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  • 1.
    Comstock, Mica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ossbahr, Gilbert
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hyper-flexibility: a concept for a new dimension in system variability2000In: CIRP - Journal of Manufacturing Systems, Vol. 31, p. 425-Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, a common for the evolving, multi-dimensional concept called 'hyper-dimensional' is proposed. The purpose of the paper is foremost to generate a discussion concerning advanced flexibility to meet today's advanced challenges, but also to present a working proposal for a common definition to the manufacturing community. In the paper, current manufacturing flexibility theory is reviewed, the origins and current usage of hyper-flexibility ate presented, and a common definition addressing several manufacturing flexibility dimensions is developed. The relation of the new concept to the manufacturing strategy of mass customization is also highlighted.

  • 2.
    Johansson, Sten
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Materials.
    Ossbahr, Gilbert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Harris, Tom
    Airbus Filton.
    Study of the Inluence of Drilling Method and Hole quality on Static Strength and Fatigue Life of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic Aircraft Material2002Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Jonsson, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Murray, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Robertsson, Anders
    Lund University, Department of Automatic Control.
    Stolt, Andreas
    Lund University, Department of Automatic Control.
    Ossbahr, Gilbert
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nilsson, Klas
    Lund University, Department of Computer Science.
    Force Feedback for Assembly of Aircraft Structures2010In: Proceedings of the SAE 2010 Aerospace Manufacturing and Automated Fastening Conference & Exhibition, SAE International, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Variability in composite manufacture and the limitations in positional accuracy of common industrial robots have hampered automation of assembly tasks within aircraft manufacturing. One way to handle geometry variations and robot compliancy is to use force control. Force control technology utilizes a sensor mounted on the robot to feedback force data to the controller system so instead of being position driven, i.e. programmed to achieve a certain position with the tool, the robot can be programmed to achieve a certain force. This paper presents an experimental case where a compliant rib is aligned to multiple surfaces using force feedback and an industrial robot system from ABB. Two types of ribs where used, one full size carbon fiber rib, and one smaller metal replica for evaluation purposes. The alignment sequence consisted of several iterative steps and a search procedure was implemented within the robot control system. The technology has the potential to lessen the need for dedicated tooling, reduce the need for traditional workspace calibration and can be used in several other applications, such as pin and socket type assemblies found in pylons or landing gear or “part to part” assemblies such as leading edge ribs to spar.

  • 4.
    Jonsson, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ossbahr, Gilbert
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Affordable Reconfigurable Tooling using Mini Flexapods2009In: Proceedings of The International 3'rd Swedish Production Symposium, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing processes are subject to increasing product changes, product diversity and customisation, higher quality demands and shorter lead times, all of which are drivers for new flexible approaches to manufacturing. As a result modular and reconfigurable fixture solutions have been both researched and commercialized. One of these is the ART, “Affordable Reconfigurable Tooling” concept, which relies on an external measuring system rather than internal accuracy of all fixture parts. Traditionally for dedicated fixtures shims are often used to achieve desired position and tolerances. This paper presents the “Mini Flexapod”, a small 6 degree of freedom reconfigurable device as part of the ART concept. The Mini Flexapod is designed to eliminate shimming and therefore has a small working envelope of approximately ± 4mm. Three different designs of the Mini Flexapod are presented, together with an illustrative application case from aircraft manufacturing. Further work will be done to improve design and to develop an intuitive operator interface for adjusting the Mini Flexapod.

  • 5.
    Jonsson, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ossbahr, Gilbert
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Aspects of reconfigurable and flexible fixtures2010In: Production Engineering, ISSN 0944-6524, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 333-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design and manufacture of fixtures and other dedicated tooling for positioning of workpieces are among the major cost drivers in product industrialization. This has spurred research and commercial interest towards other fixturing solutions like reconfigurable fixtures, with the ability to be changed, or  reconfigured , to suit different parts and products. When reconfiguring, the product interface not only has to be moved but moved to a desired position and orientation. Several different approaches have been used to move and position these devices, all with their own advantages and disadvantages. This article presents different methods used to position and reconfigure flexible fixture devices using a parallel kinematic device as a case. Discussing the different ways to reconfigure a flexible device, the article aims to arrange the techniques according to their key features.

  • 6.
    Jonsson, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ossbahr, Gilbert
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Aspects of reconfigurable and flexible fixtures2009In: Proceedings for the 3rd International Conference on Changeable, Agile, Reconfigurable and Virtual Production, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Jonsson, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ossbahr, Gilbert
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Coordinate Controlled Fixturing for Affordable Reconfigurable Tooling2008In: Proceedings of 2nd CIRP Conference on Assembly Technologies and Systems, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Jonsson, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ossbahr, Gilbert
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Development of a new flexible fixturing device for Affordable Reconfigurable Tooling2010In: 3rd CIRP Conference on Assembly Technologies and Systems: Responsive, customer demand driven, adaptive assembly / [ed] Terje K. Lien, Trondheim: Tapir Akademisk Forlag, 2010, p. 103-108Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To use thin wedges of metal to adjust fixtures, i.e shimming, has been a common approach to achieve desired position and tolerance. To build a fixture using shims is time-consuming and results in a fixture that is difficult to modify. The newly developed ART (Affordable Reconfigurable Tooling) concept addresses the need for flexible fixturing by means of reconfigurable supports that are set to desired position by guidance from an outer measuring system. The ART concept can be realized by means of several different reconfigurable devices, among these is the newly developed “Mini Flexapod”. This small 6 degree of freedom reconfigurable device was designed to eliminate shimming and therefore has a small working envelope of approximately 4x4x4 mm. The Mini Flexapod is a result of working with several manufacturing cases  described in this paper.

  • 9.
    Kihlman, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ossbahr, Gilbert
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Engström, Magnus
    Saab Aerostructures.
    Anderson, John
    Advanced Technology Centre, BAE SYSTEMS.
    Low-cost automation for aircraft assembly2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper solution for low-cost automation of aircraft assembly is presented. The concept of this development is closely related to "Lean Automation", which in this case concerns the use of modern standard equipment such as standard robots, PC-computers and a newlydeveloped spatial sensor system for prec1s1on measurements of positions. The robot is used to perform reconfiguration of tooling modules that arepossible to be configured/reconfigured in six degrees of freedom. A prototype developed as the result of an EU-project called ADFAST* has been evaluated at Linköping University in Sweden. Technical functionality is reported where the robot manages to configure the flexible tooling modules to a total error bellow 50 μm. This paper presents the resu~s on the portion of the project addressing robot, metrology system and tooling.

  • 10.
    Olsson, Tomas
    et al.
    Department of Automatic Control, Lund University, Lund and ABB Robotics, Department RC and ABB Corporate Research, Västerås, Sweden.
    Haage, Mathias
    Department of Computer Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Kihlman, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. DELFOi, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Rolf
    Department of Automatic Control, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Klas
    Department of Computer Science, Lund University, Sweden.
    Robertsson, Anders
    Department of Automatic Control, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Isaksson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ossbahr, Gilbert
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Brogardh, Torgny
    ABB Robotics, Department RC and ABB Corporate Research, Västerås, Sweden.
    Cost-efficient drilling using industrial robots with high-bandwidth force feedback2010In: Robotics and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing, ISSN 0736-5845, E-ISSN 1879-2537, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 24-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we present a method for high-precision drilling using an industrial robot with high-bandwidth force feedback which is used for building up pressure to clamp-up an end-effector to the work-piece surface prior to drilling, The focus is to eliminate the sliding movement (skating) of the end-effector during the clamp-up of the end-effector to the work-piece surface, an undesired effect that is due to the comparatively low mechanical stiffness of typical serial industrial robots. This compliance also makes the robot deflect due to the cutting forces, resulting in poor hole position accuracy and to some extent in poor hole quality. Recently, functionality for high-bandwidth force control has found its way into industrial robot control systems. This could potentially open up the possibility for robotic drilling systems with improved performance, using only standard systems without excessive extra hardware and calibration techniques. Instead of automation with expensive fixtures and precise machinery, our approach was to make use of standard low-cost robot equipment in combination with sensor feedback. The resulting sliding suppression control results in greatly improved hole positioning and quality. The conceptual idea behind the force control is useful also in many other robotic applications requiring external sensor feedback control.

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