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  • 1. Eklundh, Thomas
    et al.
    Gunnarsson, Tove
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Nordin, Conny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Monoamine compounds in cerebrospinal fluid of healthy subjects punctured without preceding strict bed rest: A pilot study2001In: Neuropsychobiology, ISSN 0302-282X, E-ISSN 1423-0224, Vol. 43, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interpretation of data on compounds in the lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is limited by several confounding factors, e.g. motor activity for which strict bed rest prior to lumbar puncture is recommended for standardisation. Now we report data from 14 healthy males employing the standardised procedure except for the requirement of strict bed rest. The levels of serotonin, noradrenaline, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), homovanillic acid and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylglycol in the second CSF fraction (7-12 ml) were significantly higher than those in the first fraction (0-6 ml), indicating the presence of concentration gradients. 5-HIAA was negatively influenced by age and the neuraxis distance in the lying position and positively by atmospheric pressure. Storage time and atmospheric pressure contributed to the variance in dopamine. Both tyrosine, tryptophan and dopamine were linearly correlated with storage time. We also found a significant curvilinear correlation between tapping time and atmospheric pressure. On comparing with previous studies, the results support the notion that the issue of strict bed rest or not prior to lumbar puncture might have to be taken into consideration when interpreting lumbar monoamine CSF data.

  • 2.
    Eklundh, Thomas
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Family Medicine, Psychiatric Section.
    Gunnarsson, Tove
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Örnhagen, Hans
    Division of Naval Medicine, National Defence Research Establishment, Department of Human Studies, Hårsfjärden, Sweden.
    Nordin, Conny
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cerebrospinal fluid levels of monoamine compounds and cholecystokinin peptides after exposure to standardized barometric pressure2000In: Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 0095-6562, E-ISSN 1943-4448, Vol. 71, no 11, p. 1131-1136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Connections between mood changes and weather have been described throughout the ages, and in more recent years, there have been reports on a relationship between atmospheric pressure and neurotransmitter levels in cerebrospinal fluid.

    METHODS: To further investigate this issue under strictly standardized conditions, we have lumbar-punctured 8 healthy males under low (963 hPa) and high (1064 hPa) barometric pressure, using a pressure chamber.

    RESULTS: Under high pressure, the tyrosine concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were lower, while the cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (CCK-4) levels were higher. No differences between low and high pressure were found for tryptophan, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA), dopamine (DA), and sulphated cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8S). The serum level of CCK-8S was higher under high pressure. On comparing concentration ratios between the second and the first CSF fraction, we found significantly increased ratios for homovanillic acid (HVA) and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylglycol (HMPG), but a decreased ratio for tyrosine under high pressure. The difference in the concentration ratios of HVA between low and high pressure correlated negatively with age. Intraspinal pressure correlated negatively with tapping time at low pressure.

    CONCLUSION: Our results are in line with the hypothesis that atmospheric pressure influences CSF levels of monoamine compounds and cholecystokinin peptides.

  • 3.
    Gunnarsson, Tove
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Cholecystokinin in cerebrospinal fluid2002In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 17, p. 51S-51SConference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Gunnarsson, Tove
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    On the cerebrospinal fluid disposition and neurobiological role of cholecystokinin in man2000Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is the most abundant neuropeptide in the brain, where it acts as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator. The tetrapeptide CCK-4 and the octapeptide CCK-8 have been implicated in various behavioural and physiological functions, such as anxiety, pain and satiety. Analyses of the levels of CCK in plasma, CSF and brain tissue have been used in studies aimed at elucidating the pathophysiological mechanisms in psychiatric disorders, but the results have been inconsistent.

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of CCK-4 and CCK-8S were analysed in three groups of healthy subjects lumbar-punctured under different conditions, with the aim to provide reference values for studies on patients, and to investigate putative confounding factors. It was found that the concentrations of CCK-4 and CCK-8S were influenced by age, bedrest or not prior to lumbar puncture, neuraxis distance, position during lumbar puncture, height, atmospheric pressure and storage time. For a correct interpretation of data, these factors should be taken into account in future CSF studies in volunteers and patients.

    Hypothyroidism is associated with depression. Thyroid hormones have been assumed to affect neuronal functions in the CNS, and animal experiments have indicated a relationship between thyroid hormones and CCK. Depressive symptoms were assessed in hypothyroid patients who were also lumbar-punctured before and during L-thyroxine treatment. Thyroid stimulating hormone, tri-iodothyronine and thyroxine in serum correlated with both CCK peptides in the CSF. A negative correlation between CCK-4 and inner tension (anxiety) was found.

    Various studies implicate the involvement of brain-stem structures in the aetiology of panic attacks. Brain-stem auditory evoked potentials were recorded in healthy subjects before and during infusion with the panic-provoking agent CCK-4 or placebo. CCK-4 delayed the latencies of peak I, III and V, and decreased peak III amplitude. This suggests that exogenous CCK-4 affects stimulus processing in the brain stem.

    List of papers
    1. Cholecystokinin peptides in cerebrospinal fluid: a study in healthy male subjects
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cholecystokinin peptides in cerebrospinal fluid: a study in healthy male subjects
    Show others...
    1997 (English)In: Regulatory Peptides, ISSN 0167-0115, E-ISSN 1873-1686, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 57-61Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The clinical reliability of measuring cholecystokinin (CCK) peptides in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has not been fully elucidated. Therefore, we have assayed CCK-8S and CCK-4 in CSF obtained from 14 healthy male subjects, lumbar-punctured at the L4–5 level following a strictly standardised procedure. CSF concentrations of free CCK-8S and free CCK-4 were used as dependent variables while age, height, body weight, atmospheric pressure and some other factors served as independent variables. It was shown that the CCK-8S ratio between the second (7–12 ml) and first (0–6 ml) CSF fractions, correlated significantly with the atmospheric pressure at the time of puncture. Neither CCK-8S nor CCK-4 displayed concentration gradients in CSF. The CCK-4 levels, expressed as pmol l−1 in the total amount of CSF were found to be positively correlated with the neuraxis distance in the lying position and negatively with the neuraxis distance in the sitting position. Furthermore, CCK-4, expressed as pmol l−1 per min of tapping-time (pmol l−1 min−1), showed a negative correlation with storage time, presumably mirroring a proteolytic process. CCK-8S and CCK-4 intercorrelated positively independently of whether expressed as pmol l−1 or pmol l−1 min−1. In conclusion, the results of this exploratory study indicate that the neuraxis distance (in the sitting and lying positions) and storage-time have to be accounted for when interpreting data on CSF levels of CCK-4. Attention has to be paid to the potential influence of atmospheric pressure on the concentration ratio of CCK-8S.

    Keywords
    CCK-4, CCK-8S, Atmospheric pressure, Storage-time, Tapping-time
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-79854 (URN)10.1016/S0167-0115(96)02104-0 (DOI)
    Available from: 2012-08-14 Created: 2012-08-14 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    2. Cholecystokinin peptides in cerebrospinal fluid: a study in healthy male subjects lumbar-punctured without preceding strict bed-rest
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cholecystokinin peptides in cerebrospinal fluid: a study in healthy male subjects lumbar-punctured without preceding strict bed-rest
    Show others...
    1999 (English)In: Journal of neural transmission, ISSN 0300-9564, E-ISSN 1435-1463, Vol. 106, no 3-4, p. 275-282Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In a recent study we analysed the concentrations of two forms of cholecystokinin (CCK), CCK-8S (sulphated) and CCK-4 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from 14 healthy male volunteers lumbar-punctured after a minimum of eight hours of strict bed-rest.

    We have now lumbar-punctured another group of 14 healthy males, using the same procedure except for the requirement of strict bed-rest prior to puncture.

    In contrast to our previous study, the concentration of CCK-4 (but not CCK-8S) was significantly higher in the second CSF fraction (7–12 ml) than in the first one (0–6 ml). On using the concentration ratio between the second and first fraction, CCK-8S (but not CCK-4) correlated positively with the atmospheric pressure, which is in contrast to our previous study in which a significant negative correlation was found.

    When the lumbar CSF concentrations were expressed as the concentration per minute of tapping-time (an estimate of the mass flow), atmospheric pressure, age and the neuraxis distance in the lying position made significant contributions to the variance in CCK-8S. A significant positive correlation with atmospheric pressure was found for CCK-4.

    In conclusion, the results indicate that the question of strict bed-rest or not prior to lumbar puncture may have to be considered when interpreting data on lumbar CSF concentrations of CCK. A controlled study is warranted.

    Keywords
    CCK-4, CCK-8, cerebrospinal fluid, atmospheric pressure
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-27799 (URN)10.1007/s007020050157 (DOI)12546 (Local ID)12546 (Archive number)12546 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    3. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of monoamine compounds and cholecystokinin peptides after exposure to standardized barometric pressure
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cerebrospinal fluid levels of monoamine compounds and cholecystokinin peptides after exposure to standardized barometric pressure
    2000 (English)In: Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 0095-6562, E-ISSN 1943-4448, Vol. 71, no 11, p. 1131-1136Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Connections between mood changes and weather have been described throughout the ages, and in more recent years, there have been reports on a relationship between atmospheric pressure and neurotransmitter levels in cerebrospinal fluid.

    METHODS: To further investigate this issue under strictly standardized conditions, we have lumbar-punctured 8 healthy males under low (963 hPa) and high (1064 hPa) barometric pressure, using a pressure chamber.

    RESULTS: Under high pressure, the tyrosine concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were lower, while the cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (CCK-4) levels were higher. No differences between low and high pressure were found for tryptophan, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA), dopamine (DA), and sulphated cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8S). The serum level of CCK-8S was higher under high pressure. On comparing concentration ratios between the second and the first CSF fraction, we found significantly increased ratios for homovanillic acid (HVA) and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylglycol (HMPG), but a decreased ratio for tyrosine under high pressure. The difference in the concentration ratios of HVA between low and high pressure correlated negatively with age. Intraspinal pressure correlated negatively with tapping time at low pressure.

    CONCLUSION: Our results are in line with the hypothesis that atmospheric pressure influences CSF levels of monoamine compounds and cholecystokinin peptides.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-27801 (URN)11086668 (PubMedID)12548 (Local ID)12548 (Archive number)12548 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    4. Cholecystokinin peptides in cerebrospinal fluid: a pilot study in hypothyroid patients
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cholecystokinin peptides in cerebrospinal fluid: a pilot study in hypothyroid patients
    1999 (English)In: Human Psychopharmacology: Clinical and Experimental, ISSN 0885-6222, E-ISSN 1099-1077, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 113-117Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (CCK-4) and the sulphated octapeptide (CCK-8) were measured in cerebrospinal fluid obtained from nine hypothyroid patients before and during L-thyroxine treatment. Before treatment, CCK-4 and CCK-8S correlated negatively with S-TSH, whereas CCK-8S also showed a positive correlation with S-T3. During treatment, S-T4 correlated negatively with CCK-8S. CSF collection time was significantly shorter during treatment than prior to treatment for the first (0–6 ml) CSF fraction. On taking CSF collection time into account, the levels of both CCK-4 and CCK-8S in the first CSF fraction were significantly increased during medication. Our results are consistent with an impact of the hypothyroid disorder and L-thyroxine treatment on the disposition of CCK compounds in CSF. This might be due to an altered CSF circulation, but other mechanisms (e.g. metabolism or elimination) cannot be ruled out.

    Keywords
    hypothyroidism, cholecystokinin, cerebrospinal fluid, CSF collection time, atmospheric pressure
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-27798 (URN)10.1002/(SICI)1099-1077(199903)14:2<113::AID-HUP76>3.0.CO;2-A (DOI)12545 (Local ID)12545 (Archive number)12545 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    5. Depressive Symptoms in Hypothyroid Disorder with some Observations on Biochemical Correlates
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Depressive Symptoms in Hypothyroid Disorder with some Observations on Biochemical Correlates
    2001 (English)In: Neuropsychobiology, ISSN 0302-282X, E-ISSN 1423-0224, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 70-74Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Lumbar punctures and ratings of depressive symptoms were done in hypothyroid patients before and during L-thyroxine therapy. Before treatment, the most prominent symptoms were concentration difficulties, lassitude, and reduced sexual interest. All patients suffered from sleep disturbances. Suicidal thoughts did not occur at all. Inner tension was negatively correlated with the anxiogenic cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (CCK-4) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), while reduced sexual interest was negatively correlated with CSF tryptophan. Furthermore, failing memory correlated negatively with T3 as well as T4 in serum. A positive correlation was found between failing memory and serum TSH. All patients improved significantly during treatment. No biochemical correlates were found. In conclusion, hypothyroidism is associated with major depressive symptoms. CSF CCK-4 and tryptophan, as well as serum thyroid hormones, may constitute biochemical correlates for some of these symptoms.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-27797 (URN)10.1159/000054869 (DOI)12544 (Local ID)12544 (Archive number)12544 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    6. Acute Effects of Cholecystokinin Tetrapeptide on Brain Stem Auditory Evoked Potentials in Healthy Volunteers
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute Effects of Cholecystokinin Tetrapeptide on Brain Stem Auditory Evoked Potentials in Healthy Volunteers
    Show others...
    2003 (English)In: Pharmacopsychiatry, ISSN 0176-3679, E-ISSN 1439-0795, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 181-186Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the effects of continuous slow intravenous infusion of cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (CCK-4) on brain stem auditory evoked potentials (BSAEP) in healthy subjects. Twenty-four subjects, 15 females and 9males, were assigned to infusion with either placebo or CCK-4 in a randomized, double-blind, parallel group design. BSAEPs, mood, physical symptoms, and vital signs were assessed once before infusion and at 10 min and 40 min after the onset of infusion. In the 16 subjects (N = 8, CCK-4; N = 8, placebo) CCK-4, compared to placebo, delayed peak I latency during early infusion, slowed the latencies of peaks III and V, and decreased the amplitude of peak III throughout the infusion. No significant treatment differences were observed with respect to symptoms, mood, or cardiovascular measures. These preliminary findings suggest that CCK-4 may interfere with information processing in the brain stem auditory pathways and that prolonged intravenous CCK-4 administration may be a useful challenge paradigm for investigating CCK's modulatory role on brain stem mechanisms mediating anxiety and panic in humans.

    Keywords
    Cholecystokinin, CCK-4, brain stem auditory evoked potentials, anxiety, panic
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-27796 (URN)10.1055/s-2003-43047 (DOI)12543 (Local ID)12543 (Archive number)12543 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
  • 5.
    Gunnarsson, Tove
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Family Medicine, Division of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge Hospital, Sweden.
    Eklundh, Thomas
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Family Medicine, Division of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge Hospital, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Department of Internal Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge Hospital, Sweden.
    Qureshi, G. Ali
    Clinical Research Center, Novum, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge Hospital, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Stefan
    Department of Internal Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge Hospital, Sweden.
    Nordin, Conny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cholecystokinin peptides in cerebrospinal fluid: a study in healthy male subjects1997In: Regulatory Peptides, ISSN 0167-0115, E-ISSN 1873-1686, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 57-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The clinical reliability of measuring cholecystokinin (CCK) peptides in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has not been fully elucidated. Therefore, we have assayed CCK-8S and CCK-4 in CSF obtained from 14 healthy male subjects, lumbar-punctured at the L4–5 level following a strictly standardised procedure. CSF concentrations of free CCK-8S and free CCK-4 were used as dependent variables while age, height, body weight, atmospheric pressure and some other factors served as independent variables. It was shown that the CCK-8S ratio between the second (7–12 ml) and first (0–6 ml) CSF fractions, correlated significantly with the atmospheric pressure at the time of puncture. Neither CCK-8S nor CCK-4 displayed concentration gradients in CSF. The CCK-4 levels, expressed as pmol l−1 in the total amount of CSF were found to be positively correlated with the neuraxis distance in the lying position and negatively with the neuraxis distance in the sitting position. Furthermore, CCK-4, expressed as pmol l−1 per min of tapping-time (pmol l−1 min−1), showed a negative correlation with storage time, presumably mirroring a proteolytic process. CCK-8S and CCK-4 intercorrelated positively independently of whether expressed as pmol l−1 or pmol l−1 min−1. In conclusion, the results of this exploratory study indicate that the neuraxis distance (in the sitting and lying positions) and storage-time have to be accounted for when interpreting data on CSF levels of CCK-4. Attention has to be paid to the potential influence of atmospheric pressure on the concentration ratio of CCK-8S.

  • 6.
    Gunnarsson, Tove
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Family Medicine, Psychiatric Section, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge Hospitel, Sweden.
    Eklundh, Thomas
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Family Medicine, Psychiatric Section, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge Hospitel, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Department of Internal Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge Hospitel, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Stefan
    Department of Internal Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge Hospitel, Sweden.
    Nordin, Conny
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cholecystokinin peptides in cerebrospinal fluid: a study in healthy male subjects lumbar-punctured without preceding strict bed-rest1999In: Journal of neural transmission, ISSN 0300-9564, E-ISSN 1435-1463, Vol. 106, no 3-4, p. 275-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a recent study we analysed the concentrations of two forms of cholecystokinin (CCK), CCK-8S (sulphated) and CCK-4 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from 14 healthy male volunteers lumbar-punctured after a minimum of eight hours of strict bed-rest.

    We have now lumbar-punctured another group of 14 healthy males, using the same procedure except for the requirement of strict bed-rest prior to puncture.

    In contrast to our previous study, the concentration of CCK-4 (but not CCK-8S) was significantly higher in the second CSF fraction (7–12 ml) than in the first one (0–6 ml). On using the concentration ratio between the second and first fraction, CCK-8S (but not CCK-4) correlated positively with the atmospheric pressure, which is in contrast to our previous study in which a significant negative correlation was found.

    When the lumbar CSF concentrations were expressed as the concentration per minute of tapping-time (an estimate of the mass flow), atmospheric pressure, age and the neuraxis distance in the lying position made significant contributions to the variance in CCK-8S. A significant positive correlation with atmospheric pressure was found for CCK-4.

    In conclusion, the results indicate that the question of strict bed-rest or not prior to lumbar puncture may have to be considered when interpreting data on lumbar CSF concentrations of CCK. A controlled study is warranted.

  • 7.
    Gunnarsson, Tove
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Leszniewski, W
    Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Radiol, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Pathol, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Bak, J
    Davidsson, L
    Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Radiol, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Pathol, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    An intradural cervical chordoma mimicking a neurinoma - Case illustration2001In: Journal of Neurosurgery, ISSN 0022-3085, E-ISSN 1933-0693, Vol. 95, no 1, p. 144-144Other (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Gunnarsson, Tove
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurosurgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Leszniewski, W
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurosurgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Bak, Julia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Davidsson, L
    An intradural cervical chordoma mimicking a neurinoma. Case illustration.2001In: Journal of Neurosurgery, ISSN 0022-3085, E-ISSN 1933-0693, Vol. 95, p. 144-144Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Gunnarsson, Tove
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mahoney, Colleen
    Royal Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Shlik, Jahov
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Bradwejn, Jacques
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Ottawa/Royal Ottawa Hospital and Institute of Mental Health Research, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Knott, Verner
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Ottawa/Royal Ottawa Hospital and Institute of Mental Health Research, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Acute Effects of Cholecystokinin Tetrapeptide on Brain Stem Auditory Evoked Potentials in Healthy Volunteers2003In: Pharmacopsychiatry, ISSN 0176-3679, E-ISSN 1439-0795, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 181-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the effects of continuous slow intravenous infusion of cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (CCK-4) on brain stem auditory evoked potentials (BSAEP) in healthy subjects. Twenty-four subjects, 15 females and 9males, were assigned to infusion with either placebo or CCK-4 in a randomized, double-blind, parallel group design. BSAEPs, mood, physical symptoms, and vital signs were assessed once before infusion and at 10 min and 40 min after the onset of infusion. In the 16 subjects (N = 8, CCK-4; N = 8, placebo) CCK-4, compared to placebo, delayed peak I latency during early infusion, slowed the latencies of peaks III and V, and decreased the amplitude of peak III throughout the infusion. No significant treatment differences were observed with respect to symptoms, mood, or cardiovascular measures. These preliminary findings suggest that CCK-4 may interfere with information processing in the brain stem auditory pathways and that prolonged intravenous CCK-4 administration may be a useful challenge paradigm for investigating CCK's modulatory role on brain stem mechanisms mediating anxiety and panic in humans.

  • 10.
    Gunnarsson, Tove
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Stefan
    Department of Internal Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge Hospital, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Department of Internal Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge Hospital, Sweden.
    Nordin, Conny
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cholecystokinin peptides in cerebrospinal fluid: a pilot study in hypothyroid patients1999In: Human Psychopharmacology: Clinical and Experimental, ISSN 0885-6222, E-ISSN 1099-1077, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 113-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (CCK-4) and the sulphated octapeptide (CCK-8) were measured in cerebrospinal fluid obtained from nine hypothyroid patients before and during L-thyroxine treatment. Before treatment, CCK-4 and CCK-8S correlated negatively with S-TSH, whereas CCK-8S also showed a positive correlation with S-T3. During treatment, S-T4 correlated negatively with CCK-8S. CSF collection time was significantly shorter during treatment than prior to treatment for the first (0–6 ml) CSF fraction. On taking CSF collection time into account, the levels of both CCK-4 and CCK-8S in the first CSF fraction were significantly increased during medication. Our results are consistent with an impact of the hypothyroid disorder and L-thyroxine treatment on the disposition of CCK compounds in CSF. This might be due to an altered CSF circulation, but other mechanisms (e.g. metabolism or elimination) cannot be ruled out.

  • 11.
    Gunnarsson, Tove
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Stefan
    Department of Internal Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Department of Internal Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Nordin, Conny
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Depressive Symptoms in Hypothyroid Disorder with some Observations on Biochemical Correlates2001In: Neuropsychobiology, ISSN 0302-282X, E-ISSN 1423-0224, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 70-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lumbar punctures and ratings of depressive symptoms were done in hypothyroid patients before and during L-thyroxine therapy. Before treatment, the most prominent symptoms were concentration difficulties, lassitude, and reduced sexual interest. All patients suffered from sleep disturbances. Suicidal thoughts did not occur at all. Inner tension was negatively correlated with the anxiogenic cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (CCK-4) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), while reduced sexual interest was negatively correlated with CSF tryptophan. Furthermore, failing memory correlated negatively with T3 as well as T4 in serum. A positive correlation was found between failing memory and serum TSH. All patients improved significantly during treatment. No biochemical correlates were found. In conclusion, hypothyroidism is associated with major depressive symptoms. CSF CCK-4 and tryptophan, as well as serum thyroid hormones, may constitute biochemical correlates for some of these symptoms.

  • 12. Knott, Verner
    et al.
    Mahoney, Colleen
    Bradwejn, Jacques
    Shlik, Jakov
    Gunnarsson, Tove
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Effects of acute cholecystokinin infusion on hemispheric EEG asymmetry and coherence in healthy volunteers2003In: Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0278-5846, E-ISSN 1878-4216, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 179-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the effects of continuous slow infusion of cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (CCK-4), a neuropeptide with panicogenic properties, on functional hemispheric differences, as indexed by quantitative electroencephalographic (EEG) asymmetry and coherence measures. Twenty-four adult volunteers (15 females and 9 males) were assigned to infusion with either placebo or CCK-4 in a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group design, with EEG being recorded before and during (10 and 40 min) a 60-min infusion period. No significant treatment differences were observed for absolute EEG power but, compared to placebo, CCK-4 infusion increased asymmetry and reduced coherence of slow-wave activity at midtemporal recording sites. These findings support the contention that functional imbalance of the temporal cortex, perhaps mediated by CCK-4, is involved in panic disorder (PD).

  • 13.
    Knott, V.J.
    et al.
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Ottawa, Institute of Mental Health Research, Ottawa, Ont., Canada, Royal Ottawa Hospital, 1145 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, Ont. K1Z 7K4, Canada.
    Mahoney, C.
    Royal Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ont., Canada.
    Gunnarsson, Tove
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Bradwejn, J.
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Ottawa, Institute of Mental Health Research, Ottawa, Ont., Canada.
    Shlik, J.
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Acute cholecystokinin effects on event-related potentials in healthy volunteers2002In: Human Psychopharmacology: Clinical and Experimental, ISSN 0885-6222, E-ISSN 1099-1077, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 285-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the effects of a continuous slow infusion of cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (CCK-4), a neuropeptide with panicogenic properties, on brain event-related potentials (ERPs) in healthy adults. Twenty-four volunteers, 15 females and 9 males, were assigned to infusion with either placebo or CCK-4 in a randomized, double-blind, parallel group design. ERPs, elicited within a standard auditory odd-ball paradigm requiring the counting of rare (20%) occurring 'deviant' tones interspersed among more frequent (80%) occurring 'standard' tones, were assessed once before infusion, and at 10 min and 40 min after the onset of infusion. Compared with the placebo, CCK-4 delayed the latencies of N100 and P200 components elicited by 'deviant' stimuli. No significant treatment differences were observed with respect to N200, P300b, mood or adverse symptoms. These preliminary findings suggest that CCK-4 may interfere with information processing relating to the selection of significant stimulating and as such, may be of relevance to mechanisms underlying panic disorder. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 14.
    Lundmark, Jöns
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Geriatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MC - Medicincentrum, Geriatrik-LAH.
    Gunnarsson, Tove
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Bengtsson, Finn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    A possible interaction between lithium and rofecoxib [1]2002In: British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0306-5251, E-ISSN 1365-2125, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 403-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 15.
    Shlik, J
    et al.
    Univ Tartu, EE-50090 Tartu, Estonia Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Nordin, Conny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Sjödin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Gunnarsson, Tove
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Maron, E
    Univ Tartu, EE-50090 Tartu, Estonia Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Toru, I
    Univ Tartu, EE-50090 Tartu, Estonia Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Cholecystokinin-serotonin interactions2002In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 17, p. 50S-51SConference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Wikström, Sverre
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry.
    Gunnarsson, Tove
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Nordin, Conny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Tactile stimulus and neurohormonal response: A pilot study2003In: International Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0020-7454, E-ISSN 1563-5279, Vol. 113, no 6, p. 787-793Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of tactile stimuli on plasma oxytocin and neuropeptide Y (NPY) were investigated in 21 volunteers exposed to massage. Blood samples for basal values were drawn immediately before and immediately after finishing the massage. A third sample was drawn after 60 min of restricted rest. On focusing on the difference between oxytocin concentrations before and immediately after massage, we found a sex difference. An opposite sex difference was found for NPY. The results imply that there might be sex-related difference in neurohormonal response to tactile stimuli such as in massage, and the results contradict those of previously reported animal experiments.

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