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  • 1.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nephrology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekermo, Bengt
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Transfusion Medicine and Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Isaksson, B.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kaijser, B.
    Department of Clinical Bacteriology, Sahlgren´s University Hospital/Göteborg University.
    Sällberg, M.
    Department of Clinical Virology, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uhlin, F.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nephrology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The Immunoglobulin G Subclass Response to Hepatitis B Vaccine and the Antibody Response to Pneumococcal Polysaccharides in Dialysis PatientsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined the response to hepatitis B vaccination in dialysis patients, and evaluated our vaccination program to hepatitis B virus. No new cases of hepatitis B occurred during the study period, i.e. from 1980 and onwards. Sera were analyzed for anti-HBs in 25 dialysis patients vaccinated at least three times against hepatitis B and 53 health care staff vaccinated three times. The IgG subclass distribution of antibodies to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) was determined in 11 dialysis patients and in 45 healthy controls. The antibody response to pneumococci was determined in 29 vaccinated patients.

    Results: Ten of 25 (40%) of the dialysis patients had anti-HBs when both tests after the third and/or fourth injections were considered. In four patients a fourth injection was cancelled due to transplantation or bad health, while such data were lacking in 8 cases. In staff 49/53 (93%) of the persons responded with anti-HBs production. In anti-HBs positive patients and controls a significant difference in the response of healthy adults was observed in anti-HBs IgG 1 (p<0.001) vs all other IgG subclasses. Dialysis patients had low levels, or negative findings, in all cases, with lgGI as the highest proportion found (3/11 patients). An antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was registred in 25 out of 29 dialysis patients (in all 86 %).Dialysis patients respond poorly to hepatitis B vaccine. An anti-HBs subclass response mainly restricted to IgG I was observed in healthy adults, while dialysis patients had low or negative test results affecting all subclasses.

    The findings suggest a general deficit in the ability to produce anti-HBs rather than a deficit in the production of a specific subclass of this antibody. Moreover, RBV-vaccination schedules in renal transplant recipients should be started early, as some patients otherwise, due to transplantation or bad health, may not receive a fourth injection.

    The antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination indicates that the antigen involved is important in vaccination responses in dialysis patients.

  • 2.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nephrology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekermo, Bengt
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Transfusion Medicine and Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Månsson, A-S.
    Department of Clinical Virology, University Hospital of Malmö, Sweden.
    Svensson, Samuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nephrology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Widell, A.
    Department of Clinical Virology, University Hospital of Malmö, Sweden.
    Detection and prevention of hepatitis C in dialysis patients and renal transplant recipients: A long-term follow up (1989–January 1997)2002In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 251, no 2, p. 119-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Hepatitis C is frequent problem in dialysis wards.

    Design.  A long time (1989–97) follow up of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in a Swedish nephrology unit was performed with anti-HCV screening, confirmatory antibody tests, viral RNA detection and molecular characterization. Case histories were reviewed with focus, onset of infection, liver morbidity and mortality.

    Results.  In October 1991, 10% (19 of 184) of the patients in the unit (haemodialysis-, peritoneal dialysis and transplanted patients) were verified or suspected HCV carriers, whilst the number at the end of 1996 was 8% (13 of 157). Most patients were infected before 1991 but only in one case from a known HCV-infected blood donor. No new HCV infections associated with haemodialysis occurred during the study period. A total of 13 of 24 viremic patients had HCV genotype 2b, a pattern suggesting nosocomial transmission. This was further supported by phylogenetic analysis of HCV viral isolates in seven. HCV viremia was also common in patients with an incomplete anti-HCV antibody pattern as 8 of the 12 indeterminant sera were HCV-RNA positive.

    Conclusions.  Awareness, prevention, identification of infected patients and donor testing limited transmission. Indeterminant recombinant immunoblot assays (RIBA)-results should be regarded with caution as a result of the relative immunodeficiency in uremic patients. Our data indicate nosocomial transmission in several patients.

  • 3.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Nephrology UHL.
    Ekermo, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Åkerlind, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Månsson, Ann-Sofie
    Malmö University Hospital.
    Widell, Anders
    Malmö University Hospital.
    Monitoring hepatitis C infection in a major Swedish nephrology unit and molecular resolution of a new case of nosocomial transmission.2010In: Journal of medical virology, ISSN 1096-9071, Vol. 82, no 2, p. 249-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a frequent problem in hemodialysis units. The prevalence and incidence of HCV infection over a decade were studied in a nephrology unit affected by previous nosocomial HCV transmission. The HCV non-structural 5B protein gene was sequenced to achieve phylogenetic analysis of a new (incident) case of infection. Proportions of patients who were and were not infected with HCV remained similar over the period, as did the inflow and outflow of patients infected previously. In 1997, 12/157 (8%) of patients at the unit (treatment: hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and renal transplant recipients) were positive in HCV RNA, whereas in 2007 the overall number was 9/239 (4%). One patient acquired an HCV infection, and the NS5B sequence in that case clustered with genotype 2b sequences found in patients from an earlier outbreak. Comparing the HCV from the incident patient with several stored longitudinal samples and cloned PCR products from the most likely source patient revealed close phylogenetic relationship with an HCV quasispecies member from the possible source. The source patient and the incident newly infected patient were not scheduled on the same dialysis shift, although the records showed that simultaneous treatment occurred on two occasions during the months preceding transmission. In conclusion, over the 10-year period, the proportion of HCV-infected patients at the unit was unchanged. Only one new infection occurred, which originated from a fellow patient's quasispecies. This establishes phylogenetic analysis as a valuable tool for tracing patient sources of HCV transmission.

  • 4.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nephrology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Nephrology UHL.
    Uhlin, F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nephrology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Nephrology UHL.
    Ekermo, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Isaksson, Barbro
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Kaijser, B
    Andersson, B
    Hahn-Zoric, M
    Sällberg, M
    Perspectives on hepatitis B infections and the efficacy of vaccination (hepatitis B and pneumococci) in dialysis patients2003In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 108, no 1, p. 61-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hepatitis B is a well known problem in dialysis units. We therefore examined the historical frequency of hepatitis B carriers in our unit, our vaccination program to hepatitis B virus (HBV), the response to hepatitis B vaccine, the IgG subclass response of anti-HBs and the response and IgG subclass response to pneumococcal vaccination (another vaccine) in dialysis patients. From 1970 and onwards 23 HBV carriers were found, but no new cases of hepatitis B occurred during the study period, i.e. from 1980 and onwards.Only one of the carriers was alive by the end of 2001. In four patients liver disease(in one of them liver cirrhosis) may have been a concomitant cause of death. The antibody response to hepatitis B vaccine was significantly lower in patients than in staff. In four patients a fourth injection was cancelled due to transplantation and bad health, while such data were lacking in 8 cases. In anti-HBs positive patients and controls a significant difference in the response of healthy adults was observed in anti-HBs IgG1 (p<0.001) vs all other IgG subclasses. Dialysis patients had low levels, or negative findings, in all cases, with IgG1 as the highest proportion found (3/11 patients). An antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was registered in 25 out of 29 dialysis patients (in all 86 %). The IgG-subclass vaccination response to pneumococci in 28 dialysis patients was mainly IgG2 and IgG1 but also occurred in IgG3 and IgG4. Prevaccination antibody levels of the controls were higher in IgG1 and IgG2 (p< 0.01) (n=21) than in dialysis patients (n=28). Hepatitis B is nowadays a rare, but still dangerous disease in nephrology units. Dialysis patients have a reduced response to hepatitis B vaccine and vaccination schedules should be started early as some patients otherwise may not receive a fourth injection. The adequate antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination mainly due to IgG2 and IgG1 antibodies indicates that the antigen involved is important in vaccination responses in dialysis patients.

  • 5.
    Benjamin, R J
    et al.
    American Red Cross.
    Bianco, C
    Canadian Blood Service.
    Seed, C R
    Australian Red Cross Blood Service.
    Yang, H
    Australian Red Cross Blood Service.
    Lee, J
    Australian Red Cross Blood Service.
    Keller, A J
    Australian Red Cross Blood Service.
    Wendel, S
    Hospital Sirio Libanes.
    Biagini, S
    Hospital Sirio Libanes.
    Murray, J
    Shanghai Blood Centre.
    Turek, P
    Thomayer Teaching Hospital.
    Moftah, F M
    National Blood Transfus Service.
    Kullaste, R
    North Estonia Medical Centre.
    Pillonel, J
    French Institute Public Health Surveillance.
    Danic, B
    Etab Francais Sang.
    Bigey, F
    Etab Francais Sang.
    Follea, G
    Etab Francais Sang.
    Seifried, E
    Goethe University of Frankfurt.
    M Mueller, M
    Goethe University of Frankfurt.
    Lin, C K
    Hong Kong Red Cross Blood Transfus Service.
    Makroo, R N
    Indraprastha Apollo Hospital.
    Grazzini, G
    Italian National Blood Centre.
    Pupella, S
    Italian National Blood Centre.
    Velati, C
    Italian National Blood Centre.
    Tadokoro, K
    Japanese Red Cross Society.
    Bravo Lindoro, A
    Institute Nacl Pediat.
    DArtote Gonzalez, A
    Banco Central Sangre Siglo XXI.
    Giner, V T
    Centre Nacl Transfus Sanguinea.
    Flanagan, P
    New Zealand Blood Service.
    Olaussen, R W
    Oslo University of Hospital.
    Letowska, M
    Institute Hematol and Transfus Med, Warsaw.
    Rosiek, A
    Institute Hematol and Transfus Med, Warsaw.
    Poglod, R
    Institute Hematol and Transfus Med, Warsaw.
    Zhiburt, E
    Pirogov Russian National Medical Surg Centre.
    Mali, P
    Blood Transfus Centre Slovenia.
    Rozman, P
    Blood Transfus Centre Slovenia.
    Gulube, S
    S African National Blood Service.
    Castro Izaguirre, E
    Centre Transfus Cruz Roja Espanola Madrid.
    Ekermo, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Barnes, S M
    NHS Blood and Transplant.
    McLaughlin, L
    University of Vienna.
    Reesink, H W
    University of Amsterdam.
    Deferral of males who had sex with other males2011In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 101, no 4, p. 339-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 6.
    Davidson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekermo, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Gaines, Hans
    Lesko, Birgitta
    Akerlind, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    The cost-effectiveness of introducing nucleic acid testing to test for hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and human immunodeficiency virus among blood donors in Sweden2011In: TRANSFUSION, ISSN 0041-1132, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 421-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of using individual-donor nucleic acid testing (ID-NAT) in addition to serologic tests compared with the sole use of serologic tests for the identification of hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among blood donors in Sweden. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: The two strategies analyzed were serologic tests and ID-NAT plus serologic tests. A health-economic model was used to estimate the lifetime costs and effects. The effects were measured as infections avoided and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained. A societal perspective was used. RESULTS: The largest number of viral transmissions occurred with serologic testing only. However, the risks for viral transmissions were very low with both strategies. The total cost was mainly influenced by the cost of the test carried out. The cost of using ID-NAT plus serologic tests compared to serologic tests alone was estimated at Swedish Krona (SEK) 101 million (USD 12.7 million) per avoided viral transmission. The cost per QALY gained was SEK 22 million (USD 2.7 million). CONCLUSION: Using ID-NAT for testing against HBV, HCV, and HIV among blood donors leads to cost-effectiveness ratios that are far beyond what is usually considered cost-effective. The main reason for this is that with current methods, the risks for virus transmission are very low in Sweden.

  • 7.
    Ekermo, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Implementation of donor screening for infectious agents transmitted by blood by nucleic acid technology2002In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 82, no 2, p. 87-111Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Lieberman, L.
    et al.
    University of Health Network, Canada.
    Devine, D. V.
    Canadian Blood Serv, Canada; University of British Columbia, Canada,.
    Reesink, H. W.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Panzer, S.
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Wong, J.
    Australian Red Cross Blood Serv, Australia.
    Raison, T.
    Australian Red Cross Blood Serv, Australia.
    Benson, S.
    Australian Red Cross Blood Serv, Australia.
    Pink, J.
    Australian Red Cross Blood Serv, Australia.
    Leitner, G. C.
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Horvath, M.
    University of Vienna, Austria.
    Compernolle, V.
    Belgian Red Cross Flanders, Belgium.
    Prado Scuracchio, P. S.
    Blood Bank Hospital Sirio Libanes, Brazil.
    Wendel, S.
    Blood Bank Hospital Sirio Libanes, Brazil.
    Delage, G.
    Hema Quebec, Canada.
    Nahirniak, S.
    Alberta Health Serv, Canada.
    Dongfu, X.
    Shanghai Blood Centre, Peoples R China.
    Krusius, T.
    Finnish Red Cross Blood Serv, Finland.
    Juvonen, E.
    Finnish Red Cross Blood Serv, Finland.
    Sainio, S.
    Finnish Red Cross Blood Serv, Finland.
    Cazenave, J. -P.
    Etab Francais Sang EFS Alsace, France.
    Guntz, P.
    Etab Francais Sang EFS Alsace, France.
    Kientz, D.
    Etab Francais Sang EFS Alsace, France.
    Andreu, G.
    Institute National Transfus Sanguine INTS, France.
    Morel, P.
    EFS Bourgogne Franche Comte, France.
    Seifried, E.
    German Red Cross, Germany.
    Hourfar, K.
    German Red Cross, Germany.
    Lin, C. K.
    Hong Kong.
    O'Riordan, J.
    National Blood Centre, Ireland.
    Raspollini, E.
    Fdn Ca Granda Osped Maggiore Policlin, Italy.
    Villa, S.
    Fdn Ca Granda Osped Maggiore Policlin, Italy.
    Rebulla, P.
    Fdn Ca Granda Osped Maggiore Policlin, Italy; Fdn Ca Granda Osped Maggiore Policlin, Italy.
    Flanagan, P.
    New Zealand Blood Serv, New Zealand.
    Teo, D.
    Health Science Author, Singapore.
    Lam, S.
    Health Science Author, Singapore.
    Ang, A. L.
    Health Science Author, Singapore.
    Lozano, M.
    University of Clin Hospital, Spain.
    Sauleda, S.
    Blood and Tissue Bank Catalonia, Spain.
    Cid, J.
    University of Clin Hospital, Spain.
    Pereira, A.
    University of Clin Hospital, Spain.
    Ekermo, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Niederhauser, C.
    Blood Transfus Serv SRC Berne, Switzerland.
    Waldvogel, S.
    Blood Transfus Serv SRC, Switzerland.
    Fontana, S.
    Blood Transfus Serv SRC Berne, Switzerland.
    Desborough, M. J.
    John Radcliffe Hospital, England.
    Pawson, R.
    John Radcliffe Hospital, England.
    Li, M.
    Blood Syst Inc, AZ, USA.
    Kamel, H.
    Blood Syst Inc, AZ, USA.
    Busch, M.
    Blood Syst Inc, AZ, USA.
    Qu, L.
    University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA; Institute Transfus Med, PA, USA.
    Triulzi, D.
    University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA; Institute Transfus Med, PA, USA.
    Prevention of transfusion-transmitted cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection: Standards of care2014In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 107, no 3, p. 276-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 9. Lithander, Eva
    et al.
    Ekermo, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Kontroll av blod och blodgivare.2003In: Smittskyddsboken / [ed] Karl Ekdahl och Johan Giesecke, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2003, 1, p. 134-138Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    De senaste 10 åren har medfört stora förändringar av betydelse för svenskt smittskydd. Genom ökat resande och invandring har vårt infektionspanorama blivit mer internationellt. Tidigare okända smittsamma sjukdomar (senast SARS) har identifierats samtidigt som polio officiellt förklarats utrotad i Europa. En ökande andel av bakterier och virus har blivit resistenta mot antibiotika men andelen barn som vaccineras mot framför allt mässling har börjat sjunka ned mot kritiska nivåer. Samtidigt har den avsiktliga spridningen av antrax i USA blixtbelyst samhällets sårbarhet och de möjliga konsekvenserna av bioterrorism. Medlemskapet i EU har också inneburit förändringar av hur övervakning av smittsamma sjukdomar sköts i Sverige. De ökade krav som dessa förändringar ställer på alla de personer som på ett eller annat sätt arbetar med smittskyddsfrågor har satt behovet av utbildning i fokus.Smittskyddsboken ska ge en samlad översikt över alla de aktörer och insatser som tillsammans gör att det svenska smittskyddet står sig så väl i alla internationella jämförelser. Tanken är också att boken ska vara tillräckligt detaljerad för att kunna fungera som en praktisk handbok för flertalet av de smittskyddsspörsmål som kan dyka upp. I stället för ingående sjukdomsbeskrivningar har vi i ett appendix listat alla de viktigaste smittsamma sjukdomarna, även här med fokus på smittvägar, inkubationstider och möjliga smittskyddsåtgärder.

  • 10.
    Malm, Kerstin
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Ekermo, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Hillgren, Kristina
    Maria Beroendecentrum, Centre for Dependency Disorders, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Britton, Sven
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Fredlund, Hans
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Andersson, Soren
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Prevalence of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 infection in Sweden2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 44, no 11, p. 852-859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Prevalence data on human T-lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2 (HTLV-1/2) in Sweden have not been updated since 1995. The seroprevalence among blood donors at that time was 0.2/10,000. A few years earlier, a high prevalence of HTLV-2 was found in intravenous drug users (IDUs) in Stockholm (3.4%). The objective of this study was to update information on the seroprevalence of HTLV in several study groups. Methods: Serum samples from pregnant women, hepatitis C virus (HCV)-positive individuals, and IDUs in Stockholm were investigated for HTLV-1/2 antibodies. Data from the mandatory HTLV-1/2 screening (2003-2006) of in vitro fertilization (IVF) clients were compiled, as well as data from new blood donors. Results: Eight out of 35,000 IVF patients were positive for anti-HTLV-1/2 (seroprevalence 2.3 per 10,000). Of the anti-HCV-positive individuals (n = 355), 1 sample was HTLV-1-positive (28.2 per 10,000). From 1995 to 2007, 18 HTLV-positive new blood donors were identified out of approximately 550,000 individuals tested (0.3 per 10,000). Thirty-five of 1079 tested IDUs were screening reactive. Conclusions: Since the start of screening in 1994, there has been no increased seroprevalence of HTLV-1/2 among blood donors in Sweden. Seroprevalence among Swedish IVF patients is 10 times higher than among blood donors. This finding is comparable to a 2003 European seroprevalence study of pregnant women in 7 countries. However, the possibility that the IVF group includes individuals with a higher risk of acquiring sexually transmitted infections, including HTLV, than the general population cannot be ruled out.

  • 11.
    Reesink, H W
    et al.
    University of Amsterdam.
    Panzer, S
    Medical University of Vienna.
    Wendel, S
    Hospital Sirio Libanes.
    Levi, J E
    Centre Imunol and Imunogenet, Brazil.
    Ullum, H
    Copenhagen University Hospital.
    Ekblom-Kullberg, S
    Finnish Red Cross Blood Service.
    Seifried, E
    German Red Cross.
    Schmidt, M
    German Red Cross.
    Shinar, E
    Osped A Manzoni.
    Berzuini, A
    Osped A Manzoni.
    Ghosh, S
    New Zealand Blood Service.
    Flesland, O
    Asker and Baerum Hospital.
    Jeansson, S
    Oslo University Hospital Ulleval.
    Zhiburt, E
    Pirogov Russian National Medical Surgery Centre.
    Piron, M
    Blood and Tissue Bank Catalonia.
    Sauleda, S
    Blood and Tissue Bank Catalonia.
    Ekermo, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Eglin, R
    NHSBT.
    Kitchen, A
    NHSBT.
    Dodd, R Y
    American Red Cross.
    Leiby, D A
    American Red Cross.
    Katz, L M
    Mississippi Valley Reg Blood Centre.
    Kleinman, S
    University British Columbia.
    The use of malaria antibody tests in the prevention of transfusion-transmitted malaria2010In: VOX SANGUINIS, ISSN 0042-9007, Vol. 98, no 3, p. 468-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 12.
    Roth, W K
    et al.
    Germany.
    Busch, M P
    USA.
    Schuller, A
    Germany.
    Ismay, S
    Australia.
    Cheng, A
    Australia.
    Seed, C R
    Australia.
    Jungbauer, C
    Austria.
    Minsk, P M
    Belarus.
    Sondag-Thull, D
    Belgium.
    Wendel, S
    Brazil.
    Levi, J E
    Brazil.
    Fearon, M
    Canada.
    Delage, G
    Canada.
    Xie, Y
    China.
    Jukic, I
    Croatia.
    Turek, P
    Czech Republic.
    Ullum, H
    Denmark.
    Tefanova, V
    Estonia.
    Tilk, M
    Estonia.
    Reimal, R
    Estonia.
    Castren, J
    Finland.
    Naukkarinen, M
    Finland.
    Assal, A
    France.
    Jork, C
    Germany.
    Hourfar, M K
    Germany.
    Michel, P
    Germany.
    Offergeld, R
    Germany.
    Pichl, L
    Germany.
    Schmidt, M
    Germany.
    Schottstedt, V
    Germany.
    Seifried, E
    Germany.
    Wagner, F
    Germany.
    Weber-Schehl, M
    Germany.
    Politis, C
    Greece.
    Lin, C K
    Hong Kong.
    Tsoi, W C
    Hong Kong.
    O'Riordan, J
    Ireland.
    Gottreich, A
    Israel.
    Shinar, E
    Israel.
    Yahalom, V
    Israel.
    Velati, C
    Italy.
    Satake, M
    Japan.
    Sanad, N
    Kuwait.
    Sisene, I
    Latvia.
    Bon, A H
    Malaysia.
    Koppelmann, M
    the Netherlands.
    Flanagan, P
    New Zealand.
    Flesland, O
    Norway.
    Brojer, E
    Poland.
    Lętowska, M
    Poland.
    Nascimento, F
    Portugal.
    Zhiburt, E
    Russia.
    Chua, S S
    Singapore.
    Teo, D
    Singapore.
    Levicnik Stezinar, S
    Slovenia.
    Vermeulen, M
    South Africa.
    Reddy, R
    South Africa.
    Park, Q
    South Korea.
    Castro, E
    Spain.
    Eiras, A
    Spain.
    Gonzales Fraile, I
    Spain.
    Torres, P
    Spain.
    Ekermo, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Niederhauser, C
    Switzerland.
    Chen, H
    Taiwan.
    Oota, S
    Tailand.
    Brant, L J
    United Kingdom.
    Eglin, R
    United Kingdom.
    Jarvis, L
    United Kingdom.
    Mohabir, L
    United Kingdom.
    Brodsky, J
    USA.
    Foster, G
    USA.
    Jennings, C
    USA.
    Notari, E
    USA.
    Stramer, S
    USA.
    Kessler, D
    USA.
    Hillyer, C
    USA.
    Kamel, H
    USA.
    Katz, L
    USA.
    Taylor, C
    USA.
    Panzer, S
    Austria.
    Reesink, H W
    the Netherlands.
    International survey on NAT testing of blood donations: expanding implementation and yield from 1999 to 2009.2012In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 102, no 1, p. 82-90Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Tynell, Elsa
    et al.
    Norda, Rut
    Ekermo, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Sanner, Margareta
    Andersson, Soren
    Bjorkman, Anders
    False-reactive microbiologic screening test results in Swedish blood donors - how big is the problem? A survey among blood centers and deferred donors2007In: Transfusion, ISSN 0041-1132, E-ISSN 1537-2995, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 80-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Screening of blood donors for markers of transfusion-transmissible infectious agents leads to a varying number of false-reactive test results and sometimes thereby temporary or permanent deferral of donors and also to loss of collected units. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Data on false-reactive screening test results in 2002 and 2003 were collected from 19 blood centers in Sweden. A questionnaire was sent to donors deferred because of false-reactive screening test results to investigate their perception of the information and their reaction to the deferral. RESULTS: Testing of 21,189 samples from new donors and 423,543 donations from regular and/or repeat donors produced 1,059 false-reactive test results, mostly from hepatitis C virus antibody testing, and 299 deferrals. Six different human immunodeficiency virus tests led to between 0.02 and 0.2 percent false-reactive results. The deferral rate varied considerably between different counties. Of 204 deferred donors contacted, 180 (88%) answered the questionnaire. More than 80 percent were worried about their test results and worry was more common among those who did not feel sufficiently informed. CONCLUSION: The results imply that there is a need for a more standardized approach to the screening of blood donors and donations with the aim of minimizing the number of false-reactive screening test results. They also emphasize the importance of appropriate information and support to deferred donors.

  • 14.
    Waldenstrom, Jesper
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Konar, Jan
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Ekermo, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Norder, Helene
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Lagging, Martin
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Neonatal transfusion-transmitted hepatitis C virus infection following a pre-seroconversion window-phase donation in Sweden2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 45, no 10, p. 796-799Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A 9-day-old child developed a transfusion-transmitted hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection following a pre-seroconversion window-phase donation. Retrospective analysis of donor plasma revealed detectable HCV core antigen (154 fmol/l), as well as HCV RNA (87,000 IU/ml). Of 5.24 million Swedish plasma samples from December 1998 to September 2012, 5 additional window-phase donations were identified.

1 - 14 of 14
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