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  • 1.
    Bergendal, B.
    et al.
    National Oral Disability Centre, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ahlborg, B.
    Mun-H-Center, National Orofacial Resource Center for Rare Disorders, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Knudsen, E.
    Department of Plastic Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Nyberg, J.
    Department of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wallenius, E.
    Swedish Association of Rare Disorders, Sundbyberg, Sweden.
    Gustafsson-Bonnier, K.
    Habilitation Services, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Living with facial disfigurement- Strategies for individuals and care management2011In: Special Care in Dentistry, ISSN 0275-1879, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 216-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Individuals and families affected by craniofacial disorders have expressed dissatisfaction with their experiences in the healthcare system, with day care, and in school situations. To capture their views, focus group encounters were done in a group of young individuals with these disorders and in a group of parents whose children were affected. The aim was to synthesize their attitudes and experiences into improved strategies for parents, teenagers, and professionals in the healthcare system. Their views were compiled into a document that emphasizes the responsibilities of persons with craniofacial disorders and their parents to actively seek information on diagnosis and treatment options and to participate in decisions on therapy. The conclusion was that it is not lack of specific knowledge but rather a lack of implementation of existing recommendations that makes living with facial disfigurement difficult for many individuals and their families. © 2011 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • 2.
    Berggren, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Abdiu, Avni
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Paulin, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Letter: The nasal alar elevator: An effective tool in the presurgical treatment of infants born with cleft lip2005In: Plastic and reconstructive surgery (1963), ISSN 0032-1052, E-ISSN 1529-4242, Vol. 115, no 6, p. 1785-1787Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 3.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    LundeborgHammarström, Inger
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Speech and Language Pathology.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Mc Allister, Anita
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Speech and Language Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Graf, Jonas
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Oralmotorik, artikulation och livskvalitet. Sexmånadersuppföljning efter tonsillotomi respektive tonsillektomi2007In: Rikstämman 2007,2007, 2007, p. 53-53Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Feragen, Kristin, Billaud
    et al.
    Centre for Rare Disorders, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Rumsey, Nichola
    Centre for Appearance Research, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK.
    Heliövaara, Arja
    Department of Plastic Surgery, Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Centre, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Boysen, Betty, Marie
    Copenhagen Cleft Palate Centre, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Johannessen, Emma Christine
    Department of Speech and Language Disorders, Statped Sørøst, Oslo, Norway.
    Havstam, Christina
    Division of Speech and Language Pathology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Nyberg, Jill
    Division of Speech and Language Pathology, Stockholm Craniofacial Team, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pedersen, Nina-Helen
    Department of Speech and Language Disorders, Statped Vest, Bergen, Norway.
    Bogh-Nielsen, Joan
    Cleft Palate Centre, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Eyres, Philip
    Dental School, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
    Bradbury, Eileen
    Private Practice, Manchester, UK.
    Semb, Gunvor
    Dental School, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
    Scandcleft randomised trials of primary surgery for unilateral cleft lip and Palate: 9. Parental report of social and emotional experiences related to their 5-year-old child's cleft diagnosis2017In: Journal of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2000-656X, E-ISSN 2000-6764, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 8p. 73-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim:Parents of children with a cleft lip and palate may be emotionally affected by the child’s diagnosis. Their experiences and perceptions are important when evaluating the complexity of satisfactory treatment outcomes. The objective was to examine parents’ social and emotional experiences related to their child’s cleft diagnosis, and their perceptions of the child’s adjustment to living with a visible difference. Design:International multicentre study by 10 cleft teams in five countries: Denmark, Finland, Sweden, Norway, and the UK. Methods:A cohort of 448 children born with a non-syndromic UCLP were included. A total of 356 parents completed the Scandcleft Parent Questionnaire. Results:The majority of parents experienced practical and emotional support from family, friends, and health professionals. Nevertheless, parents had to cope with other people’s reactions to the cleft, experiences that were described as ranging from hurtful to neutral and/or positive. According to parents, 39% of the children had experienced cleft-related comments and/or teasing. More than half of the parents reported specific worries related to their child’s future. Conclusion:While the majority of the parents experienced positive support and coped well with the child’s diagnosis, some parents were at risk for psychological and emotional challenges that should be identified by the cleft team. To optimise outcomes and the child’s adjustment, these parents should be offered psychological support when necessary. Trial registration:ISRCTN29932826. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

  • 5.
    Heliövaara, Arja
    et al.
    Department of Plastic Surgery, Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Küseler, Annelise
    Cleft Palate Center, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Skaare, Pål
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
    Shaw, William
    Dental School, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
    Mølsted, Kirsten
    Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Karsten, Agneta
    Division of Orthodontics, Department of Dental Medicine, Stockholm Craniofacial Team, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brinck, Eli
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
    Rizell,, Sara
    Orthodontic clinic, University Clinics of Odontology Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Sæle, Paul
    Oral Health Center of Excellence/Western Norway, Bergen, Norway.
    Hurmerinta, Kirsti
    Department of Plastic Surgery, Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland;.
    Rønning, Elisabeth
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
    Najar Chalien, Midia
    Orthodontic clinic, University Clinics of Odontology Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bellardie,, Haydn
    Greater Manchester Cleft Unit, Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital, Manchester, UK.
    Mooney,, Jeanette
    Greater Manchester Cleft Unit, Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital, Manchester, UK.
    Eyres, Phil
    Dental School, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
    Semb, Gunvor
    Dental School, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK;Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet and Statped Sørøst, Oslo, Norway.
    Scandcleft randomised trials of primary surgery for unilateral cleft lip and palate: 6. Dental arch relationships in 5 year-olds.2017In: Journal of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2000-656X, E-ISSN 2000-6764, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 6p. 52-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim:Good dentofacial growth is a major goal in the treatment of unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). The aim was to evaluate dental arch relationships at age 5 years after four different protocols of primary surgery for UCLP. Design:Three parallel randomised clinical trials were undertaken as an international multi-centre study by 10 cleft teams in five countries: Denmark, Finland, Sweden, Norway, and the UK. Methods:Three different surgical procedures for primary palatal repair (Arms B, C, D) were tested against a common procedure (Arm A) in the total cohort of 448 children born with non-syndromic UCLP. Study models of 418 patients (273 boys) at the mean age of 5.1 years (range = 4.8–7.0) were available. Dental arch relationships were assessed using the 5-year index by a blinded panel of 16 orthodontists. Kappa statistics were calculated to assess reliability. The trials were tested statistically witht-and Chi-square tests. Results:Good-to-very good levels of intra- and interrater reliability were obtained (0.71–0.94 and 0.70–0.87). Comparisons within each trial showed no statistically significant differences in the mean 5-year index scores or their distributions between the common method and the local team protocol. The mean index scores varied from 2.52 (Trial 2, Arm C) to 2.94 (Trial 3, Arm D). Conclusion:The results of the three trials do not provide statistical evidence that one technique is better than the others. Further analysis of the possible influence of individual surgical skill and learning curve are being pursued in this dataset. Trial registration:ISRCTN29932826. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

  • 6.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Hemlin, Claes
    Aleris specialistvård Sabbatsberg, Stockholm.
    Eggertsen, Robert
    Avd. för Samhällsmedicin och folkhälsa/allmänmedicin, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Lundeborg-Hammarström, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Proczkowska-Björklund, Marie
    Barn- och ungdomspsykiatri, Psykiatriska kliniken, Höglandet Eksjö/Nässjö.
    Stjernquist-Desatnik, Anna
    Öron-näsa-hals-kliniken, Universitetssjukhuset Lund.
    Zettergren-Wijk, Lena
    Avdelningen för tandreglering, Folktandvården Gävleborg AB, Gävle.
    Moa, Gunnar
    Projektledare Nationella medicinska indikationer.
    Törnqvist, Helene
    Projektledare Nationella medicinska indikationer.
    Indikation för tonsillotomi på barn och ungdomar2011Report (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Kallunki, Jenny
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Public Dental Health Care.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tonsillotomy versus tonsillectomy--a randomized trial regarding dentofacial morphology and post-operative growth in children with tonsillar hypertrophy2014In: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 471-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives:The primary aim of this study was to analyse two different methods of tonsil surgery, tonsillectomy (TE) and tonsillotomy (TT), regarding post-operative dentofacial growth in children with tonsillar hypertrophy. A secondary aim was to analyse these results in relation to cephalometric standards.Material and methods:The study group consisted of 64 subjects (39 boys and 25 girls), mean age 4.8 years ± 4 months. They were randomized to a complete removal of the pharyngeal tonsil, TE, (n = 31) or a partial removal, TT, (n = 33). Pre-operative and 2 years post-operative study material were obtained and analysed. The results were compared with cephalometric standards.Results:Pre-operative, children with hypertrophic tonsils displayed an increased vertical relation (P < 0.05) compared with cephalometric standards. Post-operative, no significant difference could be detected between the two surgical procedures regarding dentofacial growth. Mandibular growth with an anterior inclination was significant (P < 0.001/TE, P < 0.01/TT) for both groups. An increased upper and lower incisor inclination was noted (P < 0.01/TE,TT). The vertical relation decreased (P < 0.001/TE, P < 0.05/TT) as well as the mandibular angle (P < 0.01/TE, P < 0.001/TT). Reduction was also significant for the sagittal intermaxillar (P < 0.001/TE,TT) relation. These post-operative results, together with a more prognatic mandible (P < 0.05/TE,TT) and chin (P < 0.001/TE, P < 0.01/TT), might indicate a more horizontal direction of mandibular growth.Conclusion:TE and TT yielded equal post-operative dentofacial growth in children treated for hypertrophic tonsils. This result should be considered when deciding upon surgical technique.

  • 8.
    Karsten, Agneta
    et al.
    Stockholm Craniofacial Team, Division of Orthodontics, Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Hurmerinta, Kirsti
    Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Heliövaara, Arja
    Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Küseler,, Annelise
    Cleft Palate Center, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Skaare, Pål
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
    Bellardie, Haydn
    Greater Manchester Cleft Lip and Palate Unit, Royal Manchester Childrens’ Hospital, Manchester, UK.
    Rønning, Elisabeth
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
    Shaw, William
    Dental School, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
    Mølsted, Kirsten
    Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sæle, Paul
    Oral Health Center of Expertise/Western Norway, Bergen, Norway.
    Brinck, Eli
    Oral Health Center of Expertise/Western Norway, Bergen, Norway.
    Rizell, Sara
    Department of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Najal Chalier, Midia
    Department of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eyres, Philip
    Dental School, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
    Semb, Gunvor
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway; Dental School, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
    Scandcleft randomised trials of primary surgery for unilateral cleft lip and palate: 7. Occlusion in 5 year-olds according to the Huddart and Bodenham index.2017In: Journal of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2000-656X, E-ISSN 2000-6764, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 6p. 58-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim:Good dentofacial development and good occlusion are main goals in the treatment of UCLP. The aim was to evaluate dental occlusion at age 5 years with the Huddart and Bodenham index after four different protocols of primary surgery for UCLP. Design:Three parallel randomised controlled trials were undertaken as an international multicentre study by 10 cleft teams in five countries: Denmark, Finland, Sweden, Norway, and the UK. Methods:Three different surgical procedures for primary palatal repair (Arms B, C, and D) were tested against a common procedure (Arm A) in the total cohort of 448 children born with non-syndromic UCLP. Dental casts of 418 patients (272 boys, 146 girls), at the mean age of 5.1 years (range =4.7–6.9) were blindly assessed by 10 orthodontists with the original Huddart and Bodenham index. The main outcome measure was dental occlusion. Results:The inter- and intra-examiner reliability was good-to-excellent (0.61–0.94; 0.66–1.0, respectively). The mean total scores (+2 to −18) varied from −5.56 (Trial 2C) to −7.21 (Trial 3D). The mean anterior scores (+2 to −6) varied from −1.66 (Trial 2C) to −2.56 (Trial 3A). The mean posterior cleft-side scores (0 to −6) varied from −3.24 (Trial 3A) to −3.82 (Trial 3D) and the mean non-cleft-side scores (0 to −6) varied from −0.60 (Trial 2C) to −1.30 (Trial 3A); however, no significant differences were found within the trials. Conclusion:There was no statistical evidence of a difference in occlusion between the two surgical methods in each trial. Trial registration:ISRCTN29932826. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

  • 9. Küseler, A
    et al.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Hurmerinta, K
    Soft tissue changes in patients with complete cleft lip and palate after maxillary distraction osteogenesis and orthognatic bimaxillary surgery2005In: 10 International congress on cleft Palate and Related Craniofacial Anomalies,2005, 2005, p. 107-107Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10. Larsson, P.
    et al.
    List, T.
    Lundstroem, I.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic.
    Ohrbach, R.
    Reliability and validity of a Swedish version of the oral health impact profile.2003In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 82, p. 1873-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11. Larsson, P
    et al.
    List, T
    Lundström, Inger
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic.
    Ohrbach, R
    Reliability and validity of a Swedish version of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-S)2004In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 147-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to translate the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) into Swedish and evaluate the reliability and validity of the Swedish version (OHIP-S). The CHIP is a 49-item, self-administered questionnaire divided into 7 different subscales. The original version in English was translated into Swedish, accompanied by back-translation into English, after which the Swedish version was revised. A total of 145 consecutive patients participated and answered a questionnaire. The patients comprised five clinically separate groups: temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) (n = 30), Primary Sjogren's Syndrome (SS) (n = 30), burning sensation and pain in the oral mucosa (oral mucosal pain, OMP) (n = 28), skeletal malocclusion (malocclusion) (n = 2 7), and healthy dental recall patients (Controls) (n = 30). The TMD group and the control group participated in a test-retest procedure. The internal reliability of each subscale was calculated with Cronbach's alpha and found to be high and to range from 0.83-0.91. The stability (test-retest) of the instrument, calculated using the intraclass correlation coefficient, ranged from 0.87 to 0.98. The construct validity of OHIP-S was compared with subscales of the Symptom Check List (SCL-90) (rho 0.65) and the jaw Function Limitation Scale JFLS) (rho 0.76) and analyzed with Spearman's correlation coefficient. Convergent validity was evaluated by comparing CHIP with self-reported health using Spearman's correlation coefficient and was found to be acceptable (rho 0.61). In the evaluation of the discriminative ability of the instrument, significant differences were found in the total OHIP-S score between the controls and the other four groups (P < 0.001). We conclude that the reliability and validity of OHIP-S is excellent. The instrument can be recommended for assessing the impact of oral health on masticatory ability and psychosocial function.

  • 12.
    Lena Sundell, Anna
    et al.
    Institute Postgrad Dent Educ, Sweden.
    Ullbro, Christer
    UiT Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Twetman, Svante
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Comparing caries risk profiles between 5-and 10-year-old children with cleft lip and/or palate and non-cleft controls2015In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 15, no 85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous studies have suggested that children with oral clefts may have higher caries prevalence in comparison with non-cleft controls but the relative importance of the potential risk factors is not clear. The aim of this study was to compare the caries risk profiles in a group of cleft lip and/or palate (CL(P)) children with non-cleft controls in the same age using a computerized caries risk assessment model. Methods: The study group consisted of 133 children with CL(P) (77 subjects aged 5 years and 56 aged 10 years) and 297 non-cleft controls (133 aged 5 years and 164 aged 10 years). A questionnaire was used to collect data concerning the childs oral hygiene routines, dietary habits and fluoride exposure. Oral hygiene was assessed using Quigley-Hein plaque Index and the caries prevalence and frequency was scored according to the International Caries Detection and Assessment System. Whole saliva samples were analyzed for mutans streptococci, lactobacilli, buffering capacity and secretion rate. The risk factors and risk profiles were compared between the groups with aid of Cariogram and the estimated risk for future caries was categorized as "high" or "low". Results: Children with CL(P) (the entire study group) had significantly higher counts of salivary lactobacilli (p less than 0.05) and displayed less good oral hygiene (p less than 0.05). More 10-year-old children in the CL(P) group had low secretion rate but this difference was not significant. The average chance to avoid caries ranged from 59 to 67 % but there were no significant differences between the groups. The odds of being categorized with high caries risk in the CL(P) group was significantly elevated (OR = 1.89; 95 % CI = 1.25-2.86). In both groups, children in the high risk category had a higher caries experience than those with low risk. Conclusion: Children with CL(P) displayed increased odds of being categorized at high caries risk with impaired oral hygiene and elevated salivary lactobacilli counts as most influential factors. The results suggest that a caries risk assessment model should be applied in the routine CL(P) care as a basis for the clinical decision-making and implementation of primary and secondary caries prevention.

  • 13.
    Magnusson, Anders
    et al.
    Institute Postgrad Dent Educ, Sweden .
    Bjerklin, Krister
    Institute Postgrad Dent Educ, Sweden .
    Kim, Hyungmin
    Harvard University, USA .
    Nilsson, Peter
    Institute Postgrad Dent Educ, Sweden .
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Three-dimensional assessment of transverse skeletal changes after surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion and orthodontic treatment: A prospective computerized tomography study2012In: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, ISSN 0889-5406, E-ISSN 1097-6752, Vol. 142, no 6, p. 825-833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The aim of this prospective longitudinal study was to evaluate transverse skeletal changes after surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion. The changes were registered by using a 3-dimensional computerized tomography technique based on superimposition on the anterior base of the skull. Methods: The subjects comprised 35 patients (mean age, 19.7 years; range, 16.1-43.9 years). Low-dose, helical computerized tomography images were taken at treatment start and after orthodontic treatment. The 3-dimensional models were registered and superimposed at the anterior cranial base. Results: Surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion had a significant transverse skeletal treatment effect, significantly greater posteriorly than anteriorly. The expansion was parallel anteriorly, but posteriorly there was significant transverse tipping. Although there was no statistically significant difference between the changes at the corresponding landmarks, the range of standard deviations was marked. Conclusions: The results showed that, for registering transverse skeletal changes after surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion, 3-dimensional superimposition is a reliable method, circumventing projection and measurement errors. Surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion had a significant but nonuniform skeletal treatment effect. Despite careful surgical separation, pronounced posterior tipping occurred. No correlation was found between the severity of tipping and the patients age. (Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 2012;142:825-33)

  • 14.
    Magnusson, Anders
    et al.
    Department of Orthodontics, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bjerklin, Krister
    Department of Orthodontics, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Kim, Hyungmin
    Harvard University, USA .
    Nilsson, Peter
    Institute Postgrad Dent Educ, Sweden .
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Three-dimensional computed tomographic analysis of changes to the external features of the nose after Surgically Assisted Rapid Maxillary Expansion and orthodontic treatment: A prospective longitudinal study2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The aim of this prospective, longitudinal study was toe valuate changes to the external shape and form of the nose after Surgically Assisted Rapid Maxillary Expansion (SARME) and orthodontic treatment. The changes were registered using a three-dimensional (3-D) computer tomography technique, based on superimposition on the anterior base of the skull.

    Method: The subjects comprised 35 patients, mean age 19.7 years (16.1-43.9). Lowdose, helical Computerized Tomography (CT) was taken at treatment start and after completed orthodontic treatment, about 18months post-surgery. The 3-D models were registered and superimposed on the anterior cranial base.

    Results: There was in general significant widening and overall anterior and inferior displacement of the nasal soft tissue. The changes varied in size and direction. No correlation was found between the initial and final widths of the nose, or between the initial and final widths of the nostrils.

    Conclusion: After SARME, the most obvious changes to the external features of the nose  are at the most lateral alar-bases. The difference in lateral displacement profoundly influenced the perception of a more rounded nose. Patients with narrow and constrained nostrils can benefit from these changes. The 3-D superimposition applied in this study is a reliable method, circumventing projection and measurement errors.

  • 15.
    Magnusson, Anders
    et al.
    Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping.
    Bjerklin, Krister
    Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping.
    Jonsson, Fredrik
    Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Oral Surgery UHL. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Maxillofacial Surgery.
    Nasal cavity size, airway resistance, and subjective sensation after surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion: A prospective longitudinal study2011In: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, ISSN 0889-5406, E-ISSN 1097-6752, Vol. 140, no 5, p. 641-651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The aims of this study were to measure changes in nasal minimum cross-sectional area and nasal airway resistance after surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion and to explore a possible correlation with the subjective sensation of nasal obstruction. Methods: Minimum cross-sectional area and nasal airway resistance were measured in 39 consecutive patients treated with surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion. Subjective nasal obstruction was assessed by a questionnaire at pretreatment and at 3 and 18 months postoperatively. Results: Subjective nasal obstruction had improved significantly by 3 months postoperatively. Minimum cross-sectional area increased and nasal airway resistance decreased. No correlations were found. In subjects with pretreatment subjective nasal obstruction and initially narrow anterior minimum cross-sectional area, there was a significant correlation between a moderate increase in anterior minimum cross-sectional area and improvement in perceived nasal obstruction. Eighteen months postoperatively, no changes were found from pretreatment values for subjective nasal obstruction, minimal cross-sectional area, or nasal airway resistance, and there were no correlations. Subjects with a sensation of nasal obstruction at treatment start reported a lasting significant subjective improvement. Conclusions: The postoperative effects of surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion did not persist in the long term. No correlation was found between objective and subjective findings. Subjects with pretreatment nasal obstruction, however, reported a lasting sensation of improved nasal function after surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion.

  • 16.
    Magnusson, Anders
    et al.
    The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bjerklin, Krister
    Departments of *Orthodontics, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Maxillofacial Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion: long-term stability2009In: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 142-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate treatment outcomes and long-term stability in patients treated by surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME) and to compare the results with a matched, untreated control group. The sample comprised consecutive study models from 31 subjects (17 males and 14 females) with a mean pre-treatment age of 25.9 years [standard deviation (SD) 9.6]. The mean follow-up time was 6.4 years (SD 3.3). The transverse distances between the maxillary canines and maxillary first molars were measured with digital sliding callipers before treatment (T0), after treatment (T1), and at follow-up (T2). The data were analysed with a Mann-Whitney U, Spearman's rho, and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. At T1, all posterior crossbites were corrected and the expansions were statistically significant. At T2, despite some reduction in the transverse measurements, the posterior crossbites remained corrected. There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment and control groups at T2 regarding transverse measurements, except for the distance between the mesio-buccal cusp tips of the maxillary first molars. In the treatment group, there was no significant difference in terms of reductions in the transverse dimensions over the short- or long-term, no significant correlations between age or gender and the decrease in transverse dimensions or between the degree of anterior and posterior expansion. There were no significant correlations between the degree of expansion and subsequent post-treatment decrease. The results indicate that SARME normalizes the transverse discrepancies and is stable a mean of 6 years post-treatment. The decreases in the transverse dimensions are most pronounced during the first 3 years post-treatment. 

  • 17.
    Mani, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University Hospital.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery.
    Quality of Life Varies With Gender and Age Among Adults Treated for Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate2010In: CLEFT PALATE-CRANIOFACIAL JOURNAL, ISSN 1055-6656, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 491-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate health-related quality of life among adults treated for unilateral cleft lip and palate and to investigate whether patients were affected differently depending on gender and age. Design: Cross-sectional population study with long-term follow-up. Patients/Settings: All unilateral cleft lip and palate patients born 1960-1987 and treated at Uppsala University Hospital were invited (n = 109). Response rate was 79% (n = 86). Mean follow-up time was 35 years. Norm data matched for age and gender were used for comparison (n = 1385). Main Outcome Measures: Health-related quality of life measured with the SF-36 questionnaire. High values indicate good level of health-related quality of life. Results: The total patient group had lower values in the Mental Health subscale compared with norm data (p = .005). Values in all other subscales did not differ from norm data. Women had a higher positive difference than men in the subscale emotional role function compared with the matched norm population (p andlt; .001). The younger age group (20 to 32 years old) consistently had a larger negative difference to matched norm data compared with the older age group (33 to 47 years old) in the subscales social function (p = .009), physical role function (p andlt; .001), and emotional role function (p andlt; .001). Conclusions: Unilateral cleft lip and palate affected health-related quality of life differently depending on gender and age of the patient. Younger patients were affected more negatively than older patients on several subscales. However, except for the mental health subscale, health-related quality of life was similar among unilateral cleft lip and palate patients and norm data.

  • 18.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Does teasing affect satisfaction with facial appearance in subjects with treated cleft lip and palate2005In: 10 International congress on cleft Palate and Related Craniofacial Anomalies,2005, 2005, p. 120-120Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Evaluation of the eurocran yardstick for study model rating with and without lateral cephalogram2005In: 10 International congress on cleft Palate and Related Craniofacial Anomalies,2005, 2005, p. 119-199Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    List, Thomas
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Paulin, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dworkin, Samuel
    Department of Oral Medicine and Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences, School of Dentistry and Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, USA .
    Temporomandibular disorders in adults with repaired cleft lip and palate: a comparison with controls2001In: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 193-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), and assess psycho‐social distress in adult subjects with repaired complete cleft lip and palate (CLP). Sixty‐three adults (42 males and 21 females, mean age 24.2 years, range 19.5–29.2) with repaired CLP (CLP group) were compared with a group of 66 adults without cleft (non‐cleft group, 49 males and 17 females, mean age 25.5 years, range 20.2–29.9). All subjects underwent a clinical TMD examination, which followed the guidelines in the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD). Jaw function was assessed by evaluating answers to the mandibular function impairment questionnaire (MFIQ).

    Tension‐type headache was diagnosed according to the International Headache Society (IHS) classification. Psychological status was assessed using the depression score and the non‐specific physical symptom score with subscales of the Revised Symptom Checklist‐90 (SCL‐90‐R).

    The prevalence of reported pain in the face, jaws and/or TMJs was 14 and 9 per cent for the CLP and non‐cleft group, respectively, and did not differ significantly between the groups. The CLP group exhibited a significantly reduced jaw‐opening pattern (P < 0.001) and a higher frequency of crossbites (P < 0.05) compared with the non‐cleft group. Whilst jaw function was similar in both groups, a few items, e.g. speech and drinking, were significantly more impaired (P < 0.01) in the CLP group than in the non‐cleft group. There were no significant differences between the two groups concerning tension‐type headache or psycho‐social distress.

    The study found that overall TMD pain or psycho‐social distress was not more common in this CLP group than in a non‐cleft group.

  • 21.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum.
    List, Thomas
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Paulin, Gunnar
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of health and environment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Reliability of a multidimensional questionnaire for adults with treated complete cleft lip and palate2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2000-656X, E-ISSN 2000-6764, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 271-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability of a multidimensional questionnaire for Swedish adults with treated complete unilateral or bilateral cleft lip and palate (CLP). The questionnaire was designed to be used in the evaluation of adults with treated CLP after treatment. Before any conclusions were drawn from the results of the study we assessed the test-retest reliability of the questionnaire. The questionnaire included 168 questions and assessed the following domains: aesthetics, functions associated with CLP, satisfaction with treatment and perceived need for treatment, quality of life, depression and non-specific physical symptoms, body image, and jaw function. The subjects answered the questionnaire twice at a 2-3-week interval. Sixty-one adults (38 men, 23 women) mean age 24 years (range 20-29) participated in the study. The response rate for the questionnaire was acceptable at 75%. The test-retest reliability varied among the different domains. The reliability of questions regarding aesthetics, functions associated with CLP, and treatment satisfaction was good to excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.51 to 0.89). Good to excellent (ICC = 0.61 to 1.0) reliability was also found for the quality of life in various life domains and the wellbeing scales. The reliability of the body image scale was moderate (kappa = 0.43-0.60) for most items and lower than that of other scales used in this study. The reliability of the mean depression symptom score (ICC = 0.93) and the mean non-specific physical symptoms score (ICC = 0.85) were excellent. The reliability of the mandibular function impairment was good (ICC = 0.67). The conclusion of the study is that an overall reliability was good for the multidimensional questionnaire.

  • 22.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Paulin, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alterations in occlusion and maxillary dental arch dimensions in adults with treated unilateral complete cleft lip and palateManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this stndy was to evaluate the occlusion and maxillary dental arch dimensions in adults with repaired complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) and to investigate the patterns of change in early adulthood. Study models from 39 subjects (25 men, 14 women) (mean age 24.7 years, range 20.2-29.3) with the diagnosis complete UCLP taken at a follow-up examination were analysed and compared with the study models taken at baseline examination (mean age 19.1 years, range 16.0-20.6). Lip closure was made according to the Millard technique and palatal closure according to the Wardill-Kilner technique. All subjects had received orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. The subjects were divided into three groups according to the type of retention in the upper jaw: no retention (n = 15), retention with bonded twisted retainer (n = 13), onlay or fixed bridge (n = 11).

    Occlusion was evaluated according to a scoring system (Huddart and Bodenham, 1972). The maxillary dental arch dimensions were measured with a video imaging system. In the total sample there was a significant deterioration in the total occlusal score during the follow-up period. The impairment was larger on the cleft side than on the non-cleft side. There were no significant differences in the frontal scores. A comparison of the transversal and sagittal maxillary arch dimensions revealed significant differences in all measurements during the follow-up interval. The reduction was largest for the maxillary second premolar width, followed by the first molar width. The oveijet differed significantly between the registrations. The occlusal score and the maxillary arch dimensions were reduced in all of the three subgroups, but there were no differences between the groups. No gender differences were found.

  • 23.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Paulin, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Changes in occlusion and maxillary dental arch dimensions in adults with treated unilateral complete cleft lip and palate2005In: 10 International congress on cleft Palate and Related Craniofacial Anomalies,2005, 2005, p. 119-119Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 24.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Paulin, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL.
    Changes in occlusion and maxillary dental arch dimensions in adults with treated unilateral complete cleft lip and palate: A follow-up study2004In: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 385-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the occlusion and maxillary dental arch dimensions in adults with repaired complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) and to investigate the patterns of change in early adulthood. Study models from 39 patients (25 men, 14 women, mean age 24.7 years, range 20.2-29.3 years) with a diagnosis of complete UCLP taken at a follow-up examination were analysed and compared with the study models taken at baseline examination (mean age 19.1 years, range 16.0-20.6 years). Lip closure was carried out according to the Millard technique and palatal closure according to the Wardill-Kilner technique. All patients had received orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. The patients were divided into three groups according to the type of retention in the upper arch: no retention (n = 15), retention with a bonded twisted retainer (n = 13), an onlay or fixed bridge (n = 11). Occlusion was evaluated according to a scoring system. The maxillary dental arch dimensions were measured with a video imaging system. There was a significant deterioration in the total occlusal score during the follow-up period and this was larger on the cleft than on the non-cleft side. There were no significant differences in the anterior scores. A comparison of the transversal and sagittal maxillary arch dimensions revealed significant differences in all measurements during the follow-up interval. The reduction was largest for the maxillary second premolar width, followed by the first molar width. The overjet differed significantly between the registrations. The occlusal score and the maxillary arch dimensions were reduced in all of the three subgroups, but there were no differences between the groups.

  • 25.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Paulin, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Clinic. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östrup, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Facial appearance in adults who had cleft lip and palate treated in childhood2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2000-656X, E-ISSN 2000-6764, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 16-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sixty-eight adults (44 men and 24 women) with treated total cleft lip and palate were compared with a group of 66 adults (49 men and 17 women) without clefts, matched by sex and age. The outcome measures included a self-report questionnaire about body image, quality of life in general, health-related quality of life, somatisation, and depression. The group with clefts were also asked if they had further need of treatment. They reported significantly more dissatisfaction with their facial appearance (nose, lips, mouth, profile, and overall facial appearance) than the group without clefts. Satisfaction with facial appearance was significantly correlated with a better quality of life in both groups, and significantly correlated with a better health-related quality of life and a lower grade of somatisation in the group with clefts. Dissatisfaction with facial appearance was the most significant predictor of depression in both groups. A panel of four professionals from a cleft lip and palate treatment team judged the outcome of treatment in 64 of the subjects on colour slides. The professionals and the subjects with clefts were generally not very satisfied with the results of the surgical outcome. Thirty of the subjects with clefts (47%) wished to have more operations. The professional group recommended further operations in 38 of the cases (59%), in particular, rhinoplasties. We conclude that the subjects with treated clefts were not satisfied with their facial appearance, although they seem to be psychosocially well-adjusted to their disability.

  • 26.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Paulin, Gunnar
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Quality of life in adults with repaired complete cleft lip and palate2001In: The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal, ISSN 1055-6656, E-ISSN 1545-1569, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 379-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study evaluated the quality of life in adult Swedish subjects with repaired complete cleft lip and palate (CLP).

    Design/Patients: Sixty-eight adults with repaired CLP were compared with a group of 66 adults without cleft matched by gender and age.

    Outcome Measures: The outcome measures included a self-report questionnaire concerning quality of life in general, well-being, and health-related quality of life.

    Results: The CLP group rated their quality of life significantly lower than did the control group in the areas of life meaning (p < .05), family life (p < .0001), and private economy (p < .01). There were no significant differences between the groups concerning well-being. In the CLP group, the health-related quality of life was significantly lower concerning global life (p < .0001), disturbance to life (p < .01), well-being (p < .0001), social contacts (p < .0001), and family life (p < .05) but significantly higher concerning ability to make the most of leisure time (p < .001) and to be active (p < .001).

    Conclusions: The CLP group perceived a marked impact of the handicap on their lives concerning global aspects, well-being, and social life. More practical and tangible aspects of their daily living, however, were not affected, and only some minor aspects of their quality of life in general were poor in comparison with the control group, which indicates a fairly good life adjustment in spite of the handicap.

  • 27.
    Mølsted, Kirsten
    et al.
    Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Humerinta, Kirsti
    Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Küseler,, Annelise
    Cleft Palate Center, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Skaare, Pål
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
    Bellardie, Haydn
    Greater Manchester Cleft Lip and Palate Unit, Royal Manchester Childrens Hospital, Manchester, UK.
    Shaw, William
    Dental School, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
    Karsten, Agneta
    Stockholm Craniofacial Team, Division of Orthodontics, Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kåre Sæle, Paul
    Oral Health Center of Expertise/Western Norway, Bergen, Norway.
    Rizell, Sara
    Department of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Eyres, Philip
    Greater Manchester Cleft Lip and Palate Unit, Royal Manchester Childrens Hospital, Manchester, UK.
    Semb, Gunvor
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway;(4);Dental School, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK;(6);Statped Sørøst, Oslo, Norway.
    Scandcleft randomised trials of primary surgery for unilateral cleft lip and palate: 8. Assessing naso-labial appearance in 5-year-olds - a preliminary study2017In: Journal of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2000-656X, E-ISSN 2000-6764, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 9p. 64-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim:Facial appearance is one of the most relevant measures of success in cleft lip and palate treatment. The aim was to assess nasolabial appearance at 5 years of age in all children in the project. In this part of the project the local protocol for lip closure continued to be used because the primary lip and nose operations were not part of the randomisation. The great majority of the surgeons used Millard’s technique together with McComb’s technique for the nose. One center used Tennison-Randalls technique and in one center the centers own technique as well as nose plugs were used. Methods:Three hundred and fifty-nine children participated in this part of the project. Standardised photos according to a specific protocol developed for the Scandcleft project were taken. Only the nasolabial area was shown, the surrounding facial features were masked. Three components were scored using a 5-point ordinal scale. A new developed Scandcleft Yardstick was used. Results:The reliability of the method was tested using the weighted kappa statistics. Both the interrater and intrarater reliability scores were good to very good. There were statistically significant differences between the three trials. Conclusion:The Millard procedure combined with McComb technique had been used in the majority of the cases in all three trials. There were statistically significant differences between the three trials concerning upper lip, nasal form, and cleft side profile. Trial registration:ISRCTN29932826. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

  • 28.
    Norderyd, Johanna
    et al.
    Institute Postgrad Dent Educ, Sweden; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Graf, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Nilsson, Karolina
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Sjöstrand, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Habilitation.
    Steinwall, Gunilla
    Habilitation Centre, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Ärleskog, Elinor
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Bågesund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Public Dental Health Care.
    Sublingual administration of atropine eyedrops in children with excessive drooling - a pilot study2017In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 22-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundDrooling can be a severe disability and have high impact on daily life. Reversible treatment is preferable. AimTo analyse whether sublingual administration of atropine eyedrops is a useful reversible treatment option for severe drooling in children with disabilities. DesignThe study had a prospective, single-system research design. The participants served as their own controls. The study period was 3 weeks without treatment, 4 weeks with atropine eyedrop solution 10 mg/mL one drop a day followed by 4 weeks of one drop twice a day. Parents rating of their childs drooling was assessed on a 100-mm VAS, and unstimulated salivary secretion rate measurement was performed together with notations about side effects and practicality. ResultsParents VAS assessment of drooling decreased from a median (range) of 74 (40-98) at baseline to 48 (18-88) (P = 0.05) and 32 (12-85) (P = 0.004) after 4 weeks of atropine once a day and another 4 weeks of atropine twice a day, respectively (n = 11). Unstimulated salivary secretion rates decreased from baseline to end of study (P = 0.032). Several parents complained about difficult administration. No irreversible side effects were noted. ConclusionsSublingual atropine eyedrops may be an alternative for treatment of severe drooling in children with disabilities.

  • 29.
    Semb, Gunvor
    et al.
    Division of Dentistry, University of Manchester , Manchester , UK; Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery , Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet , Oslo , Norway; Department of Speech and Language Disorders , Statped sørøst , Oslo , Norway..
    Enemark, Hans
    Cleft Palate Center , Aarhus , Denmark.
    Friede, Hans
    Department of Orthodontics , Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Paulin, Gunnar
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Lilja, Jan
    Department of Plastic Surgery , Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Rautio, Jorma
    Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital , Helsinki , Finland.
    Andersen, Mikael
    Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, University Hospital of Copenhagen , Denmark.
    Åbyholm, Frank
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery , Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet , Oslo , Norway.
    Lohmander, Anette
    Division of Speech and Language Pathology , Karolinska Institute, and Karolinska University Hospital , Stockholm , Sweden.
    Shaw, William
    Division of Dentistry, University of Manchester , Manchester , UK.
    Mølsted, Kirsten
    Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, University Hospital of Copenhagen , Denmark.
    Heliövaara, Arja
    Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital , Helsinki , Finland.
    Bolund, Stig
    Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, University Hospital of Copenhagen , Denmark.
    Hukki, Jyri
    Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital , Helsinki , Finland.
    Vindenes, Hallvard
    Centre for Cleft Lip and Palate, Bergen University Hospital Haukeland , Bergen , Norway.
    Davenport, Peter
    Greater Manchester Cleft Lip and Palate Unit , Royal Manchester Childrens' Hospital , Manchester , UK.
    Arctander, Kjartan
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery , Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet , Oslo , Norway.
    Larson, Ola
    Stockholm Craniofacial Team , Karolinska University Hospital , Stockholm , Sweden.
    Berggren, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Whitby, David
    Greater Manchester Cleft Lip and Palate Unit , Royal Manchester Childrens' Hospital , Manchester , UK.
    Leonard, Alan
    The Royal Hospital for Sick Children , Belfast , N. Ireland.
    Neovius, Erik
    Stockholm Craniofacial Team , Karolinska University Hospital , Stockholm , Sweden.
    Elander, Anna
    Department of Plastic Surgery , Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Willadsen, Elisabeth
    Department of Nordic Studies and Linguistics , University of Copenhagen , Denmark.
    Bannister, R. Patricia
    Greater Manchester Cleft Lip and Palate Unit , Royal Manchester Childrens' Hospital , Manchester , UK.
    Bradbury, Eileen
    Private Practitioner , Manchester , UK.
    Henningsson, Gunilla
    Stockholm Craniofacial Team , Karolinska University Hospital , Stockholm , Sweden.
    Persson, Christina
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Speech and Language; Division for Speech and Language Pathology , Sahlgrenska University Hospital , Gothenburg , Sweden Pathology Unit , Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg , Sweden; .
    Eyres, Philip
    Division of Dentistry, University of Manchester , Manchester , UK.
    Emborg, Berit
    Cleft Palate Center , Aarhus , Denmark.
    Kisling-Møller, Mia
    Division of Dentistry, University of Manchester , Manchester , UK.
    Küseler, Annelise
    Division of Dentistry, University of Manchester , Manchester , UK.
    Granhof Black, Birthe
    Division of Dentistry, University of Manchester , Manchester , UK.
    Schöps, Antje
    Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, University Hospital of Copenhagen , Denmark.
    Bau, Anja
    Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, University Hospital of Copenhagen , Denmark.
    Boers, Maria
    Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, University Hospital of Copenhagen , Denmark.
    Søgaard Andersen, Helene
    Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, University Hospital of Copenhagen , Denmark.
    Jeppesen, Karin
    Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, University Hospital of Copenhagen , Denmark.
    Marxen, Dorte
    Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, University Hospital of Copenhagen , Denmark.
    Paaso, Marjukka
    Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital , Helsinki , Finland.
    Hölttä, Elina
    Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital , Helsinki , Finland.
    Alaluusua, Suvi
    Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital , Helsinki , Finland.
    Turunen, Leena
    Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital , Helsinki , Finland.
    Humerinta, Kirsti
    Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital , Helsinki , Finland.
    Elfving-Little, Ulla
    Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital , Helsinki , Finland.
    Tørdal, Inger Beate
    Department of Speech and Language Disorders , Statped sørøst , Oslo , Norway.
    Kjøll, Lillian
    Department of Speech and Language Disorders , Statped sørøst , Oslo , Norway.
    Aukner, Ragnhild
    Department of Speech and Language Disorders , Statped sørøst , Oslo , Norway.
    Hide, Øydis
    Department of Speech and Language Disorders , Statped sørøst , Oslo , Norway.
    Feragen, Kristin Billaud
    Department of Speech and Language Disorders , Statped sørøst , Oslo , Norway.
    Rønning, Elisabeth
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery , Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet , Oslo , Norway.
    Skaare, Pål
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery , Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet , Oslo , Norway.
    Brinck, Eli
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery , Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet , Oslo , Norway.
    Semmingsen, Ann-Magritt
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery , Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet , Oslo , Norway.
    Lindberg, Nina
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery , Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet , Oslo , Norway.
    Bowden, Melanie
    Greater Manchester Cleft Lip and Palate Unit , Royal Manchester Childrens' Hospital , Manchester , UK.
    Davies, Julie
    Greater Manchester Cleft Lip and Palate Unit , Royal Manchester Childrens' Hospital , Manchester , UK.
    Mooney, Jeanette
    Greater Manchester Cleft Lip and Palate Unit , Royal Manchester Childrens' Hospital , Manchester , UK.
    Bellardie, Haydn
    Greater Manchester Cleft Lip and Palate Unit , Royal Manchester Childrens' Hospital , Manchester , UK.
    Schofield, Nina
    Greater Manchester Cleft Lip and Palate Unit , Royal Manchester Childrens' Hospital , Manchester , UK.
    Nyberg, Jill
    Stockholm Craniofacial Team , Karolinska University Hospital , Stockholm , Sweden.
    Lundberg, Maria
    Stockholm Craniofacial Team , Karolinska University Hospital , Stockholm , Sweden.
    Linder-Aronson Karsten, Agneta
    Stockholm Craniofacial Team, Department of Dental Medicine , Karolinska Institute , Stockholm , Sweden.
    Larson, Margareta
    Eastman Institute, Stockholms Läns Landsting , Stockholm , Sweden.
    Holmefjord, Anders
    Statped vest , Bergen , Norway.
    Reisæter, Sigvor
    Statped vest , Bergen , Norway.
    Pedersen, Nina-Helen
    Statped vest , Bergen , Norway.
    Rasmussen, Therese
    Statped vest , Bergen , Norway.
    Tindlund, Rolf
    Dental School, University of Bergen , Bergen , Norway.
    Sæle, Paul
    Oral Health Center of Expertise/Western Norway , Bergen , Norway.
    Blomhoff, Reidunn
    Centre for Cleft Lip and Palate, Bergen University Hospital Haukeland , Bergen , Norway.
    Jacobsen, Gry
    Centre for Cleft Lip and Palate, Bergen University Hospital Haukeland , Bergen , Norway.
    Havstam, Christina
    Division for Speech and Language Pathology , Sahlgrenska University Hospital , Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Rizell, Sara
    Department of Orthodontics , Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Enocson, Lars
    Department of Orthodontics , Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Hagberg, Catharina
    Department of Orthodontics , Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Najar Chalien, Midia
    Department of Orthodontics , Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Paganini, Anna
    Department of Plastic Surgery , Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Lundeborg, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Mjönes, Anna-Britta
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Gustavsson, Annica
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Hayden, Christine
    The Royal Hospital for Sick Children , Belfast , N. Ireland.
    McAleer, Eilish
    The Royal Hospital for Sick Children , Belfast , N. Ireland.
    Slevan, Emma
    The Royal Hospital for Sick Children , Belfast , N. Ireland.
    Gregg, Terry
    The Royal Hospital for Sick Children , Belfast , N. Ireland.
    Worthington, Helen
    Division of Dentistry, University of Manchester , Manchester , UK.
    A Scandcleft randomised trials of primary surgery for unilateral cleft lip and palate: 1. Planning and management.2017In: Journal of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2000-656X, E-ISSN 2000-6764, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 2-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Longstanding uncertainty surrounds the selection of surgical protocols for the closure of unilateral cleft lip and palate, and randomised trials have only rarely been performed. This paper is an introduction to three randomised trials of primary surgery for children born with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). It presents the protocol developed for the trials in CONSORT format, and describes the management structure that was developed to achieve the long-term engagement and commitment required to complete the project.

    METHOD: Ten established national or regional cleft centres participated. Lip and soft palate closure at 3-4 months, and hard palate closure at 12 months served as a common method in each trial. Trial 1 compared this with hard palate closure at 36 months. Trial 2 compared it with lip closure at 3-4 months and hard and soft palate closure at 12 months. Trial 3 compared it with lip and hard palate closure at 3-4 months and soft palate closure at 12 months. The primary outcomes were speech and dentofacial development, with a series of perioperative and longer-term secondary outcomes.

    RESULTS: Recruitment of 448 infants took place over a 9-year period, with 99.8% subsequent retention at 5 years.

    CONCLUSION: The series of reports that follow this introductory paper include comparisons at age 5 of surgical outcomes, speech outcomes, measures of dentofacial development and appearance, and parental satisfaction. The outcomes recorded and the numbers analysed for each outcome and time point are described in the series.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN29932826.

  • 30.
    Slavnic, Snjezana
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Public Dental Service, Centre for Orthodontics and Paediatric Dentistry.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Dental Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Oral Surgery.
    Duration of orthodontic treatment in conjunction with orthognathic surgery2010In: SWEDISH DENTAL JOURNAL, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 159-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients considering undergoing combined orthodontic-orthognathic treatment for correction of malocclusion require appropriate information, particularly with respect to duration of treatment The primary aim of this study was to determine the duration of orthodontic treatment carried out in conjunction with orthognathic surgery and to analyze the influence of selected explanatory variables. A further aim was to compare the duration of orthodontic treatment in patients treated by orthodontists at Linkoping University hospital orthodontic clinic and six regional orthodontic clinics This is a retrospective study, based on data from the orthodontic records of patients who had undergone orthognathic surgery at the University Hospital Maxillofacial Unit in Linkoping, Sweden, from 2000 to 2005 The subjects comprised 207 out of 233 patients (107 women and 100 men), aged 15 8 - 56.9 years, median 24.2 years at the time of surgery 26 patients were excluded, either diagnosed with a syndrome, or because it was impossible to follow up the entire treatment. 59 subjects had undergone orthodontic treatment at the University hospital orthodontic clinic and 148 at the 6 regional orthodontic clinics. The variables recorded were gender, malocclusion, the number of appointments (scheduled and emergency) and treatment setting The median value for pre-operative orthodontic treatment time was 19.2 months (range 2.4 - 68.4); for postoperative orthodontic treatment 4 6 months (range 0 - 18 8) and for total orthodontic treatment 278 months (range 5.9 - 79 1). For the University hospital orthodontic clinic, pre-operative (16.7 months) and total orthodontic treatment times (25 months) were significantly shorter than for the regional clinics; the duration of postoperative treatment was significantly longer (4.1 months). No other explanatory variables had a significant influence on the duration of orthodontic treatment. Compared with the regional orthodontic clinics, there were significantly fewer scheduled appointments at the University hospital orthodontic clinic, but no significant difference in emergency attendance.

  • 31.
    Sundell, A. L.
    et al.
    Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, P.O. Box 1030, SE-551 11, Jönköping, Sweden. annalena.sundell@rjl.se.
    Ullbro, C.
    Department of Clinical Dentistry, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Dahlén, G.
    Department of Oral Microbiology and Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Twetman, S.
    Department of Odontology, Section for Cariology and Endodontics, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Salivary microbial profiles in 5-year old children with oral clefts: a comparative study2018In: European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 1818-6300, E-ISSN 1996-9805, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 57-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To compare the salivary microbial profile in children with oral clefts to matched non-cleft controls in a cross-sectional study.

  • 32.
    Sundell, Anna Lena
    et al.
    Institute Postgrad Dent Educ, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Anna-Karin
    Institute Postgrad Dent Educ, Sweden.
    Ullbro, Christer
    UiT Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Twetman, Svante
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Caries prevalence and enamel defects in 5-and 10-year-old children with cleft lip and/or palate: A case-control study2016In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 74, no 2, p. 90-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To determine the prevalence of dental caries and enamel defects in 5- and 10-year-old Swedish children with cleft lip and/or palate (CL(P)) in comparison to non-cleft controls. Materials and methods. The study group consisted of 139 children with CL(P) (80 subjects aged 5 years and 59 aged 10 years) and 313 age-matched non-cleft controls. All children were examined by one of two calibrated examiners. Caries was scored according to the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS-II) and enamel defects as presence and frequency of hypoplasia and hypomineralization. Results. The caries prevalence among the 5-year-old CL(P) children and the non-cleft controls was 36% and 18%, respectively (p &lt; 0.05). The CL(P) children had higher caries frequency (initial and cavitated lesions) in the primary dentition than their controls (1.2 vs 0.9; p &lt; 0.05). A significantly higher prevalence of enamel defects was found in CL(P) children of both age groups and anterior permanent teeth were most commonly affected. Conclusions. Preschool children with cleft lip and/or palate seem to have more caries in the primary dentition than age-matched non-cleft controls. Enamel defects were more common in CL(P) children in both age groups.

  • 33.
    Sundell, Anna Lena
    et al.
    Department of Paediatric Dentistry, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Törnhage, Carl-Johan
    Department of Paediatrics, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden / Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg's University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    A comparison of health-related quality of life in 5- and 10-year-old Swedish children with and without cleft lip and/or palate2017In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 238-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The current understanding on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in young Swedish children with cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) is sparse, and therefore, research on impact of CL/P on HRQoL in children is needed.

    Aims To investigate HRQoL in 5- and 10-year-old Swedish children with CL/P in comparison with non-cleft controls. Also to analyse whether there were any differences in HRQoL between children with cleft lip (with or without cleft palate, CL ± P) and cleft palate only (CP) and/or gender differences. Design A total of 137 children with CL/P and 305 non-cleft controls participated. HRQoL was measured with KIDSCREEN-52.

    Results All children in the study exhibited HRQoL within or above the age-matched reference interval of the method with similar results in both groups; however, in the dimension ‘social support and peers’, the 10-year-old children with CL/P perceived lower HRQoL than the non-cleft controls, but it did not reach statistical significance. Type of cleft or gender did not influence HRQoL.

    Conclusions Both 5- and 10-year-old Swedish children with CL/P had HRQoL in the normal reference interval. Their general life situations were well adjusted to their clefts, but the older children with CL/P felt more excluded and less supported by peers.

1 - 33 of 33
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