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  • 1.
    Bergdahl, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine.
    In the Forefront of Development:The New Undergraduate Medical Curriculu2006In: Celebrating the Past by Expanding the Future: The Faculty of Health Science, Linköping University 1986–2006 / [ed] Mats Hammar, Björn Bergdahl, Lena Öhman, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2006, 1, p. 98-102Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Bergdahl, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Läkarutbildningen i Linköpings förnyas. Problembaserat lärande, basvetenskap och folkhälsa förstärks2005In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 102, no 38, p. 2654-2658Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Bergdahl, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Persson, Anne-Christine
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    EDIT-projekti. PBL: n verkkoskenaariot haastavat opiskelijat ajattelemaan2006In: Ongelmapaperustaisen oppomisen verkko / [ed] Timo Portimojärvi, Tampere: Timo portimojärvi , 2006, p. -196Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [fi]

      Kirjassa yhdistyy kaksi runsaasti huomiota saanutta oppimisen, opiskelun ja opetuksen näkökulmaa - välillä yhdessä välillä erikseen. Ongelmaperustainen oppiminen on jo vakiintunut useissa oppilaitoksissa, ja verkko-opiskelu lisääntyy ja kehittyy joustavan opiskelun muotona. Kirja on ensimmäinen suomalainen ongelmaperustaisen oppimisen ja verkko-opiskelun yhdistämiseen keskittyvä kirja.

  • 4.
    Bergdahl, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Persson, Anne-Christine
    Problembaserat lärande på webben utmanar studenternas tänkande2004In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 101, p. 3236-3239Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Ebbers, Tino
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Calculation of relative cardiac pressure along streamlines using time-resolved 3D phase contrast MRI1999In: Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance,1999, 1999, p. 290-291Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Ebbers, Tino
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Particle trace visualization of cardiac flow patterns using 3D phase contrast MRI: an in vitro comparison with streamlines created using dye.1999In: Proc Intl Soc Magn Reson Med 7,1999, 1999, p. 2025-2025Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Eintrei, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Bergdahl, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Revising a medical PBL-curriculum - the Linköping strategy2004In: Association for Medical Education in Europe,2004, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Forsum, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Annorlunda kurslitteratur. Skönlitteratur en del av läkarutbildningen i Linköping.2006In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 103, no 35, p. 2483-2484Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Forsum, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Literary fiction in the medical programme2006In: Celebrating the past by expanding the future.: the Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University 1986-2006 / [ed] Mats Hammar, Björn Bergdahl, Lena Öhman, Lecture Notes in Computer Science , 2006, p. 38-40Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During the fall of 2006, the Faculty of Health Sciences (FHS) celebrates its 20th birthday. Linköping has a long tradition of health education; our nursing programme started already in 1895 and occupational therapy began in 1965. From the late 1960’s, medical students from Uppsala spent their last seven semesters in Linköping, mainly for clinical studies. After some years, academic and teachers from the young faculty, together with the county council, realized the enormous potential benefits of a complete undergraduate medical programme at Linköping University. Inspired by apparent innovations from McMaster University in Canada, Maastricht in Holland, Ben Gurion in Israel and Tromsø in Norway, these ideas and ideals were gradually turned into reality. In a complicated process, concerning the life or death of the medical faculty, a close co-operation between the University and the County Council of Östergötland was extremely fruitful. A proposal regarding a complete medical programme, and study periods integrated between the other health education programmes, was forwarded to the Swedish government in December 1982 and approved in 1984.

  • 10.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dynamiskt lärande: En ämnesdidaktisk avhandling om fysiologiska fenomen och läkarstudentens lärande2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known that the outcome of teaching and learning in higher education is often unsatisfactory. Earlier studies have shown that medical students often have a surface approach to their studies and that misconceptions of fundamental physiological phenomena are common. The aim of this thesis is to support educational practice in medicine, particularly in medical physiology. The thesis can be categorised as subject matter-specific education research, which means that questions about teaching and learning are closely linked to the subject studied. The researcher should be well acquainted with the subject in question. The subject area dealt with in this thesis is physiological phenomena related to cardiovascular pressure-flow relations.

    The thesis consists of studies of 3-dimensional intra cardiac pressure-flow phenomena in the heart (studies 1 and 2) and studies of how students conceive of and develop an understanding of physiological phenomena related to blood pressure and blood pressure regulation (studies 3 and 4).

    Flow in the left atrium as well as inflow-patterns to the left ventricle were studied. The 3-dimensional method elucidates vortical flow phenomena which were previously unknown. The findings could contribute to increasing physicians and technicians understanding of flow phenomena in the diagnosis and assessment of heart disease and to the further development of diagnostic methods. In the studies of learning and understanding of physiological phenomena, the findings point to new aspects of a deep approach to learning, which have to do with the students’ ability to change perspective and adopt a variety of learning strategies to a phenomenon (Moving) versus a tendency to hold on to one explanatory model (Holding). The study also investigates the students’ ability to identify and apply fundamental physiological principles as well as how they conceive of the importance of detailed knowledge for understanding of physiology. The findings point to differences in the students’ conceptions of physiological principles. A problemising approach, which includes not only causally described relations, indicates a more complex conception of physiological phenomena. The study shows aspects of understanding which are seldom assessed in examinations.

    The findings indicate a connection between the students’ approaches to learning and the quality of their understanding of fundamental physiological principles. In the thesis, teaching interventions are proposed in order to stimulate dynamic learning and a learning environment where students are not afraid to challenge their conceptions in order to acquire a rich and nuanced picture of physiological phenomena.

    List of papers
    1. Three-dimensional flow in the human left atrium
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Three-dimensional flow in the human left atrium
    Show others...
    2001 (English)In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 448-455Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Abnormal flow patterns in the left atrium in atrial fibrillation or mitral stenosis are associated with an increased risk of thrombosis and systemic embolisation; the characteristics of normal atrial flow that avoid stasis have not been well defined.

    OBJECTIVES: To present a three dimensional particle trace visualisation of normal left atrial flow in vivo, constructed from flow velocities in three dimensional space.

    METHODS: Particle trace visualisation of time resolved three dimensional magnetic resonance imaging velocity measurements was used to provide a display of intracardiac flow without the limitations of angle sensitivity or restriction to imaging planes. Global flow patterns of the left atrium were studied in 11 healthy volunteers.

    RESULTS: In all subjects vortical flow was observed in the atrium during systole and diastolic diastasis (mean (SD) duration of systolic vortex, 280 (77) ms; and of diastolic vortex, 256 (118) ms). The volume incorporated and recirculated within the vortices originated predominantly from the left pulmonary veins. Inflow from the right veins passed along the vortex periphery, constrained between the vortex and the atrial wall.

    CONCLUSIONS: Global left atrial flow in the normal human heart comprises consistent patterns specific to the phase of the cardiac cycle. Separate paths of left and right pulmonary venous inflow and vortex formation may have beneficial effects in avoiding left atrial stasis in the normal subject in sinus rhythm.

    Keywords
    atrium, blood flow, magnetic resonance imaging, haemodynamics
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14554 (URN)10.1136/heart.86.4.448 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-06-04 Created: 2007-06-04 Last updated: 2016-03-14
    2. Pitfalls in Doppler evaluation of diastolic function: insights from three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pitfalls in Doppler evaluation of diastolic function: insights from three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging
    Show others...
    1999 (English)In: Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography, ISSN 0894-7317, E-ISSN 1097-6795, Vol. 12, no 10, p. 817-826Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Ultrasound-Doppler assessment of diastolic function is subject to velocity errors caused by angle sensitivity and a fixed location of the sample volume. We used 3-dimensional phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate these errors in 10 patients with hypertension and in 10 healthy volunteers. The single (Doppler) and triple (MRI) component velocity was measured at early (E) and late (A) inflow along Doppler-like sample lines or 3-dimensional particle traces generated from the MRI data. Doppler measurements underestimated MRI velocities by 9.4% ± 8.6%; the effect on the E/A ratio was larger and more variable. Measuring early and late diastolic inflows from a single line demonstrated the error caused by their 3-dimensional spatial offset. Both errors were minimized by calculating the E/A ratio from maximal E and A values without constraint to a single line. Alignment and spatial offset are important sources of error in Doppler diastolic parameters. Improved accuracy may be achieved with the use of maximal E and A velocities from wherever they occur in the left ventricle.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Amsterdam: Elsevier Science B.V., 1999
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14555 (URN)10.1016/S0894-7317(99)70186-0 (DOI)83255200007 ()10511650 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2007-06-04 Created: 2007-06-04 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    3. Student approaches to achieving understanding ― Approaches to learning revisited
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Student approaches to achieving understanding ― Approaches to learning revisited
    2007 (English)In: Studies in Higher Education, ISSN 0307-5079, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 149-165Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a phenomenographic study that investigates students' approaches to achieving understanding. The results are based on interviews, addressing physiological phenomena, with 16 medical students in a problem-based curriculum. Four approaches—sifting, building, holding and moving—are outlined. The holding and moving approaches describe variations in deep-level processing. The moving approach is characterised by an intention to continuously refine understanding in an open-ended process. The student strives for a change in perspective and deliberately creates actions that are rich in variation and challenge. The holding approach is characterised by an intention to reach a final goal. This is achieved by high degrees of structure and control in the learning act. Understanding is sometimes sealed, 'held on to' and can be threatened by new input and other students' viewpoints. The study also shows how students deal with details when constructing understanding of wholes.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14556 (URN)10.1080/03075070701267194 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-06-04 Created: 2007-06-04 Last updated: 2018-02-06
    4. Students' conceptions of underlying principles in medical physiology: An interview study of medical students understanding in a PBL curriculum
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Students' conceptions of underlying principles in medical physiology: An interview study of medical students understanding in a PBL curriculum
    2007 (English)In: Advances in Physiology Education, ISSN 1043-4046, E-ISSN 1522-1229, Vol. 31, p. 364-369Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Medical physiology is known to be a complex area where students develop significant errors in conceptual understanding. Students’ knowledge is often bound to situational descriptions rather than underlying principles. This study explores how medical students discern and process underlying principles in physiology. Indepth interviews, where students elaborated on principles related to blood pressure and blood pressure regulation, were carried out with 16 medical students in a problem-based learning curriculum. A qualitative, phenomenographic approach was used, and interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, qualitatively analyzed, and categorized. Four categories were outlined. The underlying principles were conceived as follows: 1) general conditions for body function at a specified time point, 2) transferable phenomena between organ systems and time points, 3) conditionally transferable phenomena between organ systems and time points, and 4) cognitive constructions of limited value in medical physiology. The results offers insights into students’ thinking about underlying principles in physiology and suggest how understanding can be challenged to stimulate deep-level processing of underlying principles rather than situational descriptions of physiology. A complex conception of underlying principles includes an ability to problemize phenomena beyond long causal reasoning chains, which is often rewarded in traditional examinations and tests. Keywords for problemized processing are as follows: comparisons, differences, similarities, conditions, context, relevance, multiple sampling, connections, and dependencies.

    Keywords
    general models, phenomenography, problem-based learning
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14557 (URN)10.1152/advan.00108.2006 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-06-04 Created: 2007-06-04 Last updated: 2017-12-13
  • 11.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Three-dimensional Intracardiac Flow Studied with Time Resolved Phase Contrast MRI: blood flow in the human left atrium and ventricle1999Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Bergdahl, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Silén, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Lectures in problem-based learning - Why, when and how? An example of interactive lecturing that stimulates meaningful learning2005In: Medical teacher, ISSN 0142-159X, E-ISSN 1466-187X, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 61-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though opinions differ as to whether lecturing is compatible with problem-based learning (PBL) or not, lectures are still a common form of instruction in PBL curricula. This paper discusses the lecture in the framework of theories of learning in general and the medical problem-based learning tradition in particular. An example of how theories of learning can be implemented in the lecture hall is presented. Theories that underpin PBL as an educational philosophy rather than as a method of instruction are reviewed. A lecture form, organized in introductory, in depth and application lectures, that responds to important factors for stimulating deep processing of knowledge and meaningful learning is discussed. Examples of and practical points about how to renew and restructure lectures in a way that counteracts surface approaches to learning, teacher centring and student passivity are presented. We argue that, with proper awareness of possible drawbacks of the large format, lectures can be used as valuable tools for learning also in a PBL curriculum.

  • 13.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Complex directions of pulmonary venous inflow: Intuitive display with 3D MRI phase contrast1998In: J Am Soc Echocardiography,1998, 1998, p. 516-516Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Discrete three-dimensional pathways of right and left pulmonary venous inflow studied with phase contrast MRI1999In: J Am Coll Cardiol,1999, 1999, p. 477-478aConference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Quantification of intra ventricular vortices from 3D phase contrast MRI1999In: American Heart Assocation 72nd Scientific Session,1999, 1999Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Janerot Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Major and minor axes of the normal mitral annulus2001In: Journal of Heart Valve Disease, ISSN 0966-8519, E-ISSN 2053-2644, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 146-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim of the study: A dilated or abnormally shaped mitral annulus is a common cause of mitral valve regurgitation, and may be cured by annuloplastic surgery. Multiplane transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is the diagnostic technique of choice. Our aim was to evaluate and suggest two-dimensional TEE reference values from a standardized procedure of measuring the mitral annular major and minor axes, and their cyclic changes. Methods: The annulus was approximated elliptic in the horizontal plane. The intercommissural (IC, major axis) and anteroposterior (AP, minor axis) distances were measured at end-systole (ES), at maximal valve opening (MO), and at end-diastole (ED) from a mid-esophageal view, in 13 men and eight women with normal echocardiographic findings. Indexed values and reproducibility were calculated. Results: The success rate was 100% at ES, 90% at MO, and 29% at ED. ES distances were largest (p <0.001) and most reproducible (5-5.9%). Body weight, but not height or age, had a significant impact. ES 95% prediction intervals for IC were 27 to 46 mm (16-23 mm/m2) and 22 to 36 mm (13-18 mm/m2) for AP (p <0.001). Corresponding body weight-corrected intervals were 0.39 to 0.59 (IC) and 0.32 to 0.48 (AP) mm/kg. No subject had IC:AP <1.1 together with an AP >0.45 mm/kg. Conclusion: Among measurements made at ES, MO and ED, those at ES provided the most reproducible results, and high-quality images were obtained in normal, non-obese subjects. The distances should be judged in relation to body weight or surface area and each other. The largest IC distance and the most elliptic shape were at ES, while the annulus was minimal at ED. The procedure and normal ranges presented may contribute to the evaluation of patients with mitral regurgitation.

  • 17.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Size of the normal mitral annulus as measured by 2D multiplane transoesophageal echocardiography1997In: Echocardiography,1997, 1997Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    14:S61

  • 18.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Lövdahl, Gudrun
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Basal utbildning inom ultraljudsdiagnostik - redan verklighet i Linköping.2001In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 98, p. 2502-2502Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Silén, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Utgångspunkter för basgruppsarbete i PBL2003Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Med tiden har nya idéer om utgångspunkter utvecklats. Både lärare och studenter har upplevt att de fungerar olika bra och diskussioner har förts om vad det är som gör att utgångspunkten är mer eller mindre lyckad. Funderingar som rör innehåll och utformning av utgångspunk-ter väcker genast frågor av mer allmän karaktär avseende PBL. Vad är det som ska uppnås med utgångspunkten? Vilken inriktning i lärandet stimulerar den till och varför? Hur väljer man vilka utgångspunkter som ska användas? Hur hänger utgångspunkterna ihop genom utbild-ningen? I den här skriften har personer med erfarenhet av hur utgångs-punkter skapas och används i olika utbildningar skrivit om sina reflektioner och erfarenheter kring funktion och syfte. Inledningsvis finner du texter som teoretiskt beskriver och resonerar kring utgångspunkternas funktion i utbildningssammanhanget. Därpå följer beskrivningar från olika försök att utveckla utgångspunkter i riktning från det traditionella pappersfallet. Skriften fokuserar således inte de mest traditionella ut-gångspunkterna inom HU, utan visar på möjligheter till vidareutveck-ling och variation. Avslutningsvis finner du studentkommentarer om scenarier vid HU.

  • 20.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Silén, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wirell, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Students' conceptions of underlying principles in medical physiology: An interview study of medical students understanding in a PBL curriculum2007In: Advances in Physiology Education, ISSN 1043-4046, E-ISSN 1522-1229, Vol. 31, p. 364-369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Medical physiology is known to be a complex area where students develop significant errors in conceptual understanding. Students’ knowledge is often bound to situational descriptions rather than underlying principles. This study explores how medical students discern and process underlying principles in physiology. Indepth interviews, where students elaborated on principles related to blood pressure and blood pressure regulation, were carried out with 16 medical students in a problem-based learning curriculum. A qualitative, phenomenographic approach was used, and interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, qualitatively analyzed, and categorized. Four categories were outlined. The underlying principles were conceived as follows: 1) general conditions for body function at a specified time point, 2) transferable phenomena between organ systems and time points, 3) conditionally transferable phenomena between organ systems and time points, and 4) cognitive constructions of limited value in medical physiology. The results offers insights into students’ thinking about underlying principles in physiology and suggest how understanding can be challenged to stimulate deep-level processing of underlying principles rather than situational descriptions of physiology. A complex conception of underlying principles includes an ability to problemize phenomena beyond long causal reasoning chains, which is often rewarded in traditional examinations and tests. Keywords for problemized processing are as follows: comparisons, differences, similarities, conditions, context, relevance, multiple sampling, connections, and dependencies.

  • 21.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bolger, Ann F.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Öhman, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pitfalls in Doppler evaluation of diastolic function: insights from three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging1999In: Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography, ISSN 0894-7317, E-ISSN 1097-6795, Vol. 12, no 10, p. 817-826Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultrasound-Doppler assessment of diastolic function is subject to velocity errors caused by angle sensitivity and a fixed location of the sample volume. We used 3-dimensional phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate these errors in 10 patients with hypertension and in 10 healthy volunteers. The single (Doppler) and triple (MRI) component velocity was measured at early (E) and late (A) inflow along Doppler-like sample lines or 3-dimensional particle traces generated from the MRI data. Doppler measurements underestimated MRI velocities by 9.4% ± 8.6%; the effect on the E/A ratio was larger and more variable. Measuring early and late diastolic inflows from a single line demonstrated the error caused by their 3-dimensional spatial offset. Both errors were minimized by calculating the E/A ratio from maximal E and A values without constraint to a single line. Alignment and spatial offset are important sources of error in Doppler diastolic parameters. Improved accuracy may be achieved with the use of maximal E and A velocities from wherever they occur in the left ventricle.

  • 22.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Three-dimensional flow in the human left atrium2001In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 448-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Abnormal flow patterns in the left atrium in atrial fibrillation or mitral stenosis are associated with an increased risk of thrombosis and systemic embolisation; the characteristics of normal atrial flow that avoid stasis have not been well defined.

    OBJECTIVES: To present a three dimensional particle trace visualisation of normal left atrial flow in vivo, constructed from flow velocities in three dimensional space.

    METHODS: Particle trace visualisation of time resolved three dimensional magnetic resonance imaging velocity measurements was used to provide a display of intracardiac flow without the limitations of angle sensitivity or restriction to imaging planes. Global flow patterns of the left atrium were studied in 11 healthy volunteers.

    RESULTS: In all subjects vortical flow was observed in the atrium during systole and diastolic diastasis (mean (SD) duration of systolic vortex, 280 (77) ms; and of diastolic vortex, 256 (118) ms). The volume incorporated and recirculated within the vortices originated predominantly from the left pulmonary veins. Inflow from the right veins passed along the vortex periphery, constrained between the vortex and the atrial wall.

    CONCLUSIONS: Global left atrial flow in the normal human heart comprises consistent patterns specific to the phase of the cardiac cycle. Separate paths of left and right pulmonary venous inflow and vortex formation may have beneficial effects in avoiding left atrial stasis in the normal subject in sinus rhythm.

  • 23.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wirell, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Silén, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Student approaches to achieving understanding ― Approaches to learning revisited2007In: Studies in Higher Education, ISSN 0307-5079, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 149-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a phenomenographic study that investigates students' approaches to achieving understanding. The results are based on interviews, addressing physiological phenomena, with 16 medical students in a problem-based curriculum. Four approaches—sifting, building, holding and moving—are outlined. The holding and moving approaches describe variations in deep-level processing. The moving approach is characterised by an intention to continuously refine understanding in an open-ended process. The student strives for a change in perspective and deliberately creates actions that are rich in variation and challenge. The holding approach is characterised by an intention to reach a final goal. This is achieved by high degrees of structure and control in the learning act. Understanding is sometimes sealed, 'held on to' and can be threatened by new input and other students' viewpoints. The study also shows how students deal with details when constructing understanding of wholes.

  • 24.
    Hammar, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Persson, Anne-Christine
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Antepohl, Wolfram
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Obituray: Professor Björn Bergdahl - a pioneer in Swedish medical education2010In: Medical teacher, ISSN 0142-159X, E-ISSN 1466-187X, Vol. 32, no 9, p. 788-788Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Professor Björn Bergdahl, MD, one of the founders of the Faculty of Health Sciences (FHS) at Linköping University, passed away in March 2009. He left us all in grief and disbelief. How could we manage without him?

    Professor Bergdahl graduated with a degree in medicine from Lund University and was recruited to the internal medicine clinic at the University Hospital of Linköping in 1968. After completing his postgraduate studies, he began to teach medical students in 1977. This was the start of a life-long commitment to medical education. He was the first clinical teacher in Sweden ever to be promoted to the position of professor on scientific as well as teaching merits....

  • 25.
    Persson, Anne-Christine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bergdahl, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Perspectives on using multimedia scenarios in a PBL medical curriculum2010In: Medical teacher, ISSN 0142-159X, E-ISSN 1466-187X, Vol. 32, no 9, p. 766-772Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1999, the Faculty of Health Sciences at Linköping University, Sweden, started up a process of replacing text-based problem-based learning (PBL) scenarios with web-based multimedia-enhanced scenarios. This article brings together three studies of the results of this process and the experience gained from 10 years of implementation work. Results and conclusions: Adding multimedia to PBL scenarios makes them more realistic and thereby more motivating and stimulating for the student to process. The group process is not disrupted by the introduction of the computer in the group room. It is important to challenge the students by varying the scenarios perspective and design in order to get away from cue-seeking behaviors that might jeopardize a deep approach to learning. Scrutinizing all scenarios in a PBL curriculum can be used as a tool for improvement and renewal of the entire curriculum.

  • 26.
    Silén, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wirell, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fyrénius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Advanced 3D visualization in student-centred medical education2008In: Medical teacher, ISSN 0142-159X, E-ISSN 1466-187X, Vol. 30, no 5, p. e115-e124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Healthcare students have difficulties achieving a conceptual understanding of 3D anatomy and misconceptions about physiological phenomena are persistent and hard to address. 3D visualization has improved the possibilities of facilitating understanding of complex phenomena. A project was carried out in which high quality 3D visualizations using high-resolution CT and MR images from clinical research were developed for educational use. Instead of standard stacks of slices (original or multiplanar reformatted) volume-rendering images in the quicktime VR format that enables students to interact intuitively were included. Based on learning theories underpinning problem based learning, 3D visualizations were implemented in the existing curricula of the medical and physiotherapy programs. The images/films were used in lectures, demonstrations and tutorial sessions. Self-study material was also developed. AIMS: To support learning efficacy by developing and using 3D datasets in regular health care curricula and enhancing the knowledge about possible educational value of 3D visualizations in learning anatomy and physiology. METHOD: Questionnaires were used to investigate the medical and physiotherapy students' opinions about the different formats of visualizations and their learning experiences. RESULTS: The 3D images/films stimulated the students will to understand more and helped them to get insights about biological variations and different organs size, space extent and relation to each other. The virtual dissections gave a clearer picture than ordinary dissections and the possibility to turn structures around was instructive. CONCLUSIONS: 3D visualizations based on authentic, viable material point out a new dimension of learning material in anatomy, physiology and probably also pathophysiology. It was successful to implement 3D images in already existing themes in the educational programs. The results show that deeper knowledge is required about students' interpretation of images/films in relation to learning outcomes. There is also a need for preparations and facilitation principles connected to the use of 3D visualizations.

  • 27.
    Smedby, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Wirell, Staffan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Silén, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Göran, Pettersson
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, CSELAB - Cognitive Systems Engineering Laboratory.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Interactive volume rendering 3D images for anatomy learning on low-end computers2007In: ECR - European Congress of Radiology,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 28.
    Wigström, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bolger, Ann F.
    Division of Biomedical Science, University of California at Riverside, Riverside, California.
    Particle trace visualization of intracardiac flow using time-resolved 3D phase contrast MRI1999In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, ISSN 0740-3194, E-ISSN 1522-2594, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 793-799Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The flow patterns in the human heart are complex and difficult to visualize using conventional two-dimensional (2D) modalities, whether they depict a single velocity component (Doppler echocardiography) or all three components in a few slices (2D phase contrast MRI). To avoid these shortcomings, a temporally resolved 3D phase contrast technique was used to derive data describing the intracardiac velocity fields in normal volunteers. The MRI data were corrected for phase shifts caused by eddy currents and concomitant gradient fields, with improvement in the accuracy of subsequent flow visualizations. Pathlines describing the blood pathways through the heart were generated from the temporally resolved velocity data, starting from user-specified locations and time frames. Flow trajectories were displayed as 3D particle traces, with simultaneous demonstration of morphologic 2D slices. This type of visualization is intuitive and interactive and may extend our understanding of dynamic and previously unrecognized patterns of intracardiac flow.

  • 29.
    Wigström, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    The effects of maxwell terms on particle traces calculated from 3D cine phase contrast images1999In: Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance,1999, 1999, p. 93-93Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 29 of 29
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