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  • 1.
    Ben, Rayana M.C.
    et al.
    Ben Rayana, M.C., Laboratory of Clinical Chemistry, National Institute of Nutrition, Bab Saadoun, Tunis, Tunisia.
    Burnett, R.W.
    Department of Pathology, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT, United States.
    Covington, A.K.
    Department of Chemistry, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom.
    D'Orazio, P.
    Instrumentation Laboratory, Lexington, MA, United States.
    Fogh-Andersen, N.
    Laboratory of Clinical Chemistry, Herlev Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
    Jacobs, E.
    Clinical Laboratory Program, Wadsworth Center, NY State Deparmtent of Health, Albany, NY, United States.
    Kulpmann, W.R.
    Külpmann, W.R., Klinische Chemie, Medizinische Hochschule, Carl-Neuberg-Str. 1, 30625 Hannover, Germany.
    Kuwa, K.
    Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry.
    Lewenstam, A.
    Center ProSens, Åbo Akademi University, Åbo-Turku, Finland.
    Maas, A.H.J.
    Eurotrol bv, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Mager, G.
    Fresenius Medical Care Deutschland GmbH, Bad Homburg, Germany.
    Naskalski, J.H.J.
    Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Colleguim Medicum, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland.
    Okorodudu, A.O.
    Department of Pathology, John Sealy Hospital, Galveston, TX, United States.
    Ritter, C.
    Roche Diagnostics GmbH, Graz, Austria.
    St, John A.
    St John, A., ARC Consulting, MT Lawley, WA, Australia.
    Guidelines for sampling, measuring and reporting ionized magnesium in undiluted serum, plasma or blood: International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC)2005In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 1434-6621, E-ISSN 1437-4331, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 564-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All analyzers with ion-selective electrodes for ionized magnesium (iMg) should yield comparable and unbiased results. The prerequisite to achieve this goal is to reach consensus on sampling, measurement and reporting. The recommended guidelines for sampling, measurement and reporting iMg in plasma ("plasma" refers to circulating plasma and the forms in which it is sampled: the plasma phase of anticoagulated whole blood, plasma separated from blood cells, or serum) or blood, referring to the substance concentration of iMg in the calibrants, will provide results for iMg that are approximately 3% greater than its true concentration, and 4% less than its true molality. Binding of magnesium to proteins and ligands in plasma and blood is pH-dependent. Therefore, pH should be simultaneously measured to allow adjustment of iMg concentration to pH 7.4. The substance concentration of iMg may be physiologically and consequently clinically more relevant than the substance concentration of total magnesium. © 2005 by Walter de Gruyter.

  • 2. Ben Rayana, Mohammed C
    et al.
    Burnett, Robert W
    Covington, Arthur K
    DOrazio, Paul
    Fogh-Andersen, Niels
    Jacobs, Ellis
    Kataky, Rity
    Külpmann, Wolf R
    Kuwa, Katsuhiko
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Lewenstam, Andrzej
    Maas, Anton H J
    Mager, Gerhard
    Naskalski, Jerzy W
    Okorodudu, Anthony O
    Ritter, Christoph
    St John, Andrew
    Recommendation for measuring and reporting chloride by ISEs in undiluted serum, plasma or blood2006In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 1434-6621, E-ISSN 1437-4331, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 346-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The proposed recommendation for measuring and reporting chloride in undiluted plasma† or blood by ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) will provide results that are identical to chloride concentrations measured by coulometry for standardized normal plasma or blood samples. It is applicable to all current ISEs dedicated to chloride measurement in undiluted samples that meet the requirements. However, in samples with reduced water concentration, results by coulometry are lower than by ion-selective electrode due to volume displacement. The quantity measured by this standardized ISE procedure is called the ionized chloride concentration. It may be clinically more relevant than the chloride concentration as determined by coulometry, photometry or by ISE after dilution of the sample. © 2006 by Walter de Gruyter.

  • 3.
    Ben Rayana, Mohammed C.
    et al.
    Natl Inst Nutr, Clin Chem Lab, Tunis, Tunisia.
    Burnett, Robert W.
    Hartford Hosp, Dept Pathol, Hartford, CT 06115 USA.
    Covington, Arthur K.
    Univ Newcastle Upon Tyne, Dept Chem, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 7RU, Tyne & Wear, England.
    D'Orazio, Paul
    Instrumentat Lab, Lexington, MA USA.
    Fogh-Andersen, Niels
    Herlev Hosp, Dept Clin Biochem, Clin Chem Lab, DK-2730 Herlev, Denmark.
    Jacobs, Ellis
    NY State Dept Hlth, Wadsworth Ctr, Clin Lab Program, Albany, NY USA.
    Kulpmann, Wolf R.
    Med Hochschule, Klin Chem, Hannover, Germany.
    Kuwa, Katsuhiko
    Univ Tsukuba, Inst Clin Med, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305, Japan.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry.
    Lewenstam, Andrzej
    Abo Akad Univ, Ctr ProSens, Turku, Finland.
    Maas, Anton H. J.
    Eurotrol Bv, Ede, Netherlands.
    Mager, Gerhard
    Fresenius Med Care, Bad Homburg, Germany.
    Naskalski, Jerzy W.
    Jagiellonian Univ, Coll Med, Clin Biochem, Krakow, Poland.
    IFCC guideline for sampling, measuring and reporting ionized magnesium in plasma2008In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 1434-6621, E-ISSN 1437-4331, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 21-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analyzers with ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) for ionized magnesium (iMg) should yield comparable and unbiased results for iMg. This IFCC guideline on sampling, measuring and reporting iMg in plasma provides a prerequisite to achieve this goal [in this document, "plasma" refers to circulating plasma and the forms in which it is sampled, namely the plasma phase of anticoagulated whole blood (or "blood"), plasma separated from blood cells, or serum]. The guideline recommends measuring and reporting ionized magnesium as a substance concentration relative to the substance concentration of magnesium in primary aqueous calibrants with magnesium, sodium, and calcium chloride of physiological ionic strength. The recommended name is "the concentration of ionized magnesium in plasma". Based on this guideline, results will be approximately 3% higher than the true substance concentration and 4% lower than the true molality in plasma. Calcium ions interfere with all current magnesium ion-selective electrodes (Mg-ISEs), and thus it is necessary to determine both ions simultaneously in each sample and correct the result for Ca2+ interference. Binding of Mg in plasma is pH-dependent. Therefore, pH should be measured simultaneously with iMg to allow adjustment of the result to pH 7.4. The concentration of iMg in plasma may be physiologically and clinically more relevant than the concentration of total magnesium. Furthermore, blood-gas analyzers or instruments for point-of-care testing are able to measure plasma iMg using whole blood (with intact blood cells) as the sample, minimizing turnaround time compared to serum and plasma, which require removal of blood cells.

  • 4. Boalth, Nicolas
    et al.
    Wandrup, Jesper
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Frischauf, Peter
    Lundsgaard, Finn
    Andersen, Willy
    Jensen, Niels-Henrik
    Singer, Rolf
    Troldborg, Carl
    Lunding, Gitte
    Blood gases and oximetry: calibration-free new dry-chemistry and optical technology for near-patíent testing.2001In: Clinica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0009-8981, E-ISSN 1873-3492, Vol. 307, p. 225-233Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Burnett, Robert W
    et al.
    D'Orazio, Paul
    Fogh-Andersen, Niels
    Kuwa, Katsuhiko
    Külpmann, Wolf
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Lewnstam, Andrzej
    Maas, Anton
    Mager, Gerhard
    Spichiger-Keller, Ursula
    IFCC recommendation on reporting results for blood glucose.2001In: Clinica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0009-8981, E-ISSN 1873-3492, Vol. 307, p. 205-209Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    D'Orazio, P.
    et al.
    Instrumentation Laboratory, Lexington, MA, United States.
    Burnett, R.W.
    Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT, United States.
    Fogh-Andersen, N.
    Herlev Hospital, Herlev, Denmark, Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev Hospital, 2730 Herlev, Denmark.
    Jacobs, E.
    Wadsworth Center, Albany, NY, United States.
    Kuwa, K.
    University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan.
    Kulpmann, W.R.
    Külpmann, W.R., Medizinizche Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Germany.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry.
    Lewenstam, A.
    Åbo Akademi University, Åbo-Turku, Finland.
    Maas, A.H.J.
    Eurotrol bv, Ede, Netherlands.
    Mager, G.
    Fresenius, Bad Homburg, Germany.
    Naskalski, J.W.
    Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland.
    Okorodudu, A.O.
    Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, United States.
    Approved IFCC recommendation on reporting results for blood glucose2006In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 1434-6621, E-ISSN 1437-4331, Vol. 44, no 12, p. 1486-1490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In current clinical practice, plasma and blood glucose are used interchangeably with a consequent risk of clinical misinterpretation. In human blood, glucose is distributed, like water, between erythrocytes and plasma. The molality of glucose (amount of glucose per unit water mass) is the same throughout the sample, but the concentration is higher in plasma, because the concentration of water and therefore glucose is higher in plasma than in erythrocytes. Different devices for the measurement of glucose may detect and report fundamentally different quantities. Different water concentrations in the calibrator, plasma, and erythrocyte fluid can explain some of the differences. Results for glucose measurements depend on the sample type and on whether the method requires sample dilution or uses biosensors in undiluted samples. If the results are mixed up or used indiscriminately, the differences may exceed the maximum allowable error for glucose determinations for diagnosing and monitoring diabetes mellitus, thus complicating patient treatment. The goal of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Scientific Division, Working Group on Selective Electrodes and Point of Care Testing (IFCC-SD-WG-SEPOCT) is to reach a global consensus on reporting results. The document recommends reporting the concentration of glucose in plasma (in the unit mmol/L), irrespective of sample type or measurement technique. A constant factor of 1.11 is used to convert concentration in whole blood to the equivalent concentration in plasma. The conversion will provide harmonized results, facilitating the classification and care of patients and leading to fewer therapeutic misjudgments. © 2006 by Walter de Gruyter.

  • 7.
    D'Orazio, Paul
    et al.
    Instrumentation Lab, Lexington.
    Burnett, Robert W.
    Hartford Hospital.
    Fogh-Andersen, Niels
    Herlev Hospital.
    Jacobs, Ellis
    Wadsworth Centre.
    Kuwa, Katsuhiko
    University of Tsukuba.
    Kuelpmann, Wolf R.
    Hannover Medical School.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Lewenstam, Andrzej
    Abo Akad University.
    Maas, Anton H. J.
    Eurotrol bv, Ede, Netherlands.
    Mager, Gerhard
    Fresenius, Bad Homburg, Germany.
    Naskalski, Jerzy W.
    Jagiellonian University.
    Okorodudu, Anthony O.
    University of Texas Medical Branch.
    On a recommendation adopted by the IFCC for the report of blood glucose results2008In: Acta Bioquimica Clinica Latinoamericana, ISSN 0325-2957, E-ISSN 1851-6114, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 385-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 8. DOrazio, Paul
    et al.
    Burnett, Robert W
    Fogh-Andersen, Niels
    Jacobs, Ellis
    Kuwa, Katsuhiko
    Külpmann, Wolf R
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Lewenstam, Andrzej
    Maas, Anton H J
    Mager, Gerhard
    Naskalski, Jerzy W
    Okorodudu, Anthony O
    Approved IFCC recommendation on reporting results for blood glucose (abbreviated)2005In: Clinical Chemistry, ISSN 0009-9147, E-ISSN 1530-8561, Vol. 51, no 9, p. 1573-1576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In current clinical practice, plasma and blood glucose are used interchangeably with a consequent risk of clinical misinterpretation. In human blood, glucose, like water, is distributed between erythrocytes and plasma. The molality of glucose (amount of glucose per unit of water mass) is the same throughout the sample, but the concentration is higher in plasma because the concentration of water and, therefore, glucose is higher in plasma than in erythrocytes. Different devices for the measurement of glucose may detect and report fundamentally different quantities. Different water concentrations in calibrators, plasma, and erythrocyte fluid can explain some of the differences. Results of glucose measurements depend on sample type and on whether methods require sample dilution or use biosensors in undiluted samples. If the results are mixed up or used indiscriminately, the differences may exceed the maximum allowable error of glucose determinations for diagnosing and monitoring diabetes mellitus, and complicate the treatment. The goal of the IFCC Scientific Division Working Group on Selective Electrodes and Point of Care Testing (IFCC-SD, WG-SEPOCT) is to reach a global consensus on reporting results. The document recommends reporting the concentration of glucose in plasma (with the unit mmol/L), irrespective of sample type or measurement technique. A constant factor of 1.11 is used to convert concentration in whole blood to the equivalent concentration in the pertinent plasma. The conversion will provide harmonized results, facilitating the classification and care of patients and leading to fewer therapeutic misjudgments. © 2005 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  • 9. Ellnebo-Svedlund, Katarina
    et al.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Jonasson, Jon
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Rapid genotyping of the osteoporosis-associated polymorphic transcription factor Sp1 binding site in the COL1A1 gene by pyrosequencing2004In: Molecular Biotechnology, ISSN 1073-6085, E-ISSN 1559-0305, Vol. 26, p. 87-90Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10. Fogh-Andersen, Niels
    et al.
    D´Orazio, Paul
    Kuwa, Katsuhiko
    Külpmann, Wolf R
    Mager, Gerhard
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Recommendation on reporting results for blood glucose (from an IFCC stage 1 document) IFCC scientific division working group on selective electrodes2002In: The Journal of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 1051-2292, Vol. 12Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Fremner, E
    et al.
    Div Clin Chem, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry.
    Organization of point-of-care testing (POCT) - An administrative challenge.2000In: Clinical Chemistry, ISSN 0009-9147, E-ISSN 1530-8561, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 25-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12. Fremner, Eva
    et al.
    Kalerud, Bo
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Total quality assurance in a distributed point-of-care testing laboratory organization in primary health care. A 10-year experience2004In: Point of care, ISSN 1533-029X, Vol. 3, p. 99-114Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Fremner, Eva
    Haglund, S
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Persson, L-G
    Borgquist, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Point-of-care testing has a limited effect on time to clinical decision in primary health care2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 64, no 6, p. 547-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the clinical logistics of laboratory routines at primary health care centres (PHCs). Design and methods: Prospective registration was carried out for each PHC using questionnaires during 2-week intervals between the end of November 2001 and mid-January 2002. The study included 9 PHCs in the county of Östergötland and 4 in the county of Jönköping, Sweden, with different numbers of blood tests analysed using point-of-care testing (POCT). Data for B-glucose, HbA1c, C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), T4, cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides were collected. Main outcome measures were median time from sampling to available test result (TATa) and median time from sampling to clinical decision (TATd), and the proportion of patients informed of the outcome of the blood test in question during the sampling occasion. Results: A total of 3542 samples were collected. The median TATa showed that B-glucose, ESR and CRP were immediately analysed at all 13 PHCs. For the other tests, TATa varied from immediately to about two days. The median TATd varied from immediately to about a week. When POCT was used, 30% of the patients were informed about the outcome of the test during the sampling occasion. Conclusion: POCT has a limited effect on the clinical logistics in PHCs.

  • 14.
    Haarhaus, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nephrology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Nephrology UHL.
    Fernström, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nephrology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Magnusson, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nephrology.
    Evaluation of bio-intact (1-84) parathyroid hormone, vitamin D status and bond mineral density in patients with predialysis chronic renal failure2004In: ASN Renal Week,2004, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15. Jansson, Ulf
    et al.
    Kristiansson, Bengt
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin
    Bjarnason, Ragnar
    The decrease of IGF-I, IGF-binding protein-3 and bone alkaline phosphatase isoforms during gluten challenge correlates with small intestinal inflammation in children with coeliac disease.2001In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 144, p. 417-423Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Points of care testing in Sweden.2001In: Hospital, ISSN 0018-5469, Vol. 3, p. 51-54Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Larsson, Lasse
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry.
    Fremner, E
    Div Clin Chem, Linkoping, Sweden Linkoping Univ, POCT Div, Dept Biomed & Surg, Linkoping, Sweden.
    What is staff convenience in an advanced point-of-care testing (POCT) organization with several workplaces?2001In: Clinical Chemistry, ISSN 0009-9147, E-ISSN 1530-8561, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 588-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Larsson, Lasse
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Fremner, Eva
    Advancement of POCT in Sweden2002In: Principles & practice of point-of-care testing / [ed] Gerald J Kost, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2002, 1, p. 313-314Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume is the first comprehensive clinical practice reference in the rapidly growing field of point-of-care testing. Written by the experts and innovators in point-of-care testing technologies and procedures, the book provides practical guidance in planning and implementing the most reliable, clinically useful, and cost-effective point-of-care procedures and systems.The opening section discusses the goals of point-of-care testing and thoroughly explains the basic principles and methods. A major portion of the book examines applications in a variety of clinical settings, and includes case studies that demonstrate the benefits, limitations, and cost-effectiveness of point-of-care testing. Concluding sections focus on management, performance, information systems, and economic outcomes. A technical appendix is included.

  • 19.
    Larsson, Lasse
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Fremner, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Possibilities and limitations in near patient testing - present and future2002In: Global standardization and advanced quality managemnet '01. Quality control in the clinical laboratory, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2002, p. 255-260Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Larsson, Lasse
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Letter to the Editor. Ionized calcium or corrected total calcium?2003In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 18, no 8, p. 1554-1555Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 21.
    Larsson, Lasse
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry.
    Calcium status and supplementation2004In: Metal ions in biological systems, ISSN 0161-5149, E-ISSN 2154-9214, Vol. 41, p. 71-102Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Larsson, Lasse
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Joniserat kalcium ger bättre beslutsunderlag än albuminkorrigerat kalcium2004In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 101, p. 2289-2290Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Löfman, Owe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berglund, K.
    Department of Community Medicine, County Council of Uppsala, Uppsala.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Changes in Hip Fracture Epidemiology: Redistribution Between Ages, Genders and Fracture Types2002In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 18-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After several reports of increasing hip fracture incidence some studies have suggested a trend-break. In a previous study of hip fractures we forecast a 70% increase in the total number of fractures from 1985 up to year 2000. We therefore studied the incidence trend for the last 15 years and supply a new prognosis up to year 2010. We recorded all incident hip fractures treated in the county of Östergötland, Sweden (≈ 400 000 inhabitants) 1982–96. A total of 11 517 hip fractures in men and women aged 50 years and above were included in the study after cross-validation between a computerized register of radiologic investigations and the hospital records. The projected number of fractures up to year 2010 was estimated by a Poisson regression model, considering both age and year of fracture in every single year 1982–96 for the respective fracture type and gender, and applied to the projected population. The annual number of hip fractures increased by 39% in men and 25% in women during the study period. Amongst men, the age-adjusted incidence of cervical fractures increased from 188 to 220/100 000 and of trochanteric fractures from 138 to 170/100 000. In women the incidence of cervical fractures decreased from 462/100 000 to 418/100 000 and of trochanteric fractures from 407/100 000 to 361/100 000. Cervical/trochanteric fracture incidence rate ratio leveled off, and also the female/male fracture rate ratio declined. A prognosis assuming that the incidence development will continue as during 1982–96, and a population in agreement with the forecast, predicts that the total age- and sex-adjusted number of hip fractures will decrease by 11% up to year 2010 compared with 1996. In women and men, however, a decrease of 19% and an increase of 7% respectively were projected. If the age- and sex-specific incidence remains at the same level as at the end of the study period, no significant change in the total numbers will occur. A trend-break was thus found in hip fracture incidence for women but not for men. Whether this is due to therapeutic and/or preventive measures in women is unknown. According to the most probable scenario a substantial increase in male trochanteric fractures (36%) is expected up to 2010, while all other hip fractures in both genders will decrease by 4–32% resulting in a total reduction of 11%.

  • 24.
    Löfman, Owe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallberg, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berglund, Kenneth
    Community Medicine, County Council of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kartous, Lisa
    Div of Geriatric Medicine, Ryhov Hospital, County council of Jönköping.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Women with low energy fracture: Case for investigation?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The combined use of bone mineral density, fracture history and other risk markers for fracture is advocated for identifying subjects with high fracture risk. An incident fracture is suggested as an accurate indication for osteoporosis investigation, but there are still insufficient data for grading the priority between ages and types of fractures. We therefore decided to examine a consecutive series of 55-75 year old women with an incident fracture for evaluating a standardized clinical routine program and for studying the covariance between fracture history, bone mineral density and other risk markers.

    Materila and methods: We invited 600 consecutive women 55-75 years old with an incident newly diagnosed fracture in distal radius forearm, proximal humerus, vertebra or hip. External drop-out was 33%. Of the 400 responders 31 had a high-energy trauma, 62 were on treatment against osteoporosis and 4 were living in other counties and were therefore excluded. The remaining 303 subjects entered the study. A questionnaire on previous fractures and risk factors was enclosed with the invitation to the osteoporosis unit. At a single visit a short history was assessed and physical examination performed as well as a few laboratory investigations. Bone mineral density was measured at the hip, lumbar spine and forearm by DXA (Hologic QDR 4500A).

    Results: The fracture spectrum was: distal radius 56.4 %, proximal humerus 12.2%, vertebra 18.2% and hip 13.2%. 49% had had at least one previous fracture, 19% at least two previous and 6.3% three or more previous fractures before the recent one. As few spine X-rays were performed, the true prevalence of vertebral fracture is unknown. Patients with fracture in vertebra or hip had lower BMD and more previous fractures than patients with forearm or humerus fracture. The number of previous fractures was inversely correlated to BMD of the hip and forearm, while BMD of the spine had a biphasic relationship.

    The Odds ratio of having either osteopenia and osteoporosis were >20 for patients with hip fracture and 75 for the spine (mean values), whereas the OR of the forearm fracture group was slightly above 10, table 6. The OR were as expected dependent of cut-off limit used. Mean value for the OR was in the hip fracture group 8.2 and 9.2 for !-score -2.5 and -2.0 respectively at the lower end of the confidence interval. For the spine and the forearm, the corresponding odds ratios were 16-17 and 7-9 respectively.

    Conclussion: Vertebral fracture was the strongest and distal radius the weakest predictor of low BMD. The number of previous fractures is a helpful information for finding the most osteoporotic patients. Only 15 % had been treated for osteoporosis before the index fracture. Osteoporosis investigation therefore seems warranted in every woman 55-75 years old with a recent low-energy fracture in distal radius, proximal humerus, spine or hip, with highest priority to those in spine or hip and those with multiple previous fractures.

  • 25.
    Löfman, Owe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallberg, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berglund, Kenneth
    Community Medicine, County Council of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Kartous, Lisa
    Department of Geriatrics, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Rosenqvist, Anna-Maria
    Department of Geriatrics, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Women with low-energy fracture should be investigated for osteoporosis2007In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 78, no 6, p. 813-821Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Treatment of osteoporosis is becoming more effective, but methods to identify patients who are most suitable for investigation and treatment are still being debated. Should any type of fracture have higher priority for investigation of osteoporosis than any other? Is the number of previous fractures useful information? Material and methods: We investigated 303 consecutive women patients between 55 and 75 years of age who had a newly diagnosed low-energy fracture. They answered a questionnaire on previous fractures which also dealt with risk factors. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured at the hip, lumbar spine, and forearm. Results: The distribution of fracture location was: distal forearm 56%, proximal humerus 12%, vertebra 18%, and hip 13%, all with similar age. Half of the subjects had had at least one previous fracture before the index fracture, 19% had had two previous fractures, and 6% had had three or more previous fractures. Patients with vertebral or hip fracture had lower BMD and had had more previous fractures than patients with forearm or humerus fractures. There was an inverse correlation between number of fractures and BMD. Osteoporosis was present in one-third of patients with forearm fracture, in one-half of those with hip or humerus fracture, and in two-thirds of those with vertebral fracture. Interpretation: Vertebral fractures were the strongest marker of low BMD and forearm fractures the weakest. The number of previous fractures is helpful information for finding the most osteoporotic patient in terms of severity. Investigation of osteoporosis therefore seems warranted in every woman between the ages of 55 and 75 with a recent low-energy fracture, with highest priority being given to those with vertebral, hip, or multiple fractures. Copyright© Taylor & Francis 2007. all rights reserved.

  • 26.
    Löfman, Owe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ross, I.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berglund, K.
    Department for Community Medicine and Public Health, County Council, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bone mineral density in normal Swedish women1997In: Bone, ISSN 8756-3282, E-ISSN 1873-2763, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 167-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined 429 women, aged 20–80 years, randomly selected from the population register to establish normal values for bone mineral density (BMD) in Swedish women. BMD of the spine and hip was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA; Hologic QDR 1000) and in the forearm by single photon absorptiometry (SPA; Molsgaard ND-1100). The recalled age of menarche was negatively correlated to BMD at all ages. There was no significant change in BMD from 20–49 years at any site except a slight decline at Ward's triangle. Bone loss was rapid at all sites during the first decade after menopause. Thereafter, BMD declined slowly in the trochanter and total hip but more rapidly in the forearm, femoral neck, and Ward's triangle. BMD in the spine even increased in the eighth decade probably due to osteoarthritis. The average change in forearm BMD during the 15 perimenopausal years comprising mean age for menopause ± 2 SD (43–57 years) was −0.4% per year in premenopausal females and −1.6% per year in postmenopausal females. The corresponding annual percental change was, for the spine, +0.2 and −1.7; neck, −0.7 and −1.7; trochanter, +0.5 and −1.5; and Ward's triangle, −0.1% and −2.2%, respectively. Our normal values for lumbar spine BMD prior to menopause did not differ from published values or the manufacturer's normal values; however, our spine BMD values for the first decade after menopause were significantly lower (≈10%) than in other studies. Our femoral neck BMD values for younger women were, like those of several other groups, significantly lower than the manufacturer's normal values, but our sample of young women in this study was small. The prevalence of osteoporosis, if defined as t score < −2.5 is highly dependent on the sampling of the reference population of young adult women, and also on the choice of skeletal site. Further studies on bone mineral density in healthy young adult women are needed.

  • 27.
    Löfman, Owe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bone mineral density instead of T-score?2001In: Journal of clinical densitometry, ISSN 1094-6950, E-ISSN 1559-0747, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 75-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    No abstract available.

  • 28.
    Löfman, Owe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Common biochemical markers of bone turnover predict future bone loss: A 5-year follow-up study2005In: Clinica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0009-8981, E-ISSN 1873-3492, Vol. 356, no 1-2, p. 67-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is used to follow gain or loss of bone mass but cannot detect changes within a short period of time. Biochemical markers of bone turnover may be of value for prediction of individual bone loss.

    Methods

    We studied the relation between common inexpensive markers of bone turnover (serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OC), urinary hydroxyproline (OHPr), and calcium (Ca)), BMD, age, and menopause in a combined cross-sectional and longitudinal design comprising 429 pre- and postmenopausal randomly selected women aged 21–79 years (mean 50 years). A follow-up was initiated after 5 years (including 192 of these women), which focused on changes in bone mass and the ability of these four common markers of bone turnover (sampled at baseline) to predict future bone loss.

    Results

    A marked increase was observed for all markers at the beginning of menopause. During the postmenopausal period ALP and Ca decreased to near premenopausal levels, while OC and OHPr remained high even 15 years after menopause. We also found inverse correlations at baseline between the bone markers and BMD, independent of the selected marker or skeletal site, r=−0.14 to −0.46, P<0.05. The correlations between ALP, OC, OHPr, and subsequent bone loss over 5 years, was significant for arm, r=−0.23 to −0.36, P<0.01. Baseline levels of all bone markers correlated significantly at group level with the 5-year follow-up of BMD for all sites. The ability of markers to predict individual bone loss was estimated by a multivariate regression model, which included baseline BMD, age, and body mass index as independent variables. ROC analysis showed a validity of approximately 76% for the forearm model, but was lower for the hip (55%) and lumbar spine (65%).

    Conclusions

    These data show that the common inexpensive biochemical markers of bone turnover ALP, OC, OHPr, and Ca were related to the current bone mass and, moreover, provides information about future bone loss at the individual level. Future investigations should include an evaluation of the clinical relevance of markers of bone turnover in relation to fracture risk.

  • 29.
    Löfman, Owe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bone Mineral Density in Diagnosis of Osteoporosis: Reference Population, Definition of Peak Bone Mass, and Measured Site Determine Prevalence2000In: Journal of clinical densitometry, ISSN 1094-6950, E-ISSN 1559-0747, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 177-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A population-based study was performed in order to compare different definitions of peak bone mass, and to apply the corresponding T-scores for different skeletal sites to a cohort of 70-yr-old women for studying the prevalence of osteoporosis. Bone mineral density (BMD) of the hip, lumbar spine, and forearm was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry (Hologic 4500) in 296 women ages 16–31 yr and 210 women age 70 yr. Peak bone mass occurred in women in their early 20s at the proximal femur and at 28 and 31 yr at the spine and forearm, respectively. BMD cutoff levels were compared to machine-specific cutoff values for the different sites. When applied to our cohort of 70-yr-old women, the prevalence of osteoporosis at the total hip was 9–25%, depending on which peak bone mass the T-score of – 2.5 was based. The prevalence in the spine was 28–33% and in the forearm 45–67%. Osteoporosis in at least one of the three measured sites was documented in 49–72% of the population sample. Our results show that the use of T-score to define osteoporosis results in a highly different prevalence rate in a given population depending on the reference population and the skeletal sites chosen for measurement.

  • 30.
    Magnusson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Magnusson, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Nephrology UHL.
    Davie, Michael W J
    Sharp, Christopher A
    Isoforms of bone alkaline phosphatase: carachterization and origin in human trabecular and cortical bone.1999In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 14, p. 1926-1933Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Magnusson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry.
    Sharp, CA
    Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Biomed & Surg, Div Clin Chem, Bone & Mineral Metab Unit, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Magnusson, M
    Risteli, J
    Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Biomed & Surg, Div Clin Chem, Bone & Mineral Metab Unit, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Davie, MWJ
    Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Biomed & Surg, Div Clin Chem, Bone & Mineral Metab Unit, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry.
    Bone alkaline phosphatase isoforms in chronic renal failure - Reply2002In: Kidney International, ISSN 0085-2538, E-ISSN 1523-1755, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 1179-1179Other (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Magnusson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry.
    Sharp, Christopher
    Magnusson, Martin
    Risteli, Juha
    Davie, Michael WJ
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Bone alkaline phosphatase isoforms in chronic renal failure2002In: Kidney International, ISSN 0085-2538, E-ISSN 1523-1755, Vol. 61, p. 1178-1181Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Magnusson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry.
    Sharp, Christopher
    Magnusson, Martin
    Ristell, Juha
    Davie, Michael
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Effect of chronic renal failure on bone turnover and bone alkaline phosphatase isoforms.2001In: Kidney International, ISSN 0085-2538, E-ISSN 1523-1755, Vol. 60, p. 257-265Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Nilsson, Rudmar
    et al.
    Kommunhälsan, Linköping, Sweden.
    Löfman, Owe
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Berglund, Kenneth
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Increased Hip-Fracture Incidence in the County of Östergötland, Sweden, 1940–1986, with Forecasts up to the Year 2000: An Epidemiological Study1991In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 1018-1024Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The incidence of hip fractures in the county of Östergōtland in Sweden has increased dramatically from 1940 to 1986, mainly due to an increase in age-specific incidence of trochanteric fractures. The increase is most pronounced in people over 80 but is present even in age groups down to 50 years. If the age-specific incidence rates continue to increase, and the population of the elderly grows in accordance with the forecast, there will be 70% more hip fractures in the year 2000 than in 1985.

  • 35. Rudberg, A
    et al.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Joborn, H
    Serum isoforms of bone alkaline phosphatase increase during physical exercise in women2000In: Calcified Tissue International, ISSN 0171-967X, E-ISSN 1432-0827, Vol. 66, no 5, p. 342-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical activity is an important factor for maintaining and probably increasing bone mass in humans. However, the mechanism by which this takes place is not completely understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of physical exercise on serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and in particular, the bone isoforms of ALP. Six ALP isoforms were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography: three bone (B/I, B1, and B2), and three liver ALP isoforms. In addition, serum calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH), and other markers of bone formation and degradation, as measured by osteocalcin and cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP), were analyzed. The study groups comprised 15 women, 8 postmenopausal (range 51-62 years) and 7 near age of peak bone mass (range 21-27 years). When the postmenopausal women exercised on an ergometer cycle until exhaustion we found significant increases in serum of bone ALP isoforms B1 and B2, and phosphate, even considering the hemoconcentration that occurred during the exercise. When the young women jogged in a moderate tempo for 40- 40 minutes the levels of serum B2 and PTH increased. All changes turned towards baseline within 20 minutes after exercise. In conclusion, exercise increased serum ALP bone isoforms B1 and B2, and their responses were differentiated. As B1 and B2 are known to represent specific bone compartments, cortical and trabecular bone, the present findings may indicate different effects on bone of weight- and nonweight-bearing exercise.

  • 36. Swolin-Eide, Diana
    et al.
    Hansson, Sverker
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    The novel bone alkaline phosphatase B1x isoform in children with kidney disease2006In: Pediatric nephrology (Berlin, West), ISSN 0931-041X, E-ISSN 1432-198X, Vol. 21, no 11, p. 1723-1729Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP) B1x isoform has previously only been identified in some adults with chronic kidney disease on dialysis and in human bone tissue. Twenty-nine patients, 3-20 years of age, with reduced renal function due to a variety of kidney diseases were examined. We measured parathyroid hormone (PTH), biointact (whole 1-84) PTH, osteoprotegerin (OPG), CrossLaps (CTX), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase isoform 5b (TRACP 5b) type I procollagen intact amino-terminal propeptide (PINP), osteocalcin, total alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and BALP isoforms B/I, B1x, B1, and B2. Fifty percent higher levels were detected of PTH vs. biointact PTH, demonstrating non-(1-84) PTH fragments detected by the PTH assay. Increased activities were found in five, four, and three patients for total ALP, B1, and B2, respectively. Sixteen (55%) patients had increased B/I levels. B1x was identified in two (7%) patients, who had OPG levels in the higher range independently of age, glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and biointact PTH. B1x was identified prior to and after 9 days of growth hormone (GH) therapy in one patient but not after 1, 3, 6, and 12 months, however. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the novel BALP B1x isoform is occasionally found to be present in children with kidney disease but to a lesser degree in comparison with adults with chronic kidney disease on dialysis. It is essential to perform bone histomorphometry for future investigations in order to elucidate the exact nature of circulating B1x in patients with kidney disease for accurate classification of type of renal bone disease. © IPNA 2006.

  • 37.
    Waller, John
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Foldevi, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grahn Kronhed, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of health and environment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Löfman, Owe
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Toss, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Möller, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Knowledge of osteoporosis in a Swedish municipality: a prospective study2002In: Preventive Medicine, ISSN 0091-7435, E-ISSN 1096-0260, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 485-491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. As a part of the Vadstena Osteoporosis Prevention Project, the knowledge of osteoporosis was examined before the intervention program started, after 5 and 10 years.

    Methods. At baseline (in 1989) 15% of the population in two Swedish municipalities was randomly invited to the study. The participants in the study group were invited for examination by forearm bone densitometry and a questionnaire concerning lifestyle and risk factors for osteoporosis and also knowledge of osteoporosis, while the subjects in the control group were examined only by questionnaire. Follow-ups were made in 1994 and in 1999. Meanwhile education about osteoporosis was given to the study group, to the public, and to various professionals in the study community.

    Results. There was a difference in the level of knowledge between the groups prior to the intervention. The rate of increment did not differ significantly between the groups for the study period. Previous participants had 0.58 higher score than new participants in the study group in 1994 (P = 0.031) and 0.76 higher score in 1999 (P < 0.001) regarding the total number of correct answers. The women in the study group had 0.63 higher score than the men in 1994 (P = 0.016) and 1.03 higher score in 1999 (P < 0.001) regarding the total number of correct answers.

    Conclusion. There was no significant effect of a general intervention program concerning the knowledge of osteoporosis in participants in the intervention area compared to the control area.

1 - 37 of 37
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