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  • 1.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science.
    Theander, Kersti
    Faculty of Health, Science and Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Geriatric Medicine, Department of Research and Education, Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden; Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Departmentof Neurobiology, Caring Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm,Sweden .
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Symptom trajectory and symptom burden in older people with multimorbidity, secondary outcome from the RCT AGe-FIT study2016In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 11, p. 2773-2783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The aim of this study was to follow the symptom trajectory of community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity and to explore the effect on symptom burden from an ambulatory geriatric care unit, based on comprehensive geriatric assessment.

    Background

    Older community-dwelling people with multimorbidity suffer from a high symptom burden with a wide range of co-occurring symptoms often resulting to decreased health-related quality of life. There is a need to move from a single-disease model and address the complexity of older people living with multimorbidity.

    Design

    Secondary outcome data from the randomized controlled Ambulatory Geriatric Assessment Frailty Intervention Trial (AGe-FIT).

    Methods

    Symptom trajectory of 31 symptoms was assessed with the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale. Data from 247 participants were assessments at baseline, 12 and 24 months, 2011–2013. Participants in the intervention group received care from an ambulatory geriatric care unit based on comprehensive geriatric assessment in addition to usual care.

    Results

    Symptom prevalence and symptom burden were high and stayed high over time. Pain was the symptom with the highest prevalence and burden. Over the 2-year period 68–81% of the participants reported pain. Other highly prevalent and persistent symptoms were dry mouth, lack of energy and numbness/tingling in the hands/feet, affecting 38–59% of participants. No differences were found between the intervention and control group regarding prevalence, burden or trajectory of symptoms.

    Conclusions

    Older community-dwelling people with multimorbidity had a persistent high burden of symptoms. Receiving advanced interdisciplinary care at an ambulatory geriatric unit did not significantly reduce the prevalence or the burden of symptoms.

  • 2.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theander, Kersti
    Faculty of Health, Science and Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hellström, Iingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    To adjust and endure: a qualitative study of symptom burden in older people with multimorbidity2015In: Applied Nursing Research, ISSN 0897-1897, E-ISSN 1532-8201, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 322-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context Older people with multimorbidity are vulnerable and often suffer from conditions that produce a multiplicity of symptoms and a reduced health-related quality of life. Objectives The aim of this study is to explore the experience of living with a high symptom burden from the perspective of older community-dwelling people with multi-morbidity.

    Method A qualitative descriptive design with semi-structured interviews, including 20 community-dwelling older people with multi-morbidity and a high symptom burden. The participants were 79-€“89 years old with a mean of 12 symptoms per person. Data were analyzed using content analyses.

    Results The experience of living with a high symptom burden revealed the overall theme, “To adjust and endure” and three sub-themes. The first sub-theme was "To feel inadequate and limited". Participants reported that they no longer had the capacity or the ability to manage, and they felt limited and isolated from friends or family. The second sub-theme was "To feel dependent". This was a new and inconvenient experience; the burden they put on others caused a feeling of guilt. The final sub-theme was "To feel dejected". The strength to manage and control their conditions was gone; the only thing left to do was to sit or lie down and wait for it all to pass.

    Conclusion This study highlights the importance of a holistic approach when taking care of older people with multi-morbidity. This approach should employ a broad symptom assessment to reveal diseases and conditions that are possible to treat or improve.

  • 3.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Theander, Kersti
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Karolinska Institute KI, Sweden.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity: a cross-sectional study2015In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 15, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Globally, the population is ageing and lives with several chronic diseases for decades. A high symptom burden is associated with a high use of healthcare, admissions to nursing homes, and reduced quality of life. The aims of this study were to describe the multidimensional symptom profile and symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity, and to describe factors related to symptom burden. Methods: A cross-sectional study including 378 community-dwelling people greater than= 75 years, who had been hospitalized greater than= 3 times during the previous year, had greater than= 3 diagnoses in their medical records. The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale was used to assess the prevalence, frequency, severity, distress and symptom burden of 31 symptoms. A multiple linear regression was performed to identify factors related to total symptom burden. Results: The mean number of symptoms per participant was 8.5 (4.6), and the mean total symptom burden score was 0.62 (0.41). Pain was the symptom with the highest prevalence, frequency, severity and distress. Half of the study group reported the prevalence of lack of energy and a dry mouth. Poor vision, likelihood of depression, and diagnoses of the digestive system were independently related to the total symptom burden score. Conclusion: The older community-dwelling people with multimorbidity in this study suffered from a high symptom burden with a high prevalence of pain. Persons with poor vision, likelihood of depression, and diseases of the digestive system are at risk of a higher total symptom burden and might need age-specific standardized guidelines for appropriate management.

  • 4.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    How to promote better care of elderly patients with multi-morbidity in Europe: A Swedish example2012In: EUROPEAN GERIATRIC MEDICINE, ISSN 1878-7649, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 103-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How to improve the care of elderly patients with multi-morbidity, regardless of borders between medical specialities and professions, starting from the patients point of view and ending with a powerful policy document with impact on the political system. A document written by the Swedish Association of Geriatric Medicine, the Swedish Association of General Practice and the Swedish Association of Internal Medicine.

  • 5.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    The organisation of hospitals and the remuneration systems are not adapted to frail old patients giving them bad quality of care and the staff feelings of guilt and frustration2014In: European Geriatric Medicine, ISSN 1878-7649, E-ISSN 1878-7657, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 35-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In the coming half-century, the population of old people will increase, especially in the oldest age groups. Therefore, the prevalence of multiple chronic conditions, and consequently, the need of health care including care in hospital, is rising. Materials and methods: This article includes results from three mainly qualitative articles (interviews with frail old people, physicians, and an observational study in acute medical wards) and a cross-sectional survey of newly discharged elderly patients. Results: Health care does not take a holistic approach to patients with more complex diseases, such as frail old people. The remuneration system rewards high production of care in terms of numbers of investigations and operations, turnover of hospital beds, and easy accessibility to care. Frail old people do not feel welcome in hospital, with their complex diseases and a need of more time to recover. The staff providing care feels frustrated, and often guilty when taking care of old people. Discussion and conclusion: To improve quality of care of frail elderly, a model is suggested with the following main components: more hospital wards which can address the patients whole situation medically, functionally, and psychologically, i.e comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA). Better identification of frail elderly people is necessary, together with a change in remuneration system, with a focus on the patients functional status and quality of life. More training in geriatrics is required for staff to feel confident when treating frail old people.

  • 6.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Norrköping.
    Andersson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    They do what they think is the best for me: Frail elderly patients' preferences for participation in their care during hospitalization.2010In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 80, no 2, p. 233-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To deepen the knowledge of frail elderly patients' preferences for participation in medical decision making during hospitalization. METHODS: Qualitative study using content analysis of semi-structured interviews.

    RESULTS: Patient participation to frail elderly means information, not the wish to take part in decisions about their medical treatments. They view the hospital care system as an institution of power with which they cannot argue. Participation is complicated by barriers such as the numerous persons involved in their care who do not know them and their preferences, differing treatment strategies among doctors, fast patient turnover in hospitals, stressed personnel and linguistic problems due to doctors not always speaking the patient's own language.

    CONCLUSION: The results of the study show that, to frail elderly patients, participation in medical decision making is primarily a question of good communication and information, not participation in decisions about medical treatments.

    PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: More time should be given to thorough information and as few people as possible should be involved in the care of frail elderly. Linguistic problems should be identified to make it possible to take the necessary precautions to prevent negative impact on patient participation.

  • 7.
    Ekdahl, Anne W
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Norrköping.
    Andersson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Are elderly people with co-morbidities involved adequately in medical decision making when hospitalised?: A cross-sectional survey2011In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 11, no 46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Medical decision making has long been in focus, but little is known of the preferences and conditions for elderly people with co-morbidities to participate in medical decision making. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the preferred and the actual degree of control, i.e. the role elderly people with co-morbidities wish to assume and actually had with regard to information and participation in medical decision making during their last stay in hospital.This study was a cross-sectional survey including three Swedish hospitals with acute admittance. The participants were patients aged 75 years and above with three or more diagnoses according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) and three or more hospitalisations during the last year.

    METHODS:

    We used a questionnaire combined with a telephone interview, using the Control Preference Scale to measure each participant's preferred and actual role in medical decision making during their last stay in hospital. Additional questions were asked about barriers to participation in decision making and preferred information seeking role. The results are presented with descriptive statistics with kappa weights.

    RESULTS:

    Of the 297 elderly patients identified, 52.5% responded (n = 156, 46.5% male). Mean age was 83.1 years. Of the respondents, 42 of 153 patients said that they were not asked for their opinion (i.e. no shared decision making). Among the other 111 patients, 49 had their exact preferred level of participation, 37 had less participation than they would have preferred, and 23 had more responsibility than they would have preferred. Kappa statistics showed a moderate agreement between preferred and actual role (κw = 0.57; 95% CI: 0.45-0.69). Most patients wanted to be given more information without having to ask. There was no correlation between age, gender, or education and preferred role. 35% of the patients agreed that they experienced some of the various barriers to decision making that they were asked about: 1) the severity of their illness, 2) doctors with different treatment strategies, 3) difficulty understanding the medical information, and 4) difficulty understanding doctors who did not speak the patient's own language.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Physicians are not fully responsive to patient preferences regarding either the degree of communication or the patient's participation in decision making. Barriers to participation can be a problem, and should be taken into account more often when dealing with hospitalised elderly people.

  • 8.
    Ekdahl, Anne W
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Wirehn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Costs and Effects of an Ambulatory Geriatric Unit (the AGe-FIT Study): A Randomized Controlled Trial2015In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 497-503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To examine costs and effects of care based on comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) provided by an ambulatory geriatric care unit (AGU) in addition to usual care.

    DESIGN: Assessor-blinded, single-center randomized controlled trial.

    SETTING: AGU in an acute hospital in southeastern Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: Community-dwelling individuals aged 75 years or older who had received inpatient hospital care 3 or more times in the past 12 months and had 3 or more concomitant medical diagnoses were eligible for study inclusion and randomized to the intervention group (IG; n = 208) or control group (CG; n = 174). Mean age (SD) was 82.5 (4.9) years.

    INTERVENTION: Participants in the IG received CGA-based care at the AGU in addition to usual care.

    OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was number of hospitalizations. Secondary outcomes were days in hospital and nursing home, mortality, cost of public health and social care, participant' sense of security in care, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL).

    RESULTS: Baseline characteristics did not differ between groups. The number of hospitalizations did not differ between the IG (2.1) and CG (2.4), but the number of inpatient days was lower in the IG (11.1 vs 15.2; P = .035). The IG showed trends of reduced mortality (hazard ratio 1.51; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.988-2.310; P = .057) and an increased sense of security in care interaction. No difference in HRQoL was observed. Costs for the IG and CG were 33,371£ (39,947£) and 30,490£ (31,568£; P = .432).

    CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: This study of CGA-based care was performed in an ambulatory care setting, in contrast to the greater part of studies of the effects of CGA, which have been conducted in hospital settings. This study confirms the superiority of this type of care to elderly people in terms of days in hospital and sense of security in care interaction and that a shift to more accessible care for older people with multimorbidity is possible without increasing costs. This study can aid the planning of future interventions for older people.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01446757.

  • 9.
    Hammar, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Asp, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Maller, Rolf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    A new program for better clinical supervision of students. A joint project at the Halsouniversitet and county council in Ostergotland2006In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 103, p. 649-654Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Hammar, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Asp, Malin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Maller, Rolf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Ny handlingsplan för bättre klinisk handledning av studenter.2006In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 103, p. 649-654Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

        

  • 11.
    Mazya, A. L.
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Norrköping. Danderyd Hospital, Sweden .
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care. Vrinnevi Hospital, Sweden .
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Westöö, A.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Norrköping.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Norrköping.
    The Ambulatory Geriatric Assessment - a Frailty Intervention Trial (AGe-FIT) - A randomised controlled trial aimed to prevent hospital readmissions and functional deterioration in high risk older adults: A study protocol2013In: European Geriatric Medicine, ISSN 1878-7649, E-ISSN 1878-7657, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 242-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Care of old people with multimorbidity living at home is often fragmented with lack of coordination and information exchange between health care professionals, the elderly and their relatives. This paper describes the protocol of a randomised, controlled study, which aims to compare the efficacy of caring for older people with multimorbidity and three or more hospital admissions in the previous year at a geriatric ambulatory department based on Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) versus usual care.

    Participants and methods

    A total of 400 community-dwelling old people with multimorbidity who are living in the city of Norrköping (Sweden) and one of their relatives are recruited for this trial and randomized to an intervention and a control group. Participants in the intervention group receive interdisciplinary care after a CGA at an Ambulatory Geriatric Unit with easy accessibility during working hours in addition to usual care. The control group receives usual care provided by the primary care or hospital.

    Outcomes

    The primary outcome is number of hospitalisation, the secondary outcomes are health-related outcomes including measures of frailty, cognition, symptom burden, feeling of security, quality of life of participants and relatives and as well as costs for health and social care. Participants will be followed for 2 years.

    Discussion

    This study will contribute to evidence of the effect of two different care models. The study has the potential to change care for older people with multimorbidity.

  • 12.
    Wallin, A.K.
    et al.
    Wallin, Å.K., Clinical Memory Research Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, SE-205 02 Malmö, Sweden.
    Andreasen, N.
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurotec, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, S.
    Section of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Batsman, S.
    Båtsman, S., Department of Primary Care, Kalix Vårdcentral, Kalix, Sweden.
    Nasman, B.
    Näsman, B., Section of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Kilander, L.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Grut, M.
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Cognitive Section, Danderyd Hospital, Danderyd, Sweden.
    Ryden, M.
    Rydén, M., Department of Geriatric Medicine, Cognitive Section, Danderyd Hospital, Danderyd, Sweden.
    Wallin, A.
    Institute of Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Göteborg/Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden, Institute of Clinical Neuroscience, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Jonsson, M.
    Institute of Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Göteborg/Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden, Institute of Clinical Neuroscience, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Olofsson, H.
    Memory Clinic, Uddevalla Hospital, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Londos, E.
    Clinical Memory Research Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Wattmo, C.
    Clinical Memory Research Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Eriksdotter, Jonhagen M.
    Eriksdotter Jönhagen, M., Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurotec, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Minthon, L.
    Clinical Memory Research Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Bjorkman, A.
    Björkman, A., Clinical Memory Research Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Wunsch, A.
    Department of Primary Care, Kalix Vårdcentral, Kalix, Sweden.
    Mannberg, L.
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kallman, A.
    Källman, A., Department of Geriatric Medicine, University Hospital Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care.
    Soderin, M.
    Söderin, M., Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sjodin, C.
    Sjödin, C., Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurotec, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grut, M.
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Cognitive Section, Danderyd Hospital, Danderyd, Sweden.
    Mohlin, E.
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Cognitive Section, Danderyd Hospital, Danderyd, Sweden.
    Dahl, C.
    Clinical Memory Research Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Gustavsson, K.
    Institute of Clinical Neuroscience, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Holm, B.
    Memory Clinic, Uddevalla Hospital, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Donepezil in Alzheimer's disease: What to expect after 3 years of treatment in a routine clinical setting2007In: Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders, ISSN 1420-8008, E-ISSN 1421-9824, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 150-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims: Clinical short-term trails have shown positive effects of donepezil treatment in patients with Alzheimer's disease. The outcome of continuous long-term treatment in the routine clinical settings remains to be investigated. Methods: The Swedish Alzheimer Treatment Study (SATS) is a descriptive, prospective, longitudinal, multicentre study. Four hundred and thirty-five outpatients with the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, received treatment with donepezil. Patients were assessed with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog), global rating (CIBIC) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) at baseline and every 6 months for a total period of 3 years. Results: The mean MMSE change from baseline was positive for more than 6 months and in subgroups of patients for 12 months. After 3 years of treatment the mean change from baseline in MMSE-score was 3.8 points (95% CI, 3.0-4.7) and the ADAS-cog rise was 8.2 points (95% CI, 6.4-10.1). This is better than expected in untreated historical cohorts, and better than the ADAS-cog rise calculated by the Stern equation (15.6 points, 95% CI, 14.5-16.6). After 3 years with 38% of the patients remaining, 30% of the them were unchanged or improved in the global assessment. Conclusion: Three-year donepezil treatment showed a positive global and cognitive outcome in the routine clinical setting. Copyright © 2007 S. Karger AG.

  • 13.
    Wissendorff Ekdahl, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Frail and Elderly Hospital Patients: The Challenge of Participation in Medical Decision Making2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In research, patient participation in medical decision-making has been shown to be associated with higher patient satisfaction and improvement of treatment outcomes. But when it comes to patient participation when being old and frail there are pitfalls and the research in this area is sparse.

    The aim of this thesis is to explore participation in medical decision making of the frail elderly patient in hospital from the perspectives of patients themselves and the health care staff. In this thesis frail, elderly patients is defined as individuals 75 years old or older, who during the past 12 months have received inpatient hospital care three or more times and who have three or more diagnoses in three or more diagnostic groups according to the classification system ICD-10.

    The participants were frail patients’ in hospital or newly discharged and it was health care personnel working with frail elderly patients. In three of the studies the method was mainly qualitative (Paper I, III, IV) and in one (Paper II) quantitative. The qualitative methods were one-to-one tape-recorded interviews of 25 patients (Paper I and IV), 18 personnel (III and IV), 5 focus group interviews of physicians (Paper III) and 26 days of observations in hospital wards (IV). Chosen methodologies of analysis were content analysis and Grounded Theory. The quantitative study (II) was a cross-sectional survey using telephone interviews with patients (n= 156). This material was descriptively analysed and examined using weighted kappa statistics.

    Results: The results reported in Paper II show that elderly patients generally want to participate more in medical decision making than they do, though preferences for degree of participation are highly individualized – both findings important to consider in clinical practice.

    According to the patients important key concepts of patient participation in medical decision making are to be listened to and to be informed (Paper I). The main reasons for not being able to participate included having many illnesses and generally, overall bad medical condition (Paper II). Also, cited as a problem was difficulty in understanding medical information, for example when given by a foreign-speaking physician (Paper I, II and IV). Frail, elderly patients complained that they were less informed than was their preference (Paper I, II and IV).

    Moderate agreement was obtained between patient’s preferred and actual roles in medical decision making. Patients often expressed gratitude and confidence in their health care (Paper I and IV), but also, sympathy for stressed health care personnel who had so much to do.

    The frail elderly patients do sometimes feel like a burden to the health care (Paper I and IV). The professionals gave expressions of trying to avoid taking care of frail elderly patients and at the same time expressions of frustration and bad conscience not being able to take good care of them due to lack of time and lack of beds (Paper III, IV). Especially the physicians felt they were trapped between the needs of the patients’ and the remunerations system rewarding time-constricted health care production (number of investigations, operations, easy accessibility) – not a time-consuming holistic view on all illnesses and medications including communication with the patients and all caregivers involved (Paper III).

    Both patients and the professionals perceive the hospital as some kind of “institution of power”, difficult to challenge, and the decisions of which one has to accept.

    Conclusion: In this thesis there are shown a number of challenges to participation in medical decision making by frail, elderly patients, which thus limits quality of care for this patient group. Health care is revealed as not well adapted to meet these patients’ complex needs. A model is presented that explains how the organisation of health care, and the reimbursement system, does not facilitate a holistic view. The health care professionals appear to adapt to the organisation and the remuneration system, which leads to practices, such as, rapid discharges and a tendency to examine the patient for only one or a few problems. Finally a suggestion for a model to improve care of frail elderly patients is presented. This model includes the need of more hospital wards being able to work with a holistic view, better skills in gerontology and geriatrics and a more adapted remuneration system for the frail, elderly patients.

    List of papers
    1. They do what they think is the best for me: Frail elderly patients' preferences for participation in their care during hospitalization.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>They do what they think is the best for me: Frail elderly patients' preferences for participation in their care during hospitalization.
    2010 (English)In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 80, no 2, p. 233-240Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To deepen the knowledge of frail elderly patients' preferences for participation in medical decision making during hospitalization. METHODS: Qualitative study using content analysis of semi-structured interviews.

    RESULTS: Patient participation to frail elderly means information, not the wish to take part in decisions about their medical treatments. They view the hospital care system as an institution of power with which they cannot argue. Participation is complicated by barriers such as the numerous persons involved in their care who do not know them and their preferences, differing treatment strategies among doctors, fast patient turnover in hospitals, stressed personnel and linguistic problems due to doctors not always speaking the patient's own language.

    CONCLUSION: The results of the study show that, to frail elderly patients, participation in medical decision making is primarily a question of good communication and information, not participation in decisions about medical treatments.

    PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: More time should be given to thorough information and as few people as possible should be involved in the care of frail elderly. Linguistic problems should be identified to make it possible to take the necessary precautions to prevent negative impact on patient participation.

    Keywords
    Patient participation; Frail elderly; Hospitalization; Semi-structured interviews; Content analysis
    National Category
    Geriatrics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-52427 (URN)10.1016/j.pec.2009.10.026 (DOI)000280384500015 ()
    Note
    Original Publication: Anne Ekdahl, Lars Andersson and Maria Friedrichsen, They do what they think is the best for me: Frail elderly patients' preferences for participation in their care during hospitalization., 2010, Patient Education and Counseling, (80), 2, 233-240. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2009.10.026 Copyright: Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. http://www.elsevier.com/ Available from: 2010-02-02 Created: 2009-12-18 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    2. Are elderly people with co-morbidities involved adequately in medical decision making when hospitalised?: A cross-sectional survey
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are elderly people with co-morbidities involved adequately in medical decision making when hospitalised?: A cross-sectional survey
    2011 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 11, no 46Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Medical decision making has long been in focus, but little is known of the preferences and conditions for elderly people with co-morbidities to participate in medical decision making. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the preferred and the actual degree of control, i.e. the role elderly people with co-morbidities wish to assume and actually had with regard to information and participation in medical decision making during their last stay in hospital.This study was a cross-sectional survey including three Swedish hospitals with acute admittance. The participants were patients aged 75 years and above with three or more diagnoses according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) and three or more hospitalisations during the last year.

    METHODS:

    We used a questionnaire combined with a telephone interview, using the Control Preference Scale to measure each participant's preferred and actual role in medical decision making during their last stay in hospital. Additional questions were asked about barriers to participation in decision making and preferred information seeking role. The results are presented with descriptive statistics with kappa weights.

    RESULTS:

    Of the 297 elderly patients identified, 52.5% responded (n = 156, 46.5% male). Mean age was 83.1 years. Of the respondents, 42 of 153 patients said that they were not asked for their opinion (i.e. no shared decision making). Among the other 111 patients, 49 had their exact preferred level of participation, 37 had less participation than they would have preferred, and 23 had more responsibility than they would have preferred. Kappa statistics showed a moderate agreement between preferred and actual role (κw = 0.57; 95% CI: 0.45-0.69). Most patients wanted to be given more information without having to ask. There was no correlation between age, gender, or education and preferred role. 35% of the patients agreed that they experienced some of the various barriers to decision making that they were asked about: 1) the severity of their illness, 2) doctors with different treatment strategies, 3) difficulty understanding the medical information, and 4) difficulty understanding doctors who did not speak the patient's own language.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Physicians are not fully responsive to patient preferences regarding either the degree of communication or the patient's participation in decision making. Barriers to participation can be a problem, and should be taken into account more often when dealing with hospitalised elderly people.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London, UK: BioMed Central Ltd., 2011
    Keywords
    decision making, elderly
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-70696 (URN)10.1186/1471-2318-11-46 (DOI)
    Available from: 2011-09-20 Created: 2011-09-14 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
    3. Too complex and time-consuming to fit in! Physicians' experiences of elderly patients and their participation in medical decision making: a grounded theory study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Too complex and time-consuming to fit in! Physicians' experiences of elderly patients and their participation in medical decision making: a grounded theory study
    2012 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 2, no 3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To explore physicians' thoughts and considerations of participation in medical decision making by hospitalised elderly patients.

    Design A qualitative study using focus group interviews with physicians interpreted with grounded theory and completed with a questionnaire.

    Setting and participants The setting was three different hospitals in two counties in Sweden. Five focus groups were conducted with physicians (n=30) in medical departments, with experience of care of elderly patients.

    Results Physicians expressed frustration at not being able to give good care to elderly patients with multimorbidity, including letting them participate in medical decision making. Two main categories were found: ‘being challenged’ by this patient group and  ‘being a small part of the healthcare production machine’. Both categories were explained by the core category ‘lacking in time’. The reasons for the feeling of ‘being challenged’ were explained by the subcategories ‘having a feeling of incompetence’, ‘having to take relatives into consideration’ and ‘having to take cognitive decline into account’. The reasons for the feeling of ‘being a small part of the healthcare production machine’ were explained by the subcategories ‘at the mercy of routines' and ‘inadequate remuneration system’, both of which do not favour elderly patients with multimorbidity.

    Conclusions Physicians find that elderly patients with multimorbidity lead to frustration by giving them a feeling of professional inadequacy, as they are unable to prioritise this common and rapidly growing patient group and enable them to participate in medical decision making. The reason for this feeling is explained by lack of time, competence, holistic view, appropriate routines and proper remuneration systems for treating these patients.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    B M J Group, 2012
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-80824 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2012-001063 (DOI)000315044800075 ()
    Available from: 2013-03-28 Created: 2012-08-30 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    4. ‘Are decisions about dischargeof elderly hospital patients mainlyabout freeing blocked beds?’: A qualitative observational study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘Are decisions about dischargeof elderly hospital patients mainlyabout freeing blocked beds?’: A qualitative observational study
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: BMJ. British Medical Journal, E-ISSN 1756-1833, Vol. 2, no 6, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore the interactions concerning thefrail and elderly patients having to do with dischargefrom acute hospital wards and their participation inmedical decision-making. The views of the patients andthe medical staff were both investigated.

    Design: A qualitative observational and interviewstudy using the grounded theory.

    Setting and participants: The setting was threehospitals in rural and urban areas of two counties inSweden of which one was a teaching hospital. The datacomprised observations, healthcare staff interviews andpatient interviews. The selected patients were all aboutto be informed that they were going to be discharged.

    Results: The patients were seldom invited toparticipate in the decision-making regarding discharge.Generally, most communications regarding dischargewere between the doctor and the nurse, after which thepatient was simply informed about the decision. It wasobserved that the discharge information was oftengiven in an indirect way as if other, albeit absent,people were responsible for the decision. Interviewswith the healthcare staff revealed their preoccupationwith the need to free up beds: ‘thinking aboutdischarge planning all the time’ was the core category.This focus not only failed to fulfil the complex needs ofelderly patients, it also generated feelings of frustrationand guilt in the staff, and made the patients feelunwelcome.

    Conclusions: Frail elderly patients often did notparticipate in the medical decision-making regardingtheir discharge from hospital. The staff was highlyfocused on patients getting rapidly discharged, whichmade it difficult to fulfil the complex needs of thesepatients.

    Keywords
    Frail elderly, Patient Participation, Discharge Planning, Qualitative observational study, Grounded theory, Hospital
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-81401 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2012-002027 (DOI)000315081400135 ()
    Note

    On the day of the defence date the title of this article was: “Focusing on acquiring available beds!” : The process of discharging elderly patients: A qualitative observational study.

    Available from: 2012-09-13 Created: 2012-09-13 Last updated: 2017-12-07
  • 14.
    Wissendorff Ekdahl, Anne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Norrköping.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Norrköping.
    Andersson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Too complex and time-consuming to fit in! Physicians' experiences of elderly patients and their participation in medical decision making: a grounded theory study2012In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 2, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To explore physicians' thoughts and considerations of participation in medical decision making by hospitalised elderly patients.

    Design A qualitative study using focus group interviews with physicians interpreted with grounded theory and completed with a questionnaire.

    Setting and participants The setting was three different hospitals in two counties in Sweden. Five focus groups were conducted with physicians (n=30) in medical departments, with experience of care of elderly patients.

    Results Physicians expressed frustration at not being able to give good care to elderly patients with multimorbidity, including letting them participate in medical decision making. Two main categories were found: ‘being challenged’ by this patient group and  ‘being a small part of the healthcare production machine’. Both categories were explained by the core category ‘lacking in time’. The reasons for the feeling of ‘being challenged’ were explained by the subcategories ‘having a feeling of incompetence’, ‘having to take relatives into consideration’ and ‘having to take cognitive decline into account’. The reasons for the feeling of ‘being a small part of the healthcare production machine’ were explained by the subcategories ‘at the mercy of routines' and ‘inadequate remuneration system’, both of which do not favour elderly patients with multimorbidity.

    Conclusions Physicians find that elderly patients with multimorbidity lead to frustration by giving them a feeling of professional inadequacy, as they are unable to prioritise this common and rapidly growing patient group and enable them to participate in medical decision making. The reason for this feeling is explained by lack of time, competence, holistic view, appropriate routines and proper remuneration systems for treating these patients.

  • 15.
    Wissendorff Ekdahl, Anne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Norrköping.
    Linderholm, Märit
    Valdemarsviks Primary Care Center, 615 30 Valdemarsvik, County Council of Eastern Gotland, Sweden.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Norrköping.
    Andersson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    ‘Are decisions about dischargeof elderly hospital patients mainlyabout freeing blocked beds?’: A qualitative observational study2012In: BMJ. British Medical Journal, E-ISSN 1756-1833, Vol. 2, no 6, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore the interactions concerning thefrail and elderly patients having to do with dischargefrom acute hospital wards and their participation inmedical decision-making. The views of the patients andthe medical staff were both investigated.

    Design: A qualitative observational and interviewstudy using the grounded theory.

    Setting and participants: The setting was threehospitals in rural and urban areas of two counties inSweden of which one was a teaching hospital. The datacomprised observations, healthcare staff interviews andpatient interviews. The selected patients were all aboutto be informed that they were going to be discharged.

    Results: The patients were seldom invited toparticipate in the decision-making regarding discharge.Generally, most communications regarding dischargewere between the doctor and the nurse, after which thepatient was simply informed about the decision. It wasobserved that the discharge information was oftengiven in an indirect way as if other, albeit absent,people were responsible for the decision. Interviewswith the healthcare staff revealed their preoccupationwith the need to free up beds: ‘thinking aboutdischarge planning all the time’ was the core category.This focus not only failed to fulfil the complex needs ofelderly patients, it also generated feelings of frustrationand guilt in the staff, and made the patients feelunwelcome.

    Conclusions: Frail elderly patients often did notparticipate in the medical decision-making regardingtheir discharge from hospital. The staff was highlyfocused on patients getting rapidly discharged, whichmade it difficult to fulfil the complex needs of thesepatients.

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