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  • 1.
    Ahmadi, Ahmad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jerregård, H.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åkerbäck, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fall, Per-Arne
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Geriatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rannug, A.
    National Institute for Working Life, Solna and Inst. of Environ. Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    GSTM1 and mEPHX polymorphisms in Parkinson's disease and age of onset2000In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 269, no 3, p. 676-680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both environmental and genetic factors are involved in the development of PD and biotransformation of exogenous and endogenous compounds and may play a role in inter-individual susceptibility. Therefore, we investigated the presence of null genotypes of GSTM1, GSTT1, and two polymorphisms of mEPHX in subjects with Parkinson's disease and in a reference population. The study included 35 male PD patients and a male control group including 283 subjects. Homozygosity of the histidine (H) 113 isoform of mEPHX was significantly increased in PD patients (odds ratio = 3.8 CI 95% 1.2–11.8) and analysis of allele frequencies displayed an increased frequency of the H-allele among PD patients (odds ratio = 1.9 CI 95% 1.1–3.3). However, a significantly elevated median age for the onset of PD was found among GSTM1 gene carriers (median age = 68 years) compared to PD patients being GSTM1 null genotypes (median age = 57 years). Our observations suggest that (H) 113 isoform of mEPHX, which has been suggested as a low activity isoform, is overrepresented in PD patients and that inherited carriers of the GSTM1 gene postpone the onset of PD. These detoxification pathways may represent important protective mechanisms against reactive intermediates modifying the susceptibility and onset of PD.

  • 2.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ahmadi, Ahmad
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åkerbäck, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Axelson, Olav
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Flodin, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Glutathione S-transferase M1 null genotype as a risk modifier for solvent-induced chronic toxic encephalopathy1996In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 360-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Exposure to organic solvents increases the risk of neuropsychiatric disability or chronic toxic encephalopathy (CTE). Polymorphisms in the biotransformation of xenobiotics and solvents may influence individual susceptibility to develop toxic effects. In this study the problem of whether there could be any association between the glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) null genotype and the risk for CTE, with regard to solvent exposure, was investigated.

    Methods Sixty patients referred to a clinic because of some degree of some degrees of psychiatric or neurological symptoms, as well as exposure to solvents, were examined by means of a validated questionnaire and psychometric testing. The degree of exposure to solvents was assessed by a thorough interview. According to clinical findings, the patients were classified into three categories as those with solvent-induced CTE, those with incipient CTE, and those who were non-CTE patients. Afterwards, leukocyte DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) was isolated and the GSTM1 null genotype was determined by an assay based on polymerase chain reaction, blindly with regard to both exposure and disease status.

    Results The relative proportion (RP) of GSTM1 null genotypes was significantly increased for patients with a diagnosed CTE when they were compared with non-CTE patients (RP 2.55, 95% confidence interval 1.0--6.2). Dichotomizing the patients by high and low exposure revealed an increased risk for both GSTM1 gene carriers and the GSTM1 null genotype in the high-exposure group, the relative risks (RR) being 4.5 and 7.9, respectively. The chi-square for the Mantel extension for trend was 6.2 (P=0.025).

    Conclusion The GSTM1 null genotype acts as a risk modifier for CTE among patients occupationally exposed to solvents. The risk seems to increase in a dose-dependent fashion.

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