liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 15 of 15
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Mike
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Sensor Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Sensor Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pearce, Ruth
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Sensor Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. NPL, London from March 2012.
    Recent trends in Silicon Carbide (SiC) and Graphene based gas sensors2013In: Semiconductor Gas Sensors / [ed] R. Jaaniso and O. K. Tan, Woodhead Publishing Limited, 2013, p. 117-158Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction of silicon carbide (SiC) as the semiconductorin gas sensitive field effect devices has tremendously improved this sensor platform extending the temperature range and number of detectable gases. Here we review the recent trends in research, starting with transducer mechanisms, latest findings regarding the detection mechanism, and present new material combinations as sensing layers and smart operation of the field effect sensors enabling one sensor to act as a sensor array. Introducing epitaxially-grown graphene on SiC as gas sensing layer shows the potential of ppb detection of NO2 .

  • 2.
    Andersson, Mike
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pearce, Ruth
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tunable gas alarms for high temperature applications based on 4H-SiC MISFET devices2011In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Silicon Carbide and Related materials, 2011, p. 365-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Darmastuti, Zhafira
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pearce, Ruth
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mike
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The influence of gate bias and structure on the CO sensing performance of SiC based field effect sensors2011In: Proceedings of IEEE Sensors Conference, 2011, p. 133-136Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SiC based Field Effect Transistor gas sensors with Pt as gate material have previously been shown to exhibit a binary CO response, sharply switching between a small and a large value with increasing CO or decreasing O2 concentration or temperature. In this study Pt gates with different structures have been fabricated by dc magnetron sputtering at different argon pressures and subjected to various CO/O2 mixtures under various temperatures and gate bias conditions. The influence of gate bias and gate structure on the CO response switch point has been investigated. The results suggest that the more porous the gate material or smaller the bias, the lower the temperature or higher the CO concentration required in order to induce the transition between a small and a large response towards CO. These trends are suggested to reflect the adsorption, spill-over, and reaction characteristics of oxygen chemisorbed to the Pt and insulator surfaces.

  • 4.
    Eriksson, Jens
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pearce, Ruth
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Iakimov, Tihomir
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Virojanadara, Chariya
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gogova, Daniela
    Leibniz Institute of Crystal Growth, Berlin, Germany .
    Andersson, Mike
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Syväjärvi, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Yakimova, Rositza
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The influence of substrate morphology on thickness uniformity and unintentional doping of epitaxial graphene on SiC2012In: Applied Physics Letters, ISSN 0003-6951, E-ISSN 1077-3118, Vol. 100, no 24, p. 241607-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A pivotal issue for the fabrication of electronic devices on epitaxial graphene on SiC is controlling the number of layers and reducing localized thickness inhomogeneities. Of equal importance is to understand what governs the unintentional doping of the graphene from the substrate. The influence of substrate surface topography on these two issues was studied by work function measurements and local surface potential mapping. The carrier concentration and the uniformity of epitaxial graphene samples grown under identical conditions and on substrates of nominally identical orientation were both found to depend strongly on the terrace width of the SiC substrate after growth.

  • 5.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pearce, Ruth
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Buchholt, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bjorklund, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mike
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    FET sensor devices, state of the art research and commercialization2010In: IMCS13, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pearce, Ruth
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hedin, Linnea
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Khranovskyy, Volodymyr
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    New transducer material concepts for biosensors and surface functionalization2009In: Smart Sensors, Actuators,and MEMS IV / [ed] Ulrich Schmid, Carles Cané, Herbert Shea, Bellingham, WA United States: SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2009, Vol. 7362, p. 736206-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wide bandgap materials like SiC, ZnO, AlN form a strong platform as transducers for biosensors realized as e.g. ISFET (ion selective field effect transistor) devices or resonators. We have taken two main steps towards a multifunctional biosensor transducer. First we have successfully functionalized ZnO and SiC surfaces with e.g. APTES. For example ZnO is interesting since it may be functionalized with biomolecules without any oxidation of the surface and several sensing principles are possible. Second, ISFET devises with a porous metal gate as a semi-reference electrode are being developed. Nitric oxide, NO, is a gas which participates in the metabolism. Resistivity changes in Ga doped ZnO was demonstrated as promising for NO sensing also in humid atmosphere, in order to simulate breath.

  • 7.
    Pearce, Ruth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Becker, Elin
    Chalmers Göteborg.
    Haglin, A
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Skoglundh, Magnus
    Chalmers, Göteborg.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Understanding the gas sensor response of ZnO and Ga:ZnO2010In: IMCS13, 2010, p. 376-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Pearce, Ruth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Belmonte, Judith
    Department of Materials, Imperial College London, UK.
    Shaw, J
    Tyco Safety Products, UK.
    Andersson, Mike
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Buchholt, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Schaffer, M S P
    Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, UK.
    The effect of temperature on the gas sensing properties of CVD grown MWCNTs2007In: The 2nd Conference onf Sensing Technology ICST, 2007, Palmerston North, New Zeeland: Palmerston Inst. of Information Sciences and Techn., Massey University. , 2007, p. 455-460Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Pearce, Ruth
    et al.
    National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, UK.
    Eriksson, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Sensor Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Iakimov, Tihomir
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Sensor Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Yakimova, Rositza
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    On the Differing Sensitivity to Chemical Gating of Single and Double Layer Epitaxial Graphene Explored Using Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy2013In: ACS Nano, ISSN 1936-0851, E-ISSN 1936-086X, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 4647-4656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using environmental scanning Kelvin probe microscopy we show that the position of the Fermi level of single layer graphene is more sensitive to chemical gating than that of double layer graphene. We calculate that the difference in sensitivity to chemical gating is not entirely due to the difference in band structure of 1 and 2 layer graphene. The findings are important for gas sensing where the sensitivity of the electronic properties to gas adsorption are monitored and suggest that single layer graphene could make a more sensitive gas sensor than double layer graphene. We propose that the difference in surface potential between adsorbate-free single and double layer graphene, measured using scanning kelvin probe microscopy, can be used as a non-invasive method of estimating substrate-induced doping in epitaxial graphene.

  • 10.
    Pearce, Ruth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Iakimov, Tihomir
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, M
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Towards Optimisation of Epitaxially Grown Graphene Based Sensors for Highly Sensitive Gas Detection2010In: 2010 IEEE Sensors, Piscataway, NJ, United States: IEEE , 2010, p. 898-902Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epitaxially grown single-layer and many-layer (10 atomic layers thick) resistive graphene devices were fabricated and compared for response towards NO2. Single-layer devices showed far greater sensitivity. The many-layer devices reduced in resistance on exposure to electron withdrawing NO2 demonstrating a majority hole carriers (p-type), whereas the single-layer device demonstrated an increase in resistance upon NO2 exposure demonstrating a majority of electron carriers (n-type). An n-p shift is observed for the single-layer device upon exposure to increasing concentrations of NO2. This shift is thought to be due to the reduction of electrons in the conduction band upon adsorption of electron-withdrawing NO2 making holes the majority carriers.

  • 11.
    Pearce, Ruth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Iakimov, Tihomir
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mike
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Epitaxially grown graphene based gas sensors for ultra sensitive NO(2) detection2011In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 155, no 2, p. 451-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epitaxially grown single layer and multi layer graphene on SiC devices were fabricated and compared for response towards NO(2). Due to electron donation from SiC:, single layer graphene is n-type with a very low carrier concentration. The choice of substrate is demonstrated to enable tailoring of the electronic properties of graphene, with a SiC substrate realising simple resistive devices tuned for extremely sensitive NO(2) detection. The gas exposed uppermost layer of the multi layer device is screened from the SiC by the intermediate layers leading to a p-type nature with a higher concentration of charge carriers and therefore, a lower gas response. The single layer graphene device is thought to undergo an n-p transition upon exposure to increasing concentrations of NO(2) indicated by a change in response direction. This transition is likely to be due to the transfer of electrons to NO(2) making holes the majority carriers. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 12.
    Pearce, Ruth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hagelin, Alexander
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Becker, Elin
    Competence Centre for Catalysis Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Skoglundh, Magnus
    Competence Centre for Catalysis Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Effect of Water vapour on Gallium doped Zinc Oxide nanoparticle sensor gas response2009In: IEEE Sensors, 2009, Piscataway, NJ, United States: IEEE , 2009, p. 2039-2043Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Zinc oxide is a wide band gap (similar to 3.4ev) semiconductor material, making it a promising material for high temperature applications, such as exhaust and flue environments where NO and NO2 monitoring is increasingly required due to stricter emission controls[1]. In these environments water vapour and background levels of oxygen are present and, as such, the effect of humidity on the sensing characteristics of these materials requires further study. The reaction mechanisms in the presence of water vapour are poorly understood and there is a need for deeper understanding of the principles and mechanisms of gas response of these materials. An investigation of the influence of changing water vapour (H2O) and oxygen (O-2) backgrounds on the response of nanoparticulate Ga-doped ZnO resistive sensors is presented.

  • 13.
    Pearce, Ruth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface and Semiconductor Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mike
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Development of FETs and resistive devices based on epitaxially grown single layer graphene on SiC for highly sensitive gas detection2012In: Materials Science Forum Vols 717 - 720, Trans Tech Publications Inc., 2012, Vol. 717-720, p. 687-690Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epitaxially grown single layer graphene on silicon carbide (SiC) resistive sensors were characterised for NO2 response at room and elevated temperatures, with an n-p type transition observed with increasing NO2 concentration for all sensors. The concentration of NO2 required to cause this transition varied for different graphene samples and is attributed to varying degrees of substrate induced Fermi-level (E-F) pinning above the Dirac point. The work function of a single layer device increased steadily with increasing NO2 concentration indicating no change in reaction mechanism for high and low concentrations despite a change in sensor response direction. Epitaxially grown graphene device preparation is challenging due to poor adhesion of the graphene layer to the substrate. A field effect transistor (FET) device is presented which does not require wire bonding to contacts on graphene.

  • 14.
    Pearce, Ruth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Yakimova, Rositza
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mike
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Development of FETs based on epitaxially grown single layer graphene on SiC for highly sensitive gas detection2011In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Silicon Carbide and Related materials, 2011, p. 405-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Yakimova, Rositza
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Selegård, Linnea
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Khranovskyy, Volodymyr
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pearce, Ruth
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    ZnO materials and surface tailoring for biosensing2012In: Frontiers in bioscience (Elite edition), ISSN 1945-0508, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 254-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ZnO nanostructured materials, such as films and nanoparticles, could provide a suitable platform for development of high performance biosensors due to their unique fundamental material properties. This paper reviews different preparation techniques of ZnO nanocrystals and material issues like wettability, biocompatibility and toxicity, which have an important relevance to biosensor functionality. Efforts are made to summarize and analyze existing results regarding surface modification and molecular attachments for successful biofunctionalization and understanding of the mechanisms involved. A section is devoted to implementations of tailored surfaces in biosensors. We end with conclusions on the feasibility of using ZnO nanocrystals for biosensing.

1 - 15 of 15
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf