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  • 1.
    Bastami, Salumeh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Norling, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Trinks, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holmlund, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Walz, Thomas M
    Department of Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ahlner, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Uppugunduri, Srinivas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Inhibitory effect of opiates on LPS mediated release of TNF and IL-82013In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 52, no 5, p. 1022-1033Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most patients with advanced cancer experience severe pain and are often treated with opiates. Cancer patients are especially susceptible to opportunistic infections due to treatment with immunosuppressive and cytostatic drugs. Since opiates have been demonstrated to have immunomodulatory effects, it is of clinical importance to evaluate potential differences between commonly used opiates with regard to their effect on the immune system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of morphine, tramadol, fentanyl and ketobemidone on the functioning of the immune system with special reference to TNF and IL-8 release. Method. U-937 cells were preincubated with different concentrations of opioids followed by stimulation with LPS 100 μg/ml for three hours. The effect of opioids on the levels of cytokine mRNA was studied using RT-PCR. Erk and Akt phosphorylation was also measured by Western blot. Results. All opioids with the exception of fentanyl were capable of inhibiting TNF release from U-937 cells. Morphine had no effect on IL-8 release but the effect of other opiates was almost the same as the effect on TNF. All opioids with the exception of fentanyl were capable of inhibiting production of mRNA for TNF and IL-8. The observed effects of opiates were not always reversible by naloxone, suggesting that the effects might be mediated by other receptors or through a non-receptor mediated direct effect. Although preliminary evidence suggests the involvement of Erk and Akt pathways, further studies are needed to unravel the intracellular pathways involved in mediating the effects of opiates. Our data suggests that the order of potency with regard to inhibition of cytokine release is as follows: tramadol > ketobemidone > morphine > fentanyl. Conclusion. Further studies are needed to understand the clinical implications of the observed immunosuppressive effects of tramadol and ketobemidone and to improve opioid treatment strategies in patients with cancer.

  • 2.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holmlund, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ferraud, Lilianne
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rutqvist, Lars Erik
    Clinic of Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Skoog, Lambert
    Division of Cytology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Expression of COX-2 and steroid converting enzymes in breast cancer2006In: Oncology Reports, ISSN 1021-335X, E-ISSN 1791-2431, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 219-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    COX-2 is upregulated in many breast tumors, and one of the products of COX-2 is PGE2 that is suggested to upregulate aromatase through cAMP signaling in breast cancer. Although aromatase can increase the estrogen levels in tumors, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17HSD) activity is finally needed for the estrone/estradiol regulation. The aim of this study was to investigate if the protein expression of enzymes involved in estrogen synthesis shows covariation with the expression of COX-2. We also wanted to correlate these results with prognosis. We analyzed the expression of COX-2, aromatase, 17HSD1 and 17HSD2 with immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays composed of 356 primary breast tumors. In the present study COX-2 was correlated to aromatase (P<0.00001), 17HSD1 (P=0.0073), and 17HSD2 (P<0.00001). Patients with ER positive tumors expressing low amounts of 17HSD2 had decreased breast cancer survival (P=0.013). Elevated expression of COX-2 and aromatase was more frequent among larger tumors (P=0.017 and P=0.013). COX-2 expression correlates with the levels of the examined steroid converting enzymes and may contribute to increased estrogen levels in the tumor. In breast cancer cells, the regulatory function of 17HSD2 could be lost, and in the present study patients with low or non-detectable levels of 17HSD2 had worse prognosis than had breast cancer patients with higher levels of the enzyme.

  • 3.
    Holmqvist Knutsen, Annica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Gao, Jing-Fang
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holmlund, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Adell, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    PINCH is an independent prognostic factor in rectal cancer patients without preoperative radiotherapy: A study in a Swedish rectal cancer trial of preoperative radiotherapy2012In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 12, no 65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Purpose: The clinical significance between particularly interesting new cysteine-histidine rich protein (PINCH) expression and radiotherapy (RT) in tumours is not known. In this study, the expression of PINCH and its relationship to RT, clinical, pathological and biological factors were studied in rectal cancer patients.

    Material and Methods: PINCH expression determined by immunohistochemistry was analysed at the invasive margin and inner tumour area in 137 primary rectal adenocarcinomas (72 cases without RT and 65 cases with RT). PINCH expression in colon fibroblast cell line (CCD-18 Co) was determined by Western blot.

    Results: In patients without RT, strong PINCH expression at the invasive margin of primary tumours was related to worse survival, compared to patients with weak expression, independent of TNM stage and differentiation (p = 0.03). No survival relationship in patients with RT was observed (p = 0.64). Comparing the non-RT with RT subgroup, there was no difference in PINCH expression in primary tumours (invasive margin (p = 0.68)/inner tumour area (p = 0.49).

    Conclusions: PINCH expression at the invasive margin was an independent prognostic factor in patients without RT. RT does not seem to directly affect the PINCH expression.

     

  • 4.
    Holmqvist (Knutsen), Annica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Holmlund, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ardsby, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pathak, Surajit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    PINCH expression in relation to radiation response in co-cultured colon cancer cells and in rectal cancer patients2013In: Oncology Reports, ISSN 1021-335X, E-ISSN 1791-2431, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 2097-2104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Particularly interesting new cysteine-histidine rich protein (PINCH), involved in cell spreading, motility and proliferation, has been shown to enhance radioresistance in colon cancer cell lines. The expression of PINCH in relation to radiation was studied in co-cultured colon cancer cells. Furthermore, the clinical significance between PINCH and radiotherapy (RT) was analyzed in rectal cancer patients with or without RT. The relative PINCH expression in colon cancer (KM12C) cells cultured separately and in co-culture was examined by western blotting and real-time PCR, and was analyzed over a period of 8 and 24 h after radiation. PINCH expression was immunohistochemically examined in 137 primary rectal tumors for which 65 cases did not receive RT and 72 cases received RT. PINCH expression tended to decrease from that in the separately cultured KM12C cells without radiation to that in cells with radiation at 8 h (P=0.060); while in the co-cultured cells, no significant difference was found (P=0.446). In patients with RT, strong PINCH expression was related to worse survival, when compared to patients with weak expression, independent of TNM stage, degree of differentiation, age and p53 status (P=0.029, RR 4.03, 95% CI 1.34-12.1). No survival relationship for the patients without RT was observed (P=0.287). A statistical interaction analysis between PINCH, RT and survival showed a trend towards significance (P=0.057). In conclusion, PINCH predicts survival in rectal cancer patients with RT, but not in patients without RT. The expression of PINCH may be regulated by radiation and by environmental factors surrounding the cells.

  • 5.
    Liu, Na
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, China.
    Cox, Thomas R.
    Biotech Research and Innovation Centre (BRIC), University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cui, Weiyingqi
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Adell, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Holmlund, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Ping, Jie
    Shanghai Center for Bioinformation Technology, Shanghai, China.
    Jarlsfelt, Ingvar
    Department of Pathology, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Erler, Janine T.
    Biotech Research and Innovation Centre (BRIC), University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Nuclear expression of lysyl oxidase enzyme is an independent prognostic factor in rectal cancer patients.2017In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 8, no 36, p. 60015-60024Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emerging evidence has implicated a pivotal role for lysyl oxidase (LOX) in cancer progression and metastasis. Whilst the majority of work has focused on the extracellular matrix cross-linking role of LOX, the exact function of intracellular LOX localisation remains unclear. In this study, we analysed the LOX expression patterns in the nuclei of rectal cancer patient samples and determined the clinical significance of this expression. Nuclear LOX expression was significantly increased in patient lymph node metastases compared to their primary tumours. High nuclear LOX expression in tumours was correlated with a high rate of distant metastasis and increased recurrence. Multivariable analysis showed that high nuclear LOX expression was also correlated with poor overall survival and disease free survival. Furthermore, we are the first to identify LOX enzyme isoforms (50 kDa and 32 kDa) within the nucleus of colon cancer cell lines by confocal microscopy and Western blot. Our results show a powerful link between nuclear LOX expression in tumours and patient survival, and offer a promising prognostic biomarker for rectal cancer patients.

  • 6.
    Meng, Wen-Jian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Pathak, Surajit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ding, Zhen-Yu
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Hong
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Adell, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Holmlund, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Li, Yuan
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Zhou, Zong-Guang
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China; Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Sichuan University, Peoples R China; Sichuan University, Peoples R China.
    Special AT-rich sequence binding protein 1 expression correlates with response to preoperative radiotherapy and clinical outcome in rectal cancer2015In: Cancer Biology & Therapy, ISSN 1538-4047, E-ISSN 1555-8576, Vol. 16, no 12, p. 1738-1745Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our recent study showed the important role of special AT-rich sequence binding protein 1 (SATB1) in the progression of human rectal cancer. However, the value of SATB1 in response to radiotherapy (RT) for rectal cancer hasnt been reported so far. Here, SATB1 was determined using immunohistochemistry in normal mucosa, biopsy, primary cancer, and lymph node metastasis from 132 rectal cancer patients: 66 with and 66 without preoperative RT before surgery. The effect of SATB1 knockdown on radiosensitivity was assessed by proliferation-based assay and clonogenic assay. The results showed that SATB1 increased from normal mucosa to primary cancer, whereas it decreased from primary cancer to metastasis in non-RT patients. SATB1 decreased in primary cancers after RT. In RT patients, positive SATB1 was independently associated with decreased response to preoperative RT, early time to metastasis, and worse survival. SATB1 negatively correlated with ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and pRb2/p130, and positively with Ki-67 and Survivin in RT patients, and their potential interaction through different canonical pathways was identified in network ideogram. Taken together, our findings disclose for the first time that radiation decreases SATB1 expression and sensitizes cancer cells to confer clinical benefit of patients, suggesting that SATB1 is predictive of response to preoperative RT and clinical outcome in rectal cancer.

  • 7.
    Olsson, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holmlund, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Genetics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Methods for evaluating HER2 status in breast cancer: comparison of IHC, FISH, and real-time PCR analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue2013In: Pathology and Laboratory Medicine International, ISSN 1179-2698, Vol. 5, p. 31-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 gene (HER2) is amplified in approximately 15%–20% of all breast cancers. This results in overexpression of the HER2 protein, which is associated with worse clinical outcomes in breast cancer patients. Several studies have shown that trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody that interferes with the HER2/neu receptor, can improve overall survival in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. Immunohistochemistry (IHC), combined with different methods for in situ hybridization, is currently used for routine assessment of HER2 status. The aim of the present study was to determine whether real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can serve as a supplementary method for evaluation of HER2 status in primary breast cancer. For this purpose, 145 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded primary breast cancer samples were tested by real-time PCR amplification of HER2, using amyloid precursor protein as a reference. The results were compared with HER2 status determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and IHC. The specificity, sensitivity, and reproducibility of real-time PCR were evaluated, and a comparison of formalin-fixed and fresh-frozen samples was performed. This showed concordance of 93% between real-time PCR and FISH, and 86% between real-time PCR and IHC. Therefore, we suggest that real-time PCR can be a useful supplementary method for assessment of HER2 status.

  • 8.
    Pathak, Surajit
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.
    Zhang, Hong
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Gnosa, Sebastian
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kumar Nandy, Suman
    Kalyani University, Kalyani, West Bengal, India.
    Adell, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Holmlund, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Tafazzin protein expression is associated with tumorigenesis and radiation response in rectal cancer: a study of Swedish clinical trial on preoperative radiotherapy.2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 5, p. e98317-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Tafazzin (TAZ), a transmembrane protein contributes in mitochondrial structural and functional modifications through cardiolipin remodeling. TAZ mutations are associated with several diseases, but studies on the role of TAZ protein in carcinogenesis and radiotherapy (RT) response is lacking. Therefore we investigated the TAZ expression in rectal cancer, and its correlation with RT, clinicopathological and biological variables in the patients participating in a clinical trial of preoperative RT.

    Methods

    140 rectal cancer patients were included in this study, of which 65 received RT before surgery and the rest underwent surgery alone. TAZ expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in primary cancer, distant, adjacent normal mucosa and lymph node metastasis. In-silico protein-protein interaction analysis was performed to study the predictive functional interaction of TAZ with other oncoproteins.

    Results

    TAZ showed stronger expression in primary cancer and lymph node metastasis compared to distant or adjacent normal mucosa in both non-RT and RT patients. Strong TAZ expression was significantly higher in stages I-III and non-mucinious cancer of non-RT patients. In RT patients, strong TAZ expression in biopsy was related to distant recurrence, independent of gender, age, stages and grade (p = 0.043, HR, 6.160, 95% CI, 1.063–35.704). In silico protein-protein interaction study demonstrated that TAZ was positively related to oncoproteins, Livin, MAC30 and FXYD-3.

    Conclusions

    Strong expression of TAZ protein seems to be related to rectal cancer development and RT response, it can be a predictive biomarker of distant recurrence in patients with preoperative RT.

  • 9.
    Perez-Tenorio, Gizeh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Elin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology.
    Ahnström, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Birgit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holmlund, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska University Hospital, Department Oncol, S-11883 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Skoog, Lambert
    Karolinska University Hospital, Department Pathol and Cytol, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Clinical potential of the mTOR targets S6K1 and S6K2 in breast cancer2011In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 128, no 3, p. 713-723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and its substrates S6K1 and S6K2 regulate cell growth, proliferation, and metabolism through translational control. RPS6KB1 (S6K1) and RPS6KB2 (S6K2) are situated in the commonly amplified 17q21-23 and 11q13 regions. S6K1 amplification and protein overexpression have earlier been associated with a worse outcome in breast cancer, but information regarding S6K2 is scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic and treatment predictive relevance of S6K1/S6K2 gene amplification, as well as S6K2 protein expression in breast cancer. S6K1/S6K2 gene copy number was determined by real-time PCR in 207 stage II breast tumors and S6K2 protein expression was investigated by immunohistochemistry in 792 node-negative breast cancers. S6K1 amplification/gain was detected in 10.7%/21.4% and S6K2 amplification/gain in 4.3%/21.3% of the tumors. S6K2 protein was detected in the nucleus (38%) and cytoplasm (76%) of the tumor cells. S6K1 amplification was significantly associated with HER2 gene amplification and protein expression. S6K2 amplification correlated significantly with high S6K2 mRNA levels, ER+ status and CCND1 amplification. S6K1 and S6K2 gene amplification was associated with a worse prognosis independent of HER2 and CCND1. S6K2 gain and nuclear S6K2 expression was related to an improved benefit from tamoxifen among patients with ER+, respectively ER+/PgR+ tumors. In the ER+/PgR- subgroup, nuclear S6K2 rather indicated decreased tamoxifen responsiveness. S6K1 amplification predicted reduced benefit from radiotherapy. This is the first study showing that S6K2 amplification and overexpression, like S6K1 amplification, have prognostic and treatment predictive significance in breast cancer.

  • 10.
    Perez-Tenorio, Gizeh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ahnström Waltersson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Birgit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holmlund, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skoog, Lambert
    Department of Cytology, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Clinical Value of RPS6KB1 and RPS6KB2 Gene Amplification in Postmenopausal Breast Cancer2008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and its substrates the ribosomal S6 kinases (S6K)1 and 2 integrate nutrient and hormonal/growth factor mediated signals and are implicated indiabetes, obesity and cancer. The genes encoding S6K1 (RPS6KB1) and S6K2 (RPS6KB2) aresituated close to well known amplicons but information regarding its expression and clinicalvalue is scarce. In this study we quantified RPS6KB1/2 gene copy number, establishedassociations with other clinical factors and explored their clinical value in breast cancer. RPS6KB1/2 copy number was determined by fast real-time PCR in 207 breast tumors.RPS6KB1 was amplified (≥ 4 copies) in 10.7% (22/206) and RPS6KB2 in 4.3% (9/207) of thetumors. Amplification of RPS6KB1 was associated with HER2 gene amplification (P=0.025)and protein expression (P=0.014) while RPS6KB2 correlated with ER+ status (P=0.046) and CCND1 amplification (P<0.00001). In a multivariate analysis, both genes were independentprognostic factors indicating higher risk to develop recurrences. In terms of loco regionalcontrol, amplification of the RPS6KB1 gene predicted less response to radiotherapy (P=0.035) while RPS6KB2 gene copy gain (≥ 3 copies) indicated increased benefit from tamoxifen (P=0.03) among ER+ patients. S6K1/2 gene amplification could be used as an indicator oftherapy response among postmenopausal breast cancer patients.

  • 11.
    Pfeifer, Daniella
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wallin, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holmlund, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Protein expression following gamma-irradiation relevant to growth arrest and apoptosis in colon cancer cells with mutant p532009In: Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0171-5216, E-ISSN 1432-1335, Vol. 135, no 11, p. 1583-1592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We previously found that p53, p73, survivin and PRL were implicated in the outcome of radiotherapy in rectal cancer patients. In the present study, we tried to understand mechanisms of colon cancer cell line response to radiation based on protein expression related to proliferation and apoptosis. KM12C, KM12SM and KM12L4a, cell lines with one origin, were radiated with 0, 10 or 15 Gy γ-radiation. Radiosensitivity was determined with cell cycle and apoptosis analysis, and protein expression of TAp73, ΔNp73, mutated p53, survivin and PRL-3 was determined by Western blot. KM12C showed transient G2-arrest, low apoptosis and up-regulation of resistance factors such as PRL-3. In KM12C expression of ΔNp73 increased after 10Gy, but not after 15Gy. KM12SM had permanent G2-arrest, low apoptosis and showed up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic survivin and down-regulation of the pro-apoptotic TAp73 and the radioresistance factor PRL-3 was down-regulated. KM12L4a, the most radiosensitive cell line, showed up-regulation of TAp73 and down-regulation/no up-regulation of resistance factors such as ΔNp73, survivin and PRL-3 after radiation. In conclusion, the KM12C cell line was more radioresistant than KM12L4a regarding apoptosis and certain apoptotic proteins. The radiosensitivity of KM12L4a might partly depend on the lack of up-regulation of proteins negative for the outcome of radiotherapy.

     

  • 12.
    Trinks, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holmlund, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jönsson, Jan-Ingvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Hematology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walz, Thomas M.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Human leukemic cell lines express a truncated intracellular 160 kDa ERBB2 receptorManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It has recently been demonstrated that ERBB specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors display antineoplastic activity in human leukemic cell devoid of functional ERBB receptors. The present study was undertaken in order to identify any putative target for these drugs. Flow cytometry experiments demonstrate the presence of an immunoreactive ERBB2 protein of intracellular localization and Western blot analysis visualized an ERBB2 protein of approximately 160 kDa. Exposing leukemia cells to tunicamycin did not alter the size of the truncated ERBB2 protein. The ERBB2 gene was alternative spliced with an absence of exon 5 containing the start codon for the full-length protein. In conclusion we demonstrate a nonglycosylated 160 kDa ERBB2-receptor protein with an alternative in-frame start codon in human leukemia cell lines.

  • 13.
    Trinks, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Severinsson, Emelie A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holmlund, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gréen, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Green, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jönsson, Jan-Ingvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Hematology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallbeck, Anna-Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Walz, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    The pan-ErbB tyrosine kinase inhibitor canertinib induces caspase-mediated cell death in human T-cell leukemia (Jurkat) cells2011In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 410, no 3, p. 422-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Canertinib is a novel ErbB-receptor inhibitor currently in clinical development for the treatment of solid tumors overexpressing ErbB-receptors. We have recently demonstrated that canertinib displays anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in human myeloid leukemia cells devoid of ErbB-receptors. The mechanism mediating these effects are however unknown. In this study, we show that canertinib is able to act as a multi-kinase inhibitor by inhibition of several intracellular kinases involved in T-cell signaling such as Akt, Erk1/2 and Zap-70, and reduced Lck protein expression in the human T-cell leukemia cell line Jurkat. Treatment with canertinib at a concentration of 2 mu M caused accumulation of Jurkat cells in the G(1) cell cycle phase and increased doses induced apoptosis in a time-dependent manner. Apoptotic signs of treated cells were detected by Annexin V staining and cleavage of PARP, caspase-3, -8, -9, -10 and Bid. A subset of the pro-apoptotic signals mediated by canertinib could be significantly reduced by specific caspase inhibitors. Taken together, these results demonstrate the dual ability of canertinib to downregulate important signaling pathways and to activate caspase-mediated intrinsic apoptosis pathway in human T-cell leukemia cells.

  • 14.
    Wallin, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svanvik, Joar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Holmlund, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ferreud, Lillianne
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Anticancer effect of SN-38 on colon cancer cell lines with different metastatic potential2008In: Oncology Reports, ISSN 1021-335X, E-ISSN 1791-2431, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 1493-1498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SN-38 is an active metabolite of the topoisomerase I inhibitor irinotecan. The mechanism behind its antitumor effect in colorectal cancer is not fully understood. In this study, we examined the response of colon cancer cell lines with different metastatic potential to SN-38. The parental human colon cancer cell line KM12C and its two highly metastatic derivatives KM12SM and KM12L4a were cultivated in 5% CO2 at 37°C for 24 h and then exposed to SN-38 (2.5 µg/ml) at 37°C for 4, 24 and 48 h, respectively. The cell cycle was measured by flow cytometry, apoptotic activity was determined by flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry and the expression of topoisomerase I, Bax and survivin proteins were examined by Western blot. The exposure of the cells to SN-38 induced S-phase and G2 arrest (P<0.0001) and the KM12L4a cells had the highest response in a time-dependent manner (P<0.0001). The rates of apoptosis in the KM12SM (P=0.001) and KM12L4a cell lines (P=0.01) were increased time-dependently, though there was no such change in the KM12C cells. The expression of topoisomerase I protein was decreased in each cell line tested and the expression of Bax protein was increased, especially in KM12L4a. In conclusion, the effect of SN-38 on the colon cancer cell lines was mediated via conducting S-phase and G2 arrest and apoptosis. This effect was found in the cell lines with higher metastatic potentials, indicating that SN-38 can be used to treat advanced colon cancers.

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