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  • 1.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Bond University, Australia.
    Kjellman, Görel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Multidimensional assessment of pain related disability after surgery for cervical disc disease2013In: APA Conference 2013: New moves, Australian Physiotherapy Association , 2013, p. 2-2Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Questions: Given only 25% of patients, 10 year post-surgery for cervical disc disease report clinically meaningful improvements in functional disability, what are the biopsychosocial factors associated with continued long-term disability? What are the implications for physiotherapy practice?

    Design: Cross-sectional observational study.

    Participants: Ninety patients who had undergone anterior discectomy and fusion (ACDF) surgery 10-13 years prior.

    Outcome Measures: The Neck Disability Index (NDI), ACDF surgery type, surgical fusion status, patient age and Part 1 of the West Haven-Yale multidimensional pain inventory Swedish version (MPI-S) were entered into a statistical model. Part 1 of the MPI-S contains 5 subscales: pain severity, interference, life control, affective distress and support.

    Results: Seventy-three patients answered the questionnaires. Non-linear categorical regression modeling (CATREG) of the selected predictive variables explained 76.1% of the variance in NDI outcomes 10-13 years post ACDF. Of these predictors, MPI-S affective distress subscale (β = 0.635, p = <0.001) and pain severity subscale (β = 0.354, p = <0.001) were significant individual predictors of NDI ratings.

    Conclusion: This is the first study to investigate potential factors associated with prolonged functional disability greater than 10 years post-surgery for cervical disc disease. The results suggest the importance of not only pain severity but also screening affective distress as a potential barrier to physical functioning in patients previously operated for cervical disc disease. Future research on the utility of affect-focused body awareness therapy and pain coping strategies for post-surgical patients with continuing pain and physical disability is indicated.

    Key Practice Points:

    •  The screening of pain severity and affective distress is of importance for patients presenting with continuing physical disability after previous surgery for cervical disc disorders

    •  Affect-focused body awareness therapies and pain coping strategies may be a potential treatment alternative for patients with continuing pain and physical disability.

  • 2.
    Abbott, Rebecca
    et al.
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60611 USA.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    West, Janne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Elliott, James M.
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60611 USA; Univ Queensland, Australia; Zurich Univ Appl Sci, Switzerland.
    Åslund, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    The qualitative grading of muscle fat infiltration in whiplash using fat and water magnetic resonance imaging2018In: The spine journal, ISSN 1529-9430, E-ISSN 1878-1632, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 717-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: The development of muscle fat infiltration (MFI) in the neck muscles is associated with poor functional recovery following whiplash injury. Custom software and time-consuming manual segmentation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is required for quantitative analysis and presents as a barrier for clinical translation. PURPOSE: The purpose of this work was to establish a qualitative MRI measure for MFI and evaluate its ability to differentiate between individuals with severe whiplash-associated disorder (WAD), mild or moderate WAD, and healthy controls. STUDY DESIGN/SETTING: This is a cross-sectional study. PATIENT SAMPLE: Thirty-one subjects with WAD and 31 age-and sex-matched controls were recruited from an ongoing randomized controlled trial. OUTCOME MEASURES: The cervical multifidus was visually identified and segmented into eighths in the axial fat/water images (C4-C7). Muscle fat infiltration was assessed on a visual scale: 0 for no or marginal MFI, 1 for light MFI, and 2 for distinct MFI. The participants with WAD were divided in two groups: mild or moderate and severe based on Neck Disability Index % scores. METHODS: The mean regional MFI was compared between the healthy controls and each of the WAD groups using the Mann-Whitney U test. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analyses were carried out to evaluate the validity of the qualitative method. RESULTS: Twenty (65%) patients had mild or moderate disability and 11 (35%) were considered severe. Inter- and intra-rater reliability was excellent when grading was averaged by level or when frequency of grade II was considered. Statistically significant differences (pamp;lt;.05) in regional MFI were particularly notable between the severe WAD group and healthy controls. The ROC curve, based on detection of distinct MFI, showed an area-under-the curve of 0.768 (95% confidence interval 0.59-0.94) for discrimination of WAD participants. CONCLUSIONS: These preliminary results suggest a qualitative MRI measure for MFI is reliable and valid, and may prove useful toward the classification of WAD in radiology practice. (C) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Agnew, Louise
    et al.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Johnston, Venerina
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Overmeer, Thomas
    Malardalen University, Sweden; University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Johansson, Gun
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Queensland, Australia.
    FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH WORK ABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC WHIPLASH-ASSOCIATED DISORDER GRADE II-III: A CROSS-SECTIONAL ANALYSIS2015In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 546-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the factors related to self-perceived work ability in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder grades II-III. Design: Cross-sectional analysis. Patients: A total of 166 working age patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder. Methods: A comprehensive survey collected data on work ability (using the Work Ability Index); demographic, psychosocial, personal, work- and condition-related factors. Forward, stepwise regression modelling was used to assess the factors related to work ability. Results: The proportion of patients in each work ability category were as follows: poor (12.7%); moderate (39.8%); good (38.5%); excellent (9%). Seven factors explained 65% (adjusted R-2 = 0.65, p less than 0.01) of the variance in work ability. In descending order of strength of association, these factors are: greater neck disability due to pain; reduced self-rated health status and health-related quality of life; increased frequency of concentration problems; poor workplace satisfaction; lower self-efficacy for performing daily tasks; and greater work-related stress. Conclusion: Condition-specific and psychosocial factors are associated with self-perceived work ability of individuals with chronic whiplash-associated disorder.

  • 4.
    Amiri Arimi, Somayeh
    et al.
    Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Physiotherapy Research Center, School of Rehabilitation, Department of Physiotherapy, Tehran, Iran; University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Department of Physiotherapy, Tehran, Iran.
    Mohseni Bandpei, Mohammad Ali
    Pediatric Neurorehabilitation Research Center, Department of Physiotherapy, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran; University Institute of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, University of Lahore, Lahore, Pakistan.
    Rezasoltani, Asghar
    Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Physiotherapy Research Centre, School of Rehabilitation, Tehran, Iran.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mohammadi, Masumeh
    Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Physiotherapy Research Center, School of Rehabilitation, Department of Physiotherapy, Tehran, Iran.
    Multifidus muscle size changes at different directions of head and neck movements in females with unilateral chronic non-specific neck pain and healthy subjects using ultrasonography2018In: Journal of Bodywork & Movement Therapies, ISSN 1360-8592, E-ISSN 1532-9283, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 560-565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to compare the dimensions of cervical multifidus muscle (CMM) in different conditions.

    METHODS: Twenty five women with neck pain and 25 healthy subjects participated in this study. The dimensions of the CMM were measured at rest, 50% and 100% maximum isometric voluntary contraction (MIVC) at six directions of neck movements, using ultrasonography.

    RESULTS: The size of multifidus was smaller in patients than healthy individuals at rest state (P < 0.05). A significant smaller CMM dimension was found in the affected side compared with unaffected side in patients group (P < 0.05). The result of ANOVA for MLD showed a significant difference for contraction levels (P < 0.001) and neck movements (P < 0.001) in both groups. The MLD of the CMM was significantly different between CMM at rest and 50%, and 100% MIVC (P < 0.001). No significant differences were found between the groups at 50% and 100% MIVC (P > 0.05 in both instances). The most prominent CMM size change was observed during neck extension, flexion, ipsilateral lateral-flexion, and ipsilateral rotation, respectively (P < 0.05).

    CONCLUSIONS: Results of the present study indicate that the size of CMM was decreased in patients with neck pain in rest state. The size of CMM changes in all directions of neck movements, although the most prominent was during neck extension. This points out CMM stabilization role's in different directions of neck movements.

  • 5.
    Ardern, Clare
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar; La Trobe University, Australia; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Satisfaction With the Outcome of Physical Therapist-Prescribed Exercise in Chronic Whiplash-Associated Disorders: Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial2016In: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, ISSN 0190-6011, E-ISSN 1938-1344, Vol. 46, no 8, p. 640-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY DESIGN: Secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial. BACKGROUND: Patient perception of the benefits gained from treatment is important, yet satisfaction with the outcome of treatment for chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WADs) has not been investigated. OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether satisfaction with the outcome of treatment for chronic WAD changed over time, and whether there were group differences. METHODS: Two hundred sixteen people with chronic WAD (66% women; mean age, 40.4 years) participated in a 3-month program of physical therapist-led neck-specific exercises with or without a behavioral approach, or received a prescription of general physical activity. The main outcome was satisfaction with the outcome of treatment, assessed at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months later. Additional outcomes were enablement and expectation fulfillment. RESULTS: Satisfaction improved over time in the 3 groups (odds ratio = 1.15; 95% confidence interval: 1.10, 1.20; P amp;lt; .001). There was a significant group-by-time interaction (P amp;lt; 001), with increased odds of being satisfied in the groups receiving neck-specific exercises compared to general physical activity. Enablement increased after completion of the intervention in all groups (P amp;lt; .001). People who received neck-specific exercises reported greater enablement and expectation fulfillment than people prescribed general physical activity (P amp;lt; .01). CONCLUSION: Exercise interventions for chronic WAD led to increased satisfaction for 12 months following treatment that was unrelated to the type of exercise intervention received.

  • 6.
    Bernhoff, Gabriella
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Bertilson, Bo Christer
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Elf, Madeleine
    Kista Rygg and Idrottsklin, Sweden.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The pain drawing as an instrument for identifying cervical spine nerve involvement in chronic whiplash-associated disorders2016In: Journal of Pain Research, ISSN 1178-7090, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 9, p. 397-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the psychometric properties of a standardized assessment of pain drawing with regard to clinical signs of cervical spine nerve root involvement. Design: This cross-sectional study included data collected in a randomized controlled study. Patients: Two hundred and sixteen patients with chronic (amp;gt;= 6 months) whiplash-associated disorders, grade 2 or 3, were included in this study. Methods: The validity, sensitivity, and specificity of a standardized pain drawing assessment for determining nerve root involvement were analyzed, compared to the clinical assessment. In addition, we analyzed the interrater reliability with 50 pain drawings. Results: Agreement was poor between the standardized pain drawing assessment and the clinical assessment (kappa = 0.11, 95% CI: -0.03 to 0.20). Sensitivity was high (93%), but specificity was low (19%). Interrater reliability was good (kappa = 0.64, 95% CI: 0.53 to 0.76). Conclusion: The standardized pain drawing assessment of nerve root involvement in chronic whiplash-associated disorders was not in agreement with the clinical assessment. Further research is warranted to optimize the utilization of a pain/discomfort drawing as a supportive instrument for identifying nerve involvement in cervical spinal injuries.

  • 7.
    Bohannon, Richard W.
    et al.
    School of Allied Health, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, United States.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Massy-Westropp, Nicola
    School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
    Consolidated reference values for grip strength of adults 20 to 49 years: a descriptive meta-analysis2006In: Isokinetics and exercise science, ISSN 0959-3020, E-ISSN 1878-5913, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 221-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building on a previous meta-analysis, this study focused on the utility of consolidating grip strength data from apparently healthy subjects 20-49 years of age. All data were obtained using a Jamar dynamometer and procedures generally consistent with the recommendations of the American Society of Hand Therapists. The meta-analysis revealed that the seven sources provided homogeneous data (Q = 0.21 -0.81, p ≥ 0.667) for the left and right sides of men and women subjects. Means and confidence intervals are provided that can be used to interpret the normality of grip strength obtained from men and women 20-49 years of age. By consolidating the data from multiple studies conducted in five countries, a better overall estimate of normal is obtained. Providing reference values for three decades combined simplifies normative comparisons.

  • 8.
    Bohannon, Richard W
    et al.
    School of Allied Health, Physical Therapy, University of Connecticut, USA.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Massy-Westropp, Nicola
    School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.
    Desrosiers, Johanne
    Research Center on Aging and Faculty of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada.
    Bear-Lehman, Jane
    Steinhardt School of Education, New York University and College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
    Reference values for adult grip strength measured with a Jamar dynamometer: a descriptive meta-analysis2006In: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465, Vol. 92, no 1, p. 11-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to consolidate the results of studies presenting normative values for grip strength obtained with the Jamar dynamometer in accordance with the recommendations of the American Society of Hand Therapists. Relevant data from 12 sources (3317 subjects) were employed. Means and 95% confidence intervals are presented for the left and right sides of men and women in 12 age groups (20–24, 25–29, 30–34, 35–39, 40–44, 45–49, 50–54, 55–59, 60–64, 65–69, 70–74, 75+ years). The consolidated grip strength reference values offer a better standard for comparison than provided by any single study alone. Limitations in the meta-analysis notwithstanding, the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval can serve as a reasonable threshold for establishing grip strength impairment among adults.

  • 9.
    Dannapfel, Petra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    A Qualitative Study of Individual and Organizational Learning through Physiotherapists’ Participation in a Research Project2014In: International Journal of Clinical Medicine, ISSN 2158-284X, E-ISSN 2158-2882, Vol. 5, no 9, p. 514-524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for evidence-based practice has been recognized by physiotherapy organizations over the past decades. Earlier studies have documented facilitators and barriers that affect the use and implementation of evidence-based practice. Less is known about what kind of interventions might be useful to implement evidence-based practice. This study explores what physiotherapists learn through participation in a research project relevant to their professional development towards achieving a more evidence-based physiotherapy practice. To what extent this learning was transferred to colleagues for organizational learning is also examined. This study was set in Sweden, where health care is publicly funded. Patients do not need a referral from a physician to consult a physiotherapist. Eleven interviews were conducted with physiotherapists who had participated in a randomized, controlled, multicenter, physiotherapy intervention investigating neck-specific exercise for patients with whiplash disorder. Gadamer’s hermeneutics was used to analyze the data. The physiotherapists described a range of learning experiences from their project participation, including instrumental learning (the concrete application of knowledge to achieve changes in practice) and conceptual learning (changes in knowledge, understanding or attitudes). The research project enabled the physiotherapists to develop new treatment techniques for broader application and extend their competence in techniques already known (instrumental learning). The physiotherapists believed that project participation enhanced their overall competence as physiotherapists, increased their job motivation and strengthened their self-confidence and self-efficacy (conceptual learning). Physiotherapists’ participation in the research project yielded many individual learning experiences, fostered positive attitudes to research and was conducive to achieving a more research-informed physiotherapy practice. Participation was associated with a deeper understanding of the challenges involved in conducting research. The transfer from indi-

  • 10.
    Dannapfel, Petra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis.
    What supports physiotherapists’ use of research in clinical practice? A qualitative study in Sweden2013In: Implementation Science, ISSN 1748-5908, E-ISSN 1748-5908, Vol. 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Evidence-based practice has increasingly been recognized as a priority by professional physiotherapy organizations and influential researchers and clinicians in the field. Numerous studies in the past decade have documented that physiotherapists hold generally favorable attitudes to evidence-based practice and recognize the importance of using research to guide their clinical practice. Research has predominantly investigated barriers to research use. Less is known about the circumstances that actually support use of research by physiotherapists. This study explores the conditions at different system levels that physiotherapists in Sweden perceive to be supportive of their use of research in clinical practice.

    Methods

    Patients in Sweden do not need a referral from a physician to consult a physiotherapist and physiotherapists are entitled to choose and perform any assessment and treatment technique they find suitable for each patient. Eleven focus group interviews were conducted with 45 physiotherapists, each lasting between 90 and 110 minutes. An inductive approach was applied, using topics rather than questions to allow the participants to generate their own questions and pursue their own priorities within the framework of the aim. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results

    Analysis of the data yielded nine favorable conditions at three system levels supporting the participant’s use of research in clinical practice: two at the individual level (attitudes and motivation concerning research use; research-related knowledge and skills), four at the workplace level (leadership support; organizational culture; research-related resources; knowledge exchange) and three at the extra-organizational level (evidence-based practice guidelines; external meetings, networks, and conferences; academic research and education).

    Conclusions

    Supportive conditions for physiotherapists’ use of research exist at multiple interdependent levels, including the individual, workplace, and extra-organizational levels. Research use in physiotherapy appears to be an interactive and interpretative social process that involves a great deal of interaction with various people, including colleagues and patients.

  • 11.
    Dannapfel, Petra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ståhl, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Applying self-determination theory for improved understanding of physiotherapists rationale for using research in clinical practice: a qualitative study in Sweden2014In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 20-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physiotherapists are generally positive to evidence-based practice (EBP) and the use of research in clinical practice, yet many still base clinical decisions on knowledge obtained during their initial education and/or personal experience. Our aim was to explore motivations behind physiotherapists use of research in clinical practice. Self-Determination Theory was applied to identify the different types of motivation for use of research. This theory posits that all behaviours lie along a continuum of relative autonomy, reflecting the extent to which a person endorses their actions. Eleven focus group interviews were conducted, involving 45 physiotherapists in various settings in Sweden. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis and the findings compared with Self-Determination Theory using a deductive approach. Motivations underlying physiotherapists use of research in clinical practice were identified. Most physiotherapists expressed autonomous forms of motivation for research use, but some exhibited more controlled motivation. Several implications about how more evidence-based physiotherapy can be achieved are discussed, including the potential to tailor educational programs on EBP to better account for differences in motivation among participants, using autonomously motivated physiotherapists as change agents and creating favourable conditions to encourage autonomous motivation by way of feelings of competence, autonomy and a sense of relatedness.

  • 12.
    Dedering, Asa
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cleland, Joshua A.
    Franklin Pierce Univ, NH USA.
    Halvorsen, Marie
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Svensson, Mikael A.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Kierkegaard, Marie
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    The Effects of Neck-Specific Training Versus Prescribed Physical Activity on Pain and Disability in Patients With Cervical Radiculopathy: A Randomized Controlled Trial2018In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0003-9993, E-ISSN 1532-821X, Vol. 99, no 12, p. 2447-2456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To compare the effects of a neck-specific training program to prescribed physical activity with both groups receiving a cognitive behavioral approach, on pain and disability in patients with cervical radiculopathy (CR). Design: Parallel-group randomized clinical trial with follow-up at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Setting: Recruitment and assessments of participants were performed at a university hospital. Interventions were performed in primary care setting at outpatient physiotherapy clinics. Participants: Patients (N=144) with CR were recruited to participate in this clinical trial. Interventions: Patients were randomly assigned to 3 months of either of a neck-specific training program or prescribed physical activity. Main Outcome Measures: Primary outcomes included self-rated neck and arm pain as collected by the visual analog scale (VAS). Secondary outcomes were self-rated headache measured with the VAS, the Neck Disability Index, the EuroQol 5D, the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Assessments were performed at baseline and at 3-, 6-, 12-, and 24-month follow-up periods. Results: Intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses showed no significant interaction (group x time) or group effects. There were, however, significant time effects indicating improvement over time for both groups for all outcomes except for levels of depression. Conclusions: The study revealed that neck-specific training as well as prescribed physical activity both including additional cognitive behavioral approach decreased the pain in patients with CR, that is, participants improved regardless of the intervention received. There is a lack of consensus of how to best manage individuals with CR. However, our findings suggest that CR has a natural favorable long-term outcome when patients are prescribed neck-specific training and exercise in combination with a behavioral approach. (C) 2018 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine

  • 13.
    Dedering, Åsa
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Halvorsen, Marie
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cleland, Joshua
    Franklin Pierce University, Denver, CO, USA .
    Svensson, Mikael
    Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Neck-specific training with a cognitive behavioural approach compared with prescribed physical activity in patients with cervical radiculopathy: a protocol of a prospective randomised clinical trial2014In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 15, no 274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients with cervical radiculopathy often have neck- and arm pain, neurological changes, activity limitations and difficulties in returning to work. Most patients are not candidates for surgery but are often treated with different conservative approaches and may be sick-listed for long periods. The purpose of the current study is to compare the effectiveness of neck- specific training versus prescribed physical activity. Methods/Design: The current protocol is a two armed intervention randomised clinical trial comparing the outcomes of patients receiving neck specific training or prescribed physical activity. A total of 144 patients with cervical radiculopathy will be randomly allocated to either of the two interventions. The interventions will be delivered by experienced physiotherapists and last 14 weeks. The primary outcome variable is neck- and arm pain intensity measured with a Visual Analogue Scale accompanied with secondary outcome measures of impairments and subjective health measurements collected before intervention and at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after base-line assessment. Discussion: We anticipate that the results of this study will provide evidence to support recommendations as to the effectiveness of conservative interventions for patients with cervical radiculopathy.

  • 14.
    Dieterich, Angela V.
    et al.
    University of Medical Centre, Germany.
    Botter, Alberto
    Politecn Torino, Italy.
    Martins Vieira, Taian
    Politecn Torino, Italy; University of Federal Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Petzke, Frank
    University of Medical Centre, Germany.
    Davey, Paul
    Curtin University, Australia.
    Falla, Deborah
    University of Birmingham, England.
    Spatial variation and inconsistency between estimates of onset of muscle activation from EMG and ultrasound2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 42011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Delayed onset of muscle activation can be a descriptor of impaired motor control. Activation onset can be estimated from electromyography (EMG)-registered muscle excitation and from ultrasound-registered muscle motion, which enables non-invasive measurements in deep muscles. However, in voluntary activation, EMG-and ultrasound-detected activation onsets may not correspond. To evaluate this, ten healthy men performed isometric elbow flexion at 20% to 70% of their maximal force. Utilising a multi-channel electrode transparent to ultrasound, EMG and M(otion)-mode ultrasound were recorded simultaneously over the biceps brachii muscle. The time intervals between automated and visually estimated activation onsets were correlated with the regional variation of EMG and muscle motion onset, contraction level and speed. Automated and visual onsets indicated variable time intervals between EMG-and motion onset, median (interquartile range) 96 (121) ms and 48 (72) ms, respectively. In 17% (computed analysis) or 23% (visual analysis) of trials, motion onset was detected before local EMG onset. Multi-channel EMG and M-mode ultrasound revealed regional differences in activation onset, which decreased with higher contraction speed (Spearman rho amp;gt;= 0.45, P amp;lt; 0.001). In voluntary activation the heterogeneous motor unit recruitment together with immediate motion transmission may explain the high variation of the time intervals between local EMG-and ultrasound-detected activation onset.

  • 15.
    Engquist, Markus
    et al.
    Ryhov Hospital, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lofgren, Hakan
    Ryhov Hospital, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Holtz, Anders
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Soderlund, Anne
    Malardalen University, Sweden.
    Vavruch, Ludek
    Ryhov Hospital, Sweden.
    Lind, Bengt
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Spine Centre Göteborg, Sweden.
    Factors Affecting the Outcome of Surgical Versus Nonsurgical Treatment of Cervical Radiculopathy2015In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 40, no 20, p. 1553-1563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Design. Prospective randomized controlled trial. Objective. To analyze factors that may influence the outcome of anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) followed by physiotherapy versus physiotherapy alone for treatment of patients with cervical radiculopathy. Summary of Background Data. An understanding of patient-related factors affecting the outcome of ACDF is important for preoperative patient selection. No previous prospective, randomized study of treatment effect modifiers relating to outcome of ACDF compared with physiotherapy has been carried out. Methods. 60 patients with cervical radiculopathy were randomized to ACDF followed by physiotherapy or physiotherapy alone. Data for possible modifiers of treatment outcome at 1 year, such as sex, age, duration of pain, pain intensity, disability (Neck Disability Index, NDI), patient expectations of treatment, anxiety due to neck/arm pain, distress (Distress and Risk Assessment Method), self-efficacy (Self-Efficacy Scale) health status (EQ-5D), and magnetic resonance imaging findings were collected. A multivariate analysis was performed to find treatment effect modifiers affecting the outcome regarding arm/neck pain intensity and NDI. Results. Factors that significantly altered the treatment effect between treatment groups in favor of surgery were: duration of neck pain less than 12 months (P = 0.007), duration of arm pain less than 12 months (P = 0.01) and female sex (P = 0.007) (outcome: arm pain), low EQ-5D index (outcome: neck pain, P = 0.02), high levels of anxiety due to neck/arm pain (outcome: neck pain, P = 0.02 and NDI, P = 0.02), low Self-Efficacy Scale score (P = 0.05), and high Distress and Risk Assessment Method score (P = 0.04) (outcome: NDI). No factors were found to be associated with better outcome with physiotherapy alone. Conclusion. In this prospective, randomized study of patients with cervical radiculopathy, short duration of pain, female sex, low health quality, high levels of anxiety due to neck/arm pain, low self-efficacy, and a high level of distress before treatment were associated with better outcome from surgery. No factors were found to be associated with better outcome from physiotherapy alone.

  • 16.
    Engquist, Markus
    et al.
    Ryhov Hospital, Sweden.
    Löfgren, Håkan
    Ryhov Hospital, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Holtz, Anders
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Vavruch, Ludek
    Ryhov Hospital, Sweden.
    Lind, Bengt
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Spine Centre Göteborg, Sweden.
    A 5-to 8-year randomized study on the treatment of cervical radiculopathy: anterior cervical decompression and fusion plus physiotherapy versus physiotherapy alone2017In: JOURNAL OF NEUROSURGERY-SPINE, ISSN 1547-5654, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 19-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to evaluate the 5- to 8-year outcome of anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) combined with a structured physiotherapy program as compared with that following the same physiotherapy program alone in patients with cervical radiculopathy. No previous prospective randomized studies with a follow-up of more than 2 years have compared outcomes of surgical versus nonsurgical intervention for cervical radiculopathy. METHODS Fifty-nine patients were randomized to ACDF surgery with postoperative physiotherapy (30 patients) or to structured physiotherapy alone (29 patients). The physiotherapy program included general and specific exercises as well as pain coping strategies. Outcome measures included neck disability (Neck Disability Index [NDI]), neck and arm pain intensity (visual analog scale [VAS]), health state (EQ-5D questionnaire), and a patient global assessment. Patients were followed up for 5-8 years. RESULTS After 5-8 years, the NDI was reduced by a mean score% of 21 (95% CI 14-28) in the surgical group and 11% (95% CI 4%-18%) in the nonsurgical group (p = 0.03). Neck pain was reduced by a mean score of 39 mm (95% CI 26-53 mm) compared with 19 mm (95% CI 7-30 mm; p = 0.01), and arm pain was reduced by a mean score of 33 mm (95% CI 18-49 mm) compared with 19 mm (95% CI 7-32 mm; p = 0.1), respectively. The EQ-5D had a mean respective increase of 0.29 (95% CI 0.13-0.45) compared with 0.14 (95% CI 0.01-0.27; p = 0.12). Ninety-three percent of patients in the surgical group rated their symptoms as "better" or "much better" compared with 62% in the nonsurgical group (p = 0.005). Both treatment groups experienced significant improvement over baseline for all outcome measures. CONCLUSIONS In this prospective randomized study of 5- to 8-year outcomes of surgical versus nonsurgical treatment in patients with cervical radiculopathy, ACDF combined with physiotherapy reduced neck disability and neck pain more effectively than physiotherapy alone. Self-rating by patients as regards treatment outcome was also superior in the surgery group. No significant differences were seen between the 2 patient groups as regards arm pain and health outcome.

  • 17.
    Engquist, Markus
    et al.
    Department of Orthopaedics, Ryhov Hospital, Sweden and Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Löfgren, Håkan
    Neuro-Orthopedic Center, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holtz, Anders
    Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Department of Physiotherapy, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Vavruch, Ludek
    Neuro-Orthopedic Center, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Lind, Bengt
    Spine Center Göteborg, Gothenburg, Sweden and Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Surgery Versus Non-Surgical Treatment for Cervical Radiculopathy: A prospective, randomized study comparing surgery plus physiotherapy with physiotherapy alone with a two year follow-up2013In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 38, no 20, p. 1715-1722Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Design. Prospective randomized controlled trial.Objective. To study the outcome of anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) combined with a structured physiotherapy program compared to the same physiotherapy program alone for patients with cervical radiculopathy.Summary of Background Data. Knowledge concerning the effects of interventions for patients with cervical radiculopathy is scarce due to a lack of randomized studies.Methods. 63 patients were randomized to surgery with postoperative physiotherapy (n = 31) or physiotherapy alone (n = 32). The surgical group was treated with ACDF. The physiotherapy program included general/specific exercises and pain coping strategies. The outcome measures were disability (Neck Disability Index, NDI), neck- and arm-pain intensity (VAS) and the patient's global assessment. Patients were followed for 24 months.Results. The result from the repeated-measures ANOVA showed no significant between group difference for NDI (p = 0.23).For neck-pain intensity, the repeated-measures ANOVA showed a significant between group difference over the study period in favor of the surgical group (p = 0.039).For arm-pain intensity, no significant between group differences was found according to the repeated-measures ANOVA (p = 0.580).87% of the patients in the surgical group rated their symptoms as "better/much better" at the 12-month follow-up, compared to 62% in the non-surgical group (p<0.05). At 24 months the corresponding figures were 81% and 69% (p = 0.28). The difference was significant only at the 12-month follow-up in favor of the surgical group.Significant reduction in NDI, neck-pain and arm-pain compared to baseline was seen in both groups (p<0.001).Conclusion. In this prospective, randomized study of patients with cervical radiculopathy, it was shown that surgery with physiotherapy resulted in a more rapid improvement during the first postoperative year, with significantly greater improvement in neck pain and the patient's global assessment compared to physiotherapy alone, but the differences between the groups decreased after two years. Structured physiotherapy should be tried before surgery is chosen.

  • 18.
    Enthoven, Paul
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala.
    Wibault, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    VALIDITY, INTERNAL CONSISTENCY AND SELF-RATED CHANGE OF THE PATIENT ENABLEMENT INSTRUMENT IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN2019In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 51, no 8, p. 587-597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Patient enablement reflects patients understanding of and coping with illness. The aim of this study was to investigate the content validity, construct validity, internal consistency and selfrated change (SRC) of the Patient Enablement Instrument (PEI) in patients with whiplash-associated disorders, cervical radiculopathy and mixed chronic pain treated in different settings. Design: Psychometric analyses. Participants: Patients with disabling non-malignant chronic musculoskeletal pain. Methods: Participants answered questionnaires on disability (Neck Disability Index (NDI) or Functional Rating Index (FRI)), anxiety/depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; HADS) and general health (EuroQol; EQ-5D). Content validity, construct validity (confirmatory factor analysis), internal consistency and cut-off for SRC were investigated for the PEI after treatment. The SRC value was the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve optimal cut-off point. Results: After treatment all items were completed by 516 patients (mean standard deviation (SD) age 45.1 years (SD 10.1), women 75% (n=385)). The 1-factor PEI model had approximate fit to the data. The internal consistency Cronbachs alpha was between 0.878 and 0.929 for the 3 groups. Correlations between the PEI and the NDI/FRI, HADS and EQ-5D were fair to good. The SRCROC for whiplash-associated disorders, cervical radiculopathy and mixed chronic pain groups was 5, 6 and 4 points in the PEI, respectively. Conclusion: The PEI showed fair content validity, construct validity and internal consistency. However, the scale needs further development to improve measurement of change.

  • 19.
    Falla, D.
    et al.
    University Hospital Gottingen, Germany; University of Birmingham, England.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala.
    Soldini, E.
    University of Appl Science and Arts Southern Switzerland SUPSI, Switzerland.
    Schneebeli, A.
    University of Appl Science and Arts Southern Switzerland, Switzerland.
    Barbero, M.
    University of Appl Science and Arts Southern Switzerland, Switzerland.
    Perceived pain extent is associated with disability, depression and self-efficacy in individuals with whiplash-associated disorders2016In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 20, no 9, p. 1490-1501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundCompletion of a pain drawing is a familiar task in those presenting with whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). Some people report pain almost over their entire body. Yet the reasons for larger pain extent have not been fully explored. MethodsA novel method was applied to quantify pain extent from the pain drawings of 205 individuals with chronic WAD. Pain extent was evaluated in relation to sex, age, educational level, insurance status and financial status. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to verify whether pain extent was associated with other health indicators including perceived pain and disability, health-related quality of life, pain catastrophizing, anxiety, depression and self-efficacy. ResultsPain extent was influenced by sex ((2):10.392, pamp;lt;0.001) with larger pain extent in women compared to men (7.887.66% vs. 5.406.44%). People with unsettled insurance claims ((2): 7.500, pamp;lt;0.05) and those with a worse financial situation ((2):12.223, pamp;lt;0.01) also had larger pain extent. Multiple linear regression models revealed that, when accounting for age, sex, education, insurance status, financial status and neck pain intensity, pain extent remained associated with perceived disability (pamp;lt;0.01), depression (pamp;lt;0.05) and self-efficacy (pamp;lt;0.001). ConclusionBy utilizing a novel method for pain extent quantification, this study shows that widespread pain is associated with a number of factors including perceived disability, depression and self-efficacy in individuals with chronic WAD. Widespread pain should alert the clinician to consider more specific psychological screening, particularly for depression and self-efficacy, in patients with WAD. What does this study add?Women with chronic WAD, those with unsettled insurance claims and those with poorer financial status perceive more widespread pain. When controlling for these factors, larger pain areas remain associated with perceived pain and disability, depression and self-efficacy. The pain drawing is useful to support psychological screening in people with chronic WAD.

  • 20.
    Halvorsen, Marie
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Abbott, Allan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Bond University, Gold Coast, Australia .
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia .
    Dedering, Åsa
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Endurance and fatigue characteristics in the neck muscles during sub-maximal isometric test in patients with cervical radiculopathy2014In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 590-598Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The aim of the study was to compare myoelectric manifestation in neck muscle endurance and fatigue characteristics during sub-maximal isometric endurance test in patients with cervical radiculopathy and asymptomatic subjects. An additional aim was to explore associations between primary neck muscle endurance, myoelectric fatigability, and self-rated levels of fatigue, pain and subjective health measurements in patients with cervical radiculopathy.

    Methods

    Muscle fatigue in the ventral and dorsal neck muscles was assessed in patients with cervical radiculopathy and in an asymptomatic group during an isometric neck muscle endurance test in prone and supine. 46 patients and 34 asymptomatic subjects participated. Surface electromyography signals were recorded from the sternocleidomastoid, cervical paraspinal muscles and upper and middle trapezius bilaterally during the endurance test. Subjective health measurements were assessed with questionnaires.

    Results

    The results showed altered neck muscle endurance in several of the muscles investigated with greater negative median frequency slope, greater variability, side imbalance, lower endurance time and higher experience of fatigue among the cervical radiculopathy patients compared with healthy subjects. Endurance times were significantly lower in both prone and in supine positions between the patients compared to asymptomatic subjects. During the neck muscle endurance test, fatigues in the upper trapezius muscles during the prone test and in the sternocleidomastoid muscles during the supine test were of more importance than self-perceived pain, fatigue, disability and kinesiophobia in predicting neck muscle endurance (NME).

    Conclusion

    NME testing in the primary neck muscles seems to be an important factor to take into consideration in rehabilitation.

  • 21.
    Halvorsen, Marie
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Abbott, Allan
    Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stephansson-Dedering, Åsa
    Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Endurance and fatigue characteristics of static test of the neck muscles in patients with cervical radiculopathy2012In: Proceedings of the XIXth Congress of the International Society of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology / [ed] Kylie Tucker; Bianca Butler; Paul Hodges, The International Society of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology (ISEK) , 2012, p. 55-55Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Neck muscle function is important for support and control of the cervical spine. With the application of frequency analysis of the electromyography (EMG) signal, the fatigue rate of muscles can be monitored. In several EMG studies, the neck muscles have been shown to fatigue faster in subjects with neck pain. This can be seen when the median frequency (MF) decreases when a contraction is sustained.

    AIM: In this experimental study the purpose was to evaluate patients with cervical radiculopathy compared to healthy subjects regarding changes in neckZmuscle fatigue during static endurance test in prone and supine.

    METHODS: A total of 33 patients (19 women and 14 men) with cervical radiculopathy and 28 healthy subjects (17 women and 11 men) were included in the study. Neck muscle fatigue was studied using EMG with surface electrodes bilaterally on cervical paraspinal and sternocleidomastoid muscle groups with electrode placement according to SENIAM. Measurements of neck muscle fatigue were performed in supine and prone positions until patient perceived time till exhaustion. Subjective neck muscle fatigue was rated on a Borg CRZ10 scale while subjective neck pain was measured on 0Z10 Visual analogue scale (VAS). Patients with cervical radiculopathy even completed the Neck Disability Index (NDI).

    RESULTS: The mean endurance time during static extension between groups was significantly different (p<0.001) with cervical radiculopathy patients recording 190 seconds (Sd=119) and the healthy subjects 509 seconds (Sd=213). Differences in mean endurance time during static flexion between groups were nonZsignificant with cervical radiculopathy patients recording 64 seconds (Sd=40) and the healthy subjects 96 seconds (Sd=69). Cervical radiculopathy patients MF EMG slope (Z0.039) for the right cervical paraspinal muscles significantly decreased (p=0.009) more the healthy subjects (Z0.017) during the extension test. NDI significantly correlated with MF EMG slope for both left (r=Z0.631 p= 0.001) and right side (r=Z0Z496 p=0.014) cervical paraspinal muscles during extension for the patient group.

    CONCLUSION:  Patients with cervical radiculopathy perform similar to healthy subjects with regards to static supine flexion endurance time and cervical muscle fatigue. Patients with cervical radiculopathy however have significantly lower endurance times and fatigue faster in the right side cervical paraspinal muscles during static prone extension.

    ACKNOWLEDGEMENT: The authors declare no conflicts of interest. The present study was supported by funds from Karolinska Institute.

  • 22.
    Halvorsen, Marie
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Falla, Deborah
    University of Birmingham, England.
    Gizzi, Leonardo
    University of Stuttgart, Germany.
    Harms-Ringdahl, Karin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dedering, Asa
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    SHORT- AND LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF EXERCISE ON NECK MUSCLE FUNCTION IN CERVICAL RADICULOPATHY: A RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL2016In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 48, no 8, p. 696-704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To compare short-and long-term changes in neck muscle endurance, electromyography measures of neck muscle activation and fatigue and ratings of fatigue and pain after neck-specific training or physical activity in people with cervical radiculopathy. Design: Randomized clinical trial. Subjects/patients: Seventy-five patients with cervical radiculopathy. Methods: Patients underwent neck-specific training in combination with a cognitive behavioural approach or prescribed physical activity over a period of 14 weeks. Immediately after the intervention and 12 months later, surface electromyography was recorded from neck flexor and extensor muscles during neck endurance tests. Time to task failure, amplitude and median frequency of the electromyography signal, and subjective fatigue and pain ratings were analysed in 50 patients who completed at least one follow-up. Results: A significant increase in neck flexor endurance time was observed for both groups at 14 weeks compared with baseline and this was maintained at the 12-month follow-up (pamp;lt;0.005). No change was identified for the slope of the median frequency. For the neck-specific training group, splenius capitis was less active during neck flexion at both follow-ups (pamp;lt;0.01), indicating reduced muscle co-activation. Conclusion: Both specific and general exercise increased neck flexor endurance, but neck-specific training only reduced co-activation of antagonist muscles during sustained neck flexion.

  • 23.
    Halvorsen, Marie
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Kierkegaard, Marie
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Harms-Ringdahl, Karin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dedering, Asa
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Dimensions Underlying Measures of Disability, Personal Factors, and Health Status in Cervical Radiculopathy A Cross-Sectional Study2015In: Medicine (Baltimore, Md.), ISSN 0025-7974, E-ISSN 1536-5964, Vol. 94, no 24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This cross-sectional study sought to identify dimensions underlying measures of impairment, disability, personal factors, and health status in patients with cervical radiculopathy. One hundred twenty-four patients with magnetic resonance imaging-verified cervical radiculopathy, attending a neurosurgery clinic in Sweden, participated. Data from clinical tests and questionnaires on disability, personal factors, and health status were used in a principal-component analysis (PCA) with oblique rotation. The PCA supported a 3-component model including 14 variables from clinical tests and questionnaires, accounting for 73% of the cumulative percentage. The first component, pain and disability, explained 56%. The second component, health, fear-avoidance beliefs, kinesiophobia, and self-efficacy, explained 9.2%. The third component including anxiety, depression, and catastrophizing explained 7.6%. The strongest-loading variables of each dimension were "present neck pain intensity," "fear avoidance," and "anxiety." The three underlying dimensions identified and labeled Pain and functioning, Health, beliefs, and kinesiophobia, and Mood state and catastrophizing captured aspects of importance for cervical radiculopathy. Since the variables "present neck pain intensity," "fear avoidance," and "anxiety" had the strongest loading in each of the three dimensions; it may be important to include them in a reduced multidimensional measurement set in cervical radiculopathy.

  • 24.
    Hermansen, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Vavruch, Ludek
    Ryhov Hospital.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A Comparison Between the Carbon Fiber Cage and the Cloward Procedure in Cervical Spine Surgery A Ten- to Thirteen-Year Follow-Up of a Prospective Randomized Study2011In: SPINE, ISSN 0362-2436, Vol. 36, no 12, p. 919-925Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Design. Ten- to 13-year follow-up of a prospective randomized study. Objective. To compare the 10- to 13-year outcomes of anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) with a cervical intervertebral fusion cage (CIFC), and the Cloward procedure (CP) using a broad clinical and patient-centered assessment. Summary of Background Data. There are few prospective studies and none with a follow-up of 10 years or more. Methods. Patient questionnaires completed 10 years or more after ACDF. Seventy-three patients (77%) responded. Radiographs were obtained at 2 years. Results. Apart from greater fulfillment of preoperative expectation (P = 0.01) and less headache (P = 0.005) in the CIFC group compared with the CP group, there were no significant differences in the outcomes of the two surgical methods. Pain intensity improved in comparison with preoperative levels in both the CIFC and CP groups (P andlt; 0.0001), but the Neck Disability Index (NDI) only improved in the CIFC group (P = 0.04). Only those with a healed fusion benefited from an improved NDI (P = 0.02). There was no deterioration in pain intensity or NDI after the 2-year follow-up. Conclusion. The outcomes of the two surgical methods, with a few exceptions, were equal at 10- to 13-year follow-up, and there was no deterioration in outcome after the 2-year follow-up. Pain intensity improved more than disability, which may indicate that further improvement of physical function requires early more extensive postoperative rehabilitation. Despite persisting disability, repeat surgery was relatively uncommon.

  • 25.
    Hermansen, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Vavruch, Ludek
    Ryhov Hospital, Sweden .
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Positive predictive factors and subgroup analysis of clinically relevant improvement after anterior cervical decompression and fusion for cervical disc disease: a 10-to 13-year follow-up of a prospective randomized study Clinical article2013In: Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, ISSN 1547-5654, E-ISSN 1547-5646, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 403-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Object. The main purpose of this 10- to 13-year follow-up of a prospective randomized study was to identify preoperative factors that predicted good long-term outcome after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) with the Cloward procedure or the cervical intervertebral fusion cage. A second purpose was to investigate subgroup differences at the 10-year follow-up between patients with and without clinically relevant improvement (CRI) and between men and women. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods. To evaluate clinically meaningful outcomes, good outcome was defined as CRI in neck-related pain intensity (andgt;= 30-mm improvement on a visual analog scale), and CRI in neck-specific disability (andgt;= 20% improvement in the neck disability index [NUT]) from preoperative measurements to the 10-year follow-up. A total of 73 patients (77% of the original study sample) completed questionnaires at least 10 years after ACDF. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults. High preoperative neck-related pain intensity and preoperative nonsmoking status were predictors of CRI in neck-related pain intensity, and male sex was a predictor of CRI in neck-specific disability; however, no additional predictive factors were identified for good outcome after ACDF. The surgical procedure, number of operated levels, and radiological factors such as healing status did not influence the prediction models. Individuals without CRI in neck-specific disability (75%) and pain intensity (43%) reported a worse outcome for several psychosocial outcome variables compared with those with CRI. At the 10-year follow-up, women reported significantly greater neck- and arm-related pain intensity than men, and women also reported more disability and worse psychosocial status. Women reported CRI on the NDI less frequently than men (p = 0.01). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions. Preoperative predictive factors of good outcome 10-13 years after ACDF included initial high neck-related pain intensity, nonsmoking status at the time of surgery, and male sex. There were greater improvements in pain intensity than in neck-specific disability, and the latter showed a greater association with psychosocial factors. These results suggest the need for multimodal postoperative rehabilitation for patients who do not have a satisfactory outcome after ACDF.

  • 26.
    Hermansen, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Department of Orthopaedics , Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg , Göteborg , Sweden.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Futurum , Region Jönköping County , Jönköping , Sweden.
    Balance problems and dizziness after neck surgery - associations with pain and health-related quality of life.2019In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Symptoms of dizziness or imbalance are often present in individuals with a variety of neck-disorders. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of patient-reported balance problems and dizziness 10-13 years after surgery for cervical degenerative disc disease; evaluate associations with neck pain and health-related quality of life; and investigate how these individuals described dizziness.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty-eight individuals, 10 years or more after anterior cervical decompression and fusion surgery, who previously participated in a randomized controlled trial were included. Participants completed questionnaires including ratings of dizziness and balance problems, the Dizziness Handicap Inventory, and an open-ended question regarding their experience of dizziness. Secondary outcomes were neck pain and quality of life.

    RESULTS: Seventy-two percent experienced occasional or daily symptoms of unsteadiness and/or dizziness. Intensity ratings for dizziness during movement and for balance problems were similar and rather low, but had an impact on quality of life. Ratings of dizziness at rest were even lower. Dizziness ratings were associated with neck pain. Strenuous activities were related to dizziness and dizziness was primarily described as intermittent and non-rotatory.

    CONCLUSIONS: Dizziness or balance problems in the long-term after surgery for cervical degenerative disc disease are common and have an impact on daily life. Ratings of problem frequency and intensity were usually low. Dizziness and balance problems may affect quality of life. Patients' descriptions of these problems are in line with common symptoms of cervicogenic dizziness.

  • 27.
    Hermansen, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Futurum Region Jönköping County.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Women’s experiences of daily life after anterior cervical decompression and fusion surgery: A qualitative interview study2016In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 352-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Subjects: Fourteen women aged 39-62 years (median 52 years), were included 1.5 to 3 years after ACDF for cervical degenerative disc disease.

    Methods: Individual semi-structured interviews were analyzed by qualitative content analysis with an inductive approach.

    Results: The women described their experiences of daily life in five different ways; Experiences of recovery; Experiences of symptoms in daily life influence feelings and thoughts; Making daily life work; Importance of social  and occupational networks; Experiences of the influence of healthcare professionals and interventions on daily life.

    Conclusion: This interview study provides insight into women’s daily life after ACDF. While improved after surgery, informants also experienced remaining symptoms and limitations in daily life. A variety of mostly active coping strategies were used to manage daily life. Social support from family, friends, occupational networks and healthcare professionals positively influenced daily life. These findings provide knowledge on aspects of daily life that should be considered in individualized postoperative care and rehabilitation in an attempt to provide better outcomes in women after ACDF.

  • 28.
    Karlsson, Anette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Åslund, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    West, Janne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    An Investigation of Fat Infiltration of the Multifidus Muscle in Patients With Severe Neck Symptoms Associated With Chronic Whiplash-Associated Disorder2016In: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, ISSN 0190-6011, E-ISSN 1938-1344, Vol. 46, no 10, p. 886-893Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. BACKGROUND: Findings of fat infiltration in cervical spine multifidus, as a sign of degenerative morphometric changes due to whiplash injury, need to be verified. OBJECTIVES: To develop a method using water/fat magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate fat infiltration and cross-sectional area of multifidus muscle in individuals with whiplash associated disorders (WADS) compared to healthy controls. METHODS: Fat infiltration and cross-sectional area in the multifidus muscles spanning the C4 to C7 segmental levels were investigated by manual segmentation using water/fat-separated MRI in 31 participants with WAD and 31 controls, matched for age and sex. RESULTS: Based on average values for data spanning C4 to C7, participants with severe disability related to WAD had 38% greater muscular fat infiltration compared to healthy controls (P = .03) and 45% greater fat infiltration compared to those with mild to moderate disability related to WAD (P = .02). There were no significant differences between those with mild to moderate disability and healthy controls. No significant differences between groups were found for multifidus cross-sectional area. Significant differences were observed for both cross-sectional area and fat infiltration between segmental levels. CONCLUSION: Participants with severe disability after a whiplash injury had higher fat infiltration in the multifidus compared to controls and to those with mild/moderate disability secondary to WAD. Earlier reported findings using T1-weighted MRI were reproduced using refined imaging technology. The results of the study also indicate a risk when segmenting single cross-sectional slices, as both cross-sectional area and fat infiltration differ between cervical levels.

  • 29.
    Khosravi, Fariba
    et al.
    Department of Physiotherapy, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karimi, Noureddin
    epartment of Physiotherapy, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Rahnama, Leila
    Department of Physiotherapy, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Scapular Upward Rotator Morphologic Characteristics in Individuals With and Without Forward Head Posture: A Case-Control Study2019In: Journal of ultrasound in medicine, ISSN 0278-4297, E-ISSN 1550-9613, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 337-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives There are several reports suggesting that forward head posture contributes to alterations in scapular kinematics and muscle activity, leading to the development of shoulder problems. Currently, it is unknown whether forward head posture alters the thickness of the scapular muscles. The aim of this study was to compare the thickness of the serratus anterior and upper and lower trapezius muscles at rest and during loaded isometric contractions in individuals with and without forward head posture. Methods Twenty individuals with forward head posture and 20 individuals with normal head posture participated in this case-control study. Three separate ultrasound images of the serratus anterior and upper and lower trapezius muscles were captured under 2 randomized conditions: at rest and during a loaded isometric contraction. Results The thickness of each muscle significantly increased from rest to the loaded isometric contraction (P?<?.001). The only difference between the groups was that the thickness of the serratus anterior muscle at rest in the normal-posture group was larger than that in the forward-posture group (P?=?.01). Conclusions Forward head posture appears to be related to atrophy of the serratus anterior muscle, which may contribute to the development of shoulder problems. Further research is required to identify more about the association of forward head posture with the imbalance of shoulder girdle muscles and the impact of head posture on upper quadrant pain.

  • 30.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Neck-specific exercise program2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Description of neck specific exercise program as used by Maria Landén Ludvigsson, Anneli Peolsson, Gunnel Peterson in a randomized study comparing exercise approaches in chronic whiplash “Effects of neck-specific exercise with or without a behavioural approach in addition to prescribed physical activity for individuals with chronic whiplash-associated disorders: a prospective randomised study”

  • 31.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Dedering, Åsa
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Johansson, Gun
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cost-effectiveness of neck-specific exercise with or without a behavioral approach versus physical activity prescription in the treatment of chronic whiplash-associated disorders Analyses of a randomized clinical trial2017In: Medicine (Baltimore, Md.), ISSN 0025-7974, E-ISSN 1536-5964, Vol. 96, no 25, article id e7274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Fifty percent of people injured by whiplash still report neck pain after 1 year and costs associated with whiplash associated disorders (WAD) are mostly attributed to health service and sick-leave costs in chronic conditions. With increasing health care expenditures the economic impact of interventions needs to be considered. Objective: To analyze the cost-effectiveness of physiotherapist-led neck-specific exercise without (NSE) or with a behavioral approach (NSEB), or prescription of physical activity (PPA) in chronic WAD, grade 2 to 3. Methods: This is a secondary cost-effectiveness analysis of a multicenter randomized clinical trial of 216 participants with chronic WAD grade 2 to 3. The interventions were physiotherapist-led neck-specific exercise without or with a behavioral approach, or prescription of physical activity for 12 weeks. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were determined after 1 year and bootstrapped cost-effectiveness planes and sensitivity analyses of physiotherapy visits were performed. Health care and production loss costs were included and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were estimated, using the Euroqol-5D questionnaire. Comparisons with the Short Form-6D, and neck disability index (NDI) were also made. Results: The 1-year follow-up was completed by 170 participants (79%). Both physiotherapist-led groups improved in health related quality of life. The intervention cost alone, per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gain in the NSE group was US$12,067. A trend for higher QALY gains were observed in the NSEB group but the costs were also higher. The ICERs varied depending on questionnaire used, but the addition of a behavioral approach to neck-specific exercise alone was not cost-effective from a societal perspective (ICER primary outcome $127,800 [95% confidence interval [CI], 37,816-711,302]). The sensitivity analyses confirmed the results. The prescription of physical activity did not result in any QALY gain and the societal costs were not lower. Conclusion: Neck-specific exercise was cost-effective from a societal perspective in the treatment of chronic WAD compared with the other exercise interventions. ICERS varied depending on health-related quality of life questionnaires used, but the addition of a behavioral approach was not cost-effective from a societal perspective. The prescription of physical activity did not result in any QALY gain and was thus not considered a relevant option.

  • 32.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Dedering, A.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Falla, D.
    University Hospital Gottingen, Germany; University of Gottingen, Germany.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Factors associated with pain and disability reduction following exercise interventions in chronic whiplash2016In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 307-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundSome studies support the prescription of exercise for people with whiplash-associated disorders (WAD); however, the response is highly variable. Further research is necessary to identify factors which predict response. MethodsThis is a secondary analysis of a randomized, multicentre controlled clinical trial of 202 volunteers with chronic WAD (grades 2 and 3). They received either neck-specific exercise with, or without a behavioural approach, or prescription of physical activity for 12weeks. Treatment response, defined as a clinical important reduction in pain or disability, was registered after 3 and 12months, and factors associated with treatment response were explored using logistic regression. ResultsParticipation in the neck-specific exercise group was the only significant factor associated with both neck pain and neck disability reduction both at 3 and 12months. Patients in this group had up to 5.3 times higher odds of disability reduction and 3.9 times higher odds of pain reduction compared to those in the physical activity group. Different baseline features were identified as predictors of response depending on the time point examined and the outcome measure selected (pain vs. disability). ConclusionFactors associated with treatment response after exercise interventions differ in the short and long term and differ depending on whether neck pain or disability is considered as the primary outcome. Participation in a neck-specific exercise intervention, in contrast to general physical activity, was the only factor that consistently indicated higher odds of treatment success. These results support the prescription of neck-specific exercise for individuals with chronic WAD.

  • 33.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Dedering, Asa
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    One- and two-year follow-up of a randomized trial of neck-specific exercise with or without a behavioural approach compared with prescription of physical activity in chronic whiplash disorder2016In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 56-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore whether neck-specific exercise, with or without a behavioural approach, has benefits after 1 and 2 years compared with prescribed physical activity regarding pain, self-rated functioning/disability, and self-efficacy in management of chronic whiplash. Design: Follow-up of a randomized, assessor blinded, clinical trial. Patients: A total of 216 volunteers with chronic whiplash associated disorders, grades 2 or 3. Methods: Participants were randomized to 1 of 3 exercise interventions: neck-specific exercise with or without a behavioural approach, or physical activity prescription. Self-rated pain (visual analogue scale), disability/functioning (Neck Disability Index/Patient Specific Functional Scale) and self-efficacy (Self-Efficacy Scale) were evaluated after 1 and 2 years. Results: Both neck-specific exercise groups maintained more improvement regarding disability/functioning than the prescribed physical activity group at both time-points (p &lt;= 0.02). At 1 year, 61% of subjects in the neck-specific group reported at least 50% pain reduction, compared with 26% of those in the physical activity prescription group (p &lt; 0.001), but at 2 years the difference was not significant. Conclusion: After 1-2 years, participants with chronic whiplash who were randomized to neck-specific exercise, with or without a behavioural approach, remained more improved than participants who were prescribed general physical activity.

  • 34.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Jull, Gwendolen
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Trygg, Johan
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mechanical properties of the trapezius during scapular elevation in people with chronic whiplash associated disorders - A case-control ultrasound speckle tracking analysis2016In: Manual Therapy, ISSN 1356-689X, E-ISSN 1532-2769, Vol. 21, p. 177-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Approximately 50% of people with Whiplash Associated Disorders (WAD) report longstanding symptoms. The upper trapezius is commonly painful yet its mechanical properties are not fully understood. Objectives: This study examined the deformation of different depths of the upper trapezius muscle during a scapular elevation task (shoulder shrugging) before and following loaded arm abduction. Design and Methods: A cross-sectional case-control study of 36 people (26 female and 10 male, mean age 38 (SD 11)) with chronic WAD and 36 controls, matched for age and gender. Real-time ultrasound recordings of upper trapezius were taken during both scapular elevation tasks. Post-process speckle tracking analysis was undertaken of three different sections of the upper trapezius muscle (superficial, middle, deep). Results: The WAD group had lower deformation of the superficial section of the upper trapezius compared to the control group in both concentric and eccentric phases of scapular elevation (p &lt; 0.05) especially before the loaded arm abduction. After arm abduction, the deformation of the trapezius was reduced in both groups but only significantly in the WAD-group (p = 0.03). Within-group analysis revealed that the control group least engaged the deep section of upper trapezius during the task (p &lt; 0.01). Conclusion: This study, measuring mechanical deformation of the upper trapezius during a scapular elevation task indicates that persons with WAD may display different patterns in engagement of the muscle sections than those in the control group. Further research is needed to replicate and understand the reasons for and implications of this possible change in motor strategy within upper trapezius. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 35.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    OLeary, Shaun
    University of Queensland, Australia; Queensland Heatlh, Australia.
    Dedering, Asa
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The Effect of Neck-specific Exercise With, or Without a Behavioral Approach, on Pain, Disability, and Self-Efficacy in Chronic Whiplash-associated Disorders: A Randomized Clinical Trial2015In: The Clinical Journal of Pain, ISSN 0749-8047, E-ISSN 1536-5409, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 294-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the effect on self-rated pain, disability, and self-efficacy of 3 interventions for the management of chronic whiplash-associated disorders: physiotherapist-led neck-specific exercise (NSE), physiotherapist-led NSE with the addition of a behavioral approach, or Prescription of Physical Activity (PPA). Materials and Methods: A total of 216 volunteers with chronic whiplash-associated disorders participated in this randomized, assessor blinded, clinical trial of 3 exercise interventions. Self-rated pain/pain bothersomeness (Visual Analogue Scale), disability (Neck Disability Index), and self-efficacy (Self-Efficacy Scale) were evaluated at baseline and at 3 and 6 months. Results: The proportion of patients reaching substantial reduction in pain bothersomness (at least 50% reduction) was more evident (P less than 0.01) in the 2 NSE groups (29% to 48%) compared with the PPA group (5%) at 3 months. At 6 months 39% to 44% of the patients in the 2 neck-specific groups and 28% in the PPA group reported substantial pain reduction. Reduction of disability was also larger in the 2 neck-specific exercise groups at both 3 and 6 months (P less than 0.02). Self-efficacy was only improved in the NSE group without a behavioral approach (P = 0.02). However, there were no significant differences in any outcomes between the 2 physiotherapist-led NSE groups. Discussion: NSE resulted in superior outcomes compared with PPA in this study, but the observed benefits of adding a behavioral approach to the implementation of exercise in this study were inconclusive.

  • 36.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Neck-specific exercise may reduce radiating pain and signs of neurological deficits in chronic whiplash - Analyses of a randomized clinical trial2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 12409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Up to 90% of people with neurological deficits following a whiplash injury do not recover and cervical muscle dysfunction is common. The aim of this multicentre, randomized controlled trial was to examine whether two versions of neck-specific exercise or prescription of physical activity (PPA) can improve radiating arm pain and clinical signs that can be associated with neurological deficits in people with chronic whiplash associated disorders (WAD). Participants with chronic WAD, arm symptoms and signs associated with neurological deficits (n = 171) were randomized to: 12 weeks of neck-specific exercise without (NSE) or with a behavioural approach (NSEB), or PPA. Pain/bothersomeness frequency, six measures of arm pain/paraesthesia (VAS scales), and four clinical neurological tests were evaluated after 3 months. The NSE group reported the lowest frequency and lowest levels of arm pain, the highest proportion of participants with at least 50% pain reduction and the highest proportion of normal arm muscle force. The NSEB group reported increased normal tendon reflexes. No improvements were recorded for the PPA group. Neck-specific exercise may improve arm pain and decrease signs of neurological deficits, but the addition of a behavioural approach does not seem to be of additional benefit. © 2018, The Author(s).

  • 37.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland, Uppsala University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The effect of three exercise approaches on health-related quality of life, and factors associated with its improvement in chronic whiplash-associated disorders: analysis of a randomized controlled trial.2019In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 357-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The aim was to evaluate whether neck-specific exercise, with (NSEB) or without (NSE) a behavioural approach, improves health-related quality of life (HRQoL) compared to physical activity prescription (PPA) in chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) grades 2 and 3. A secondary aim was to identify factors associated with HRQoL and HRQoL improvement following exercise interventions.

    METHODS: This is a secondary analysis of a multicentre randomized clinical trial. Participants (n = 216) with chronic WAD grades 2 and 3 were randomized to 12 weeks of PPA or physiotherapist-led NSE or NSEB. The EQ-5D 3L/EQ-VAS and SF-36v2 physical (PCS) and mental (MCS) component summaries were collected together with several neck-related and psychosocial outcomes at baseline, after 3, 6 and 12 months, and were analysed with linear mixed models (all time points) and multivariate linear regressions (baseline, 6 months).

    RESULTS: NSE/NSEB resulted in better outcomes than PPA (EQ-VAS and SF-36 PCS, both groups, p < 0.01) but not in a higher EQ-5D score. Improvement over time was seen in EQ-5D/EQ-VAS for the NSEB group (p < 0.01), and for NSE/NSEB as measured with the PCS (p < 0.01). Factors associated with baseline HRQoL and change to 6 months in HRQoL (R2 = 0.38-0.59) were both neck-related and psychosocial (e.g. depression, work ability).

    CONCLUSION: Neck-specific exercise, particularly with a behavioural approach, may have a more positive impact on HRQoL than physical activity prescription in chronic WAD grades 2 and 3. HRQoL is however complex, and other factors also need to be considered. Factors associated with HRQL and improvements in HRQoL following exercise are multidimensional.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ClinicalTrials.gov, No. NCT01528579.

  • 38.
    Liew, Bernard X. W.
    et al.
    Univ Birmingham, England.
    Scutari, Marco
    Univ Oxford, England.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala. Cty Council Ostergotland, Sweden; Cty Council Ostergotland, Sweden.
    Falla, Deborah
    Univ Birmingham, England.
    Investigating the Causal Mechanisms of Symptom Recovery in Chronic Whiplash-associated Disorders Using Bayesian Networks2019In: The Clinical Journal of Pain, ISSN 0749-8047, E-ISSN 1536-5409, Vol. 35, no 8, p. 647-655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The present studys objective was to understand the causal mechanisms underpinning the recovery of individuals with whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). We applied Bayesian Networks (BN) to answer 2 study aims: (1) to identify the causal mechanism(s) of recovery underpinning neck-specific exercise (NSE), and (2) quantify if the cyclical pathway of the fear-avoidance model (FAM) is supported by the present data. Materials and Methods: We analyzed a prospective cohort data set of 216 individuals with chronic WAD. Fifteen variables were used to build a BN model: treatment group (NSE with or without a behavioral approach, or general physical activity), muscle endurance, range of motion, hand strength, neck proprioception, pain catastrophizing, fear, anxiety, depression, self-efficacy, perceived work ability, disability, pain intensity, sex, and follow-up time. Results: The BN model showed that neck pain reduction rate was greater after NSE compared with physical activity prescription (beta=0.59 points per month [Pamp;lt;0.001]) only in the presence of 2 mediators: global neck muscle endurance and perceived work ability. We also found the following pathway of variables that constituted the FAM: anxiety, followed by depressive symptoms, fear, catastrophizing, self-efficacy, and consequently pain. Conclusions: We uncovered 2 mediators that explained the mechanisms of effect behind NSE, and proposed an alternative FAM pathway. The present study is the first to apply BN modelling to understand the causal mechanisms of recovery in WAD. In doing so, it is anticipated that such analytical methods could increase the precision of treatment of individuals with chronic WAD.

  • 39.
    Lo, Hiu Kwan
    et al.
    The University of Queensland, Australia.
    Johnston, Venerina
    The University of Queensland, Australia.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Overmeer, Thomas
    Mälardalen University, Sweden, Örebro University, Sweden.
    David, Michael
    The University of Queensland, Australia; The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Factors associated with work ability following exercise interventions for people with chronic whiplash-associated disorders: Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial.2018In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy of exercise interventions and factors associated with changes in work ability for people with chronic whiplash-associated disorders.

    DESIGN: Secondary analysis of a single-blind, randomized multi-centre controlled trial.

    SETTING: Interventions were conducted in Swedish primary care settings.

    PATIENTS: A total of 165 individuals with chronic whiplash-associated disorders grade II-III.

    METHODS: Participants were randomly allocated to neck-specific exercise, neck-specific exercise with a behavioural approach, or prescribed physical activity interventions. Work ability was evaluated with the Work Ability Index at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months.

    RESULTS: The neck-specific exercise with a behavioural approach intervention significantly improved work ability compared with the prescribed physical activity intervention (3 months, p = 0.03; 6 months, p = 0.01; 12 months, p = 0.01), and neck-specific exercise at 12 months (p = 0.01). Neck-specific exercise was better than the prescribed physical activity intervention at 6 months (p = 0.05). An increase in work ability from baseline to one year for the neck-specific exercise with a behavioural approach group (p < 0.01) was the only significant within-group difference. Higher self-rated physical demands at work, greater disability, greater depression and poorer financial situation were associated with poorer work ability (p < 0.01).

    CONCLUSION: This study found that neck-specific exercise with a behavioural approach intervention was better at improving self-reported work ability than neck-specific exercise or prescribed physical activity. Improvement in work ability is associated with a variety of factors.

  • 40.
    Marcusson, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Nord, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dannapfel, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thomas, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Poksinska, Bozena
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sverker, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cedersund, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kelfve, Susanne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Motel-Klingebiel, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hellstrom, Ingrid
    Norrkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Böttiger, Ylva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Dong, Huan-Ji
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lyth, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regional Board, Research and Development Unit.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regional Board, Research and Development Unit.
    Proactive healthcare for frail elderly persons: study protocol for a prospective controlled primary care intervention in Sweden2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 5, article id e027847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction The provision of healthcare services is not dedicated to promoting maintenance of function and does not target frail older persons at high risk of the main causes of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of a proactive medical and social intervention in comparison with conventional care on a group of persons aged 75 and older selected by statistical prediction.

    Methods and analysis In a pragmatic multicentre primary care setting (n=1600), a prediction model to find elderly (75+) persons at high risk of complex medical care or hospitalisation is used, followed by proactive medical and social care, in comparison with usual care. The study started in April 2017 with a run-in period until December 2017, followed by a 2-year continued intervention phase that will continue until the end of December 2019. The intervention includes several tools (multiprofessional team for rehabilitation, social support, medical care home visits and telephone support). Primary outcome measures are healthcare cost, number of hospital care episodes, hospital care days and mortality. Secondary outcome measures are number of outpatient visits, cost of social care and informal care, number of prescribed drugs, health-related quality of life, cost-effectiveness, sense of security, functional status and ability. We also study the care of elderly persons in a broader sense, by covering the perspectives of the patients, the professional staff and the management, and on a political level, by using semistructured interviews, qualitative methods and a questionnaire.

    Ethics and dissemination Approved by the regional ethical review board in Linköping (Dnr 2016/347-31). The results will be presented in scientific journals and scientific meetings during 2019–2022 and are planned to be used for the development of future care models.

  • 41.
    Ng, Eunice
    et al.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Johnston, Venerina
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Wibault, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lofgren, Hakan
    Ryhov Hospital, Sweden.
    Dedering, Asa
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Queensland, Australia.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Queensland, Australia.
    Factors Associated With Work Ability in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Cervical Radiculopathy2015In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 40, no 16, p. 1270-1276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Design. Cross-sectional study. Objective. To investigate the factors associated with work ability in patients undergoing surgery for cervical radiculopathy. Summary of Background Data. Surgery is a common treatment of cervical radiculopathy in people of working age. However, few studies have investigated the impact on the work ability of these patients. Methods. Patients undergoing surgery for cervical radiculopathy (n = 201) were recruited from spine centers in Sweden to complete a battery of questionnaires and physical measures the day before surgery. The associations between various individual, psychological, and work-related factors and self-reported work ability were investigated by Spearman rank correlation coefficient, multivariate linear regression, and forward stepwise regression analyses. Factors that were significant (P &lt; 0.05) in each statistical analysis were entered into the successive analysis to reveal the factors most related to work ability. Work ability was assessed using the Work Ability Index. Results. The mean Work Ability Index score was 28 (SD, 9.0). The forward stepwise regression analysis revealed 6 factors significantly associated with work ability, which explained 62% of the variance in the Work Ability Index. Factors highly correlated with greater work ability included greater self-efficacy in performing self-cares, lower physical load on the neck at work, greater self-reported chance of being able to work in 6 months time, greater use of active coping strategies, lower frequency of hand weakness, and higher health-related quality of life. Conclusion. Psychological, work-related and individual factors were significantly associated with work ability in patients undergoing surgery for cervical radiculopathy. High self-efficacy was most associated with greater work ability. Consideration of these factors by surgeons preoperatively may provide optimal return to work outcomes after surgery.

  • 42.
    Overmeer, Thomas
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Sweden; University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The effect of neck-specific exercise with or without a behavioral approach on psychological factors in chronic whiplash-associated disorders: A randomized controlled trial with a 2-year follow-up2016In: Medicine (Baltimore, Md.), ISSN 0025-7974, E-ISSN 1536-5964, Vol. 95, no 34, p. e4430-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:To investigate the effect of neck-specific exercise with (NSEB) or without (NSE) a behavioural approach and prescribed physical activity (PPA) on general pain disability and psychological factors in chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WAD), grade 2 and 3, with a 2-year follow-up.Methods:A randomized controlled multi-centre study of 3 exercise interventions (NSE, NSEB or PPA) including a 2-year follow-up. A total of 216 volunteers with chronic WAD were recruited and 194 were analyzed, mean age 40.4 (Standard Deviation [SD] 11.4). Measures of general pain disability, pain catastrophizing, anxiety and depression, and kinesiophobia were evaluated at baseline, and 3, 6, 12 and 24 months with linear mixed models.Results:General pain disability decreased by 28% in the NSEB group from baseline to 3 months (Pamp;lt;0.001) and the improvements in disability were maintained over time (6, 12 and 24 months Pamp;lt;0.01) compared to the NSE (Pamp;gt;0.42) and PPA groups (Pamp;gt;0.43). Pain catastrophizing decreased in the NSE group from baseline to 6 and 12 months (Pamp;lt;0.01) and in the NSEB group from baseline to 3 and 24 months (Pamp;lt;0.01) compared to the PPA group (Pamp;gt;0.82) that showed no change over time. The NSE group improved in kinesiophobia over time from baseline to12 months (Pamp;lt;0.01) compared to the NSEB (P=0.052) and the PPA groups (Pamp;gt;0.74). Anxiety decreased over time from baseline to 12 and 24 months in the NSE group (Pamp;gt;0.02), but not in the NSEB (Pamp;gt;0.25) or the PPA (Pamp;gt;0.50) groups. The PPA had no effect on general disability or any of the measured psychological factors.Conclusion:This randomised controlled trial with a 2-year follow-up shows that physiotherapist-led neck-specific exercise with or without the addition of a behavioural approach had superior outcome on general disability and most psychological factors compared to the mere prescription of physical activity.

  • 43.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Functional analysis of the cervical spine: Reliability, reference data and outcome after anterior cervical decompression and fusion2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the thesis was to investigate the reliability of the test procedure, and to obtain reference values for active range of motion (AROM) of the neck, neck-, and hand strength. Another aim was to perform a broad assessment of outcome in patients with cervical disc disease operated on by anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) and to identify predictive factors for a good outcome. For a broad assessment it is important to have reliable objective and subjective variables, and reference values obtained in healthy people.

    Three studies concern reliability and reference values for neck AROM, neck strength, and hand strength of healthy individuals. One study concerns the outcome of 34 consecutively included patients six months and one year after ACDF, and any remaining deficits afterwards. One study is a prospective randomised study of 103 patients concerning prognostic factors (mean follow-up 19 months, SD 6, range 12-24 months) for a good outcome of ACDF, and any remaining deficits afterwards.

    The intra-, and inter-tester reliability of neck AROM, neck strength, and hand strength obtained from 30-32 healthy volunteers were considered substantial to almost perfect (ICC-values 0.61-0.98) and can be used for comparisons between or within groups. The reference values obtained in 101 asymptomatic men and women aged 25-64 years showed that age was the most important factor to take into consideration when measuring neck AROM, and gender was most important for neck and hand strength measurements. The patients showed benefits from ACDF at the one-year follow-up in neck strength in lateral flexion, neck muscle endurance in flexion, pain, numbness, ADL, Neck Disability Index (NDI), sick leave, change in general health, and symptom satisfaction. Except for a deterioration in general health there were no significant differences between the six-month and the one-year followup. The most important predictor for low postoperative pain intensity was greater preoperative kyphosis.

    The predictive value of segmental kyphosis is noteworthy and of potential clinical interest. Low preoperative pain intensity was the most important predictor for improved NDI. Non-smoking males with a greater segmental kyphosis at the level of surgical intervention, with less severe pain experience and better initial function, had the best prognosis for a successful outcome of ACDF. Although the patients experienced benefits from surgery in many of the variables, a large number still had remaining deficits. These studies support the need for improvements in the selection for and the treatment techniques in both surgery and physiotherapy in degenerative cervical disorders.

    List of papers
    1. Intra- and inter-tester reliability and range of motion of the neck
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intra- and inter-tester reliability and range of motion of the neck
    2000 (English)In: Physiotherapy Canada, ISSN 0300-0508, E-ISSN 1708-8313, Vol. 52, p. 233-242Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    To our knowledge, neither reliability nor reference values have previously been investigated on the cervical measurement system (CMS) equipment. In this study we determined the intra- and intertester reliability of measuring active range of motion (AROM) in the three planes using the cervical measurement system (CMS) and the golden standard cervical range of motion device (CROM). Based on repeated measurements by two observers in 30 healthy volunteers, measurement of AAOM with the GMS equipment was shown to be a reliable method and nearly as good as the CROM equipment. Thus, the CMS equipment can be used for evaluating cervical AROM in clinical practice. Age- and sex-specific cervical range of motion was measured with the CMS equipment in 101 randomly selected asymptomatic men and women aged 25-64 years. The results from the reference- value study showed that age is a much more important determinant of cervical AROM than sex, body weight, or body mass index.

    Keywords
    Cervical Spine, Neck, Active Range of Motion, Reliability
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-27923 (URN)12684 (Local ID)12684 (Archive number)12684 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Intra- and inter-tester reliability and reference values for hand strength
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intra- and inter-tester reliability and reference values for hand strength
    2001 (English)In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 36-41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The intra- and inter-tester reliability for measurement of handgrip strength and indexgrip strength using the Jamar dynamometer was investigated in 32 healthy volunteers, and the intra-tester reliability in 13 patients with cervical radiculopathy. The results from the reliability studies showed that handgrip and indexgrip strength measured with the Jamar dynamometer is a reliable method (ICC values 0.85-0.98) and can be recommended for use in clinical practice. Age- and sex-specific reference values for handgrip strength and indexgrip strength were measured with the Jamar dynamometer in 101 randomly selected healthy volunteers, aged 25-64 years. The results from the reference value study showed that sex is a more important determinant of hand strength than age, height and body weight. The reference values for hand strength improve the potential for objective evaluation of patients with arm/hand disorders caused by cervical radiculopathy.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-27924 (URN)10.1080/165019701300006524 (DOI)12685 (Local ID)12685 (Archive number)12685 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    3. Intra- and inter-tester reliability and reference values for isometric neck strength
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intra- and inter-tester reliability and reference values for isometric neck strength
    2001 (English)In: Physiotherapy Research International, ISSN 1358-2267, E-ISSN 1471-2865, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 15-26Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Age- and sex-specific reference values for neck strength based on reliable measurements in the upright position are lacking. The aim of the present study was to determine intra- and inter-tester reliability and age- and sex-specific reference values for isometric neck strength in extension, flexion and lateral flexion in sitting position measured with the David Back Clinic 140 (DBC 140) equipment.

    METHOD: The reliability of the DBC 140 equipment was investigated in 30 healthy volunteers and reference values were obtained from 101 healthy men and women.

    RESULTS: The reliability study showed that neck strength measured with the DBC 140 equipment has almost perfect intra- and inter-tester reliability (ICC values between 0.85 and 0.97). The mean value of the first in a series of three measurements was the highest for all three test leaders and for almost all directions. Results from the reference value study showed that gender is a much more important determinant of neck strength than age, body weight or body mass index (BMI). Neck strength in women was, on average, 55% of that in men, and when adjusted for body weight or BMI, the percentages were 70% and 59%, respectively. In all directions observed, neck strength decreased by approximately 20% from age 25 to 64 years.

    CONCLUSIONS: Measurements of neck strength taken in upright position with the DBC 140 equipment have almost perfect intra- and inter-tester reliability and justify the use of this test procedure. The use of the first measurement in a test series can be recommended for use in clinical practice since it was shown to be the maximal test value and thus, had a very low intra-tester difference. The use of reference values for neck strength when evaluating patients with neck disorders needs to take gender into account.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-81290 (URN)10.1002/pri.210 (DOI)
    Available from: 2012-09-11 Created: 2012-09-11 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    4. Disability after anterior decompression and fusion for cervical disc disease
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disability after anterior decompression and fusion for cervical disc disease
    2002 (English)In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 111-124Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Few prospective studies on outcome have been conducted with respect to disability after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF), and the need for further rehabilitation after surgery is unknown. Thirty-four patients with cervical disc disease verified by magnetic resonance imaging were included before ACDF with a cervical carbon fibre intervertebral fusion cage. Measurements took place the day before, 6 months and 1 year after surgery, and consisted of both objective and subjective measurements. The results showed a significant improvement from surgery in neck muscle endurance in flexion, neck strength in lateral flexion, some of the pain variables, numbness, neck specific disability, change in general health and symptom satisfaction at the 1-year follow-up. Except for worsening in general health, there were no significant differences between the 6-month and the 1-year follow-up. Despite improvement in several of the variables, about one-third of the patients had deficits in the objective measurements and about two-thirds had deficits in the subjective variables. Only five patients were without neck problems according to average pain, the Neck Disability Index and general health. This suggests that there is still a great need for improvement both of the surgical procedure and the rehabilitation afterwards.

    Keywords
    Cervical radiculopathy, Neck, Outcome, Rehabilitation, Spine, Surgery
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-46883 (URN)10.1080/140381902320387531 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    5. Predictive factors for the outcome of anterior cervical decompression and fusion
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictive factors for the outcome of anterior cervical decompression and fusion
    2003 (English)In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 274-280Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In a prospective study, 103 patients were randomised to anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) with a cervical carbon-fibre intervertebral fusion cage or the Cloward procedure. Preoperative background variables, active range of neck motion, handgrip strength, radiological evaluation and subjective variables were used in a multiple regression model to find the strongest predictors of postoperative outcome as measured by current pain intensity and the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Male sex, greater kyphosis at the level operated on, non-smoking, a greater neck mobility in right rotation, low disability on NDI, and older age were predictors of pain reduction and explained 30% of current pain intensity at follow-up. Higher educational level, non-smoking, greater kyphosis at the level operated on, a greater flexion mobility, greater right handgrip strength and lower current pain intensity were predictors of improvement, and explained 28% of the postoperative outcome on NDI. The most important predictor for postoperative pain intensity was the magnitude of the preoperative kyphosis. Preoperative pain intensity was the most important predictor for improved NDI. At follow-up about 70% of the patients still had deficit based on current pain intensity and NDI, and 44% had remaining dysfunction based on Odom's criteria. In conclusion, the multivariate analysis shows that male sex, non-smoking, greater segmental kyphosis and a low pain and disability level are preoperative predictors of a good outcome in ACDF. In addition, the study suggests the importance of other predictive variables than those studied for the outcome of ACDF.

    Keywords
    cervical spine, intervertebral fusion, prognostic factors, outcome
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-47773 (URN)10.1007/s00586-003-0530-2 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
  • 44.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Investigation of clinically important benefit of anterior cervical decompression and fusion2007In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 507-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of the prospective randomized study are to investigate the clinically relevant change after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) using measures of pain intensity (visual analog scale, VAS) and neck disability index (NDI). And to determine the number of subjects showing persistent pain and disability at 6-year follow-up. To investigate the possibility of differences in outcome between ACDF with the cervical intervertebral fusion cage (CIFC) and the Cloward procedure (CP). Clinically relevant change and residual, postoperative pain intensity and disability after ACDF have been investigated a little. Ninety-five patients with neck and radicular arm pain lasting for at least 6 months were randomly selected to receive ACDF with the CP or the CIFC. Questionnaires concerning pain and NDI were obtained from 83 patients (87%) at a mean follow-up time of 76 months (range 56–94 months). When evaluating clinical benefits regarding pain intensity 6 years after ACDF, according to different cut-off points and relative percentages, symptoms improved in 46–78% of patients. Improvement in NDI was seen in 18–20% of patients. Approximately 70% of the patients had persistent pain and disability at 6-year follow-up. There was no clinically important difference following CP versus CIFC. Thirty millimeter and 20% in pain intensity and NDI, respectively, are reasonable criteria to suggest a clinically relevant change after ACDF. Before patients undergo ACDF, they should be informed that they have an approximate 50% probability of achieving pain relief and little probability of functional improvement. The findings demonstrate that there is poor evidence for difference between CIFC and CP.

  • 45.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Almkvist, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindqvist, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pettersson, Susanne
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Age- and Sex-Specific Reference Values of a Test of Neck Muscle Endurance2007In: Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, ISSN 0161-4754, E-ISSN 1532-6586, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 171-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    This study evaluates age- and sex-specific reference values for neck muscle endurance (NME).

    Methods

    In this cross-sectional study, 116 randomly selected, healthy volunteers (ages 25-64 years) stratified according to age and gender participated. Dorsal and ventral NME was measured in seconds until exhaustion in a laying-down position. A weight of 4 kg for men or 2 kg for women was used in the dorsal procedure. The ventral procedure was performed without external load. Background and physical activity data were obtained and used in the analysis of NME performance.

    Results

    Mean values for dorsal and ventral NME were about 7 and 2.5 minutes for men and 8.5 and 0.5 minutes for women, respectively. The cutoff values for subnormal dorsal and ventral NME were 157 and 56 seconds for men and 173 and 23 seconds for women, respectively. Women's NME was 122% of men's NME in the dorsal (P = .17) and 24% of men's NME in the ventral (P < .0001) procedure. There were no significant differences among age groups. In multiple regression analysis, physical activity explained 4% of variability in the performance of the dorsal NME; and sex explained 37% of the variability in the performance of ventral NME.

    Conclusion

    The reference values and the cutoff points obtained could be used in clinical practice to identify patients with a subnormal NME. Sex is an important consideration when using both the test procedure and the reference values.

  • 46.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brodin, Lars-Ake
    Royal Institute Technology KTH.
    Peolsson, Michael
    Royal Institute Technology KTH.
    A tissue velocity ultrasound imaging investigation of the dorsal neck muscles during resisted isometric extension2010In: MANUAL THERAPY, ISSN 1356-689X, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 567-573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Persons with neck pain exhibit altered patterns of muscle patterning, but limited investigations have been carried out on these alterations or muscle patterning in healthy volunteers. This study investigated the tissue motion of the dorsal neck muscles at the C4 segmental level in 15 healthy subjects during manually resisted head extension. Doppler-based tissue velocity ultrasound imaging (TVI) was used to detect regional tissue deformation, providing indirect evidence of inter-muscular movement patterning. The deep muscles, multifidus and semispinalis, had different muscular movement patterning than the superficial muscles, especially the trapezius muscle. The semispinalis cervicis (SSCerv) was the first deformed upon exercise initiation, followed by multifidus and semispinalis capitis (SSCap). The semispinalis muscles, notably capitis, exhibited a high rate of deformation during the exercise. The trapezius muscle exhibited the least and lowest deformation rate. In conclusion, TVI provided detailed information on regional tissue activity and muscle movement patterning among the dorsal neck muscles. In future studies, data from patients with neck disorders will have to be matched to data from healthy volunteers in a variety of situations and activities.

  • 47.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hamp, Catarina
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Albinsson, Anna-Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engdahl, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Test position and reliability in measurements of dorsal neck muscle endurance2007In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 181-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of the study were to compare the relative electromyographic (EMG) activity of the extensor muscles at three different locations of the spine (cervical, thoracic and lumbar) during three different dorsal neck muscle endurance test procedures, in order to determine the procedure in which the dorsal neck muscles are maximally activated in asymptomatic individuals. The reliability for one of these test procedures was evaluated using an endurance test expressed in seconds in both healthy volunteers and patients with neck discomfort. Surface EMG activity of the spinal extensor muscles was acquired in three different locations during three different test procedures: the “extended neck lift”, and “straight neck lift” with light and heavy loads in 12 healthy volunteers. The “extended neck lift” was assessed for intra-rater reliability in 30 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with neck disorders and for inter-rater reliability in another 30 healthy volunteers and nine patients with neck disorders. EMG activation of the spinal extensor muscles was generally low. Only during the “extended neck lift” was there a slight tendency that cervical extensors were more activated compared with thoracic extensors. The reliability was good (ICC 0.80–0.94); however, the maximal intra-individual differences and the measurement error were large. The different test procedures used are comparable but there was a slight tendency for “the extended neck lift” to be a more selective measurement for the cervical extensors. The “extended neck lift” is reliable and could be appropriate for evaluating groups of patients.

  • 48.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hedlund, Rund
    Department of Orthopaedics, Huddinge Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Intra- and inter-tester reliability and reference values for hand strength2001In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 36-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The intra- and inter-tester reliability for measurement of handgrip strength and indexgrip strength using the Jamar dynamometer was investigated in 32 healthy volunteers, and the intra-tester reliability in 13 patients with cervical radiculopathy. The results from the reliability studies showed that handgrip and indexgrip strength measured with the Jamar dynamometer is a reliable method (ICC values 0.85-0.98) and can be recommended for use in clinical practice. Age- and sex-specific reference values for handgrip strength and indexgrip strength were measured with the Jamar dynamometer in 101 randomly selected healthy volunteers, aged 25-64 years. The results from the reference value study showed that sex is a more important determinant of hand strength than age, height and body weight. The reference values for hand strength improve the potential for objective evaluation of patients with arm/hand disorders caused by cervical radiculopathy.

  • 49.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Department of Orthopaedics, Huddinge Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vavruch, Ludek
    Department of Neuro-Orthopaedic Surgery, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Prediction of fusion and importance of radiological variables for the outcome of anterior cervical decompression and fusion2004In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 229-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a prospective randomised study with a 2-year follow-up, 103 patients were randomised to anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) with a cervical carbon-fibre intervertebral fusion cage (CIFC) or the Cloward procedure (CP). The purpose of the present study was to report predictors for fusion and also to investigate the importance of radiological variables for the clinical outcome. Gender, age, smoking habits, disc height, segmental kyphosis and type of surgical procedure were used as independent (before surgery) variables in a multiple regression model. Male gender, one-level surgery and CP treatment were significant predictors of fusion and explained 14% of the variability of fusion status at follow-up. Number of levels operated on, however, did not influence the clinical outcome. Fifty-two per cent of the women and 17% of the men in the CIFC group, and 25% of the women and 8% of the men in the CP group, had pseudarthrosis. Although patients with a healed fusion had significantly less pain intensity than patients with pseudarthrosis, radiological variables explained only 4% of the variability of pain at follow-up. Apart from a significant correlation between preoperative kyphosis and neck disability index at follow-up, no significant correlation between either postoperative kyphosis or preoperative or postoperative disc height and clinical outcome was found. Neither degree of segmental kyphosis nor disc height was different between patients with healed fusion and pseudarthrosis. One can conclude that male gender and type of surgery were significant predictors for a healed fusion and that pseudarthrosis affected outcome. In contrast to the commonly held view based mainly on theoretical considerations, no effect on clinical outcome could be demonstrated for segmental kyphosis and disc height at follow-up. Overall, the study shows that the importance of radiological factors as predictors for fusion as well as clinical outcome is limited.

  • 50.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Department of Orthopaedics, Huddinge Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vavruch, Ludek
    Department of Neuro-Orthopaedic Surgery, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Predictive factors for the outcome of anterior cervical decompression and fusion2003In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 274-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a prospective study, 103 patients were randomised to anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) with a cervical carbon-fibre intervertebral fusion cage or the Cloward procedure. Preoperative background variables, active range of neck motion, handgrip strength, radiological evaluation and subjective variables were used in a multiple regression model to find the strongest predictors of postoperative outcome as measured by current pain intensity and the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Male sex, greater kyphosis at the level operated on, non-smoking, a greater neck mobility in right rotation, low disability on NDI, and older age were predictors of pain reduction and explained 30% of current pain intensity at follow-up. Higher educational level, non-smoking, greater kyphosis at the level operated on, a greater flexion mobility, greater right handgrip strength and lower current pain intensity were predictors of improvement, and explained 28% of the postoperative outcome on NDI. The most important predictor for postoperative pain intensity was the magnitude of the preoperative kyphosis. Preoperative pain intensity was the most important predictor for improved NDI. At follow-up about 70% of the patients still had deficit based on current pain intensity and NDI, and 44% had remaining dysfunction based on Odom's criteria. In conclusion, the multivariate analysis shows that male sex, non-smoking, greater segmental kyphosis and a low pain and disability level are preoperative predictors of a good outcome in ACDF. In addition, the study suggests the importance of other predictive variables than those studied for the outcome of ACDF.

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