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  • 1.
    Fredriksson, B
    et al.
    Saab-Scania AB, Aircraft Division.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Endahl, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Numerical Solutions to Contact, Friction and Crack problems with Applications1984In: Engineering computations, ISSN 0264-4401, E-ISSN 1758-7077, Vol. 1, no 2, 133-143 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of contact and friction problems in different application areas is discussed. Methods and algorithms for numerical solutions using the finite element method are presented. Both elastic and elastic plastic materials are included as well as combination of contact and crack problems. The methods are applied to practical applications such as bolted joints, lugs and roller bearings.

  • 2.
    Fredriksson, Billy
    et al.
    Saab-Scania AB, Aircraft Division.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pressure Distribution in Crowned Roller Contacts1984In: Engineering Analysis, ISSN 0955-7997, Vol. 1, no 1, 32-39 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fatigue life of a roller bearing is heavily influenced by the crowning profile of the rollers. The pressure distribution for different types of crowning has been studied. For solving this three-dimensional contact problem a numerical procedure for analysis of general elasto-static contact problems has been used. The method is based on an incremental and iterative algorithm applied to a set of linear equations established with finite element technique. The contact surfaces are assumed to be perfectly smooth, dry and frictionless. The pressure distribution between the bodies has been compared with results obtained from other methods. The influence on the pressure distribution by the free boundary at the end of the finite cylinders has also been investigated. It is also shown that it is possible to use the same finite element model to study different types of crowning, thus making it efficient to perform paramater surveys. A method of obtaining required or ‘optimal’ pressure distribution is suggested.

  • 3. Hilding, D.
    et al.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics .
    Klarbring, Anders
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics .
    A computational methodology for shape optimization of structures in frictionless contact2001In: Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, ISSN 0045-7825, E-ISSN 1879-2138, Vol. 190, no 31, 4043-4060 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a computational methodology for shape optimization of structures in frictionless contact, which provides a basis for developing user-friendly and efficient shape optimization software. For evaluation it has been implemented as a subsystem of a general finite element software. The overall design and main principles of operation of this software are outlined. The parts connected to shape optimization are described in more detail. The key building blocks are: analytic sensitivity analysis, an adaptive finite element method, an accurate contact solver, and a sequential convex programing optimization algorithm. Results for three model application examples are presented, in which the contact pressure and the effective stress are optimized. cr 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Holmberg, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Klarbring, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fatigue constrained topology optimization2014In: Structural and multidisciplinary optimization (Print), ISSN 1615-147X, E-ISSN 1615-1488, Vol. 50, no 2, 207-219 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a contribution to a relatively unexplored application of topology optimization: structural topology optimization with fatigue constraints. A probability based high-cycle fatigue analysis is combined with principal stress calculations in order to find the topology with minimal mass that can withstand prescribed loading conditions for a specific life time. This allows us to generate optimal conceptual designs of structural components where fatigue life is the dimensioning factor.

    We describe the fatigue analysis and present ideas that makes it possible to separate the fatigue analysis from the topology optimization. The number of constraints is kept low as they are applied to stress clusters, which are created such that they give adequate representations of the local stresses. Optimized designs constrained by fatigue and static stresses are shown and a comparison is also made between stress constraints based on the von Mises criterion and the highest tensile principal stresses.

  • 5.
    Holmberg, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Saab AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Klarbring, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Global and clustered approaches for stress constrained topology optimization and deactivation of design variables2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a global (one constraint) version of the clustered approach previously developed for stress constraints, and also applied to fatigue constraints, in topology optimization. The global approach gives designs without large stress concentrations or geometric shapes that would cause stress singularities. For example, we solve the well known L-beam problem and obtain a radius at the internal corner.

    The main reason for using a global stress constraint in topology optimization is to reduce the computational cost that a high number of constraints impose. In this paper we compare the computational cost and the results obtained using a global stress constraint versus using a number of clustered stress constraints.

    We also present a method for deactivating those design variables that are not expected to change in the current iteration. The deactivation of design variables provides a considerable decrease of the computational cost and it is made in such a way that approximately the same final design is obtained as if all design variables are active.

  • 6.
    Holmberg, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Klarbring, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Stress constrained topology optimization2013In: Structural and multidisciplinary optimization (Print), ISSN 1615-147X, E-ISSN 1615-1488, Vol. 48, no 1, 33-47 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper develops and evaluates a method for handling stress constraints in topology optimization. The stress constraints are used together with an objective function that minimizes mass or maximizes stiffness, and in addition, the traditional stiffness based formulation is discussed for comparison. We use a clustering technique, where stresses for several stress evaluation points are clustered into groups using a modified P-norm to decrease the number of stress constraints and thus the computational cost. We give a detailed description of the formulations and the sensitivity analysis. This is done in a general manner, so that different element types and 2D as well as 3D structures can be treated. However, we restrict the numerical examples to 2D structures with bilinear quadrilateral elements. The three formulations and different approaches to stress constraints are compared using two well known test examples in topology optimization: the L-shaped beam and the MBB-beam. In contrast to some other papers on stress constrained topology optimization, we find that our formulation gives topologies that are significantly different from traditionally optimized designs, in that it actually manage to avoid stress concentrations. It can therefore be used to generate conceptual designs for industrial applications.

  • 7.
    Hozić, Dženan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Klarbring, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Density Filter Control of Thickness-to-Length Change of Composite Structures2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The homogenized material optimization (HMO) problem is a novel structural optimization problem that we have developed for optimization of fiber reinforced composite structures. In the HMO problem we apply a smeared-out approach to model the material properties of fiber reinforced composite materials. The objective of the HMO problem is to maximize the stiffness of a composite structure by means of finding the optimal distribution of composite material, belonging to a fixed set of fiber orientations, across the design domain. In order to obtain manufacturable solutions, we have introduced a linear density filter as a restriction method to control the thickness variation across the design domain. To examine the effect of the density filter on the thickness variation and the objective function value of composite structures, obtained in the HMO problem, we have performed numerical tests for different load cases, mesh densities and range of the filter radius.

    It is observed that for the present problem the thickness variation was mesh-independent. Both the thickness variation and objective function value depend on the load case used in the HMO problem. For all load cases the thickness variations exhibits an approximately piece-wise linear behaviour for increased filter radius. Furthermore, it was observed that an increase of filter radius would result in an moderate increase in objective function value for the solutions obtained from the HMO problem. From these results we conclude that by using a density filter, the HMO problem can be used to obtain manufacturable designs for composite structures.

  • 8.
    Hozić, Dženan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Klarbring, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Stiness and Lay-up Optimization of Composite Structures based on a Homogenized Material Approach2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present work we propose a two phase composite structure optimization method based on a novel material homogenization approach. It consists of a stiffness and a lay-up optimization problem, respectively, with the aim of obtaining manufacturable composite structures with maximized stiffness properties. The method is applied to a cantilever plate, and numerical tests were performed for three load cases and for a number of parameters settings. The results show that the proposed method can obtain manufacturable composite structures with maximized stiffness properties. In the first phase of the method, the stiffness optimization problem provides an optimal distribution of the composite material, such that the stiffness properties of the structureare maximized. The second phase, the lay-up optimization problem, provides a manufacturable lay-up sequence of discrete plies which attempts to retain the stiffness properties of the structure from the first phase.

  • 9.
    Klarbring, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics .
    Petersson, Joakim
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics .
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics .
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Topology optimization of flow networks2003In: Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, ISSN 0045-7825, E-ISSN 1879-2138, Vol. 192, no 35-36, 3909-3932 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of topology optimization is well developed for load carrying trusses, but so far not for other similar network problems. The present paper is a first study in the direction of topology optimization of flow networks. A linear network flow model based on Hagen-Poiseuille's equation is used. Cross-section areas of pipes are design variables and the objective of the optimization is to minimize a measure, which in special cases represents dissipation or pressure drop, subject to a constraint on the available (generalized) volume. A ground structure approach where cross-section areas may approach zero is used, whereby the optimal topology (and size) of the network is found.A substantial set of examples is presented: Small examples are used to illustrate difficulties related to non-convexity of the optimization problem, larger arterial tree-type networks, with bio-mechanics interpretations, illustrate basic properties of optimal networks, the effect of volume forces is exemplified.We derive optimality conditions which turns out to contain Murray's law, thereby, presenting a new derivation of this well known physiological law. Both our numerical algorithm and the derivation of optimality conditions are based on an e-perturbation where cross-section areas may become small but stay finite. An indication of the correctness of this approach is given by a theorem, the proof of which is presented in an appendix. © 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 10.
    Klarbring, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Newton Method for Contact problems with Friction and Interface Compliance1992Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Klarbring, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dynamical systems and topology optimization2010In: Structural and multidisciplinary optimization (Print), ISSN 1615-147X, E-ISSN 1615-1488, Vol. 42, no 2, 179-192 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper uses a dynamical systems approach for studying the material distribution (density or SIMP) formulation of topology optimization of structures. Such an approach means that an ordinary differential equation, such that the objective function is decreasing along a solution trajectory of this equation, is constructed. For stiffness optimization two differential equations with this property are considered. By simple explicit Euler approximations of these equations, together with projection techniques to satisfy box constraints, we obtain different iteration formulas. One of these formulas turns out to be the classical optimality criteria algorithm, which, thus, is receiving a new interpretation and framework. Based on this finding we suggest extensions of the optimality criteria algorithm. A second important feature of the dynamical systems approach, besides the purely algorithmic one, is that it points at a connection between optimization problems and natural evolution problems such as bone remodeling and damage evolution. This connection has been hinted at previously but, in the opinion of the authors, not been clearly stated since the dynamical systems concept was missing. To give an explicit example of an evolution problem that is in this way connected to an optimization problem, we study a model of bone remodeling. Numerical examples, related to both the algorithmic issue and the issue of natural evolution represented as bone remodeling, are presented.

  • 12.
    Klarbring, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dynamical systems, SIMP, bone remodeling and time dependent loads2012In: Structural and multidisciplinary optimization (Print), ISSN 1615-147X, E-ISSN 1615-1488, Vol. 45, no 3, 359-366 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dynamical systems approach to sizing and SIMP topology optimization, introduced in a previous paper, is extended to the case of time-varying loads. A general dynamical system, satisfying a Lyaponov-type descent condition, is derived and specialized to a goal function combining stiffness and mass. For a cyclic time-dependent load it is indicated how, in the limit of short cycles compared to the overall time scale, this can be handled by multiple load cases. Numerical examples, both for a convex and a non-convex case, illustrates the theory.

  • 13.
    Klarbring, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Growth, Optimzation and Configurational Forces2008In: In D. Ambrosi, K. Garikipati and E. Kuhl (Eds) Mini-Workshop: The Mathematics of Growth and Remodelling of Soft Biological Tissues,, Oberwohlfach: Mathematisches Forschungsinstitut , 2008, 2239-2243 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Klarbring, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lazy zone bone remodeling theory and its relation to topology optimization2012In: Annals of Solid and Structural Mechanics, ISSN 1867-6936, Vol. 4, no 1-2, 25-32 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The connection between apparent density-type bone remodeling theories and density formulations of topology optimization is well known from a large number of publications and its theoretical basis has recently been discussed by making use of a dynamical systems approach to optimization. The present paper takes this connection one step further by showing how the Coleman–Noll procedure of rational thermodynamics can be used to derive general dynamical systems, where a special case includes the lazy zone concept of bone remodeling theory. It is also shown how a numerical solution method for the dynamical system can be developed by using the sequential convex approximation idea. The method is employed to obtain a series of solutions that show the influence of modeling parameters representing elements of plasticity and viscosity in the growth process.

  • 15.
    Klarbring, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    ODE Approach to Topology Optimization2009In: 8th World Congress on Structural and Multidisciplinary Optimization, June 1-5, 2009, Lisbon, Portugal, Lissabon, Portugal, 2009, 1148-1148 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Klarbring, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Satha, Ganarupan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nutrient modulated structural design with application to growth and degradation2015In: Zeitschrift für angewandte Mathematik und Mechanik, ISSN 0044-2267, E-ISSN 1521-4001, Vol. 95, no 11, 1323-1334 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phenomena such as biological growth and damage evolution can be thought of as time evolving processes, the directions of which are governed by descendent of certain goal functions. Mathematically this means using a dynamical systems approach to optimization. We extend such an approach by introducing a field quantity, representing nutrients or other non-mechanical stimuli, that modulate growth and damage evolution. The derivation of a generic model is systematic, starting from a Lyaponov-type descent condition and utilizing a Coleman-Noll strategy. A numerical algorithm for finding stationary points of the resulting dynamical system is suggested and applied to two model problems where the influence of different levels of nutrient sensitivity are observed. The paper demonstrates the use of a new modeling technique and shows its application in deriving a generic problem of growth and damage evolution. (C) 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  • 17.
    Marciniec, A
    et al.
    Technical University of Rzeszow, Poland.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Load Distribution in flexibly Supported Three-Row Roller Slew Bearings1994In: Tribology Transactions, ISSN 1040-2004, E-ISSN 1547-397X, Vol. 37, no 4, 757-762 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In general, slew bearings are less firmly supported by their mounting structures than small bearings. Hence, the load distribution around the bearing may be vastly different than that predicted by classic bearing formulas. The finite element method has been employed to determine load distribution in a three-row roller slew bearing mounted between two flexible, ring shaped supporting structures composed of beam elements. A special bar element modeling the system of two opposite rollers in contact with its raceways has been elaborated. The influence of the nonlinear force displacement characteristics of each of the rollers, as well as the influence of gaps between the rollers and its raceways have been taken into account. The nonlinear contact problem has been solved utilizing the Newton-Raphson method with continually updated stiffness matrix due to both element nonlinearity and contact status. The effect of a number of design parameters on the load distribution has been investigated.

  • 18. Petersson, J
    et al.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Topology Optimization in Fluid Mechanics2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Selskog, Pernilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, M.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kinematics of the Heart: Finite Element and 3D Time-Resolved Phase Contrast Magnetic resonance Imaging2002In: Proceedings of 9th Workshop on The Finite Element Method in Biomedical Engineering, Biomechanics and Related Fields, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complex three-dimensional structure of the heart muscle (myocardium) has anisotropic, non-linear and time-dependent mechanical properties. During the cardiac cycle, the myocardium undergoes large elastic deformations as a consequence of the active muscle contraction along the muscle fibers and their relaxation, respectively. A four-dimensional (4D) description (three spatial dimensions + time) of the mechanical properties of the myocardium would be of interest in the assessment of myocardial function. Time-resolved 3D phase contrast MRI makes it possible to quantify all three velocity components, which is necessary to as accurately as possible describe the velocities in the heart. The velocity data may be used for investigation of the deformation of the heart and calculation of strain in the myocardial wall. We present a method for estimation of myocardial kinematics using finite elements and 3D time-resolved phase contrast MRI.

  • 20.
    Thellner, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Topology optimization with design-dependant using simultaneous shape and topology variationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a new method for topology optimization with design-dependent loads. In traditional topology optimization a fixed design domain on which the loads and constraints are specified is used. Such an approach can not handle loads which depend on the design. Here we introduce domain shape variation. using techniques from shape optimization, simultaneously with topology optimization. For topology optimization we use the SIMP interpolation function together with a filter as restriction method. The stiffness of the structure is maximized given a limited alllount of material. Three numerical examples are presented which illustrates the proposed method.

  • 21.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    Linköping University. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering.
    An Automatic incrementation technique for Contact problems with Friction1984In: Computer & Structures, Vol. 19, no 3, 393-400 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    Linköping University. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering.
    Contact Problems with Friction in General Purpose Finite Element Computer Programs1983In: Computer & Structures, Vol. 16, no 1-4, 487-498 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    TRINITAS - en effektiv integrerad miljö för finit elementanalys med exempel från kontaktproblem2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Allestam, H
    Klarbring, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Shape Optimization in an Object-Oriented Finite Element Program Environment1993Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics .
    Klarbring, Anders
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics .
    Conceptual Design of Optimal Structural Properties of Modular Car Product families2006In: NAFEMS Nordic Seminar,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Klarbring, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Conceptual optimal design of modular car product families using simultaneous size, shape and topology optimization2007In: Finite elements in analysis and design (Print), ISSN 0168-874X, E-ISSN 1872-6925, Vol. 43, 1050-1061 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics .
    Klarbring, Anders
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics .
    Optimal Modules in Conceptual design of Car product Families2006In: Nordic Seminar on Computational Mechanics,2006, Lund: Lund University , 2006, 206- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics .
    Klarbring, Anders
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics .
    Structural Optimization of Modular Product Families2007In: 7th World Congress on Structural and Multidisciplinary Optimization,2007, Seoul: ISSMO , 2007, 210- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Torstenfelt, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics .
    Klarbring, Anders
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics .
    Structural optimization of modular product families with application to car space frame structures2006In: Structural and multidisciplinary optimization (Print), ISSN 1615-147X, E-ISSN 1615-1488, Vol. 32, no 2, 133-140 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper extends classical structural optimization from single-product optimization to optimization of a whole family of products that have common modules. It integrates the family commonality problem with the finite element models of the structures. A general mathematical frame where optimization is seen as a balance between cost and performance is given. The most obvious cost function is mass, while performance is taken to be a weighted sum of compliances. As a case study, a car product family consisting of three products is presented. These three products are a base model, a seven-seat version, and a pickup version. The study shows how optimal results are effected by requiring modules to be shared between products. Loads emanating from prescribed acceleration fields that simulate crash situations are used. This is a proof-of-concept paper which is a first step toward including more general manufacturing costs than mass and performance measures other than compliance.

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