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  • 1.
    La Fontaine, Jean S.
    et al.
    London, UK.
    Rydstrøm, HelleLinköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Invisibility of Children. Papers presented at an international conference on anthropology and children, May, 19971998Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although an increasing number of studies on children in non-Western and Western contexts have been conducted during the last twenty years, the field of anthropology and children still remains at an early stage. On the 5th and 6th of May, 1997, the Department of Child Studies (Linkoping University, Sweden) organised an international two-day conference called the "Invisibility of Children".

    The Department of Child Studies is very grateful to Jens Aagaard-Hansen, Pia Christensen, Eva van Hirsch, Don Kulick, Jean La Fontaine, 01ga Nieuwenhuys, Karin Nonnan, Alan Praut, and Christina Toren for agreeing to participate in the conference. Their papers concerned children's agency, local assumptions about children, and methodological and theoretical questions with respect to anthropological studies on children. All the papers appearing in tltis publication were read at the conference.

    Unfommately, not all the papers presented at the conference could be included in tllis publication. Don Kulick's paper on \Vestem understandings of adolescence as related to interpretations of Brazilian transvestites' memories of their early sexual experiences was committed to the Journal of American Anthropologist (Kulick 1997; see also Kulick 1998). Alan Prout's paper on a theory of social structure with regard to studies on children in \Vestem societies is being prepared for publication elsewhere. Christina Toren's paper on children's cognition and the human "embodied mind" was already conunitted to the Journal ofthe Royal Anthropological Institute (Toren in press).

    The organisers of the conference and the editors of this publication wish to express their gratitude to all contributors for presenting papers at the conference and/or for producing written papers for this publication. Don Kulick, Jean La Fontaine, Armika Rabo, and Bengt Sandin are acknowledged for chairing sessions at the conference. All the participants of the conference are thanked for providing stimulating discussions on the field of anthropology and children .

  • 2.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    A Preliminary Study of Kopundol Women's Educational Needs1988Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    A Swedish Save the Children Report on Rural Vietnamese Girls' Gender Socialization1999Report (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    At Ville Glemme Krigen med USA2000Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    bao cao cua to chuc cuu tro tre em Thuy Dien ve xa hoi hoa ve gioi cua tre em gai nong thon Viet Nam (A Swedish Save the Children Report on Rural Vietnamese Girls' Gender Socialization)1999Report (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Boernene i antropologien: Vietnamesiske pigers könssocialisering (The Field of Children and Anthropology1996Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 7.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Bridging Pedagogical Traditions: Educational Traditions in Vietnam and Sweden2005In: Pacific-Asian education, ISSN 1019-8725, Vol. 18: 1, p. 137-152Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Embodying morality: Girls' socialization in a north Vietnamese commune1998Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study argues that Vietnamese girls' socialization is inseparable from the symbolic and biological meaning of female and male bodies. Socialization is not so much about "sex" (i.e. biological sex) or "gender" (i.e. social/symbolic sex) as it is about "body". This argument is elaborated theoretically with regard to contemporary research on the body and empirically with respect to a local north Vietnamese fieldsite called Thinh Tri.

    By exploring the turbulent past of Viet Nam, which includes epoches of Confucianism, Colonialism, Anti-colonialism, Revolution, Communism, and wars, the study shows that contemporary socialization of girls is a process of syncretism of both Confucian and Communist moral ideals.

    Thinh Tri girls and boys are ensconced in a patrilineally organized universe which emphasizes the importance of practicing either good female or male "morality" (dao duc). From the day a child is born its biological sex is configured due to whether the child is able to reproduce its patrilineage. A boy is seen as a materialization of the history of his patrilineage and, in such terms, his body is ascribed with "honor" (danh du). A son's vital importance for his patrilineage means that he is expected to demonstrate nghia ("obligations"/"loyalty"/"duty") towards his patrilineage by having a son himself when he grows up.

    A girl's body, on the other hand, is considered to be blank in both biological and symbolic terms. The body of a girl is bound to present time because her blood cannot be passed from one generation to another. This study demonstrates that the blank female body is perceived to be in need of social inscription because it does not incorporate any inborn "honor". Girls' socialization is, therefore, a bodily project of learning how to compensate socially for what is perceived to be a biological deficiency. Girls' bodies are inscribed with appropriate female "morality" by their female kin, in particular, who teach them how to embody the social and symbolic capital of tinh cam ("sentiments"/"feelings"/"emotions"). Tinh cam is assumed to be manifested in various situations of daily social interaction as a significant way of practicing good female "morality". Whenever girls take care of a younger sibling, play with their peers, conduct household chores, and are in kindergarten or primary school, they display from a very young age that they have learned to act with a "sense" (tinh cam) for the logic of a particular social situation. In this light, tinh cam emerges as a crucial social capacity which girls can invest in various fields of daily life.

  • 9.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Embodying Morality: Growing Up in Rural Northern Vietnam2003Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

       "One of the first anthropological studies based on extensive fieldwork in Vietnam in decades, Embodying Morality examines child-rearing in a rural Red River delta commune. It is a sophisticated and intriguing exploration of the ways in which a family system based on principles of male descent influences the moral upbringing and learning of girls and boys." "In Vietnamese culture, boys alone perpetuate the patrilineal family line; they incorporate the past, present, and future morality, honor, and reputation of their father's lineage. Within this patrilineal universe, girls are viewed as blank sheets of paper and must compensate for this deficiency by embodying tinh cam (sensitivity, sense). Such attitudes play a significant role in the upbringing of girls and boys and in how they learn to use and understand their bodies. Helle Rydstrom offers fresh data - from audiotapes, video-tapes, textbooks, observations in the home and at school - for identifying the transformation of local and educational constructions of females, males, and morality into body styles of girls, boys, women, and men. She highlights the extent to which body performances in daily life produce, reproduce, and challenge widespread northern Vietnamese ideals of femininity and masculinity."--BOOK JACKET

  • 10.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Encountering Hot Anger: Domestic Violence in Rural Vietnam2003In: Violence against Women, ISSN 1077-8012, E-ISSN 1552-8448, Vol. 9: 6, p. 676-697Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Encountering "hot" anger. Domestic violence in contemporary Vietnam2003In: Violence against Women, ISSN 1077-8012, E-ISSN 1552-8448, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 676-697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines husband-to-wife violence within a rural Vietnamese community. In Vietnam, domestic violence is tied to a complex field of cultural forces that consists of a patrilineal tradition of ancestor worship, assumptions about females' versus males' character, Confucian virtues, and a history of war. Females are expected to encourage household harmony by adjusting themselves and, in so doing, make social life smooth. Males, on the other hand, are assumed to have a hot character, meaning that a male mightily into a rage and even behave violently. Local ways of constructing females and males, the article suggests, provide conditions for considering females as a corporeal materiality that can be manipulated into the right shape by the means of (male) violence. Domestic violence, like any other violence, by ignoring the corporeal limits thus brutally alters assumptions about the topography of the human body. © 2003 Sage Publications.

  • 12.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Female and Male 'Characters': Images of Identification and Self-Identification for Rural Vietnamese Children and Adolescents2004In: Gender practices in contemporary Vietnam / [ed] Lisa Drummond and Helle Rydstrøm, Singapore: Singapore University Press , 2004, p. 74-95Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Gender-related studies on contemporary Vietnam are few in number, and most writing concentrates on socio-economic topics. This book's focus on the fundamental issues of gender roles is a significant contribution. Bruce M. Lockhart, National University of Singapore. Our knowledge of contemporary Vietnamese society is still limited, and studies of gender-related topics are few and far between. This book breaks much New ground on Vietnamese society that it will be of interest also to Vietnam specialists working on non-gender topics, as well as to non-specialists. Confucianism, colonialism and socialism have all contributed significantly to gender relations in Vietnam. More recently, political and social change associated with modernization and globalization have also had an impact. How do the Vietnamese display their social positions and their identities as male or female? This volume examines negotiations, and transgressions, of gender within Vietnamese society, looking at family, social and work relations, bodily displays, body language and occupation of space. Of special interest is a discussion of sexual harassment in schools and the workplace, and the strategies women adopt to deal with it, the first discussion of this issue by a Vietnamese scholar.

  • 13.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Gender, Sex og Habitus i Vietnam (Gender, Sex and Habitus in Vietnam)1996Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gender/Sex og Habitus i Viet Nam1996Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [da]

    Denne artikel bygger pa et igangvrerende Ph.D. projekt om pigers kønssocialisering i Viet Nam. Jeg vil således geme i det følgende diskutereprobIemer indenfor den könsteoretiske debat i forhold til det at studere pigers socialisering i en ikke-vestlig kultur.

  • 15.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Genus och funktionshinder i Vietnam - Interview2004Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Guida din bödel2000Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

      

  • 17.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Kropslig differens: pigers socialisering i Vietnam (Bodily Differences1998In: Norsk Antropologisk Tidsskrift, ISSN 0802-7285, E-ISSN 1504-2898, Vol. 9, p. 188-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 18.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    'Like a White Piece of Paper'. Embodiment and the Moral Upbringing of Vietnamese Children2001In: Ethnos, ISSN 0014-1844, E-ISSN 1469-588X, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 394-413Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    LiU forskning om Vietnam - Interview2004Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Masculinity and punishment: Men's upbringing of boys in rural Vietnam2006In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 329-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines men's use of physical punishment when interacting with their sons or grandsons in rural Vietnam. By drawing on two periods of anthropological fieldwork in a northern Vietnamese commune, the article analyses the ways in which violence is informed by, while also perpetually reinforcing, a masculine discourse. Vietnam has ratified the Convention on the Rights of the Child and in this spirit virtually all men in the local community disapprove of the use of physical punishment when bringing up boys. However, a father or grandfather occasionally beats his son or grandson when it is deemed necessary to instil discipline in a boy. The article elucidates the ways in which the contradictions between ideals of nonviolent behaviour and actual corporal punishment have fed the construction of certain codes regarding men's beating of boys. Copyright © 2006 SAGE Publications.

  • 21.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Moral og 'Normalisering': Funktionshindrede Elever i Vietnamesiske Skoler (Morality and 'Normalization'2005In: Svensk religionshistorisk årsskrift, ISSN 0283-0302, Vol. 14, p. 182-205Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 22.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Pligternes Glaeder - og Sorger (The Pleasure and Sorrow of Chores)1996Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Proximity and distance: Vietnamese memories of the war with the USA2007In: Anthropological Forum, ISSN 0066-4677, E-ISSN 1469-2902, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 21-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By employing an intergenerational perspective, this article examines the ways in which memories about the war between Vietnam and the USA are engraved in the social and individual body in a northern Vietnamese rural community. Throughout the 1990s, Vietnam and the USA attempted to improve their postwar relationship. ne current atmosphere of coming to terms with a past of war through coexistence and reconciliation fosters ambivalences and ambiguities in young postwar generations. On the one hand, they have to reconcile themselves to the pain and bitterness caused by the war. On the other, they have to bridge the gap between themselves and their parents and grandparents concerning the extent to which they are able to forget the past and look toward the future', as one national postwar strategy recommends. The article thus highlights the complex ways in which war and postwar generations in local Vietnam attempt to remember and/or forget brutality, sorrow and anger, in order to come to terms with what in Vietnam is referred to as the American War.

  • 24.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Report on Rädda Barnen/Save the Children Sweden Workshop Discussions, Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, November, December 19992000Report (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Review of Liljeström, Lindskog Nguyen & Vuong, 1998, Profit and Poverty in Rural Vietnam2001In: Ethnos, ISSN 0014-1844, E-ISSN 1469-588X, Vol. 66: 1, p. 121-123Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Rita Liljeström, Eva Lindskog, Nguyen Van Ang, & Vuong Xuan Tinh. 1998. Profit and Poverty in Rural Vietnam.2001In: Ethnos, ISSN 0014-1844, E-ISSN 1469-588X, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 126-127Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Sexed bodies, gendered bodies: Children and the body in Vietnam2002In: Women's Studies: International Forum, ISSN 0277-5395, E-ISSN 1879-243X, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 359-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how local Vietnamese ideas about female and male bodies, the patrilineage, and morality intersect with one another and influence girls' and boys' different social positions. In the rural commune of Thinh Tri, the meaning of patrilineal ancestor worship is salient. It is perceived to be a person's moral obligation to provide male progeny in order to continue either one's own or one's husband's patrilineage. Because only sons are thought to be able to continue their father's lineage, their genitals (i.e. the Phallus) and by extension, their bodies are imbued with symbolic meaning. Therefore, males hold a special position within the local community. Since daughters are not assumed to be able to reproduce their father's lineage, their bodies are not celebrated in similar ways as boys'. Hence, a child's body is construed as a powerful socio-symbolic and material sign that reflects local life in terms of hierarchies, positions, and power. Local understandings of female and male bodies crystallize the ways in which a child's body simultaneously is wrought socially (i.e. in terms of 'gender') and biologically (i.e. in terms of 'sex'), both the notions of sex and gender have a history, which is constructed discursively. In other words, both notions address the same question, which is namely, how female and male bodies are rendered meaningful in time and space. Since the notions of sex and gender are overlapping one another, this article suggests that we approach the human body as an analytical category that can substitute the notions of sex and gender. © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 28.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Sexed Bodies/Gendered Bodies: Children and the Body in Vietnam2002In: Women's Studies: International Forum, ISSN 0277-5395, E-ISSN 1879-243X, Vol. 25: 3, p. 359-372Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Sexual desires and 'social evils': Young women in rural Vietnam2006In: Gender, Place and Culture: A Journal of Feminist Geography, ISSN 0966-369X, E-ISSN 1360-0524, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 283-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vietnam's increased integration into the global market economy entails rapid and dynamic changes that foster new ways of acting, interacting and rendering the world meaningful. This article addresses the ways in which an ongoing process of transformation in contemporary Vietnam is epitomised by the ambivalence and ambiguity with which female sexuality is imbued. Female sexuality is ideally restricted to marriage and motherhood, meaning that females' premarital or extramarital sexual relations tend to be associated with the category of 'social evils' (te nan xa hoi). The category of 'social evils' is vague in definition and was introduced into Vietnamese society by virtue of what was seen as the country's increased involvement in a morally polluted world. By drawing on two periods of fieldwork (1994-1995 and 2000-2001) in a northern rural Vietnamese commune, this article highlights the ways in which female sexuality in a local field site is intertwined with anxieties about the forces of a global and 'poisonous culture' (van hoa doc hai) that may lead young women to transgress moral limits: For example, by having premarital sex. For many rural female adolescents sexuality thus means a need of self-imposed and/or governmentally imposed control in order to guarantee appropriate morality. For others, however, sexuality means the involvement in premarital sexual relations and, hence, a crossing of moral boundaries.

  • 30.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Sidder det i kroppen? En Bourdieusk indgang til studiet af piger i Vietnam (Is it Embodied? A Bourdieuan Understanding of Girls Living in Vietnam)1993Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 31.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    The Intersections Between Desires and Violences - Interview with LUM2007Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 32.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    The Invisibility of Children: Introduction1998In: The Invisibility of Children, Linköping: Department of Child Studies, Linköping University , 1998Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    The Needs for Alternative Energy in Nepal - Terms of Reference1990Report (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Vietnam's Urbane Unge - og ABBA2005Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    'When the Rice Boils': Domestic Violence in Rural Vietnam2002In: Workshop on Violence in Asia,2002, Copenhagen: Tema Nord Serien , 2002, p. 451-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Rydström, Helle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Drummond, Lisa
    York University.
    Gender Practices in Contemporary Vietnam2004Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

          Gender-related studies on contemporary Vietnam are few in number, and most writing concentrates on socio-economic topics. This book's focus on the fundamental issues of gender roles is a significant contribution. Bruce M. Lockhart, National University of Singapore. Our knowledge of contemporary Vietnamese society is still limited, and studies of gender-related topics are few and far between. This book breaks much New ground on Vietnamese society that it will be of interest also to Vietnam specialists working on non-gender topics, as well as to non-specialists. Confucianism, colonialism and socialism have all contributed significantly to gender relations in Vietnam. More recently, political and social change associated with modernization and globalization have also had an impact. How do the Vietnamese display their social positions and their identities as male or female? This volume examines negotiations, and transgressions, of gender within Vietnamese society, looking at family, social and work relations, bodily displays, body language and occupation of space. Of special interest is a discussion of sexual harassment in schools and the workplace, and the strategies women adopt to deal with it, the first discussion of this issue by a Vietnamese scholar.

  • 37.
    Rydström, Helle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Drummond, Lisa
    York University.
    Introduction2004In: Gender Practices in Contemporary Vietnam / [ed] Lisa Drummond and Helle Rydstrøm, Singapore: Singapore University Press , 2004, p. -286Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Gender-related studies on contemporary Vietnam are few in number, and most writing concentrates on socio-economic topics. This book's focus on the fundamental issues of gender roles is a significant contribution. Bruce M. Lockhart, National University of Singapore. Our knowledge of contemporary Vietnamese society is still limited, and studies of gender-related topics are few and far between. This book breaks much New ground on Vietnamese society that it will be of interest also to Vietnam specialists working on non-gender topics, as well as to non-specialists. Confucianism, colonialism and socialism have all contributed significantly to gender relations in Vietnam. More recently, political and social change associated with modernization and globalization have also had an impact. How do the Vietnamese display their social positions and their identities as male or female? This volume examines negotiations, and transgressions, of gender within Vietnamese society, looking at family, social and work relations, bodily displays, body language and occupation of space. Of special interest is a discussion of sexual harassment in schools and the workplace, and the strategies women adopt to deal with it, the first discussion of this issue by a Vietnamese scholar.

  • 38.
    Rydström, Helle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    La Fontaine, Jean S.
    The Invisibility of Children1998Book (Other academic)
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