liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Erichsén, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Constipation in palliative care: Prevalence, definitions, symptom distress and risk-factors2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: Constipation for patients in palliative care is common and described with variations in prevalence. Side -effects from opioid- treatment, is considered to be one of the main factors leading to constipation. The overall aim of the thesis was to study constipation among patients admitted to specialized palliative care- settings in Sweden. The specific aims of the thesis were 1) To describe and explore the prevalence, definition and symptom distress of constipation by applying different definitions of constipation, in patients admitted to specialized palliative care settings in Sweden. 2) To identify factors related to constipation in patients in specialized palliative care and comparing these factors for patients with different types of constipation to patients without constipation.

    Methods: A literature- search were conducted where prevalence of- and factors related to constipation was explored and included in a questionnaire, developed for this thesis. Data was collected in a cross- sectional design with a response rate of 50% and analysed with logistic regression.

    Results: A total of 485 patients from 38 specialized palliative care- units in Sweden participated. Prevalence of constipation for patients in specialized palliative care varied between 7- 43 % depending on definition used. Two different constipation- groups were identified: Medical constipation- group 23% (MCG) and Perceived constipation- group 35% (PCG). Three sub- groups was also identified: patients with i) only ≤ 3 defecations/week, 7%, ii) only perception of being constipated, 19%, and iii) patients with both ≤ 3 defecations/ week and perception of being constipated,16%. Several factors were found to be related to constipation as hospitalisation, absence of laxative- treatment, haemorrhoids, poor appetite, hard stool form and opioids.

    Conclusions: Prevalence of constipation may differ depending on definitions used. Distress from constipation and other factors related to constipation, than opioids, needs to be incorporated into the clinical constipation- assessment. Validated constipation assessment tool needs to be developed.

    List of papers
    1. Constipation in specialized palliative care: prevalence, definition and patient perceived symptom distress
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Constipation in specialized palliative care: prevalence, definition and patient perceived symptom distress
    2015 (English)In: Journal of Palliative Medicine, ISSN 1096-6218, E-ISSN 1557-7740, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 585-592Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Context: The prevalence of constipation among patients in palliative care has varied in prior research, from 18-90 %, depending on different study factors.

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe and explore the prevalence and symptom distress of constipation, using different definitions of constipation, in patients admitted to specialized palliative care settings.

    Methods: Data was collected in a cross-sectional survey from 485 patients in 38 palliative care units in Sweden. Variables were analyzed using logistic regression and summarized as odds ratio (OR).

    Result: The prevalence of constipation varied between 7 – 43 %, depending on the definition used. Two constipation- groups were found: (i) Medical constipation- group (MCG; ≤ 3 defecations/week n=114; 23%); (ii) Perceived constipation- group (PCG; Patients with a perception of being constipated the last two weeks; n= 171; 35%). Three sub-groups emerged: patients with (a) only medical constipation (7 %), (b) only perceived constipation (19 %), and (c) with both medical and perceived constipation (16%). There were no differences in symptom severity between groups; 71% of all constipated patients had severe constipation.

    Conclusion: The prevalence of constipation may differ, depending on the definition used and how constipation is assessed. In this study we found two main groups and three sub-groups, analyzed from the definitions of frequency of bowel movements and experience of being constipated. To be able to identify constipation, the patients’ definition has to be further explored and assessed.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Mary Ann Liebert, 2015
    Keywords
    Palliative care, constipation, prevalence, definition, symptom-distress
    National Category
    Other Medical Sciences Nursing Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117184 (URN)10.1089/jpm.2014.0414 (DOI)000361880600005 ()25874474 (PubMedID)
    Note

    At the time for thesis presentation publication was in status: Manuscript

    Available from: 2015-04-21 Created: 2015-04-21 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
    2. Constipation in specialized palliative care: factors related to constipation when applying different definitions
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Constipation in specialized palliative care: factors related to constipation when applying different definitions
    2016 (English)In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 691-698Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    CONTEXT:

    For patients in palliative care, constipation is primarily a result of opioid treatment. Impacts from other factors related to constipation in palliative care are rarely studied.

    OBJECTIVES:

    The aim was to identify factors related to constipation in patients in palliative care, and then to compare these factors between patients with different types of constipation and patients without constipation.

    METHODS:

    Cross-sectional data on constipation was collected with a 26-item questionnaire from 485 patients in 38 specialist palliative care units in Sweden. Three different constipation groups were used; MC ONLY, PC ONLY, and MC & PC. Logistic regression analyses were used to calculate odds ratios.

    RESULTS:

    Patients with <3 defecations/week, MC ONLY, (n = 36) had higher odds of being hospitalized, bed-restricted, in need of personal assistance for toilet visits, and of having a poor fluid intake. Patients with the perception of being constipated, PC ONLY, (n = 93) had higher odds of having poor appetite, hemorrhoids, hard stool, more opioid treatment, less laxative treatment and of being more dissatisfied with constipation information. Patients with both <3 defecations/week and a perception of being constipated, MC & PC, (n = 78) had higher odds of having cancer- disease.

    CONCLUSION:

    There were several significant factors related to constipation with higher odds than opioid- treatment, for patients in palliative care, such as; hard stool, cancer diagnosis, dissatisfaction with information, low fluid intake, hemorrhoids, bed restriction, hospitalization, and need of personal assistance for toilet visits.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2016
    Keywords
    Constipation, Palliative care, Risk factors, Symptom assessment
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121720 (URN)10.1007/s00520-015-2831-5 (DOI)000367458200022 ()26160464 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS), 228731
    Note

    At the time for thesis presentation publication was in status: Manuscript

    Funding agencies: Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS); Vrinnevi Hospital Research Board

    Available from: 2015-10-02 Created: 2015-10-02 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
  • 2.
    Erichsén, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care.
    Hadd Danielsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatrics and Hospital based homecare VHN.
    A phenomenological study of nurse´s understanding of honesty in palliative care2010In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 39-50Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Honesty is essential for the care of seriously ill and dying patients. The current study aimed to describe how

    nurses experience honesty in their work with patients receiving palliative care at home. The interviews in

    this phenomenological study were conducted with 16 nurses working with children and adults in palliative

    home-based care. Three categories emerged from analyses of the interviews: the meaning of honesty, the

    reason for being honest and, finally, moral conflict when dealing with honesty. The essence of these

    descriptions was that honesty is seen as a virtue, a good quality that a nurse should have. The nurses’ ethical

    standpoint was shown in the moral character they show in their work and in their intention to do good. This

    study could help nurses to identify different ways of looking at honesty to promote more consciousness and

    openness in ethical discussions between colleagues and other staff members.

  • 3.
    Erichsén, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Constipation in specialized palliative care: factors related to constipation when applying different definitions2016In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 691-698Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONTEXT:

    For patients in palliative care, constipation is primarily a result of opioid treatment. Impacts from other factors related to constipation in palliative care are rarely studied.

    OBJECTIVES:

    The aim was to identify factors related to constipation in patients in palliative care, and then to compare these factors between patients with different types of constipation and patients without constipation.

    METHODS:

    Cross-sectional data on constipation was collected with a 26-item questionnaire from 485 patients in 38 specialist palliative care units in Sweden. Three different constipation groups were used; MC ONLY, PC ONLY, and MC & PC. Logistic regression analyses were used to calculate odds ratios.

    RESULTS:

    Patients with <3 defecations/week, MC ONLY, (n = 36) had higher odds of being hospitalized, bed-restricted, in need of personal assistance for toilet visits, and of having a poor fluid intake. Patients with the perception of being constipated, PC ONLY, (n = 93) had higher odds of having poor appetite, hemorrhoids, hard stool, more opioid treatment, less laxative treatment and of being more dissatisfied with constipation information. Patients with both <3 defecations/week and a perception of being constipated, MC & PC, (n = 78) had higher odds of having cancer- disease.

    CONCLUSION:

    There were several significant factors related to constipation with higher odds than opioid- treatment, for patients in palliative care, such as; hard stool, cancer diagnosis, dissatisfaction with information, low fluid intake, hemorrhoids, bed restriction, hospitalization, and need of personal assistance for toilet visits.

  • 4.
    Erichsén, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Constipation in specialized palliative care: prevalence, definition and patient perceived symptom distress2015In: Journal of Palliative Medicine, ISSN 1096-6218, E-ISSN 1557-7740, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 585-592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: The prevalence of constipation among patients in palliative care has varied in prior research, from 18-90 %, depending on different study factors.

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe and explore the prevalence and symptom distress of constipation, using different definitions of constipation, in patients admitted to specialized palliative care settings.

    Methods: Data was collected in a cross-sectional survey from 485 patients in 38 palliative care units in Sweden. Variables were analyzed using logistic regression and summarized as odds ratio (OR).

    Result: The prevalence of constipation varied between 7 – 43 %, depending on the definition used. Two constipation- groups were found: (i) Medical constipation- group (MCG; ≤ 3 defecations/week n=114; 23%); (ii) Perceived constipation- group (PCG; Patients with a perception of being constipated the last two weeks; n= 171; 35%). Three sub-groups emerged: patients with (a) only medical constipation (7 %), (b) only perceived constipation (19 %), and (c) with both medical and perceived constipation (16%). There were no differences in symptom severity between groups; 71% of all constipated patients had severe constipation.

    Conclusion: The prevalence of constipation may differ, depending on the definition used and how constipation is assessed. In this study we found two main groups and three sub-groups, analyzed from the definitions of frequency of bowel movements and experience of being constipated. To be able to identify constipation, the patients’ definition has to be further explored and assessed.

  • 5.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV).
    Erichsen, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV).
    The lived experience of constipation in cancer patients in palliative hospital-based home care.2004In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 10, no 7, p. 321-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Constipation is a common and well-studied symptom in palliative care. Most previous studies have focused on the frequency and management of constipation. The current study aimed to investigate the lived experience of constipation among cancer patients in palliative hospital-based home care. Eleven cancer patients admitted to a hospital-based home care unit in Sweden who had experienced constipation participated in this study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and a qualitative, phenomenological approach was used. Three themes emerged: bodily suffering, mental preoccupation and a reminder of death, and avoidance and social isolation. The experience of constipation was described as an extensive complete person-experience that must be prevented. To prevent unnecessary suffering nurses need to be proactive in the assessment of constipation.

1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf