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  • 1.
    Bolger, Ann F
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Eidenvall, Lars
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    THE MULTIPLE DETERMINANTS OF CONTINUOUS WAVE SIGNAL INTENSITY1992In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 86, no 4, SArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Bolger, Ann F
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Heiberg, Einar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Carlsson, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Johansson, P
    Markenroth, K
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Arheden, H
    Tredimensionellt MR-blodflöde och diastolisk kinetisk energi kvantiferat med magnetisk resonanstomografi efter kirurgisk vänsterkammarrekonstruktion. Ny teknik för utvärdering av kammarfunktion.2007In: Riksstämman,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Bolger, Ann F
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Heiberg, Einar
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Transit of blood flow through thehuman left ventricle mapped by cardiovascular magnetic resonance2007In: Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, ISSN 1097-6647, E-ISSN 1532-429X, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 741-747Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The transit of blood through the beating heart is a basic aspect of cardiovascular physiology which remains incompletely studied. Quantification of the components of multidirectional flow in the normal left ventricle (LV) is lacking, making it difficult to put the changes observed with LV dysfunction and cardiac surgery into context.

    METHODS:

    Three dimensional, three directional, time resolved magnetic resonance phase-contrast velocity mapping was performed at 1.5 Tesla in 17 normal subjects, 6 female, aged 44+/-14 years (mean+/-SD). We visualized and measured the relative volumes of LV flow components and the diastolic changes in inflowing kinetic energy (KE). Of total diastolic inflow volume, 44+/-11% followed a direct, albeit curved route to systolic ejection (videos 1 and 2), in contrast to 11% in a subject with mildly dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), who was included for preliminary comparison (video 3). In normals, 16+/-8% of the KE of inflow was conserved to the end of diastole, compared with 5% in the DCM patient. Blood following the direct route lost or transferred less of its KE during diastole than blood that was retained until the next beat (1.6+/-1.0 millijoules vs 8.2+/-1.9 millijoules, p<0.05); whereas, in the DCM patient, the reduction in KE of retained inflow was 18-fold greater than that of the blood tracing the direct route.

    CONCLUSION:

    Multidimensional flow mapping can measure the paths, compartmentalization and kinetic energy changes of blood flowing into the LV, demonstrating differences of KE loss between compartments, and potentially between the flows in normal and dilated left ventricles.

  • 4.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Bissell, Malenka
    University of Oxford, England.
    Barker, Alex J.
    Northwestern University, IL 60611 USA.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. University of Calif San Francisco, CA USA.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Francios, Christopher J.
    University of Wisconsin, WI 53706 USA.
    Frydrychowicz, Alex
    University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Germany.
    Geiger, Julia
    University of Childrens Hospital Zurich, Switzerland.
    Giese, Daniel
    University Hospital Cologne, Germany.
    Hope, Michael D.
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA USA.
    Kilner, Philip J.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Kozerke, Sebastian
    University of Zurich, Switzerland; ETH, Switzerland.
    Myerson, Saul
    University of Oxford, England.
    Neubauer, Stefan
    University of Oxford, England.
    Wieben, Oliver
    University of Wisconsin, WI 53706 USA.
    Markl, Michael
    Northwestern University, IL 60611 USA; Northwestern University, IL 60611 USA.
    4D flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance consensus statement2015In: Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, ISSN 1097-6647, E-ISSN 1532-429X, Vol. 17, no 72Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pulsatile blood flow through the cavities of the heart and great vessels is time-varying and multidirectional. Access to all regions, phases and directions of cardiovascular flows has formerly been limited. Four-dimensional (4D) flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has enabled more comprehensive access to such flows, with typical spatial resolution of 1.5x1.5x1.5 - 3x3x3 mm(3), typical temporal resolution of 30-40 ms, and acquisition times in the order of 5 to 25 min. This consensus paper is the work of physicists, physicians and biomedical engineers, active in the development and implementation of 4D Flow CMR, who have repeatedly met to share experience and ideas. The paper aims to assist understanding of acquisition and analysis methods, and their potential clinical applications with a focus on the heart and greater vessels. We describe that 4D Flow CMR can be clinically advantageous because placement of a single acquisition volume is straightforward and enables flow through any plane across it to be calculated retrospectively and with good accuracy. We also specify research and development goals that have yet to be satisfactorily achieved. Derived flow parameters, generally needing further development or validation for clinical use, include measurements of wall shear stress, pressure difference, turbulent kinetic energy, and intracardiac flow components. The dependence of measurement accuracy on acquisition parameters is considered, as are the uses of different visualization strategies for appropriate representation of time-varying multidirectional flow fields. Finally, we offer suggestions for more consistent, user-friendly implementation of 4D Flow CMR acquisition and data handling with a view to multicenter studies and more widespread adoption of the approach in routine clinical investigations.

  • 5.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Eriksson, Jonatan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F.
    University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Extending 4D Flow Visualization to the Human Right Ventricle2009In: Proceedings of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine: 17th Scientific Meeting 2009, International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine , 2009, p. 3860-3860Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The right ventricle has an important role in cardiovascular disease. However, because of the complex geometry and the sensitivity to the respiratory cycle, imaging of the right ventricle is challenging. We investigated whether 3D cine phase-contrast MRI can provide data with sufficient accuracy for visualizations of the 4D blood flow in the right ventricle. Whole-heart 4D flow measurements with optimized imaging parameters and post-processing tools were made in healthy volunteers. Pathlines emitted from the right atrium could be traced through the right ventricle to the pulmonary artery without leaving the blood pool and thereby met our criteria for sufficient accuracy.

  • 6.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Carlhäll, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Boano, Gabriella
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Hermansson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Bolger, Ann F.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology.
    Hemodynamic aspects of mitral regurgitation assessed by generalized phase-contrast MRI2011In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 582-588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Mitral regurgitation creates a high velocity jet into the left atrium (LA), contributing both volume andpressure; we hypothesized that the severity of regurgitation would be reflected in the degree of LA flowdistortion.

    Material and Methods: Three-dimensional cine PC-MRI was applied to determine LA flow patterns andturbulent kinetic energy (TKE) in seven subjects (five patients with posterior mitral leaflet prolapse, two normalsubjects). In addition, the regurgitant volume and the time-velocity profiles in the pulmonary veins weremeasured.

    Results: The LA flow in the mitral regurgitation patients was highly disturbed with elevated values of TKE.Peak TKE occurred consistently at late systole. The total LA TKE was closely related to the regurgitant volume.LA flow patterns were characterized by a pronounced vortex in proximity to the regurgitant jet. In some patients,pronounced discordances were observed between individual pulmonary venous inflows, but these could not berelated to the direction of the flow jet or parameters describing global LA hemodynamics.

    Conclusion: PC-MRI permits investigations of atrial and pulmonary vein flow patterns and TKE in significantmitral regurgitation, reflecting the impact of the highly disturbed blood flow that accompanies this importantvalve disease.

  • 7.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Assessment of fluctuating velocities in disturbed cardiovascular blood flow: in vivo feasibility of generalized phase-contrast MRI2008In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 655-663Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    To evaluate the feasibility of generalized phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) for the noninvasive assessment of fluctuating velocities in cardiovascular blood flow.

    Materials and Methods

    Multidimensional PC-MRI was used in a generalized manner to map mean flow velocities and intravoxel velocity standard deviation (IVSD) values in one healthy aorta and in three patients with different cardiovascular diseases. The acquired data were used to assess the kinetic energy of both the mean (MKE) and the fluctuating (TKE) velocity field.

    Results

    In all of the subjects, both mean and fluctuating flow data were successfully acquired. The highest TKE values in the patients were found at sites characterized by abnormal flow conditions. No regional increase in TKE was found in the normal aorta.

    Conclusion

    PC-MRI IVSD mapping is able to detect flow abnormalities in a variety of human cardiovascular conditions and shows promise for the quantitative assessment of turbulence. This approach may assist in clarifying the role of disturbed hemodynamics in cardiovascular diseases.

  • 8.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Assessment of Turbulent Flow using Magnetic Resonance Imaging2007In: IX Svenska Kardiovaskulära Vårmötet,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 9.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Improved image acquisition and processing allow accurate 4D flow investigations of the right ventricle2008In: Medicinteknikdagarna,2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 10.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics .
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    In-vivo quantification of turbulent velocity fluctuations2007In: 15th Int Soc Magn Reson Med,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Non-invsive assessment of turbulent flow using magnetic resonance imaging2007In: Medicinteknikdagarna,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Franzén, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Bolger, Ann F.
    University of California San Fransisco, San Fransisco, California, United States.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    In-Vitro Turbulence Mapping in Prosthetic Heart Valves using Generalized Phase-Contrast MRI2009In: Proc. Intl. Soc. Mag. Reson. Med., 2009, p. 3941-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Ebbers, Tino
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Calculation of relative cardiac pressure along streamlines using time-resolved 3D phase contrast MRI1999In: Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance,1999, 1999, p. 290-291Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Ebbers, Tino
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Particle trace visualization of cardiac flow patterns using 3D phase contrast MRI: an in vitro comparison with streamlines created using dye.1999In: Proc Intl Soc Magn Reson Med 7,1999, 1999, p. 2025-2025Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Eriksson, Jonatan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bolger, Ann F.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Carlhäll, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology.
    Spatial heterogeneity of 4D relative pressure fields in the human left ventricle2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Blood flow throughout the cardiovascular system is driven by pressure differences generated by the contraction and relaxation of the heart, where blood accelerates from high to low pressure areas. Absolute intracardiac pressure cannot be measured noninvasively, but relative pressure can be calculated. The aim of this study was to assess the spatial heterogeneity of the 4D relative pressure fields in the human left ventricle (LV).

    Twelve healthy subjects underwent MRI examination where 4D flow as well as morphological data were acquired. The morphological data were segmented, and the segmentation used as boundary condition when computing relative pressure fields from the pressure Poisson equation using a multi grid solver. The LV lumen was divided according to a seventeen segment model in order to assess spatial heterogeneity and present the extensive amount of data in a comprehensive manner.

    The basal anteroseptal segment shows a significantly lower median pressure than the opposite basal inferolateral segment during both early and late diastolic filling (p<0.0005 and p=0.0024, respectively). Along the long axis, the relative pressure in the apical segments are significantly higher relative to the basal segments (p<0.0005) along both the anteroseptal and inferolateral sides at and after the peaks of E-wave and A-wave.

    During diastole the main pressure differences in the LV occur along the basal-apical axis. However, pressure differences can also be found in the short-axis direction, and may also reflect important aspects of atrioventricular coupling.

  • 16.
    Eriksson, Jonatan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. University of Calif San Francisco, CA USA.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Spatial Heterogeneity of Four-Dimensional Relative Pressure Fields in the Human Left Ventricle2015In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, ISSN 0740-3194, E-ISSN 1522-2594, Vol. 74, no 6, p. 1716-1725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To assess the spatial heterogeneity of the four-dimensional (4D) relative pressure fields in the healthy human left ventricle (LV) and provide reference data for normal LV relative pressure. Methods: Twelve healthy subjects underwent a cardiac MRI examination where 4D flow and morphological data were acquired. The latter data were segmented and used to define the borders of the LV for computation of relative pressure fields using the pressure Poisson equation. The LV lumen was divided into 17 pie-shaped segments. Results: In the normal left ventricle, the relative pressure in the apical segments was significantly higher relative to the basal segments (P &lt; 0.0005) along both the anteroseptal and inferolateral sides after the peaks of early (E-wave) and late (A-wave) diastolic filling. The basal anteroseptal segment showed significantly lower median pressure than the opposite basal inferolateral segment during both E-wave (P &lt; 0.0005) and A-wave (P = 0.0024). Conclusion: Relative pressure in the left ventricle is heterogeneous. During diastole, the main pressure differences in the LV occur along the basal-apical axis. However, pressure differences were also found in the short axis direction and may reflect important aspects of atrioventricular coupling. Additionally, this study provides reference data on LV pressure dynamics for a group of healthy subjects. (C) 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • 17.
    Eriksson, Jonatan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bolger, Ann F.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology.
    Carlhäll, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Four-dimensional blood flow-specific markers of LV dysfunction in dilated cardiomyopathy2013In: European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 2047-2404, E-ISSN 2047-2412, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 417-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims : Patients with mild heart failure (HF) who are clinically compensated may have normal left ventricular (LV) stroke volume (SV). Despite this, altered intra-ventricular flow patterns have been recognized in these subjects. We hypothesized that, compared with normal LVs, flow in myopathic LVs would demonstrate a smaller proportion of inflow volume passing directly to ejection and diminished the end-diastolic preservation of the inflow kinetic energy (KE).

    Methods and results : In 10 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) (49 ± 14 years, six females) and 10 healthy subjects (44 ± 17 years, four females), four-dimensional MRI velocity and morphological data were acquired. A previously validated method was used to separate the LV end-diastolic volume (EDV) into four flow components based on the blood's locations at the beginning and end of the cardiac cycle. KE was calculated over the cardiac cycle for each component. The EDV was larger (P = 0.021) and the ejection fraction smaller (P < 0.001) in DCM compared with healthy subjects; the SV was equivalent (DCM: 77 ± 19, healthy: 79 ± 16 mL). The proportion of the total LV inflow that passed directly to ejection was smaller in DCM (P = 0.000), but the end-diastolic KE/mL of the direct flow was not different in the two groups (NS).

    Conclusion : Despite equivalent LVSVs, HF patients with mild LV remodelling demonstrate altered diastolic flow routes through the LV and impaired preservation of inflow KE at pre-systole compared with healthy subjects. These unique flow-specific changes in the flow route and energetics are detectable despite clinical compensation, and may prove useful as subclinical markers of LV dysfunction.

  • 18.
    Eriksson, Jonatan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Semi-automatic quantification of 4D left ventricular blood flow2010In: JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE, ISSN 1097-6647, Vol. 12, no 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The beating heart is the generator of blood flow through the cardiovascular system. Within the hearts own chambers, normal complex blood flow patterns can be disturbed by diseases. Methods for the quantification of intra-cardiac blood flow, with its 4D (3D+time) nature, are lacking. We sought to develop and validate a novel semi-automatic analysis approach that integrates flow and morphological data. Method: In six healthy subjects and three patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, three-directional, three-dimensional cine phase-contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) velocity data and balanced steady-state free-precession long- and short-axis images were acquired. The LV endocardium was segmented from the short-axis images at the times of isovolumetric contraction (IVC) and isovolumetric relaxation (IVR). At the time of IVC, pathlines were emitted from the IVC LV blood volume and traced forwards and backwards in time until IVR, thus including the entire cardiac cycle. The IVR volume was used to determine if and where the pathlines left the LV. This information was used to automatically separate the pathlines into four different components of flow: Direct Flow, Retained Inflow, Delayed Ejection Flow and Residual Volume. Blood volumes were calculated for every component by multiplying the number of pathlines with the blood volume represented by each pathline. The accuracy and inter- and intra-observer reproducibility of the approach were evaluated by analyzing volumes of LV inflow and outflow, the four flow components, and the end-diastolic volume. Results: The volume and distribution of the LV flow components were determined in all subjects. The calculated LV outflow volumes [ml] (67 +/- 13) appeared to fall in between those obtained by through-plane phase-contrast CMR (77 +/- 16) and Doppler ultrasound (58 +/- 10), respectively. Calculated volumes of LV inflow (68 +/- 11) and outflow (67 +/- 13) were well matched (NS). Low inter- and intra-observer variability for the assessment of the volumes of the flow components was obtained. Conclusions: This semi-automatic analysis approach for the quantification of 4D blood flow resulted in accurate LV inflow and outflow volumes and a high reproducibility for the assessment of LV flow components.

  • 19.
    Eriksson, Jonatan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Improved visualization and quantification of 4D intracardiac blood flow2008In: Medicinteknikdagarna,2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Eriksson, Jonatan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Quantification of presystolic blood flow organization and energetics in the human left ventricle2011In: AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY-HEART AND CIRCULATORY PHYSIOLOGY, ISSN 0363-6135, Vol. 300, no 6, p. H2135-H2141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intracardiac blood flow patterns are potentially important to cardiac pumping efficiency. However, these complex flow patterns remain incompletely characterized both in health and disease. We hypothesized that normal left ventricular (LV) blood flow patterns would preferentially optimize a portion of the end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) for effective and rapid systolic ejection by virtue of location near and motion towards the LV outflow tract (LVOT). Three-dimensional cine velocity and morphological data were acquired in 12 healthy persons and 1 patient with dilated cardiomyopathy using MRI. A previously validated method was used for analysis in which the LVEDV was separated into four functional flow components based on the bloods locations at the beginning and end of the cardiac cycle. Each components volume, kinetic energy (KE), site, direction, and linear momentum relative to the LVOT were calculated. Of the four components, the LV inflow that passes directly to outflow in a single cardiac cycle (Direct Flow) had the largest volume. At the time of isovolumic contraction, Direct Flow had the greatest amount of KE and the most favorable combination of distance, angle, and linear momentum relative to the LVOT. Atrial contraction boosted the late diastolic KE of the ejected components. We conclude that normal diastolic LV flow creates favorable conditions for ensuing ejection, defined by proximity and energetics, for the Direct Flow, and that atrial contraction augments the end-diastolic KE of the ejection volume. The correlation of Direct Flow characteristics with ejection efficiency might be a relevant investigative target in cardiac failure.

  • 21.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Boano, G
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Multidimensional Turbulence Mapping in Mitral Insufficiency2008In: Soc Cardiovascular Magn Reson. 11th Scientific Sessions,2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    F Bolger, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    MR allows a unique possibility to see how the blood flow affects the cardiovascular system [MR ger unik möjlighet se hur blodflödet inverkar på hjärtkärlsystemet.]2009In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 106, no 30-31, p. 1901-1904Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 23.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Franzen, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    In Vitro Assessment of Flow Patterns and Turbulence Intensity in Prosthetic Heart Valves Using Generalized Phase-Contrast MRI2010In: JOURNAL OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING, ISSN 1053-1807, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 1075-1080Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To assess in vitro the three-dimensional mean velocity field and the extent and degree of turbulence intensity (TI) in different prosthetic heart valves using a generalization of phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI). Materials and Methods: Four 27-mm aortic valves (Bjork-Shiley Monostrut tilting-disc, St. Jude Medical Standard bileaflet, Medtronic Mosaic stented and Freestyle stentless porcine valve) were tested under steady inflow conditions in a Plexiglas phantom. Three-dimensional PC-MRI data were acquired to measure the mean velocity field and the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), a direction-independent measure of TI. Results: Velocity and TI estimates could be obtained up and downstream of the valves, except where metallic structure in the valves caused signal void. Distinct differences in the location, extent, and peak values of velocity and TI were observed between the valves tested. The maximum values of TKE varied between the different valves: tilting disc, 100 J/m(3); bileaflet, 115 J/m(3); stented, 200 J/m(3); stentless, 145 J/m(3). Conclusion: The TI downstream from a prosthetic heart valve is dependent on the specific valve design. Generalized PC-MRI can be used to quantify velocity and TI downstream from prosthetic heart valves, which may allow assessment of these aspects of prosthetic valvular function in postoperative patients.

  • 24.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Franzén, Stefan
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    In Vitro Assessment of Flow Patterns and Turbulence Intensity in Prosthetic Heart Valves Using Generalized Phase-Contrast Magnetic Resonance ImagingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To assess in vitro the three-dimensional mean velocity field and the extent and degree of turbulenceintensity in different prosthetic heart valves using a generalization of phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging(PC-MRI).

    Material and Methods: Four 27 mm aortic valves (Björk-Shiley Monostrut tilting-disc, St. Jude MedicalStandard bileaflet, Medtronic Mosaic stented and Freestyle stentless porcine valve) were tested under steadyinflow conditions in a Plexiglas phantom. Three-dimensional PC-MRI data were acquired to measure the meanvelocity field and the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), a direction-independent measure of turbulence intensity.

    Results: Velocity and turbulence intensity estimates could be obtained up and downstream of the valves, exceptwhere metallic structure in the valves caused signal void. Distinct differences in the location, extent and peakvalues of velocity and turbulence intensity were observed between the valves tested. The maximum values ofTKE varied between the different valves: tilting disc, 100 J/m3; bileaflet, 115 J/m3; stented, 200 J/m3; stentless,145 J/m3.

    Conclusion: The turbulence intensity downstream from a prosthetic heart valve is dependent on the specificvalve design. Generalized PC-MRI can be used to quantify velocity and turbulence intensity downstream fromprosthetic heart valves, which may allow assessment of these aspects of prosthetic valvular function inpostoperative patients.

  • 25.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Complex directions of pulmonary venous inflow: Intuitive display with 3D MRI phase contrast1998In: J Am Soc Echocardiography,1998, 1998, p. 516-516Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Discrete three-dimensional pathways of right and left pulmonary venous inflow studied with phase contrast MRI1999In: J Am Coll Cardiol,1999, 1999, p. 477-478aConference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Quantification of intra ventricular vortices from 3D phase contrast MRI1999In: American Heart Assocation 72nd Scientific Session,1999, 1999Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bolger, Ann F.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Öhman, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pitfalls in Doppler evaluation of diastolic function: insights from three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging1999In: Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography, ISSN 0894-7317, E-ISSN 1097-6795, Vol. 12, no 10, p. 817-826Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultrasound-Doppler assessment of diastolic function is subject to velocity errors caused by angle sensitivity and a fixed location of the sample volume. We used 3-dimensional phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate these errors in 10 patients with hypertension and in 10 healthy volunteers. The single (Doppler) and triple (MRI) component velocity was measured at early (E) and late (A) inflow along Doppler-like sample lines or 3-dimensional particle traces generated from the MRI data. Doppler measurements underestimated MRI velocities by 9.4% ± 8.6%; the effect on the E/A ratio was larger and more variable. Measuring early and late diastolic inflows from a single line demonstrated the error caused by their 3-dimensional spatial offset. Both errors were minimized by calculating the E/A ratio from maximal E and A values without constraint to a single line. Alignment and spatial offset are important sources of error in Doppler diastolic parameters. Improved accuracy may be achieved with the use of maximal E and A velocities from wherever they occur in the left ventricle.

  • 29.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Three-dimensional flow in the human left atrium2001In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 448-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Abnormal flow patterns in the left atrium in atrial fibrillation or mitral stenosis are associated with an increased risk of thrombosis and systemic embolisation; the characteristics of normal atrial flow that avoid stasis have not been well defined.

    OBJECTIVES: To present a three dimensional particle trace visualisation of normal left atrial flow in vivo, constructed from flow velocities in three dimensional space.

    METHODS: Particle trace visualisation of time resolved three dimensional magnetic resonance imaging velocity measurements was used to provide a display of intracardiac flow without the limitations of angle sensitivity or restriction to imaging planes. Global flow patterns of the left atrium were studied in 11 healthy volunteers.

    RESULTS: In all subjects vortical flow was observed in the atrium during systole and diastolic diastasis (mean (SD) duration of systolic vortex, 280 (77) ms; and of diastolic vortex, 256 (118) ms). The volume incorporated and recirculated within the vortices originated predominantly from the left pulmonary veins. Inflow from the right veins passed along the vortex periphery, constrained between the vortex and the atrial wall.

    CONCLUSIONS: Global left atrial flow in the normal human heart comprises consistent patterns specific to the phase of the cardiac cycle. Separate paths of left and right pulmonary venous inflow and vortex formation may have beneficial effects in avoiding left atrial stasis in the normal subject in sinus rhythm.

  • 30.
    Haraldsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Improved estimation and visualization of two-dimensional myocardial strain rate using MR velocity mapping2008In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 604-611Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To estimate regional myocardial strain rate, with reduced sensitivity to noise and velocities outside the region of interest, and provide a visualization of the spatial variation of the obtained tensor field within the myocardium. Materials and Methods: Myocardial velocities were measured using two-dimensional phase contrast velocity mapping. Velocity gradients were estimated using normalized convolution and the calculated 2D strain rate tensor field was visualized using a glyph representation. Validation utilized a numerical phantom with known strain rate distribution. Strain rate glyph visualizations were created for normal myocardium in both systole and diastole and compared to a patient with an anteroseptal infarction. Results: In the phantom study the strain rate calculated with normalized convolution showed a very good agreement with the analytic solution, while traditional methods for gradient estimation were shown to be sensitive to both noise and surrounding velocity data. Normal myocardium showed a homogenous strain rate distribution, while a heterogeneous strain rate can be clearly seen in the patient data. Conclusion: The proposed approach for quantification and visualization of the regional myocardial strain rate can provide an objective measure of regional myocardial contraction and relaxation that may be valuable for the assessment of myocardial heart disease. © 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • 31.
    Kvitting, John-Peder Escobar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnetresonanstomografi ger unika möjligheter att bedöma blodflödet och dess inverkan på hjärt och kärlsystemet.2009In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 106, p. 1901-1904Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Kvitting, J.P.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sigfridsson, A.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wigström, L.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bolger, A.F.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Analysis of human myocardial dynamics using virtual markers based on magnetic resonance imaging2010In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 23-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Myocardial dynamics are three-dimensional (3D) and time-varying. Cineradiography of surgically implanted makers in animals or patients is accurate for assessing these events, but this invasive method potentially alters myocardial motion. The aim of the study was to quantify myocardial motion using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and hence to provide a non-invasive approach to characterize 3D myocardial dynamics.

    Methods: Myocardial motion was quantified in ten normal volunteers by tracking the Lagrangian motion of individual points (i.e. virtual markers), based on time-resolved 3D phase-contrast MRI data and Fourier tracking. Nine points in the myocardium were tracked over the entire cardiac cycle, allowing a wire frame model to be generated and systolic and diastolic events identified.

    Results: Radius of curvature of the left ventricular (LV) wall was calculated from the virtual markers; the ratio between the anterior–posterior (AP) and septal–lateral (SL) walls in the LV shows an oval shape of the apical short axis plane at end systole (ES) and more circular at end diastole (ED). The AP/SL ratio for the basal plane shows an oval shape at ES and ED. We found that the rotation of the basal plane in ES was less compared to the apical plane [−2·0 ± 2·2 versus 4·1 ± 2·6 degrees (P<0·005)]. The apical plane rotated counter clock wise as viewed from the apex.

    Conclusion: This new non-invasive tool, despite current limitations in temporal and spatial resolution, may provide a comprehensive set of virtual myocardial markers throughout the entire LV without the confounding effects introduced by surgical implantation.

  • 33. Kvitting, JPE
    et al.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Olin, CL
    Assessment of the 3-D flow pattern in the sinuses of Valsalva2003In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, ISSN 0735-1097, E-ISSN 1558-3597, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 437A-437AConference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Wigström, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    The effects of maxwell terms on particle traces calculated from 3D cine phase contrast images1999In: Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance,1999, 1999, p. 93-93Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Zajac, Jacub
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Eriksson, Jonatan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Bolger, Ann F.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Carlhäll, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Turbulent Kinetic Energy in Normal and Myopathic Left Ventricles2015In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 1021-1029Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To assess turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) within the left ventricle (LV) of healthy subjects using novel 4D flow MRI methods and to compare TKE values to those from a spectrum of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM).

    Methods: 4D flow and morphological MRI-data were acquired in 11 healthy subjects and 9 patients with different degrees of diastolic dysfunction. TKELV was calculated within the LV at each diastolic time frame. At peak early (E) and late (A) diastolic filling, the TKELV was compared to transmitral peak velocity, LV diameter and mitral annular diameter.

    Results: In the majority of all subjects, peaks in TKELV could be observed at E and A. Peak TKELV at E was not different between the groups, and correlated with mitral annular dimensions. Peak TKELV at A was higher in DCM patients compared to healthy subjects, and was related to LV diameter and transmitral velocity.

    Conclusions: In normal LVs, TKE values are low. Values are highest during early diastole, and diminish with increasing LV size. In a heterogeneous group of DCM patients, late diastolic TKE values are higher than in healthy subjects. Kinetic energy loss due to elevated late diastolic TKE may reflect inefficient flow in dilated LVs.

1 - 35 of 35
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