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  • 1.
    Bobinski, L
    et al.
    Neurokirurgisk klinik Rekonstruktionscentrum.
    Boström, Sverre
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurosurgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Hillman, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurosurgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Postoperative pseudoaneurysm of the superficial temporal artery (S.T.A.) treated with Thrombostat® (thrombin glue) injection2004In: Acta Neurochirurgica, ISSN 0001-6268, E-ISSN 0942-0940, Vol. 146, no 9, p. 1039-1041Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Pseudo-aneurysm is a rare complication of craniotomy. Blunt injury to the temporal artery region is the usual cause, but still a rare complication. Clinical presentation. A patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage was successfully treated by aneurysm clipping. The patient developed hydrocephalus, and was admitted for a shunt operation seventeen days later. The craniotomy had healed normally, but a palpable temporal lump was present in the skin incision. Intervention. The pulsating mass proved to be a postoperative aneurysm of the superficial temporal artery (S.T.A.) and was successfully occluded with 500 units Thrombostat® (thrombin glue) which was injected into the aneurysm sac using a 22-gauge needle guided by ultrasound. The permanency of the obliteration was verified by ultrasound examination.

  • 2. Bobinski, L
    et al.
    Boström, Sverre
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurosurgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurosurgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Leptomeningeal cyst due to vacuum extraction delivery in a twin infant2007In: Acta Neurochirurgica, ISSN 0001-6268, E-ISSN 0942-0940, Vol. 149, no 3, p. 319-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A rare case of a leptomeningeal cyst is reported in a twin male neonate delivered using a vacuum extractor, who presented a huge, non-pulsating, oedematous mass overlying the frontal fontanelle after birth. The mass was initially diagnosed as a cephalo haematoma. Ultrasonography indicated intracranial bleeding and a subsequent CT scan revealed an intraparenchymal bleeding above the left frontal horn, combined with a thin, left-sided, subdural haematoma and subarachnoid haemorrhage in the left Sylvian fissure. Apart from a bulging soft and round formation (2 × 2 × 3 cm) next to the anterior fontanel growing since birth, the neurological development of the infant was normal. MRI examination at the age of 7 months revealed that it consisted of a cystic mass (leptomeningeal cyst) connected to the left frontal horn, stretching right through the brain and also penetrating the dura mater. No signs of the perinatal haematomas were observed at this time. Surgical treatment, with fenestration of the cyst into the frontal horn and a watertight duraplasty with a periosteal flap and thrombin glue covered by small bone chips, was performed at 9 months of age. Due to a residual skull bone defect a second cranioplasty with autologous skull bone was performed three and half years later. During a follow-up period of 12 years the neurological and psychological development of the boy has been indistinguishable to that of his twin brother, indicating the satisfactory outcome of the treatment. © 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  • 3.
    Boström, Sverre
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurosurgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Bobinski, L
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurosurgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Improved brain protection at decompressive craniectomy - a new method using Palacoso (R) R-40 (methylmethacrylate)2005In: Acta Neurochirurgica, ISSN 0001-6268, E-ISSN 0942-0940, Vol. 147, no 3, p. 279-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new method is described for protecting the brain after decompressive craniectomy in which a temporary methylmethacrylate flap is formed, somewhat larger than the original bone flap, thus gaining "extra" volume for the oedematous brain in which to expand. The present procedure was developed as a pan of ordinary clinical practice particularly in response to demands from the NICU staff and our colleagues at other clinics who were responsible for the care of the patient in the post NICU period. They made us keenly aware that these patients frequently lack optimal co-ordination and balance and therefore run an increased risk of trauma to the unprotected brain when failing. This prompted us to develop a method for brain protection after decompressive craniectomy aiding in the care and rehabilitation until the final installation of the patient's own bone flap can be performed.

  • 4.
    Boström, Sverre
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurosurgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Bobinski, Lukas
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurosurgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Nilsson, Inge
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    A new scaled microgauge for use in neurosurgery2005In: Acta Neurochirurgica, ISSN 0001-6268, E-ISSN 0942-0940, Vol. 147, no 12, p. 1281-1282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new scaled microgauge is described for measuring anatomical structures during microsurgery. The instrument has a tip marked in millimetres, which can be positioned in any desired angle enabling measurement in confined areas. © Springer-Verlag 2005.

  • 5.
    Boström, Sverre
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Milos, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Bobinski, Lukas
    Department of Neurosurgery, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå.
    A new microsurgical instrument - a suction tube combined with a microdissector2011In: BRITISH JOURNAL OF NEUROSURGERY, ISSN 0268-8697, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 320-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A microsurgical suction tube with an attached ball probe has been developed. It functions as a microdissector when the ball probe is in its extended position, creating a larger working field than an ordinary sucker. When the ball probe is in the repose position, it does not interfere with the suction capacity, and the suction tube serves as a regular sucker. By adding the properties of the microdissector to the suction tube, dissection of exquisitely fine and subtle structures, including arachnoidal membranes, is facilitated. The ball probe is easily dismantled from the suction tube and the whole instrument conveniently cleaned.

  • 6.
    Eneling, J
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Boström, Sverre
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Rossitti, Sandro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Editorial Material: Subarachnoid Hemorrhage-associated Arachnoiditis and Syringomyelia2012In: CLINICAL NEURORADIOLOGY, ISSN 1869-1439, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 169-173Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 7.
    Gunnarsson, Thorsteinn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fridriksson, Steen
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Boström, Sverre
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persliden, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radio Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Hillman, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mobile computerized tomography scanning in the neurosurgery intensive care unit: increase in patient safety and reduction of staff workload2000In: Journal of Neurosurgery, ISSN 0022-3085, E-ISSN 1933-0693, Vol. 93, no 3, p. 432-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Object. Transportation of unstable neurosurgical patients involves risks that may lead to further deterioration and secondary brain injury from perturbations in physiological parameters. Mobile computerized tomography (CT) head scanning in the neurosurgery intensive care (NICU) is a new technique that minimizes the need to transport unstable patients. The authors have been using this device since June 1997 and have developed their own method of scanning such patients.

    Methods. The scanning procedure and radiation safety measures are described. The complications that occurred in 89 patients during transportation and conventional head CT scanning at the Department of Radiology were studied prospectively. These complications were compared with the ones that occurred during mobile CT scanning in 50 patients in the NICU. The duration of the procedures was recorded, and an estimation of the staff workload was made. Two patient groups, defined as high- and medium-risk cases, were studied. Medical and/or technical complications occurred during conventional CT scanning in 25% and 20% of the patients in the high- and medium-risk groups, respectively. During mobile CT scanning complications occurred in 4.3% of the high-risk group and 0% of the medium-risk group. Mobile CT scanning also took significantly less time, and the estimated personnel cost was reduced.

    Conclusions. Mobile CT scanning in the NICU is safe. It minimizes the risk of physiological deterioration and technical mishaps linked to intrahospital transport, which may aggravate secondary brain injury. The time that patients have to remain outside the controlled environment of the NICU is minimized, and the staff's workload is decreased.

  • 8.
    Ström, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Boström, Sverre
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Bobinski, L.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Low-grade infection complicating silastic dural substitute 32 years post-operatively2011In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 250-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A complication of a silastic dural substitute is described, which appeared after 32 years-by far the longest latency period reported in the literature. Methods: Case report and literature review. Results: In 1971, a 20-year old woman suffered from an acute subdural haematoma and a temporal cerebral contusion due to a motorbike accident. She underwent an operation with evacuation of these and the dura was mended with a silastic duraplasty. Thirty-two years later she deteriorated with increased memory problems and dysphasia. CT revealed an expanding haemorrhagic mass around the previous duraplasty, which demanded surgery with removal of the silastic dural implant and evacuation of the haemorrhagic mass. Although the haemorrhagic mass enveloped the silastic implant, a contribution of the acrylate flap cannot be ruled out. Bacteriological cultures revealed Acinetobacter spp. in the CSF. Adequate post-operative antibiotic treatment was administered. The patient slowly improved, but the complication represented a major setback in her long-term cognitive and communicative functions. Conclusions: This case widens the previously reported time-frame of late complications by 60%, from 20 to 32 years, and will hopefully serve to increase the awareness of late infections and haemorrhages induced by silastic dural implants, thereby improving diagnosis and treatment in future cases.

  • 9.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurosurgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Bobinski, L.
    Boström, Sverre
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurosurgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Beh?et's disease, associated with subarachnoid heamorrhage due to intracranial aneurysm2005In: Acta Neurochirurgica, ISSN 0001-6268, E-ISSN 0942-0940, Vol. 147, no 5, p. 569-571Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Beh?et's disease is an unusual medical condition in central Europe and North America, however more common in Turkey and Japan. It was originally described in Turkey, characterized by recurrent oral ulcers, genital ulcers and also uveitis. A variety of vascular lesions such as venous occlusions, arterial aneurysms and varices account for the high rate of morbidity and mortality with this disease. Arterial aneurysms most commonly occur in the abdominal aorta, femoral arteries and in the pulmonary arteries. To our knowledge there have been seventeen documented reports of patient's with Beh?et's disease combined with aneurysms of cerebral arteries. We describe a patient with Beh?et's disease and subarachnoid haemorrhage due to a ruptured cerebral aneurysm. © Springer-Verlag 2005.

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