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  • 1.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kullman, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Early endoscopic treatment of blunt traumatic pancreatic injury2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 1435-1443Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blunt pancreatic trauma is a rare and challenging situation. In many cases, there are other associated injuries that mandate urgent operative treatment. Morbidity and mortality rates are high and complications after acute pancreatic resections are common. The diagnosis of pancreatic injuries can be difficult and often requires multimodal approach including Computed Tomography scans, Magnetic resonance imaging and Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP). The objective of this paper is to review the application of endoprothesis in the settings of pancreatic injury. A review of the English literature available was conducted and the experience of our centre described. While the classical recommended treatment of Grade III pancreatic injury (transection of the gland and the pancreatic duct in the body/tail) is surgical resection this approach carries high morbidity. ERCP was first reported as a diagnostic tool in the settings of pancreatic injury but has in recent years been used increasingly as a treatment option with promising results. This article reviews the literature on ERCP as treatment option for pancreatic injury and adds further to the limited number of cases reported that have been treated early after the trauma.

  • 2.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sparrelid, E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Rosok, B.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Pomianowska, E.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Hasselgren, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Bjornbeth, B. A.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Isaksson, B.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy in patients with colorectal liver metastases - Intermediate oncological results2016In: European Journal of Surgical Oncology, ISSN 0748-7983, E-ISSN 1532-2157, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 531-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) not amenable for resection have grave prognosis. One limiting factor for surgery is a small future liver remnant (FLR). Early data suggests that associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) effectively increases the volume of the FLR allowing for resection in a larger fraction of patients than conventional two-stage hepatectomy (TSH) with portal vein occlusion (PVO). Oncological results of the treatment are lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the intermediate oncological outcomes after ALPPS in patients with CRLM. Material and methods: Retrospective analysis of all patients with CRLM operated with ALPPS at the participating centres between December 2012 and May 2014. Results: Twenty-three patients (16 male, 7 female), age 67 years (28-80) were operated for 6.5 (1-38) metastases of which the largest was 40 nun (14-130). Six (27.3%) patients had extra-hepatic metastases, 16 (72.7%) synchronous presentation. All patients received chemotherapy, 6 cycles (3-25) preoperatively and 16 (70%) postoperatively. Ten patients (43%) were rescue ALPPS after failed PVO. Severe complications occurred in 13.6% and one (4.5%) patient died within 90 days of surgery. After a median follow-up of 22.5 months from surgery and 33.5 months from diagnosis of liver metastases estimated 2 year overall survival was 59% (from surgery) and 73% (from diagnosis). Liver only recurrences (n = 8), were treated with reresection/ablation (n = 7) while lung recurrences were treated with chemotherapy. Conclusion: The overall survival, rate of severe complications and perioperative mortality associated with ALPPS for patients with CRLM is comparable to TSH. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Bäck, Karolina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Differential expression of insulin and IGF-I receptors in human tissuesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Insulin and IGF-I are related peptides with similar structure. They both signal via their cognate receptors, the insulin receptor (IR) and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I receptor (IGF-IR).

    Our aim was to simultaneously measure the amount of insulin and IGF-I receptors in different human tissues and also the IR-A and IR-B isoforms to study tissue specific expression

    Renal artery intima-media, myometrium, skeletal muscle or liver tissue samples were obtained from patients undergoing surgery. IR, IGF-IR, IR-A and IR-B gene expression was investigated with real-time RT-PCR and expression of IR and IGF-IR protein was examined by Western blot and ELISA.

    Renal arteries and myometrium expressed the IGF-IR gene to a higher extent than the IR gene, liver expressed more IR than IGF-IR and skeletal muscle expressed almost equal amounts of both receptors. IR-B was the most abundant isoform in all tissues. With Western blot we could detect IR in skeletal muscle, liver and myometrium. With ELISA we found that, normalized to total protein, the highest levels of IGF-IR were found in renal arteries and myometrium and low levels in skeletal muscle and liver. The highest levels of IR were found in liver.

    In conclusion there is a large variation in the quantity and ratio of insulin receptors and IGF-I receptors expressed in different tissues, the extremes being arterial intima media with predominantly IGF-I receptors and liver with predominantly insulin receptors. This suggests that differential expression of insulin and IGF-I receptors is a key mechanism in regulation of growth and metabolism.

  • 4. Feng, Wang
    et al.
    Adrian, TE
    Westermark, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology.
    Ding, X
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: Gastrokir.
    Permert, Johan
    Islet amyloid polypeptide tonally inhiits beta-, alpha-, and delta-cell secretion in isolated rat pancreatic islets.1999In: American journal of physiology, ISSN 0002-9513, Vol. 276, p. 19-24Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Feng, Wang
    et al.
    Westermark, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: Gastrokir.
    Permert, Johan
    Effect of islet amyloid polypeptide on somatostatin inhibition of insulin secretion from isolated rat pancreatic islets.1999In: Regulatory Peptides, ISSN 0167-0115, E-ISSN 1873-1686, Vol. 72, p. 61-67Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Long-term effects of cholecystokinin on exocrine and endocrine pancreas1991Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The gastrointestinal hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) is known to be oneof the most potent stimulators of pancreatic growth. CCK is alsosuggested to be an initiator and/or promotor of pancreatic carcinogenesis. This study was undertaken to elucidate the effects oflong-term stimulation with exogenous and endogenous CCK andexogenous secretin on exocrtne and endocrine pancreatic cell proliferation (in rats and mice) and on . endocrine (B-cell) function (inrats). Cell kinetics were studied autoradiographically by means of 3H-thymidine labeling of DNA synthesizing cells and endogenous increasein plasma CCK level was induced by surgical pancreatico-biliary diversion (PBD).

    The study showed that long-term stimulation with the CCK analogue cerulein (in mice) as well as endogenously induced hyperCCKemia (in rats) induced pancreatic hyperplasia. The proliferative response was as high, or even higher, in the ductal and centroacinar cell populations than in the acinar one, which traditionally is regarded as the target forCCK. The cells adapt to the continuous CCK stimulation with a decrease in proliferative activity to control level after 14-20 days. Cerulein seems to induce early changes in the centroacinar cell region with signs of transition of cells from acinar to centroacinar position. Secretin, which has the ductal cells as its main target cell, had no growth stimulating effect on any of the studied cell types. Long-term endogenous CCK stimulation does not affect the proliferation of cells in the islands of Langerhans, nor affect the insulin secretory response or the glucose elimination following intravenous glucose loading. The results of the study are of special interest as human pancreatic carcinoma is considered to be ductal and as there are suggestions of early changes in the centroacinar · region in experimental pancreatic carcinogenesis. Funhermore, the PBD model was found to be suitable for studies on longterm CCK effects, as the pancreatic growth response following PBD was exclusively caused by the increased plasma CCK level.

  • 7.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Holmberg, B
    Permert, Johan
    Pancreas 2000 - a new concept for education and development in pancreatology2005In: Pancreatology (Print), ISSN 1424-3903, E-ISSN 1424-3911, Vol. 5, p. 545-546Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Røsok, Bård I
    et al.
    Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sparrelid, Ernesto
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hasselgren, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Pomianowska, Ewa
    Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Bjørnbeth, Bjørn Atle
    Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Isaksson, Bengt
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Scandinavian multicenter study on the safety and feasibility of the associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy procedure.2016In: Surgery, ISSN 0039-6060, E-ISSN 1532-7361, Vol. 159, no 5, p. 1279-1286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) has emerged as an additional tool to increase the size of the future liver remnant (FLR) in the settings of advanced tumor burden in the liver. Initial reports have indicated high feasibility but also high mortality and morbidity. The aim of this study was to assess the initial experience with ALPPS in Scandinavia regarding feasibility, morbidity, and mortality.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of all patients who underwent ALPPS since its introduction at 3 Scandinavian hepatobiliary centers.

    RESULTS: Thirty-six patients were identified, 21 male and 15 female. Median age was 67 years (22-83). Colorectal liver metastases (n = 25) were the most common indication for ALPPS followed by hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 4), cholangiocarcinoma (n = 4), and other (n = 3). Median growth of the FLR between the operations was 67% (-17 to 238) in 6 (5-13) days. All patients completed the second operation, and 71% of the resections were R0. Although the total percentage of patients with complication(s) was 92%, only 4 patients (11%) had a grade 3b complication according to the Clavien-Dindo classification, and no other severe complications were noted. There was no in-hospital mortality, but 1 (2.8%) patient died within 90 days of operation.

    CONCLUSION: ALPPS is a highly feasible method to stimulate FLR growth in patients with colorectal liver metastases as well as primary hepatobiliary malignancies. The treatment can be carried out with relative safety.

  • 9.
    Sandström, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Trulsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery .
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology .
    von Dobeln, U.
    Department of Laboratory Medicine Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm.
    Svanvik, Joar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Serum amino acid profile in patients with acute pancreatitis2008In: Amino Acids, ISSN 0939-4451, E-ISSN 1438-2199, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 225-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients in the early phase of acute pancreatitis (AP) have reduced serum levels of arginine and citrulline. This may be of patho-biological importance, since arginine is the substrate for nitric oxide, which in turn is involved in normal pancreatic physiology and in the inflammatory process. Serum amino acid spectrum was measured daily for five days and after recovery six weeks later in 19 patients admitted to the hospital for acute pancreatitis. These patients had abnormal levels of most amino acids including arginine, citrulline, glutamine and glutamate. Phenylalanine and glutamate were increased, while arginine, citrulline, ornithine and glutamine were decreased compared to levels after recovery. NO2/NO3 concentration in the urine, but not serum arginase activity, was significantly increased day 1 compared to day 5 after admission. Acute pancreatitis causes a disturbance of the serum amino acid spectrum, with possible implications for the inflammatory process and organ function both in the pancreas and the gut. Supplementation of selected amino acids could possibly be of value in this severe condition. © 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  • 10.
    Trulsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery .
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Permerth, J
    Svanvik, Joar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    The balance of mitogenesis and apoptosis in the rat pancreas in response to CCK-8.2000In: Gastroenterology, ISSN 0016-5085, E-ISSN 1528-0012, Vol. 118, no 4, p. 5324-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Trulsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Department of Surgery, Vrinnevi Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svanvik, Joar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The influence of nitric oxide on basal and cholecystokinin-8-induced proliferation and apoptosis in the rat pancreas2002In: Regulatory Peptides, ISSN 0167-0115, E-ISSN 1873-1686, Vol. 106, no 1-3, p. 97-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nitric oxide (NO) is formed by different cell types in the pancreas. In this study, inhibition of endogenous nitric oxide by Nω-nitro-l-arginine (l-NNA) reduced the urinary excretion of NO2/NO3 and raised serum l-arginine and the NO donator S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) increased the urinary excretion of NO2/NO3. The peptide cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8) has a strong influence on exocrine pancreatic proliferation. Rat pancreas was excised and studied with regard to tissue weight, protein and DNA contents after 3 days of treatment with saline, l-NNA or SNAP given separately or combined with CCK-8. Further, proliferation of different pancreatic cells was studied with [3H]-thymidine incorporation and apoptotic activity was studied by analysing caspase-3 activity and histone-associated DNA fragments. The effects of l-NNA indicate that endogenous nitric oxide formation has a tonic inhibition on apoptosis in the pancreas during both basal condition and growth stimulation by CCK-8. In CCK-induced hyperplasia, NO inhibits the proliferation of acinar cells but stimulates ductal cells. Endogenous NO may regulate the balance between proliferation and apoptosis and in a situation of growth stimulation by CCK-8, it has a tonic inhibition on both mitogenesis and apoptosis thus slowing down the acinar cell turnover in the pancreas.

  • 12.
    Trulsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Svanvik, Joar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Cholecystokinin-8-induced hypoplasia of the rat pancreas: Influence of nitric oxide on cell proliferation and programmed cell death2004In: Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology, ISSN 1742-7835, E-ISSN 1742-7843, Vol. 95, no 4, p. 183-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The background of cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8)-induced hypoplasia in the pancreas is not known. In order to increase our understanding we studied the roles of nitric oxide and NF-κB in rats. CCK-8 was injected for 4 days, in a mode known to cause hypoplasia, and the nitric oxide formation was either decreased by means of Nω-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) or increased by S-nitroso-N-acetylpencillamine (SNAP). The activation of NF-κB was quantified by ELISA detection, apoptosis with caspase-3 and histone-associated DNA-fragmentation and mitotic activity in the acinar, centroacinar and ductal cells were visualized by the incorporation of [3H]-thymidine. Pancreatic histology and weight as well as protein- and DNA contents were also studied. Intermittent CCK injections reduced pancreatic weight, protein and DNA contents and increased apoptosis, acinar cell proliferation and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation. It also caused vacuolisation of acinar cells. The inhibition of endogenous nitric oxide formation by L-NNA further increased apoptosis and NF-κB activation but blocked the increased proliferation and vacuolisation of acinar cells. The DNA content was not further reduced. SNAP given together with CCK-8 increased apoptosis and other pathways of cell death, raised proliferation of acinar cells and strongly reduced the DNA content in the pancreas. Histological examination showed no inflammation in any group. We conclude that during CCK-8-induced pancreatic hypoplasia, endogenously formed nitric oxide suppresses apoptosis but increases cell death along non-apoptotic pathways and stimulates regeneration of acinar cells. Exogenous nitric oxide enhances the acinar cell turnover by increasing both apoptotic and non-apoptotic cell death and cell renewal. In this situation NF-κB activation seems not to inhibit apoptosis nor promote cell proliferation.

  • 13.
    Trulsson, Lena M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Department of Surgery, Vrinnevi Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Svanvik, Joar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cholecystokinin-8-induced atrophy in the rat pancreas: influence of nitric oxide on proliferation, programmed cell death and NF-κB activationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanisms involved in cholecystokinin-8-induced atrophy in the pancreas are not known and in this study the roles of nitric oxide (NO) and NF-κB were studied in rats. CCK-8 was injected for 4 days, in a mode known to cause atrophy, and the NO formation was either decreased by Nω-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) or increased by S-nitroso-N-acetylpencillamine (SNAP). Activation of NF-κB was quantified by ELISA detection, apoptosis with caspase-3 and histone associated DNA-fragmentation and mitotic activity in the acinar, centroacinar and ductal cells was visualized by incorporation of [3H]-thymidine. Pancreatic histology, weight, protein- and DNA contents were studied.

    Intermittent CCK injections reduced pancreatic weight, protein and DNA contents and increased apoptosis, acinar cell proliferation and NF-κB activation. It also caused vacuolisation of the acinar cells. Inhibition of endogenous NO formation by L-NNA further increased apoptosis and NF-κB activation but blocked the increased proliferation and vacuolisation of acinar cells. The DNA content was not further reduced. SNAP given together with CCK-8 increased both apoptosis and proliferation of acinar cells and strongly reduced the DNA content in the pancreas. Further, it caused vacuolisation in the acinar cells and these findings together indicate cell death by other pathways besides apoptosis. Histological examination showed no inflammation in any group.

    During CCK-8 induced pancreatic atrophy endogenous NO suppresses apoptosis and stimulates regeneration of acinar cells but increases cell death by non-apoptotic pathways. Exogenous NO enhances the acinar cell turnover by increases of both proliferation and apoptotic and non-apoptotic cell deaths. NF-κB activation, in this situation, seems not to inhibit apoptosis or promote cell proliferation.

  • 14.
    Trulsson, Lena M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svanvik, Joar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Permert, Johan
    Department of Surgery, Karolinska Institute at Huddinge, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cholecystokinin octapeptide induces both proliferation and apoptosis in the rat pancreas2001In: Regulatory Peptides, ISSN 0167-0115, E-ISSN 1873-1686, Vol. 98, no 1-2, p. 41-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8) causes exocrine pancreatic hypertrophy and hyperplasia. High doses of the CCK analogue cerulein causes necrosis and an inflammatory response in the pancreas. We have studied the pancreatic growth response in rats after administration of CCK-8 for 3 days, given either intermittently (20–80 μg/kg) twice a day, or continuously (2.4–48 μg/kg per 24 h). Plasma CCK-8 levels, pancreatic wet weight, water, protein and DNA contents and the pancreatic caspase-3 activity were measured. Cell proliferation was visualized by [3H]thymidine incorporation and apoptosis by TUNEL reaction. Continuous administration of CCK-8 dose-dependently increased the plasma CCK levels, the pancreatic wet weight, protein and DNA contents as well as thymidine labeling index, apoptotic index and caspase-3 activity. Intermittent injections of CCK-8 caused transient raises in plasma CCK, increased apoptotic index and caspase-3 activity, a dose-dependent increase in thymidine labeling but caused a dose-dependent reduction of pancreatic wet weight, protein, and DNA contents. It is concluded that CCK-8 causes both increased proliferation and apoptosis in the pancreas. In case of continuous administration of CCK-8, the proliferation outweighs the apoptosis causing hyperplasia but in the case of intermittent administration the opposite effect is seen.

  • 15.
    Trulsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Smeds, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svanvik, Joar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The influence of a load of L-arginine on serum amino acids and pancreatic apoptosis/proliferation and ATP levels in the rat2004In: Pancreas, ISSN 0885-3177, E-ISSN 1536-4828, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 113-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    Administration of high doses of amino acids like ethionine, methionine, and arginine causes pancreatic tissue damage. The initial mechanism behind these effects is not known. The aim of this study was to show the early effects of a load of L-arginine on programed cell death/proliferation and ATP levels in the pancreas.

    METHODS:

    We analyzed in rats the effects of intraperitoneal administration of L-arginine on serum amino acids, pancreatic cell apoptosis/proliferation, and ATP levels at 8, 16, and 24 hours. Serum amino acid concentrations were measured with HPLC, tissue ATP was measured fluorometrically, apoptosis was studied with caspase-3 activity and histone-associated DNA-fragments, and proliferation was studied with thymidine autoradiography.

    RESULTS:

    After a load of l-arginine, there were initially increased serum levels of L-arginine and L-citrulline, but these fell below control levels after 24 hours as well as amino acids in the glutamate family (ornithine, proline, histidine, and glutamine). Initially, increased ATP levels in the pancreatic tissue returned to control levels at 24 hours. The acinar cells proliferation was suppressed and the apoptosis rate strongly increased at 16 and 24 hours. Pancreatic histology showed vacuole formation in the acinar cells at 8 hours. At 16 hours, there was less vacuolization, but apoptotic bodies were seen, and at 24 hours there was cell degeneration but no necrosis.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    After a load of l-arginine, amino acid metabolism causes a high ATP production in the pancreatic tissue that may cause mitochondrial initiation of cell death.

  • 16.
    Vernmark, Karolina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Albertsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Holmqvist, Annica
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    From palliative to curative treatment - stage IV mucinous adenocarcinoma, successfully treated with metronomic capecitabine in combination with Bevacizumab and surgery- a case report2015In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 15, no 884Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Mucinous adenocarcinoma (MAC) represents 6-19 % of all colorectal carcinoma. It is associated with poorer response to chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Case presentation: A 27-year-old Swedish woman presented with stomach pain and weight loss, and was diagnosed with locally advanced MAC in the transverse colon as well as 3 liver metastases. Neoadjuvant treatment with fluorouracil, folinic acid and oxaliplatin (FLOX) failed due to several infections, pulmonary embolism and deteriorated performance status. The patient was therefore considered palliative. Palliative treatment with metronomic capecitabine 500 mg x 2 daily and bevacizumab every other week were initiated. After 4 months of treatment the tumors had regressed and the patient was able to undergo radical surgery, thereby changing the treatment intention from palliative to curative. No adjuvant chemotherapy was given. There were no signs of recurrence 9 months later. Conclusions: The role of the combination of metronomic capecitabine and bevacizumab in patients with MAC merits further investigation.

  • 17. Wang, Feng
    et al.
    Adrian, TE
    Westermark, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology.
    Gasslanderq, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: Gastrokir.
    Permert, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: Gastrokir.
    Dissociated insulin and islet amyloid polypeptide secretion from isolated rat pancreatic islets cocultured with human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells.1999In: Pancreas, ISSN 0885-3177, E-ISSN 1536-4828, Vol. 18, p. 403-409Article in journal (Refereed)
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