make the information easier to retain. Together, over 180 self-contained chapters in 15 sections cover every area of human growth, including:

    • Intrauterine growth retardation.
    • Postnatal growth in normal and abnormal situations.
    • Cells and growth of tissues.
    • Sensory growth and development.
    • Effects of disease on growth.
    • Methods and standards for assessment of growth, and more.
  • 10.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Anward, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Att få sista ordet: Om avslutande sekvenser i samtal med personer med kommunikativa funktionshinder2010In: Språk och interaktion, ISSN 1795-4428, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 249-263Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sundqvist, Anett
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A dialogical approach to Theory of Mind in aided and non-aided child interaction2013In: Aided Communication in Everyday Interaction / [ed] Niklas Norén, Christina Samuelsson and Charlotta Plejert, Guildford: J & R Press , 2013, p. 153-187Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Rune Nielsen, T.
    et al.
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Antelius, Eleonor
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Storstein Spilker, Ragnhild
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Torkpoor, Rozita
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Toresson, Hakan
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Lindholm, Camilla
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Letter: Dementia care for people from ethnic minorities: a Nordic perspective in INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY, vol 30, issue 2, pp 217-2182015In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, ISSN 0885-6230, E-ISSN 1099-1166, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 217-218Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 13.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekström, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Majlesi, Ali Reza
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kommunikation vid demenssjukdom2016In: Att leva med demens / [ed] Ingrid Hellström & Lars-Christer Hydén, Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016, 1, p. 63-70Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lundeborg Hammarström, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Video Recording as a Tool for Assessing Children’s Everyday Use of Features Targeted in Phonological Intervention2016In: Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders/Equinox, ISSN 2040-5111, E-ISSN 2040-512X, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 27-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The last decades, speech and language pathology services have been subject to changes, and there has been a growing demand for intervention activities to be effective and evidence-based. The aim of the present study was to investigate if and how video recording can be used to assess the use of features targeted in phonological intervention, in everyday talk by children with LI. Three five-year-old girls with phonological problems participated in the study, and data consist of video recordings of intervention sessions and of interaction at home. Three different paths of development were identified: Some targeted speech sounds are displayed in everyday interaction; Targeted speech sound is present in intervention-like activity; No displays of targeted sounds. The results of the present study clearly demonstrate that the use of video recordings, transcriptions and analysis of interaction outside of the clinical setting contribute important information that may guide planning, goal-setting and evaluation of intervention.

  • 15.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    On the use of Conversation Analysis and retrospection in intervention for children with language impairment2015In: Child Language Teaching and Therapy, ISSN 0265-6590, E-ISSN 1477-0865, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 19-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Models of speech and language intervention for communicative disabilities vary from structured programmes to more interactive and ecological methods (Fey, 1986). Ideally, a model for intervention should fit the interests and personality of the patient, focus on crucial aspects of speech and language, and be suited to the patients everyday communication needs (Johnston, 2006). The present article addresses how features of everyday interaction and speech and language intervention may be captured and used for children with language impairment (LI), their caretakers, and speech and language therapists (SLTs), within and outside of clinical practice. Specifically, the aim of the study is to explore the use of retrospection (Erickson and Schultz, 1982), based on Conversation Analytical (CA) methodology (e.g. Schegloff, 2007), and to establish if and how CA-based retrospection may contribute to raising participants awareness of their own and others interactional behaviours. Retrospection here refers to sessions where participants watch and comment on sequences of video-recordings from intervention, as well as from situations captured in a variety of everyday settings. Four children with LI and three speech and language therapists participated, as well as parents of the children. The procedure comprised analysis and transcription of video-recordings of everyday interaction and intervention involving the children, retrospections with the children, the parents of the children with LI, and the SLTs, and analysis and transcription of the recordings made of the retrospections. The analysis of the retrospections generated four categories of phenomena relevant for intervention and everyday interaction: (I) Observations of well-functioning interaction strategies; (2) Observations of less well-functioning interaction strategies; (3) Assessment of positive performance; and (4) Comments relating to intervention. The results show that CA-based retrospection may be used to raise the participants awareness of their own interactional behaviours, and provide the opportunity to discuss strategies relevant for both intervention and everyday interaction for children with LI.

  • 16.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Anward, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Defusing practices as mitigation in speech and language intervention.2014In: Communication & Medicine: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Healthcare, Ethics and Society, ISSN 1612-1783, E-ISSN 1613-3625, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 299-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present paper, speech and language intervention was investigated in order to explore the use and function of defusing practices. Defusing practices may be viewed as a special form of mitigation. In previous research, including studies on clinical interaction, mitigation has been described mainly as devices used in order to reduce the unwelcome effects of an utterance, or reduce the discomfort of bad news. Defusing practices, however, appear to serve somewhat different functions, which are examined here. Data comprises video and audio recordings of eight intervention sessions with children with language impairment (LI), and six intervention sessions with adults with aphasia, The analysis revealed the following kinds of defusing practices: circumscriptions/figurative language, diminutive words, words like ‘try’ or ‘test’, placing the problem outside of the patient, collective pronouns, diminishing the speech and language pathologist’s own competence, encouragement, and references to well-known phenomena. If speech and language therapists (SLPs) are made aware of the practice and function of defusing, they may make conscious use of these practices in order to reduce face-threatening situations in intervention

  • 17.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nettelbladt, Ulrika
    Lunds universitet.
    Anward, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Role of Interactional Prosody in Language testing Activities in Swedish.2011In: Speech Prosody in Atypical Populations: Assessment and Remediation / [ed] Vesna Stojanovik & Jane Setter, London: J&R Press , 2011, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book is based on recent findings and will report current original research in the field of speech prosody in atypical populations.

    With contributions from experts working on the prosody of a specific client group, the book will cover both paediatric and adult groups within a single volume, and will promote this often neglected area of clinical assessment and management.

    As well as being a key reference for those who are conducting research in this area, the book will be an invaluable tool for speech and language therapists who currently rarely assess prosody because of the lack of information relevant to them.

  • 18.
    Strandroos, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Panah, Maziar Yazdan
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Flerspråklig interaktion och kommunikativa resurser2016In: Att leva med demens / [ed] Ingrid Hellström, Lars-Christer Hydén, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016, 1, p. 155-163Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Sundqvist, Annette (Anett)
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Role of Active Participation in Interaction for Children Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication2010In: Communication & Medicine: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Healthcare, Ethics and Society, ISSN 1612-1783, E-ISSN 1613-3625, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 165-175Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present case-study investigates practices in interaction that manifest themselves as active participation for three Swedish children who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Analyses are based on interaction data from three different settings, involving the children in dialogue with adults as well as peers. In-depth analysis of the data by means of Conversation Analysis revealed three practices inducive for active participation. The first one dealt with experiencing a sense of control, i.e. that the child who uses AAC was treated as a competent communicator, e.g. initiating topics and allocating turns etc. The second practice revealed the importance of coconstruction of communicative projects, and the possible negative effects of instances where adults attempted to impose an agenda on the children. Finally, analyses displayed different means by which participants could be included in the interaction, and the effects of such strategies. The study stresses the importance of communication partners’ abilities to balance and counterbalance the necessity to follow, share or sometimes inhibit a need to shape contributions to interaction, in order to enhance active participation for the child who uses AAC.

  • 20.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    et al.
    Habiliteringens Forskningscentrum (HFC), Örebro, Sweden.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Turn-organisation in mediated phone interaction using Video Relay Service (VRS)2012In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 44, no 10, p. 1313-1334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technical development has created new arenas of communication for people. One such arena is the VideoRelayService (VRS). The VRS facilitates interaction between people who use visual/gestual sign language on a videophone, and people who use verbal/auditive language on the telephone/mobile phone. The interaction is mediated by a sign language interpreter. The interpreter is the only person in the setting who is directly linked to the others, and all participants are physically separated from each other. The interpreter plays a key role in the interaction, administrating and co-ordinating the talk. In order to do so, the interpreter uses a range of different techniques and strategies. It is the purpose of the current article to describe, analyse and discuss the turn-organisation of the VRS. The article demonstrates how the interpreter is a power figure, who may sanction or not sanction an utterance. The interpreter also manages the turn-taking machinery by means of visible and audible techniques, as well as rendition strategies. The interpreter is not only a mediator, but a co-creator of the interaction; a part that relates dynamically, and makes the participants relate dynamically, to the specific setting of the service.

1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf