liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Borch, Kurt
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jönsson, Kjell-Åke
    Petersson, Fredrik
    Redéen, Stefan
    Mårdh, Sven
    Franzén, Lennart
    Prevalence of gastroduodenitis and Helicobacter priori infection in a general population sample: relations to symptomatology and life-style2000In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568, Vol. 45, no 7, p. 1322-1329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some benign and malignant diseases develop on the background of chronic gastritis or duodenitis. The present study was performed in order to determine the magnitude of these background changes with relations to symptomatology and life style in the general population. Examinations were performed in 501 volunteers (age 35–85 years). Fifty percent had gastritis; this was associated with H. pylori in 87%. H. pylori-negative gastritis was associated with regular use of NSAIDs [odds ratio 3.8 (1.6–9.9)]. Duodenitis, observed in 32%, was associated with H. pylori infection [odds ratio 2.3 (1.3–4.6)], previous cholecystectomy [odds ratio 3.6 (1.1–16.1)], and regular use of NSAIDs [odds ratio 3.0 (1.4–7.1)]. Neither gastritis nor duodenitis was associated with smoking or alcohol consumption. The rate of digestive symptoms did not differ between subjects with and without uncomplicated gastritis or duodenitis. In conclusion, half of this adult population had gastritis strongly associated with H. pylori infection. Gastritis without H. pylori infection was frequently associated with regular NSAID intake. One third had duodenitis, which was associated with H. pylori infection as well as with regular use of NSAIDs and previous cholecystectomy. Digestive symptoms were not overrepresented in uncomplicated gastritis or duodenitis.

  • 2.
    Petersson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Chronic gastritis in a sample of the general population: Helicobacter pylori infection, metaplastic transformation, epithelial proliferation, p53- and p21 expression and antral mucosal gastrin content with reference to gastric carcinoma development2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Infection with H. pylori is the main cause of chronic inflammation in the stomach. lt is strongly associated with benign ulcer disease and a risk factor for gastric carcinoma (GC). Different tophographical types of gastritis bear different risks for future development of GC. Mucosal changes, atrophy and intestinal metaplasia (IM) are known precancerous conditions.

    The aims of this thesis were to map out the prevalence of chronic gastritis, including different tophographical types, carditis and H. pylori infection in an adult Swedish general population sample. To determine the prevalence of atrophy and different types of IM and measure the mucosal proliferative activity (Ki-67), expression of p53 and p21 with immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, to determine plasma levels of gastrin and the content of G-cells in the antrum with immunohistochemistry measured with three different morphometrical methods.

    The prevalence of chronic gastritis was 50%. lt was associated with H. pylori infection in 87%. The prevalence of carditis was 55% and it was associated with local H. pylori infection in 70%. The most common type of gastritis was antrum predominant (44%) followed by pangastritis (37%) and corpus predominant (19%). The prevalence of atrophy (antrum and/or corpus) was 55% and it increased with age, as did the prevalence of IM, which was present in the antrum or corpus in 23% and in the cardia in 10%. Corresponding figures for the prevalence of type III IM was 4% and 1%, repspectively. In all locations there was a strong correlation between the occurrence of IM and both H. pylori infection and chronic inflammation. Chronic inflammation and H. pylori infection were associated with increased mucosal proliferation and expression of p53. Atrophy as well as IM were associated with increased expression of p53 in both the corpus and antrum. IM was associated with increased proliferation in the mucosa, as was atrophy in the corpus. The expression of p21 was low and not affected by infection or inflammation. Plasma levels of gastrin were increased in subjects with H. pylori infection and showed no correlation with the amount of antral G-cells. The three different methods for G-cell quantification correlated poorly.

    In conclusion,chronic gastritis and carditis in this sample of an adult Swedish general population were frequent and strongly associated with H. pylori infection. The prevalences of different gastritis types and mucosal changes associated with increased cancer risk were determined and the relationships between chronic gastritis/carditis and both increased mucosal proliferation and expression of p53 in all parts of the stomach were established. Increased plasma levels of gastrin among subejects with H. pylori infection were established, as was the lack of a correlation between circulating gastrin levels and the amount of G-cells in the antrum. Poor correlations between three different methods for G-cell quantification highlight a methodological problem.

    List of papers
    1. Prevalence of gastroduodenitis and Helicobacter priori infection in a general population sample: relations to symptomatology and life-style
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevalence of gastroduodenitis and Helicobacter priori infection in a general population sample: relations to symptomatology and life-style
    Show others...
    2000 (English)In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568, Vol. 45, no 7, p. 1322-1329Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Some benign and malignant diseases develop on the background of chronic gastritis or duodenitis. The present study was performed in order to determine the magnitude of these background changes with relations to symptomatology and life style in the general population. Examinations were performed in 501 volunteers (age 35–85 years). Fifty percent had gastritis; this was associated with H. pylori in 87%. H. pylori-negative gastritis was associated with regular use of NSAIDs [odds ratio 3.8 (1.6–9.9)]. Duodenitis, observed in 32%, was associated with H. pylori infection [odds ratio 2.3 (1.3–4.6)], previous cholecystectomy [odds ratio 3.6 (1.1–16.1)], and regular use of NSAIDs [odds ratio 3.0 (1.4–7.1)]. Neither gastritis nor duodenitis was associated with smoking or alcohol consumption. The rate of digestive symptoms did not differ between subjects with and without uncomplicated gastritis or duodenitis. In conclusion, half of this adult population had gastritis strongly associated with H. pylori infection. Gastritis without H. pylori infection was frequently associated with regular NSAID intake. One third had duodenitis, which was associated with H. pylori infection as well as with regular use of NSAIDs and previous cholecystectomy. Digestive symptoms were not overrepresented in uncomplicated gastritis or duodenitis.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-24959 (URN)10.1023/A:1005547802121 (DOI)9370 (Local ID)9370 (Archive number)9370 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    2. Prevalence of subtypes of intestinal metaplasia in the general population and in patients with autoimmune chronic atrophic gastritis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevalence of subtypes of intestinal metaplasia in the general population and in patients with autoimmune chronic atrophic gastritis
    2002 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 262-266Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Gastric intestinal metaplasia (IM) is seen mostly in association with chronic gastritis, induced either by Helicobacter pylori infection or autoimmune mechanisms. IM can be categorized into three subtypes, where type III is associated with gastric carcinoma of intestinal type.

    Methods: Gastric biopsies from 475 subjects randomly selected from the general population and from 27 patients with autoimmune gastritis associated with pernicious anaemia were used. The criteria of Filipe & Jass were applied using different histochemical techniques in combination with haematoxylin and eosin stained material.

    Results: Twenty-three percent (109/475) of the subjects from the general population and 88% (24/27) in the group with autoimmune gastritis had IM. Type III IM occurred in 4% in both populations. Type III IM was located in the antrum in 90% in the general population. In the group with autoimmune gastritis, only one patient had type III IM, which was located in the corpus.

    Conclusions: This study reveals for the first time the prevalence and distribution of subtypes of IM in a general population from the Western world. The comparatively high prevalence of type III IM in the general population (4%) indicates that its role as a precursor of gastric carcinoma may have been overemphasized. A similar prevalence of type III IM in patients with autoimmune gastritis may be considered low and suggests that mechanisms for gastric carcinogenesis other than the atrophy - metaplasia-dysplasia sequence could also operate in this condition.

    Keywords
    Chronic Gastritis, Epidemiology, Helicobacter, Pylori, Intestinal Metaplasia
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-24963 (URN)10.1080/003655202317284156 (DOI)9374 (Local ID)9374 (Archive number)9374 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    3. Gastric epithelial proliferation and p53 and p21 expression in a general population sample: relations to age, sex, and mucosal changes associated with H. pylori infection
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gastric epithelial proliferation and p53 and p21 expression in a general population sample: relations to age, sex, and mucosal changes associated with H. pylori infection
    2002 (English)In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568, Vol. 47, no 7, p. 1558-1566Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the main cause of chronic gastritis. The infection has been linked to altered proliferative activity and changes in various cell cycle regulating proteins. To determine, in a general population sample, the proliferative activity and expression of p53 and p21 in males and females of different age groups with and without H. pylori-associated chronic gastritis, gastric biopsies from 273 subjects (188 with and 85 without H. pylori infection) randomly selected from a general population were examined immunohistochemically for Ki-67, p53, and p21. One thousand epithelial cells, including the surface, neck, and glandular areas, were counted in both the corpus and the antrum. Results are expressed as the percentage of positive cells. Subjects with H. pylori infection showed significantly increased proliferative activity and expression of p53 compared to uninfected individuals. Regarding the expression of p21, no difference was detected. Multiple linear regression analysis showed significant associations between chronic inflammation or inflammatory activity, on the one hand, and the degree of proliferation in both the corpus and the antrum, on the other hand. In the antrum, the degree of H. pylori colonization was related to the expression of p53. H. pylori seems to cause increased proliferation and increased expression of p53 (but not p21) in the gastric mucosa, neither of which is age or sex dependent. The proliferative activity is related mainly to events associated with inflammation, while the expression of p53 in the antrum is associated with the degree of H. pylori infection. The action of p53 appears to be independent of p21 activity.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-24964 (URN)10.1023/A:1015938303993 (DOI)9375 (Local ID)9375 (Archive number)9375 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    4. Characterization of the gastric cardia in volunteers from the general population: type of mucosa, helicobacter pylori infection, inflammation, mucosal proliferative activity, p53 and p21 expression, and relations to gastritis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterization of the gastric cardia in volunteers from the general population: type of mucosa, helicobacter pylori infection, inflammation, mucosal proliferative activity, p53 and p21 expression, and relations to gastritis
    2010 (English)In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 46-53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this research was to characterize the mucosa of the gastric cardia in relation to infection with Helicobacter pylori and the occurrence of chronic gastritis in other parts of the stomach in a sample of the general population. In this study, 80 adult volunteers underwent esophagogastroscopy with biopsies from the gastric cardia, corpus, and antrum. Gastritis was classified according to the Sydney system. Chronic gastritis (cardia excepted) was diagnosed in 35 subjects, 30 with Hpylori infection. Epithelial proliferative activity (Ki-67), p53- and p21 expression were examined quantitatively with cell counting after immunohistochemical stainings. Esophagitis was diagnosed macroscopically. Fourty eight subjects had cardia-type and 32 corpus-type mucosa in the anatomical cardia. The prevalence of esophagitis (nine cases) did not differ between these groups. Carditis was more prevalent among subjects with cardia-type mucosa (73 vs. 28%, P < 0.0001). Hpylori was present in 48% of those with cardia-type and 25% of those with corpus-type mucosa (P = 0.06). Of the 44 subjects with carditis, 31 had Hpylori in this location. The group with Hpylori infection had significantly higher mucosal proliferative activity when compared to uninfected subjects. Among the subjects with H. pylori-associated carditis, more p53-positive epithelial cells were detected compared to both the non-infected group (P = 0.0004) and to subjects with non-Hpylori-associated carditis (P = 0.03). In subjects with cardia-type mucosa, and both carditis and gastritis, the degree of chronic inflammation was higher in the cardia compared to the corpus and antrum and the p53 expression was significantly higher in the cardia compared to the corpus, but similar to that in the antrum. The proliferative activity was significantly higher in the antrum compared to the cardia and corpus, respectively. In conclusion, H. pylori infection, carditis, and increased p53 expression are more common in subjects with cardia- than corpus-type mucosa in the gastric cardia. Carditis is mainly related to Hpylori infection. There are some differences regarding inflammation, proliferative activity, and p53 expression between the cardia and other regions of the stomach, yet the significance of these differences remains to be clarified.

    Keywords
    Cardia, Carditis, Gastritis, Helicobacter pylori, Proliferation, Ki-67, p53, p21
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-53693 (URN)10.1007/s10620-008-0705-0 (DOI)
    Available from: 2010-02-01 Created: 2010-02-01 Last updated: 2017-12-12
    5. A morphometric study of antral G-cell density in a sample of adult general population: comparison of three different methods and correlation with patient demography, helicobacter pylori infection, histomorphology and circulating gastrin levels
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A morphometric study of antral G-cell density in a sample of adult general population: comparison of three different methods and correlation with patient demography, helicobacter pylori infection, histomorphology and circulating gastrin levels
    2009 (English)In: International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Pathology, ISSN 1936-2625, E-ISSN 1936-2625, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 239-248Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Helicobacter pylori infection has been linked to hypergastrinemia and either decreased or normal G-cell content in the antral mucosa. To clarify this controversial issue, we quantitatively determined antral G-cell content on the same biopsy specimens with three different methods and examined whether these methods are intercorrelated and the relation of these methods to plasma gastrin concentrations, demography, the occurrence of H. pylori infection and chronic gastritis. Gastric antral mucosal biopsy sections from 273 adults (188 with and 85 without H pylori infection) from a general population sample were examined immunohistochemically for G-cells using cell counting, stereology (point counting) and computerized image analysis. Gastritis was scored according to the updated Sydney system. Basal plasma gastrin concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay. The three methods for G-cell quantification were poorly correlated and the results showed no correlation with basal plasma gastrin concentrations. The antral G-cell density and scores for H. pylori colonization were positively related to age. Neither the scores for chronic inflammation, nor the scores for inflammatory activity, atrophy or intestinal metaplasia were consistently related to the antral G-cell content. In conclusion, the results of three techniques for G-cell quantification in the gastric antral mucosa were poorly intercorrelated and none of the methods correlated with plasma gastrin concentrations. Age and scores for H pylori colonization seem to be determinants of the G-cell density. That common morphometric techniques correlate poorly is of utmost importance to bear in mind when quantitative morphological studies are planned, compared or interpreted.

    Keywords
    Gastrin, cell counting, computerized image analysis, gastritis, inflammation, morphometry, point counting, stereology, stomach
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-21318 (URN)19079618 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Published article from the manuscript entitled "Antral G-cell content in a sample of the adult general population. A Quantitative Study comparing three methods with reference to demography, H pylori infection, histomorphology and circulating gastrin levels"

    Available from: 2009-09-30 Created: 2009-09-30 Last updated: 2017-12-13
  • 3. Petersson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Borch, Kurt
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Franzén, L. E.
    Prevalence of subtypes of intestinal metaplasia in the general population and in patients with autoimmune chronic atrophic gastritis2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 262-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Gastric intestinal metaplasia (IM) is seen mostly in association with chronic gastritis, induced either by Helicobacter pylori infection or autoimmune mechanisms. IM can be categorized into three subtypes, where type III is associated with gastric carcinoma of intestinal type.

    Methods: Gastric biopsies from 475 subjects randomly selected from the general population and from 27 patients with autoimmune gastritis associated with pernicious anaemia were used. The criteria of Filipe & Jass were applied using different histochemical techniques in combination with haematoxylin and eosin stained material.

    Results: Twenty-three percent (109/475) of the subjects from the general population and 88% (24/27) in the group with autoimmune gastritis had IM. Type III IM occurred in 4% in both populations. Type III IM was located in the antrum in 90% in the general population. In the group with autoimmune gastritis, only one patient had type III IM, which was located in the corpus.

    Conclusions: This study reveals for the first time the prevalence and distribution of subtypes of IM in a general population from the Western world. The comparatively high prevalence of type III IM in the general population (4%) indicates that its role as a precursor of gastric carcinoma may have been overemphasized. A similar prevalence of type III IM in patients with autoimmune gastritis may be considered low and suggests that mechanisms for gastric carcinogenesis other than the atrophy - metaplasia-dysplasia sequence could also operate in this condition.

  • 4.
    Petersson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Pathology Research Department, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping.
    Borch, Kurt
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Franzén, Lennart
    Department of Pathology, Medical Centre Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Gastric epithelial proliferation and p53 and p21 expression in a general population sample: relations to age, sex, and mucosal changes associated with H. pylori infection2002In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568, Vol. 47, no 7, p. 1558-1566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the main cause of chronic gastritis. The infection has been linked to altered proliferative activity and changes in various cell cycle regulating proteins. To determine, in a general population sample, the proliferative activity and expression of p53 and p21 in males and females of different age groups with and without H. pylori-associated chronic gastritis, gastric biopsies from 273 subjects (188 with and 85 without H. pylori infection) randomly selected from a general population were examined immunohistochemically for Ki-67, p53, and p21. One thousand epithelial cells, including the surface, neck, and glandular areas, were counted in both the corpus and the antrum. Results are expressed as the percentage of positive cells. Subjects with H. pylori infection showed significantly increased proliferative activity and expression of p53 compared to uninfected individuals. Regarding the expression of p21, no difference was detected. Multiple linear regression analysis showed significant associations between chronic inflammation or inflammatory activity, on the one hand, and the degree of proliferation in both the corpus and the antrum, on the other hand. In the antrum, the degree of H. pylori colonization was related to the expression of p53. H. pylori seems to cause increased proliferation and increased expression of p53 (but not p21) in the gastric mucosa, neither of which is age or sex dependent. The proliferative activity is related mainly to events associated with inflammation, while the expression of p53 in the antrum is associated with the degree of H. pylori infection. The action of p53 appears to be independent of p21 activity.

  • 5.
    Petersson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Borch, Kurt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rehfeld, J.F.
    Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Franzén, Lennart E.
    Department of Pathology, University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    A morphometric study of antral G-cell density in a sample of adult general population: comparison of three different methods and correlation with patient demography, helicobacter pylori infection, histomorphology and circulating gastrin levels2009In: International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Pathology, ISSN 1936-2625, E-ISSN 1936-2625, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 239-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Helicobacter pylori infection has been linked to hypergastrinemia and either decreased or normal G-cell content in the antral mucosa. To clarify this controversial issue, we quantitatively determined antral G-cell content on the same biopsy specimens with three different methods and examined whether these methods are intercorrelated and the relation of these methods to plasma gastrin concentrations, demography, the occurrence of H. pylori infection and chronic gastritis. Gastric antral mucosal biopsy sections from 273 adults (188 with and 85 without H pylori infection) from a general population sample were examined immunohistochemically for G-cells using cell counting, stereology (point counting) and computerized image analysis. Gastritis was scored according to the updated Sydney system. Basal plasma gastrin concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay. The three methods for G-cell quantification were poorly correlated and the results showed no correlation with basal plasma gastrin concentrations. The antral G-cell density and scores for H. pylori colonization were positively related to age. Neither the scores for chronic inflammation, nor the scores for inflammatory activity, atrophy or intestinal metaplasia were consistently related to the antral G-cell content. In conclusion, the results of three techniques for G-cell quantification in the gastric antral mucosa were poorly intercorrelated and none of the methods correlated with plasma gastrin concentrations. Age and scores for H pylori colonization seem to be determinants of the G-cell density. That common morphometric techniques correlate poorly is of utmost importance to bear in mind when quantitative morphological studies are planned, compared or interpreted.

  • 6.
    Petersson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Pathology Research Department, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden and Department of Pathology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Franzén, Lennart E
    Department of Pathology, Medical Centre Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Borch, Kurt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Characterization of the gastric cardia in volunteers from the general population: type of mucosa, helicobacter pylori infection, inflammation, mucosal proliferative activity, p53 and p21 expression, and relations to gastritis2010In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 46-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this research was to characterize the mucosa of the gastric cardia in relation to infection with Helicobacter pylori and the occurrence of chronic gastritis in other parts of the stomach in a sample of the general population. In this study, 80 adult volunteers underwent esophagogastroscopy with biopsies from the gastric cardia, corpus, and antrum. Gastritis was classified according to the Sydney system. Chronic gastritis (cardia excepted) was diagnosed in 35 subjects, 30 with Hpylori infection. Epithelial proliferative activity (Ki-67), p53- and p21 expression were examined quantitatively with cell counting after immunohistochemical stainings. Esophagitis was diagnosed macroscopically. Fourty eight subjects had cardia-type and 32 corpus-type mucosa in the anatomical cardia. The prevalence of esophagitis (nine cases) did not differ between these groups. Carditis was more prevalent among subjects with cardia-type mucosa (73 vs. 28%, P < 0.0001). Hpylori was present in 48% of those with cardia-type and 25% of those with corpus-type mucosa (P = 0.06). Of the 44 subjects with carditis, 31 had Hpylori in this location. The group with Hpylori infection had significantly higher mucosal proliferative activity when compared to uninfected subjects. Among the subjects with H. pylori-associated carditis, more p53-positive epithelial cells were detected compared to both the non-infected group (P = 0.0004) and to subjects with non-Hpylori-associated carditis (P = 0.03). In subjects with cardia-type mucosa, and both carditis and gastritis, the degree of chronic inflammation was higher in the cardia compared to the corpus and antrum and the p53 expression was significantly higher in the cardia compared to the corpus, but similar to that in the antrum. The proliferative activity was significantly higher in the antrum compared to the cardia and corpus, respectively. In conclusion, H. pylori infection, carditis, and increased p53 expression are more common in subjects with cardia- than corpus-type mucosa in the gastric cardia. Carditis is mainly related to Hpylori infection. There are some differences regarding inflammation, proliferative activity, and p53 expression between the cardia and other regions of the stomach, yet the significance of these differences remains to be clarified.

  • 7.
    Redéen, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Petersson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Forensic Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Törnkrantz, E.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery.
    Levander, H.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery.
    Mårdh, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Borch, Kurt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Reliability of diagnostic tests for Helicobacter pylori infection2011In: Gastroenterology Research and Practice, ISSN 1687-6121, E-ISSN 1687-630X, Vol. 2011, no 940650Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection is very common worldwide. A reliable diagnosis is crucial for patients with H.pylori related diseases. At follow-up it is important to confirm that eradication therapy has been successful. There is no established gold standard for the diagnosis of H.pylori infection.

    Material and Methods: A sample of 304 volunteers from the general population was screened for H.pylori infection with serology, 13C-urea breath test (UBT), rapid urease test (RUT) on fresh biopsy, culture from biopsy and histological examination. Each method was tested against the other methods (except serology) taken together as gold standard.

    Result: The sensitivity was 0.99 for serology 0.92 for UBT, 0.96 for RUT, 0.99 for culture and 0.95 for histological examination. Corresponding specificities were 0.82, 0.94, 0.93, 0.90 and 0.92, respectively. The accuracy was 0.86 for serology, 0.94 for UBT, 0.94 for RUT, 0.93 for culture and 0.93 for histology. There was a strong correlation between the results of UBT and histological scores for H.pylori colonization as well as between the results of UBT and the scores of RUT.

    Conclusion: There were only minor differences in accuracy between three invasive tests for H.pylori infection in this population. RUT may be recommended as first choice since a result is obtained within hours. The accuracy of UBT was comparable to the invasive tests and it is recommended for situations when endoscopy is not needed.

  • 8.
    Tiveljung, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Borch, Kurt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Jonasson, Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Mårdh, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Petersson, Fredrik
    Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping.
    Monstein, Hans-Jürg
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Identification of Helicobacter in gastric biopsies by PCR based on 16S rDNA sequences: a matter of little significance for the prediction of H. pylori-associated gastritis?1998In: Journal of Medical Microbiology, ISSN 0022-2615, E-ISSN 1473-5644, Vol. 47, no 8, p. 695-704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to correlate molecular evidence of the presence of Helicobacter pylori in gastric biopsy samples, based on analysis of 16S rDNA, vacuolating toxin (vacA), urease A (ureA) and cagA genes, with the clinical, histological and serological findings in patients with H. pylori-associated gastritis. Fresh biopsy samples were collected from the gastric antrum and corpus of 22 asymptomatic volunteers with or without H. pylori-associated gastritis. Total DNA was extracted from the biopsy material and subjected to 16S rDNA PCR amplification, Southern blotting and 16S rDNA sequence analysis of the PCR products. The vacA, ureA and cagA genes were characterised by PCR amplification and Southern blot analysis. Based on partial 16S rDNA sequence analysis, DNA belonging to the genus Helicobacter was detected in gastric biopsy samples from 20 of 22 subjects, including seven of nine histologically and serologically normal controls. Six of 20 partial 16S rDNA sequences revealed variations within variable regions V3 and V4 that deviated from those of the H. pylori type strain ATCC 4350T and, therefore, possibly represented other species of Helicobacter. VacA genes identical with those of the type strain were found predominantly in the subjects with H. pylori gastritis, and all the patients except one were found to be cagA-positive. There was no evidence of false positive PCR reactions. In conclusion, the PCR-based molecular typing methods used here were apparently too sensitive when applied to the detection of H. pylori in human gastric tissues. The lack of quantitative analysis makes them inappropriate as clinical tools for the diagnosis of H. pylori-associated gastritis, despite the fact that they provide a qualitative and sensitive tool for the detection and characterisation of H. pylori in the gastrointestinal tract.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf