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  • 1.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Symptom burden among people with chronic disease2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Chronic diseases tend to increase with old age. Older people with chronic disease are commonly suffering from conditions which produce a multiplicity of symptoms and a decreased health-related quality of life. Nurses have a responsibility to prevent, ease or delay a negative outcome through symptom management, or assist in achieving an acceptable level of symptom relief.

    Aim: The overall aim of the thesis was to describe different aspects of symptom burden from the perspective of community-dwelling people with chronic disease.

    Methods: This thesis is based upon four papers that used both quantitative and qualitative data to describe different aspects of symptom burden, experienced by people with chronic diseases. Paper (I) is a cross-sectional study with 91 participants diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Papers (II and IV) are based upon secondary outcome data from a randomized controlled trial with 382 community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity. Paper (II) is a cross-sectional study and Paper (IV) has a descriptive and an explorative design reporting on the trajectory of symptom prevalence and symptom burden. Paper (III) is a qualitative study with participants from the AGe-FIT.

    Results: Among people diagnosed with COPD the most prevalent symptoms with the highest symptom burden scores were shortness of breath, dry mouth, cough, sleep problems, and lack of energy, with just a few differences between participants with moderate and severe airflow limitation (I). For older people with multimorbidity, pain was the symptom with the highest prevalence and burden. Other highly prevalent symptoms were lack of energy and a dry mouth. Poor vision, likelihood of depression, and diagnoses of the digestive system were independently related to the total symptom burden score (II). The symptoms experienced by the older people were persistent and the symptom burden remained high over time (IV). The experience of living with a high symptom burden was described as an endless struggle. The analysis revealed an overall theme, “To adjust and endure” and three sub-themes, “to feel inadequate and limited”, “to feel dependent”, and “to feel dejected” (III).

    Conclusions: The results of this thesis indicate the importance of early symptom identification. People with chronic diseases have an unmet need for optimized treatment that focuses on the total symptom burden, and not only disease specific symptoms. A large proportion of older people with multimorbidity suffer a high and persistent symptom burden, and the prevalence and trajectory of pain are high. Older people sometimes think their high age is the reason they experience a diversity of symptoms, and they do not always communicate these to their health-care provider.

    List of papers
    1. Symptom burden in stable COPD patients with moderate or severe airflow limitation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Symptom burden in stable COPD patients with moderate or severe airflow limitation
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 351-357Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    To describe a multidimensional symptom profile in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and determine whether symptom experience differed between patients with moderate or severe airflow limitations.

    BACKGROUND:

    Patients with severe airflow limitation experience numerous symptoms, but little is known regarding patients with moderate airflow limitation.

    METHODS:

    A multidimensional symptom profile (Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale) was assessed in 42 outpatients with moderate and 49 with severe airflow limitations.

    RESULTS:

    The mean number of symptoms in the total sample was 7.9 (±4.3) with no difference between patients with moderate and severe airflow limitations. The most prevalent symptoms with the highest MSAS symptom burden scores were shortness of breath, dry mouth, cough, sleep problems, and lack of energy in both groups.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Patients with moderate or severe airflow limitations experience multiple symptoms with high severity and distress. An assessment of their multidimensional symptom profile might contribute to better symptom management.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2014
    Keywords
    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; Symptom assessment; Symptom experience; Respiratory nursing
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109384 (URN)10.1016/j.hrtlng.2014.04.004 (DOI)000338972500022 ()24856227 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-08-15 Created: 2014-08-15 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    2. Symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity: a cross-sectional study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity: a cross-sectional study
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 15, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Globally, the population is ageing and lives with several chronic diseases for decades. A high symptom burden is associated with a high use of healthcare, admissions to nursing homes, and reduced quality of life. The aims of this study were to describe the multidimensional symptom profile and symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity, and to describe factors related to symptom burden. Methods: A cross-sectional study including 378 community-dwelling people greater than= 75 years, who had been hospitalized greater than= 3 times during the previous year, had greater than= 3 diagnoses in their medical records. The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale was used to assess the prevalence, frequency, severity, distress and symptom burden of 31 symptoms. A multiple linear regression was performed to identify factors related to total symptom burden. Results: The mean number of symptoms per participant was 8.5 (4.6), and the mean total symptom burden score was 0.62 (0.41). Pain was the symptom with the highest prevalence, frequency, severity and distress. Half of the study group reported the prevalence of lack of energy and a dry mouth. Poor vision, likelihood of depression, and diagnoses of the digestive system were independently related to the total symptom burden score. Conclusion: The older community-dwelling people with multimorbidity in this study suffered from a high symptom burden with a high prevalence of pain. Persons with poor vision, likelihood of depression, and diseases of the digestive system are at risk of a higher total symptom burden and might need age-specific standardized guidelines for appropriate management.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BioMed Central, 2015
    Keywords
    Chronic disease; Older people; Symptom assessment
    National Category
    Sociology Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114010 (URN)10.1186/1471-2318-15-1 (DOI)000347569800001 ()25559550 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Faculty of Health sciences, Linkoping University; county council of Ostergotland; Signe and Olof Wallenius trust fund; Solstickan; Swedish Association of Geriatric Medicine; Mundipharma

    Available from: 2015-02-06 Created: 2015-02-05 Last updated: 2019-06-27
    3. To adjust and endure: a qualitative study of symptom burden in older people with multimorbidity
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>To adjust and endure: a qualitative study of symptom burden in older people with multimorbidity
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Applied Nursing Research, ISSN 0897-1897, E-ISSN 1532-8201, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 322-327Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Context Older people with multimorbidity are vulnerable and often suffer from conditions that produce a multiplicity of symptoms and a reduced health-related quality of life. Objectives The aim of this study is to explore the experience of living with a high symptom burden from the perspective of older community-dwelling people with multi-morbidity.

    Method A qualitative descriptive design with semi-structured interviews, including 20 community-dwelling older people with multi-morbidity and a high symptom burden. The participants were 79-€“89 years old with a mean of 12 symptoms per person. Data were analyzed using content analyses.

    Results The experience of living with a high symptom burden revealed the overall theme, “To adjust and endure” and three sub-themes. The first sub-theme was "To feel inadequate and limited". Participants reported that they no longer had the capacity or the ability to manage, and they felt limited and isolated from friends or family. The second sub-theme was "To feel dependent". This was a new and inconvenient experience; the burden they put on others caused a feeling of guilt. The final sub-theme was "To feel dejected". The strength to manage and control their conditions was gone; the only thing left to do was to sit or lie down and wait for it all to pass.

    Conclusion This study highlights the importance of a holistic approach when taking care of older people with multi-morbidity. This approach should employ a broad symptom assessment to reveal diseases and conditions that are possible to treat or improve.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2015
    Keywords
    Multimorbidity, Older people, Symptom burden, Content analysis
    National Category
    Nursing Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122740 (URN)10.1016/j.apnr.2015.03.008 (DOI)000366148700012 ()
    Available from: 2015-11-19 Created: 2015-11-19 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
    4. Symptom trajectory and symptom burden in older people with multimorbidity, secondary outcome from the RCT AGe-FIT study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Symptom trajectory and symptom burden in older people with multimorbidity, secondary outcome from the RCT AGe-FIT study
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 11, p. 2773-2783Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The aim of this study was to follow the symptom trajectory of community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity and to explore the effect on symptom burden from an ambulatory geriatric care unit, based on comprehensive geriatric assessment.

    Background

    Older community-dwelling people with multimorbidity suffer from a high symptom burden with a wide range of co-occurring symptoms often resulting to decreased health-related quality of life. There is a need to move from a single-disease model and address the complexity of older people living with multimorbidity.

    Design

    Secondary outcome data from the randomized controlled Ambulatory Geriatric Assessment Frailty Intervention Trial (AGe-FIT).

    Methods

    Symptom trajectory of 31 symptoms was assessed with the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale. Data from 247 participants were assessments at baseline, 12 and 24 months, 2011–2013. Participants in the intervention group received care from an ambulatory geriatric care unit based on comprehensive geriatric assessment in addition to usual care.

    Results

    Symptom prevalence and symptom burden were high and stayed high over time. Pain was the symptom with the highest prevalence and burden. Over the 2-year period 68–81% of the participants reported pain. Other highly prevalent and persistent symptoms were dry mouth, lack of energy and numbness/tingling in the hands/feet, affecting 38–59% of participants. No differences were found between the intervention and control group regarding prevalence, burden or trajectory of symptoms.

    Conclusions

    Older community-dwelling people with multimorbidity had a persistent high burden of symptoms. Receiving advanced interdisciplinary care at an ambulatory geriatric unit did not significantly reduce the prevalence or the burden of symptoms.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2016
    Keywords
    Registration clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01446757 Keywords Symptom management, Community Care, Older people, Quality of care
    National Category
    Nursing Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122741 (URN)10.1111/jan.13032 (DOI)000386079500019 ()27222059 (PubMedID)
    Note

    At the time for thesis presentation publication was in status: Manuscript

    At the time for thesis presentation publication was named: Symptom trajectory and symptom burden in older people with multimorbidity, data from the RCT AGe-FIT study

    Available from: 2015-11-19 Created: 2015-11-19 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
  • 2.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kärner, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nurses conceptions of facilitative strategies of weaning patients from mechanical ventilation-A phenomenographic study2009In: Intensive and Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 225-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Mechanical ventilator withdrawal can amount up to 40% of total ventilator time. Being on a mechanical ventilator is associated with risk of anxiety, post-traumatic stress syndrome, nosocomial pneumonia and premature mortality. Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to describe different conceptions of nurses facilitating decision-making strategies regarding weaning patients from mechanical ventilations cared for in intensive care unit (ICU). Method: Semi-structured interviews were analysed within the phenomenographic framework. Twenty ICU nurses were interviewed. Findings: The findings revealed three main categories of nurses facilitating decision-making strategies: "The intuitive and interpretative strategy" featured nurses pre-understandings. "The instrumental strategy" involved analysis and assessment of technological and physiological parameters. "The cooperative strategy" was characterised by interpersonal relationships in the work situation. Absence of a common strategy and lack of understanding of others strategies were a source of frustration. The main goals were to end mechanical ventilator support, create a sense of security, and avoid further complications. Conclusion: Although these findings need to be confirmed by further studies we suggest that nurses variable use of individual strategies more likely complicate an efficient and safe weaning process of the patients from mechanical ventilation.

  • 3.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jakobsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pulmonary Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine UHL.
    Kentsson, Magnus
    Landstinget i Jönköpings län.
    Skargren, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tödt, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Theander, Kersti
    Karlstad Universitet.
    Symptom Prevalence And Symptom Distress In Patients With COPD2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science.
    Theander, Kersti
    Faculty of Health, Science and Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Geriatric Medicine, Department of Research and Education, Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden; Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Departmentof Neurobiology, Caring Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm,Sweden .
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Symptom trajectory and symptom burden in older people with multimorbidity, secondary outcome from the RCT AGe-FIT study2016In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 11, p. 2773-2783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The aim of this study was to follow the symptom trajectory of community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity and to explore the effect on symptom burden from an ambulatory geriatric care unit, based on comprehensive geriatric assessment.

    Background

    Older community-dwelling people with multimorbidity suffer from a high symptom burden with a wide range of co-occurring symptoms often resulting to decreased health-related quality of life. There is a need to move from a single-disease model and address the complexity of older people living with multimorbidity.

    Design

    Secondary outcome data from the randomized controlled Ambulatory Geriatric Assessment Frailty Intervention Trial (AGe-FIT).

    Methods

    Symptom trajectory of 31 symptoms was assessed with the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale. Data from 247 participants were assessments at baseline, 12 and 24 months, 2011–2013. Participants in the intervention group received care from an ambulatory geriatric care unit based on comprehensive geriatric assessment in addition to usual care.

    Results

    Symptom prevalence and symptom burden were high and stayed high over time. Pain was the symptom with the highest prevalence and burden. Over the 2-year period 68–81% of the participants reported pain. Other highly prevalent and persistent symptoms were dry mouth, lack of energy and numbness/tingling in the hands/feet, affecting 38–59% of participants. No differences were found between the intervention and control group regarding prevalence, burden or trajectory of symptoms.

    Conclusions

    Older community-dwelling people with multimorbidity had a persistent high burden of symptoms. Receiving advanced interdisciplinary care at an ambulatory geriatric unit did not significantly reduce the prevalence or the burden of symptoms.

  • 5.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theander, Kersti
    Faculty of Health, Science and Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hellström, Iingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    To adjust and endure: a qualitative study of symptom burden in older people with multimorbidity2015In: Applied Nursing Research, ISSN 0897-1897, E-ISSN 1532-8201, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 322-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context Older people with multimorbidity are vulnerable and often suffer from conditions that produce a multiplicity of symptoms and a reduced health-related quality of life. Objectives The aim of this study is to explore the experience of living with a high symptom burden from the perspective of older community-dwelling people with multi-morbidity.

    Method A qualitative descriptive design with semi-structured interviews, including 20 community-dwelling older people with multi-morbidity and a high symptom burden. The participants were 79-€“89 years old with a mean of 12 symptoms per person. Data were analyzed using content analyses.

    Results The experience of living with a high symptom burden revealed the overall theme, “To adjust and endure” and three sub-themes. The first sub-theme was "To feel inadequate and limited". Participants reported that they no longer had the capacity or the ability to manage, and they felt limited and isolated from friends or family. The second sub-theme was "To feel dependent". This was a new and inconvenient experience; the burden they put on others caused a feeling of guilt. The final sub-theme was "To feel dejected". The strength to manage and control their conditions was gone; the only thing left to do was to sit or lie down and wait for it all to pass.

    Conclusion This study highlights the importance of a holistic approach when taking care of older people with multi-morbidity. This approach should employ a broad symptom assessment to reveal diseases and conditions that are possible to treat or improve.

  • 6.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Theander, Kersti
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Karolinska Institute KI, Sweden.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity: a cross-sectional study2015In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 15, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Globally, the population is ageing and lives with several chronic diseases for decades. A high symptom burden is associated with a high use of healthcare, admissions to nursing homes, and reduced quality of life. The aims of this study were to describe the multidimensional symptom profile and symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity, and to describe factors related to symptom burden. Methods: A cross-sectional study including 378 community-dwelling people greater than= 75 years, who had been hospitalized greater than= 3 times during the previous year, had greater than= 3 diagnoses in their medical records. The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale was used to assess the prevalence, frequency, severity, distress and symptom burden of 31 symptoms. A multiple linear regression was performed to identify factors related to total symptom burden. Results: The mean number of symptoms per participant was 8.5 (4.6), and the mean total symptom burden score was 0.62 (0.41). Pain was the symptom with the highest prevalence, frequency, severity and distress. Half of the study group reported the prevalence of lack of energy and a dry mouth. Poor vision, likelihood of depression, and diagnoses of the digestive system were independently related to the total symptom burden score. Conclusion: The older community-dwelling people with multimorbidity in this study suffered from a high symptom burden with a high prevalence of pain. Persons with poor vision, likelihood of depression, and diseases of the digestive system are at risk of a higher total symptom burden and might need age-specific standardized guidelines for appropriate management.

  • 7.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tödt, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Jakobsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skargren, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kentsson, M.
    Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Theander, K.
    Karlstad University, Sweden; Värmland County Council, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Symptom burden in stable COPD patients with moderate or severe airflow limitation2014In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 351-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    To describe a multidimensional symptom profile in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and determine whether symptom experience differed between patients with moderate or severe airflow limitations.

    BACKGROUND:

    Patients with severe airflow limitation experience numerous symptoms, but little is known regarding patients with moderate airflow limitation.

    METHODS:

    A multidimensional symptom profile (Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale) was assessed in 42 outpatients with moderate and 49 with severe airflow limitations.

    RESULTS:

    The mean number of symptoms in the total sample was 7.9 (±4.3) with no difference between patients with moderate and severe airflow limitations. The most prevalent symptoms with the highest MSAS symptom burden scores were shortness of breath, dry mouth, cough, sleep problems, and lack of energy in both groups.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Patients with moderate or severe airflow limitations experience multiple symptoms with high severity and distress. An assessment of their multidimensional symptom profile might contribute to better symptom management.

  • 8.
    Ekdahl, Anne W.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindh Mazya, Amelie
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science.
    Wiklund, Rolf
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Long-Term Evaluation of the Ambulatory Geriatric Assessment: A Frailty Intervention Trial (AGe-FIT): Clinical Outcomes and Total Costs After 36 Months2016In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 263-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To compare the effects of care based on comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) as a complement to usual care in an outpatient setting with those of usual care alone. The assessment was performed 36 months after study inclusion. Design: Randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded, single-center trial. Setting: A geriatric ambulatory unit in a municipality in the southeast of Sweden. Participants: Community-dwelling individuals aged >= 75 years who had received inpatient hospital care 3 or more times in the past 12 months and had 3 or more concomitant medical diagnoses were eligible for study inclusion. Participants were randomized to the intervention group (IG) or control group (CG). Intervention: Participants in the IG received CGA-based care for 24 to 31 months at the geriatric ambulatory unit in addition to usual care. Outcome measures: Mortality, transfer to nursing home, days in hospital, and total costs of health and social care after 36 months. Results: Mean age (SD) of participants was 82.5 (4.9) years. Participants in the IG (n = 208) lived 69 days longer than did those in the CG (n = 174); 27.9% (n = 58) of participants in the IG and 38.5% (n = 67) in the CG died (hazard ratio 1.49, 95% confidence interval 1.05-2.12, P =.026). The mean number of inpatient days was lower in the IG (15.1 [SD 18.4]) than in the CG (21.0 [SD 25.0], P =.01). Mean overall costs during the 36-month period did not differ between the IG and CG (USD 71,905 [SD 85,560] and USD 65,626 [SD 66,338], P =.43). Conclusions: CGA-based care resulted in longer survival and fewer days in hospital, without significantly higher cost, at 3 years after baseline. These findings add to the evidence of CGAs superiority over usual care in outpatient settings. As CGA-based care leads to important positive outcomes, this method should be used more extensively in the treatment of older people to meet their needs. (c) 2016 AMDA - The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine.

  • 9.
    Ekdahl, Anne W
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Wirehn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Costs and Effects of an Ambulatory Geriatric Unit (the AGe-FIT Study): A Randomized Controlled Trial2015In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 497-503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To examine costs and effects of care based on comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) provided by an ambulatory geriatric care unit (AGU) in addition to usual care.

    DESIGN: Assessor-blinded, single-center randomized controlled trial.

    SETTING: AGU in an acute hospital in southeastern Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: Community-dwelling individuals aged 75 years or older who had received inpatient hospital care 3 or more times in the past 12 months and had 3 or more concomitant medical diagnoses were eligible for study inclusion and randomized to the intervention group (IG; n = 208) or control group (CG; n = 174). Mean age (SD) was 82.5 (4.9) years.

    INTERVENTION: Participants in the IG received CGA-based care at the AGU in addition to usual care.

    OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was number of hospitalizations. Secondary outcomes were days in hospital and nursing home, mortality, cost of public health and social care, participant' sense of security in care, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL).

    RESULTS: Baseline characteristics did not differ between groups. The number of hospitalizations did not differ between the IG (2.1) and CG (2.4), but the number of inpatient days was lower in the IG (11.1 vs 15.2; P = .035). The IG showed trends of reduced mortality (hazard ratio 1.51; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.988-2.310; P = .057) and an increased sense of security in care interaction. No difference in HRQoL was observed. Costs for the IG and CG were 33,371£ (39,947£) and 30,490£ (31,568£; P = .432).

    CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: This study of CGA-based care was performed in an ambulatory care setting, in contrast to the greater part of studies of the effects of CGA, which have been conducted in hospital settings. This study confirms the superiority of this type of care to elderly people in terms of days in hospital and sense of security in care interaction and that a shift to more accessible care for older people with multimorbidity is possible without increasing costs. This study can aid the planning of future interventions for older people.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01446757.

  • 10.
    Mazya, A. L.
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Norrköping. Danderyd Hospital, Sweden .
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care. Vrinnevi Hospital, Sweden .
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Westöö, A.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Norrköping.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Norrköping.
    The Ambulatory Geriatric Assessment - a Frailty Intervention Trial (AGe-FIT) - A randomised controlled trial aimed to prevent hospital readmissions and functional deterioration in high risk older adults: A study protocol2013In: European Geriatric Medicine, ISSN 1878-7649, E-ISSN 1878-7657, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 242-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Care of old people with multimorbidity living at home is often fragmented with lack of coordination and information exchange between health care professionals, the elderly and their relatives. This paper describes the protocol of a randomised, controlled study, which aims to compare the efficacy of caring for older people with multimorbidity and three or more hospital admissions in the previous year at a geriatric ambulatory department based on Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) versus usual care.

    Participants and methods

    A total of 400 community-dwelling old people with multimorbidity who are living in the city of Norrköping (Sweden) and one of their relatives are recruited for this trial and randomized to an intervention and a control group. Participants in the intervention group receive interdisciplinary care after a CGA at an Ambulatory Geriatric Unit with easy accessibility during working hours in addition to usual care. The control group receives usual care provided by the primary care or hospital.

    Outcomes

    The primary outcome is number of hospitalisation, the secondary outcomes are health-related outcomes including measures of frailty, cognition, symptom burden, feeling of security, quality of life of participants and relatives and as well as costs for health and social care. Participants will be followed for 2 years.

    Discussion

    This study will contribute to evidence of the effect of two different care models. The study has the potential to change care for older people with multimorbidity.

  • 11.
    Theander, Kersti
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Sweden County Council Varmland, Sweden .
    Hasselgren, Mikael
    County Council Varmland, Sweden University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Luhr, Kristina
    Örebro County Council, Sweden .
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Ingela
    Karlstad University, Sweden .
    Symptoms and impact of symptoms on function and health in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic heart failure in primary health care2014In: The International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, ISSN 1176-9106, E-ISSN 1178-2005, Vol. 9, p. 785-794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic heart failure (CHF) seem to have several symptoms in common that impact health. However, methodological differences make this difficult to compare. Aim: Comparisons of symptoms, impact of symptoms on function and health between patients with COPD and CHF in primary health care (PHC). Method: The study is cross sectional, including patients with COPD (n=437) and CHF (n=388), registered in the patient administrative systems of PHC. The patients received specific questionnaires - the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, the Medical Research Council dyspnea scale, and the Fatigue Impact Scale - by mail and additional questions about psychological and physical health. Results: The mean age was 70 +/- 10 years and 78 +/- 10 years for patients with COPD and CHF respectively (P=0.001). Patients with COPD (n=273) experienced more symptoms (11 +/- 7.5) than the CHF patients (n=211) (10 +/- 7.6). The most prevalent symptoms for patients with COPD were dyspnea, cough, and lack of energy. For patients with CHF, the most prevalent symptoms were dyspnea, lack of energy, and difficulty sleeping. Experience of dyspnea, cough, dry mouth, feeling irritable, worrying, and problems with sexual interest or activity were more common in patients with COPD while the experience of swelling of arms or legs was more common among patients with CHF. When controlling for background characteristics, there were no differences regarding feeling irritable, worrying, and sexual problems. There were no differences in impact of symptoms or health. Conclusion: Patients with COPD and CHF seem to experience similar symptoms. There were no differences in how the patients perceived their functioning according to their cardinal symptoms; dyspnea and fatigue, and health. An intervention for both groups of patients to optimize the management of symptoms and improve function is probably more relevant in PHC than focusing on separate diagnosis groups.

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