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  • 1.
    Arapovic-Johansson, B.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kwak, L.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Björklund, C.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Jensen, I.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Work-related stress assessed by a text message single-item stress question2017In: Occupational Medicine, ISSN 0962-7480, E-ISSN 1471-8405, Vol. 67, no 8, p. 601-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Given the prevalence of work stress-related ill-health in the Western world, it is important to find cost-effective, easy-to-use and valid measures which can be used both in research and in practice. Aims To examine the validity and reliability of the single-item stress question (SISQ), distributed weekly by short message service (SMS) and used for measurement of work-related stress. Methods The convergent validity was assessed through associations between the SISQ and subscales of the Job Demand-Control-Support model, the Effort-Reward Imbalance model and scales measuring depression, exhaustion and sleep. The predictive validity was assessed using SISQ data collected through SMS. The reliability was analysed by the test-retest procedure. Results Correlations between the SISQ and all the subscales except for job strain and esteem reward were significant, ranging from -0.186 to 0.627. The SISQ could also predict sick leave, depression and exhaustion at 12-month follow-up. The analysis on reliability revealed a satisfactory stability with a weighted kappa between 0.804 and 0.868. Conclusions The SISQ, administered through SMS, can be used for the screening of stress levels in a working population.

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  • 2.
    Arapovic-Johansson, Bozana
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Jensen, Irene
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bjorklund, Christina
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kwak, Lydia
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Process Evaluation of a Participative Organizational Intervention as a Stress Preventive Intervention for Employees in Swedish Primary Health Care2020In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 19, article id 7285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is a process evaluation of a trial examining the effects of an organizational intervention (Productivity Measurement and Enhancement System or ProMES) on employee stress. The aims were to explore the implementation process and fidelity to the intervention guidelines, examine the influence of contextual factors (hindrances and facilitators) and explore participants experience of working with ProMES. We used the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) guidance to guide the process evaluation. The recruitment, reach and dose delivered were satisfactory and participation high. The employees felt ProMES clarified priorities, gave control and increased participation in decision-making. However, difficulty in obtaining statistical productivity data from the central administration office (a central feature of the intervention) hindered full implementation and regular feedback meetings. Staffing shortages interfered with the implementation process, while having seven design teams and one consultant prevented all occupational groups from working simultaneously. A detailed examination of access to necessary organizational data should be undertaken before implementing ProMES. We recommend a better introduction for new employees, more work on design and packaging and giving employees more training in how to use the software program. The study contributes to our understanding of process evaluations in research into organizational stress management interventions.

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  • 3.
    Arapovic-Johansson, Bozana
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hagberg, Jan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kwak, Lydia
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Axen, Iben
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bjorklund, Christina
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Jensen, Irene
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Experience of Stress Assessed by Text Messages and Its Association with Objective Workload-A Longitudinal Study2020In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 3, article id 680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exploring stress trajectories in detail and over a long time may give valuable information in terms of both understanding and practice. We followed a group of primary health care employees in a randomized controlled trial. The objective was to describe their experience of stress, explore the intra-individual variability and examine the association between the experience of stress and the objective workload. Weekly text messages with a single item stress question were distributed in two time series: 12 weeks at the beginning of the trial and 26 weeks after the 6-month follow up. Aggregated objective data about workload were collected from their administration office and related to stress levels. There was a seasonal variation, with higher stress during the fall than in spring and summer. The analysis comparing high and low stress subgroups showed that the stress trajectory of a high-stress subgroup was different from that of a low-stress subgroup. Individuals with high exhaustion scores had higher odds of belonging to a subgroup of individuals with high intra-individual variability in stress experience. The objective workload was measured in two ways and was strongly associated with the stress experience. We found that the lower the productivity, the higher the feeling of stress.

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  • 4.
    Arapovic-Johansson, Bozana
    et al.
    Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hagberg, Jan
    Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kwak, Lydia
    Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björklund, Christina
    Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jensen, Irene
    Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Participatory work place intervention for stress prevention in primary health care. A randomized controlled trial2018In: European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, ISSN 1359-432X, E-ISSN 1464-0643, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 219-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to explore whether a participatory, organizational intervention can reduce work-related risk factors, and thereby prevent stress-related ill health. We build on the job demand-control and effort-reward imbalance models of stress. It is a two-armed randomized trial, with one primary health care unit receiving the intervention and a two-unit control group. Validated questionnaires for the assessment of psychosocial work environment and health were administered, at the baseline and at 6 and 12-month follow up. The primary outcome was job strain. Secondary outcomes were effort-reward imbalance, exhaustion, sleep, and recovery. Group-level objective data on workload and data about relevant processes during the study were continuously collected. The changes in the intervention group with regard to job strain, effort-reward imbalance, exhaustion, sleep and recovery were not statistically different from changes in the control group. For the non-exhausted employees though, reward was significantly higher at follow up compared to baseline, but only in the intervention group. An important piece of information is that the objective workload was statistically significantly higher in the intervention group throughout the study. Not all the components of the intervention were implemented as intended. Context and process information, such as objective data and implementation fidelity are necessary for a valid interpretation of the results.

  • 5.
    B Jensen, Irene
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björk Brämberg, Elisabeth
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björklund, Christina
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hermansson, Ulric
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lohela Karlson, Malin
    Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Uppsala University and Region Vastmanland—Uppsala University, Centre for Clinical Research, Hospital of Vastmanland Vasteras, 721 89 Vasteras, Sweden.
    Schäfer Elinder, Liselotte
    Department of Global Public Health, Karolinska Institutet and Centre for Epidemiology and Community Medicine, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Munck Af Rosenschöld, Peter
    Swedish Association of Occupational Health and Safety, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nevala, Tarja
    Swedish Agency for Government Employers, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Carter, Ned
    Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mellblom, Bodil
    The Confederation of Swedish Enterprise, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kwak, Lydia
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Promoting Evidence-Based Practice for Improved Occupational Safety and Health at Workplaces in Sweden. Report on a Practice-Based Research Network Approach.2020In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 15, article id E5283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the rapid growth in research and R&D expenditures, the translation of research into practice is limited. One approach to increase the translation and utilization of research is practice based research networks. With the aim of strengthening evidence-based practice (EBP) within occupational health services in Sweden (OH-Services), a practice-based research network (PBRN-OSH) was developed. The PBRN-OSH includes researchers and representatives from end-users. This paper reports on the development, outputs and lessons learned in the PBRN-OSH. The PBRN-OSH resulted in several practice-based research projects as well as different measures to ensure EBP in OSH such as the governmentally sanctioned national guidelines for the OH-services. Moreover, results show that the competence in EBP increased among practitioners at the OH-services. Conducting research in a PBRN is more resource demanding; however, this does not imply that it is less cost effective. To succeed in increasing the utility of research findings via PBRN, resources must be invested into an infrastructure that supports collaboration in the PBRN, including costs for a variety of means of dissemination. Further, translation activities need to be included in academic career paths and reward systems if a major improvement in the impact and return of investments from research is to be expected.

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    Occupational Safety and Health
  • 6.
    Boström, Maria
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björklund, Christina
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bergström, Gunnar
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Nybergh, Lotta
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Schäfer Elinder, Liselotte
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stigmar, Kjerstin
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jensen, Irene
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kwak, Lydia
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Health and Work Environment among Female and Male Swedish Elementary School Teachers: A Cross-Sectional Study2020In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 1, article id E227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Changes in teachers' work situation in Sweden since the 1990s may have contributed to an increase in common mental disorders (CMDs) and burnout. However, there is a lack of research in this field. The aim was to describe how Swedish elementary school teachers experience their health, organizational and social work environment, and the psychosocial safety climate at the workplace, and especially differences and similarities between female and male teachers.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data were collected with the COPSOQ, OLBI, UWES and PSC-12 from 478 elementary teachers, 81.0% of them women, from twenty schools. The response rate was 96.4%.

    RESULTS: Teachers reported relatively good general health but experienced high stress, high work pace and emotional demands, low influence at work and a poor psychosocial safety climate. These factors were especially prominent among female teachers. Both women and men experienced good development possibilities and high work engagement.

    CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study can help us to develop a more sustainable work environment for female and male teachers. A more sustainable work environment might attract more people to the profession and incentivize existing teachers to remain in the profession.

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  • 7.
    Buck, Sebastian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Sandqvist, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strid, Emma Nilsing
    Örebro Univ, Sweden.
    Knibbe, Hanneke J. J.
    Res Hlth Care, Netherlands.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the risk assessment instrument TilThermometer for a Swedish version - patient handling in the healthcare sector2022In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are common in the healthcare sector due to exposure of physical demanding work tasks. Risk assessment is necessary to prevent injuries and promote a safety culture. The TilThermometer has proved to be useful in the Netherlands for assessing healthcare workers physical exposure to patient handling. The aim of this study was to translate the risk assessment instrument TilThermometer from Dutch to Swedish, perform cross-cultural adaptation, and evaluate its linguistic validity to a Swedish healthcare context.

    Methods. Translation and validation process was performed according to following eight steps: 1) Translation (two translators), 2) Synthesis, 3) Back-translation (two back-translators), 4) Synthesis, 5) Linguistic review (one bilingual reviewer), 6) fifteen experts in a panel review according to Delphi-method, 7) Semi-structured interviewing eleven informants, analyzed using qualitative content analysis and step 8) discussion and input from creators of the instrument.

    Results: A new Swedish version, the TilThermometer, was provided through the translation process (steps 1-5). The linguistic validity and usefulness were confirmed thru step 6 and 7. Consensus was reached in the expert review after two rounds, comments were analyzed and grouped into five groups. The qualitative content analyses of the interviews emerged in to three categories: 1) "User-friendly and understandable instrument", 2) "Further development", and 3) "Important part of the systematic work-environment management".

    Conclusion: In this study, the cross-cultural adaption and translation performed of the Swedish version of TilThermometer assured linguistic validity. This is this first phase before further testing the psychometrics aspects, inter-rater reliability and feasibility of TilThermometer. In the second phase TilThermometer will be implemented and evaluated together with other measures in the Swedish healthcare sector.

  • 8.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Early and Late Return to Work After Sick Leave: Predictors in a Cohort of Sick-Listed Individuals with Common Mental Disorders2015In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 627-637Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The study aims to identify individual and workplace factors associated with early return to work (RTW)-defined as within 3 months-and factors associated with later RTW-between 3 and 12 months after being sick-listed-in a cohort of newly sick-listed individuals with common mental disorders. Methods In a prospective cohort study, a cross-sectional analysis was performed on baseline measures of patients granted sick leave due to common mental disorders. A total of 533 newly sick-listed individuals fulfilled the inclusion criteria and agreed to participate. A baseline questionnaire was sent by post within 3 weeks of their first day of certified medical sickness; 354 (66 %) responded. Those who were unemployed were excluded, resulting in a study population of 319 individuals. Sick leave was recorded for each individual from the Social Insurance Office during 1 year. Analyses were made with multiple Cox regression analyses. Results Early RTW was associated with lower education, better work ability at baseline, positive expectations of treatment and low perceived interactional justice with the supervisor. RTW after 3 months was associated with a need to reduce demands at work, and turnover intentions. Conclusions Early RTW among sick-listed individuals with common mental disorders seems to be associated with the individuals need to secure her/his employment situation, whereas later RTW is associated with variables reflecting dissatisfaction with work conditions. No health measures were associated with RTW. The study highlights the importance of considering not only health and functioning, but also workplace conditions and relations at the workplace in implementing RTW interventions.

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  • 9.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Is Mobility in the Labor Market a Solution to Sustainable Return to Work for Some Sick Listed Persons?2011In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 355-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The study aims to identify characteristics associated with long-term expectations of professional stability or mobility among recently sick-listed workers, and to study whether expectations of professional mobility and turnover intentions were associated with duration of sick leave.

    Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on baseline measures in a prospective cohort study of patients who were granted sick leave due to musculoskeletal (MSD) or mental (MD) disorders. A total of 1,375 individuals fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A baseline questionnaire was sent by mail within 3 weeks of their first day of certified medical sickness; 962 individuals responded (70%). The main diagnosis was MSD in 595 (62%) individuals and MD in 367 (38%).

    Results: Expectations of ability to remain in the present profession in 2 years was associated with better health and health-related resources, younger age, higher education, and better effort-reward balance. Effort-reward imbalance, MD, high burnout scores, and better educational and occupational position were associated with turnover intentions. Low expectations of ability to remain in the present profession defined two vulnerable groups with regard to RTW, those with no turnover intentions were older, had lower personal resources, more often had MSD, and slower RTW rate. Those with turnover intentions had a clear effort-reward imbalance and high burnout scores.

    Conclusions: The results of this explorative study underline the importance of differentiating RTW-interventions based on knowledge about the sick-listed person's resources in relation to the labor market and the work place, and their expectations of future employment and employability.

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  • 10.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Is mobility in the labor market a solution to sustainable return to work for some sicklisted persons?: Poster presentation2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Flodin, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Rolander, B.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Futurum, Sweden.
    Lofgren, H.
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Krapi, Blerim
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Nyqvist, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research, Institute for Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Risk factors for neck pain among forklift truck operators: a retrospective cohort study2018In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 19, article id 44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    No previous research has been performed into neck pain among forklift operators. This is a common complaint among these workers, who number around 150,000 in Sweden and six million in Europe. The aim of the study was to examine long-term exposure to unnatural neck positions among forklift operators as a risk factor for neck pain.

    Methods

    A retrospective cohort study was conducted of all eligible employees at a high-level warehouse. Forklift operators and office workers answered an 18-page questionnaire comprising questions about joint pain, work tasks, work postures and year of start for all items. By using person years in the exposed and less-exposed groups before start of neck pain we were able to calculate Incident Rate ratios for various exposures.

    Results

    Forty nine percent of the forklift operators reported having experienced neck pain compared to 30 % of office workers. Being a forklift operator was associated with an increased risk of neck pain (OR = 5.1, 95% CI 1.4–18.2). Holding the head in an unnatural position resulted in significantly increased risks for neck pain, irrespective of type of position. The risks for neck pain remained after taking other ergonomic exposures and psychosocial aspects into consideration.

    Conclusions

    This is the first published study showing that forklift operators have an increased risk of neck pain. The results are therefore of significance for improving work schedules, the adjustment of work tasks for these workers and the design of the vehicles.

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  • 12.
    Kwak, Lydia
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lornudd, Caroline
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björklund, Christina
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bergström, Gunnar
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Nybergh, Lotta
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Elinder, Liselotte Schäfer
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Centre for Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stigmar, Kjerstin
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Jensen, Irene
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Implementation of the Swedish Guideline for Prevention of Mental ill-health at the Workplace: study protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial, using multifaceted implementation strategies in schools2019In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 1668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Given today's high prevalence of common mental disorders and related sick leave among teachers, an urgent need exists for a more systematic approach to the management of social and organizational risk factors within schools. In 2015, we launched the first Swedish occupational health guideline to support a structured prevention of these risks at the workplace. The existence of guidelines does however not guarantee their usage, as studies show that guidelines are often underused. Knowledge is therefore needed on effective implementation strategies that can facilitate the translation of guidelines into practice. The primary aim of the randomized waiting list-controlled trial described in this study protocol is to compare the effectiveness of a multifaceted implementation strategy versus a single implementation strategy for implementing the Guideline for the prevention of mental ill-health at the workplace within schools. The effectiveness will be compared regarding the extent to which the recommendations are implemented (implementation effectiveness) and with regard to social and organisational risk factors for mental ill-health, absenteeism and presenteeism (intervention effectiveness).

    METHODS: The trial is conducted among primary schools of two municipalities in Sweden. The single implementation strategy is an educational strategy (an educational meeting). The multifaceted strategy consists of the educational meeting, an implementation team and a series of workshops. The outcome measure of implementation effectiveness is guideline adherence. The primary outcome of intervention effectiveness is exhaustion. Secondary outcomes include demands at work, work organization and job contents, interpersonal relations and leadership, presenteeism, work performance, recovery, work-life balance, work-engagement, self-reported stress, self-perceived health, sickness absence and psychosocial safety climate. Process outcomes as well as barriers and facilitators influencing the implementation process are assessed. Data will be collected at baseline, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months by mixed methods (i.e. survey, focus-group interviews, observation).

    DISCUSSION: The study described in this protocol will provide valuable knowledge on the effectiveness of implementation strategies for implementing a guideline for the prevention of common mental disorders within schools. We hypothesize that successful implementation will result in reductions in school personnel's perceived social and organizational risk factors, mental ill-health and sick-leave.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT03322839 (trial registration: 09/19/2017).

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  • 13.
    Kwak, Lydia
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Toropova, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Powell, Byron J.
    Washington Univ, MO 63110 USA; Washington Univ, MO 63110 USA; Washington Univ, MO 63110 USA.
    Lengnick-Hall, Rebecca
    Washington Univ, MO 63110 USA.
    Jensen, Irene
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bergström, Gunnar
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Univ Gavle, Sweden.
    Elinder, Liselotte Schäfer
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Ctr Epidemiol & Community Med, Sweden.
    Stigmar, Kjerstin
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Björklund, Christina
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    A randomized controlled trial in schools aimed at exploring mechanisms of change of a multifaceted implementation strategy for promoting mental health at the workplace2022In: Implementation Science, E-ISSN 1748-5908, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background This study will explore implementation mechanisms through which a single implementation strategy and a multifaceted implementation strategy operate to affect the implementation outcome, which is fidelity to the Guideline For The Prevention of Mental Ill Health within schools. The guideline gives recommendations on how workplaces can prevent mental ill health among their personnel by managing social and organizational risks factors in the work environment. Schools are chosen as the setting for the study due to the high prevalence of mental ill health among teachers and other personnel working in schools. The study builds on our previous research, in which we compared the effectiveness of the two strategies on fidelity to the guideline. Small improvements in guideline adherence were observed for the majority of the indicators in the multifaceted strategy group. This study will focus on exploring the underlying mechanisms of change through which the implementation strategies may operate to affect the implementation outcome. Methods We will conduct a cluster-randomized-controlled trial among public schools (n=55 schools) in Sweden. Schools are randomized (1:1 ratio) to receive a multifaceted strategy (implementation teams, educational meeting, ongoing training, Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles) or a single strategy (implementation teams, educational meeting). The implementation outcome is fidelity to the guideline. Hypothesized mediators originate from the COM-B model. A mixed-method design will be employed, entailing a qualitative study of implementation process embedded within the cluster-randomized controlled trail examining implementation mechanisms. The methods will be used in a complementary manner to get a full understanding of the implementation mechanisms. Discussion This implementation study will provide valuable knowledge on how implementation strategies work (or fail) to affect implementation outcomes. The knowledge gained will aid the selection of effective implementation strategies that fit specific determinants, which is a priority for the field. Despite recent initiatives to advance the understanding of implementation mechanisms, studies testing these mechanisms are still uncommon.

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  • 14.
    Kwak, Lydia
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Stigmar, Kjerstin
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Jensen, Irene
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Developing a practice guideline for the occupational health services by using a community of practice approach: a process evaluation of the development process2017In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 17, article id 89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: One way to facilitate the translation of research into the occupational health service practice is through clinical practice guidelines. To increase the implementability of guidelines it is important to include the end-users in the development, for example by a community of practice approach. This paper describes the development of an occupational health practice guideline aimed at the management of non-specific low back pain (LBP) by using a community of practice approach. The paper also includes a process evaluation of the development providing insight into the feasibility of the process. Methods: A multidisciplinary community of practice group (n = 16) consisting of occupational nurses, occupational physicians, ergonomists/physical therapists, health and safety engineers, health educators, psychologists and researchers from different types of occupational health services and geographical regions within Sweden met eleven times (June 2012-December 2013) to develop the practice guideline following recommendations of guideline development handbooks. Process-outcomes recruitment, reach, context, satisfaction, feasibility and fidelity were assessed by questionnaire, observations and administrative data. Results: Group members attended on average 7.5 out of 11 meetings. Half experienced support from their workplace for their involvement. Feasibility was rated as good, except for time-scheduling. Most group members were satisfied with the structure of the process (e.g. presentations, multidisciplinary group). Fidelity was rated as fairly high. Conclusions: The described development process is a feasible process for guideline development. For future guideline development expectations of the work involved should be more clearly communicated, as well as the purpose and tasks of the CoP-group. Moreover, possibilities to improve support from managers and colleagues should be explored. This paper has important implications for future guideline development; it provides valuable information on how practitioners can be included in the development process, with the aim of increasing the implementability of the developed guidelines.

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  • 15.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Intervention and Implementation Research Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Rolander, Bo
    Jönköping County Council, Jönköping, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Workplace health in dental care: a salutogenic approach2018In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 103-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose was to explore self-reported psychosocial health and work environments among different dental occupations and workplaces from a salutogenic perspective. A further purpose was to analyse possible associations between three salutogenic measurements: The Sense of Coherence questionnaire (SOC), the Salutogenic Health Indicator Scale (SHIS) and the Work Experience Measurement Scale (WEMS).

    METHODS: Employees in the Public Dental Service in a Swedish county council (n = 486) were invited to respond to a self-reported web survey including demographics, work-related factors, the SOC, the SHIS and the WEMS.

    RESULTS: This study showed positive associations between employee characteristics and self-reported overall psychosocial health as well as experienced work environment. Autonomy was reported more among men than women (P < 0.000) and to a higher degree by dentists and dental hygienists than dental nurses (P < 0.000). Meaningfulness, happiness, job satisfaction, autonomy and positive to reorganization were reported by personnels aged less than 40 years (P ≤ 0.047). Clinical coordinators reported significant better health (SOC, SHIS) and experienced more autonomy, better management and more positive to reorganization than other dental professions. Dental hygienists and nurses experienced less time pressure than dentists (P ≤ 0.007). Better health and positive work experiences were also seen in smaller clinics (P ≤ 0.29).

    CONCLUSION: Dental professionals reported a high degree of overall psychosocial health as well as a positive work experience. Some variations could be seen between employee characteristics such as gender, years in dental care, professionals, managing position and workplace size. Identify resources and processes at each workplace are important and should be included in the employee's/employers dialogue.

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  • 16.
    Merolli, Mark
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Australia; Health and Biomedical Informatics Centre, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
    Busuttil, Maria-Louisa
    Consumer Affairs and Civil Liberties, Ministry for Social Dialogue, Valletta, Malta.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research, Karolinska Institutet, Institute for Environmental Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Green, Ann
    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Coventry University, Coventry, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
    Global communication practices of physiotherapists on Twitter2019In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 20-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Social media have offered professional communities the opportunity to be digitally connected. The hashtag #GlobalPT was conceived and promoted from 2015 and has acted as a slogan for the globally connected physiotherapy community. This study explores the global reach and dominant communication themes that emerged during a set time frame that represented the single largest period of #GlobalPT activity.

    Method: Using purposive sampling, 988 publically available tweets including the hashtag #GlobalPT were studied. Descriptive statistical analysis was conducted to quantify tweet data and qualitative, inductive phenomenological thematic content analysis to describe latent themes within the tweets.

    Results: #GlobalPT activity was noted across 24 countries (UK top represented) and four languages (929/988, 94.03% in English). Europe was the most active area (738/988, 74.70%), followed by Oceania (120/988, 12.15%). Thematic content analysis identified eight themes within the communication practices of the physiotherapy community on Twitter. The three major themes were: sharing information (108/377, 28.65%), promotional activity (93/377, 24.67%) and positive feedback (69/377, 18.30%).

    Conclusion: The professional communication practices of physiotherapists on Twitter show a global spread of communication. The themes provide preliminary evidence for social media’s unique potential to assist the World Confederation for Physical Therapy strategic vision.

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  • 17.
    Nilsing Strid, Emma
    et al.
    University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Institute for Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ros, Axel
    Region Jönköping County and The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Kvarnström, Susanne
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Övr Regionledningskontoret.
    Health care workers’ experiences of workplace incidents that posed a risk of patient and worker injury: a critical incident technique analysis2021In: BMC Health Services Research, E-ISSN 1472-6963, BMC Health Serv Res, Vol. 21, p. 1-12, article id 511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Health care workers (HCWs) are at high risk of occupational injuries and approximately 10–15% of patients are affected by an adverse event during their hospital stay. There is scarce scientific literature about how HCWs manage these risks in practice and what support they need. This knowledge is needed to improve safety for patients and HCWs. This study explores HCWs’ experiences of workplace incidents that led to injury or posed a risk of patient and worker injury, with focus on HCWs’ emotions and actions.

    Methods

    This study employed a qualitative design using the critical incident technique. Semi-structured individual interviews were held with 34 HCWs from three regions in Sweden. Data were analysed using inductive category development.

    Results

    Altogether 71 workplace incidents were reported. The analysis of two dimensions – the emotions HCWs feel and the actions team members and managers take when a workplace incident occurs – yielded two categories each: Anxiety during the incident, Persistent distress after the incident, Team interplay for safety actions and Support and ratification from managers and colleagues. Health care workers risked their own safety and health to provide patient safety. Teamwork and trustful relationships were critical for patient and worker safety. Support and validation from colleagues and managers were important for closure; unsatisfactory manager response and insufficient opportunities to debrief the incident could lead to persistent negative emotions. Participants described insecurity and fear, sadness over being injured at work, and shame and self-regret when the patient or themselves were injured. When the workplace had not taken the expected action, they felt anger and resignation, often turning into long-term distress.

    Conclusions

    Work situations leading to injury or risk of patient and worker injury are emotionally distressing for HCWs. Team interplay may facilitate safe and dynamic practices and help HCWs overcome negative emotions. Organizational support is imperative for individual closure. For safety in health care, employers need to develop strategies for active management of risks, avoiding injuries and providing support after an injury.

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  • 18.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Wibault, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Löfgren, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Neuroorthoped Ctr, Sweden.
    Dedering, Åsa
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Work Ability After Anterior Cervical Decompression and Fusion Followed by a Structured Postoperative Rehabilitation: Secondary Outcomes of a Prospective Randomized Controlled Multi-Centre Trial with a 2-year Follow-up2022In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 473-482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Information on work ability after ACDF and postoperative rehabilitation is lacking. The aim of the present study is therefore to investigate the work ability benefits of a structured postoperative treatment (SPT) over a standard care approach (SA) in patients who underwent anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) for cervical radiculopathy and factors important to the 2-year outcome. Methods Secondary outcome and prediction model of a prospective randomized controlled multi-centre study with a 2-year follow-up (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01547611). The Work Ability Index (WAI) and Work Ability Score (WAS) were measured at baseline and up to 2 years after ACDF in 154 patients of working age who underwent SPT or SA after surgery. Predictive factors for the WAI at 2 years were analysed. Results Both WAI and WAS significantly improved with SPT and SA (p &lt; 0.001), without any between-group differences. Thoughts of being able to work within the next 6 months, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and work-related neck load explained 59% of the variance in WAI at the 2-year follow-up after ACDF. Conclusions Patients improved over time without group differences, suggesting the improvement to be surgery related. Expectation to work within the next 6 months, self-reported neck functioning and work-related neck load were important to work ability and are central factors to ask early after ACDF, to identifying further interventions promoting return to work.

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  • 19.
    Persson, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Costs of production loss and primary health care interventions for return-to-work of sick-listed workers in Sweden2015In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 37, no 9, p. 771-776Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate, from the perspective of society, the costs of sick leave and rehabilitation of recently sick-listed workers with musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) or mental disorders (MD). Methods: In a prospective cohort study, 812 sick-listed workers with MSD (518) or MD (294) were included. Data on consumption of health care and production loss were collected over six months from an administrative casebook system of the health care provider. Production loss was estimated based on the number of sick-leave days. Societal costs were based on the human capital approach. Results: The mean costs of production loss per person were EUR 5978 (MSD) and EUR 6381 (MD). Health care interventions accounted for 9.3% (MSD) and 8.2% (MD) of the costs of production loss. Corresponding figures for rehabilitation activities were 3.7% (MSD) and 3.1% (MD). Health care interventions were received by about 95% in both diagnostic groups. For nearly half of the cohort, no rehabilitation intervention at all was provided. Conclusions: Costs associated with sick leave were dominated by production loss. Resources invested in rehabilitation were small. By increasing investment in early rehabilitation, costs to society and the individual might be reduced. Implications for Rehabilitation Resources invested in rehabilitation for sick-listed with musculoskeletal and mental disorders in Sweden are very small in comparison with the costs of production loss. For policy makers, there may be much to gain through investments into improved rehabilitation processes for return to work. Health care professionals need to develop rehabilitative activities aiming for return to work, rather than symptoms treatment only.

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  • 20.
    Rolander, B
    et al.
    Jönköping County Council, Jönköping, Sweden; Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden;.
    Lindmark, U
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Johnston, V
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Wagman, P
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Organizational types in relation to exposure at work and sickness: a repeated cross-sectional study within public dentistry2020In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 78, no 2, p. 132-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Organizations and state agencies that provide dental care continuously face various and novel demands related to the need for dental care. However, rearrangements of work tasks by reducing the number of tasks performed by dental personnel might make the work more monotonous, repetitive, and static within an organization. The aim of this study is to compare how two dental work organizations, with different staffing and clinic size, are perceived by dental personnel focusing on physical and psychosocial conditions, leadership, work ability and presenteeism in 2012 and 2014.

    Material and Methods: This repeated cross-sectional study included personnel from the Public Dental Service in Sweden. There were 282 dentists, dental hygienists, and dental nurses who answered a questionnaire 2012 and 299 in 2014.

    Results and conclusion: In 2012, nine per cent of medium clinics reported poor leadership compared with 27% in 2014. For large clinics, 17% perceived poor leadership in 2012 compared with 31% in 2014. A higher proportion of the employees reported presenteeism due to high physical load (43%) and high psychosocial load (21%) in 2014 compared with 31% and 13% in 2012. These results indicate the need for work place interventions promoting health among dental employees.

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  • 21.
    Rolander, Bo
    et al.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Acad Hlth & Care, Sweden.
    Forsman, Mikael
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Measurements and observations of movements at work for warehouse forklift truck operators2022In: International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, ISSN 1080-3548, E-ISSN 2376-9130, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 1840-1848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inclinometry and video analyses can provide objective measures of physical workloads. The study aim was to measure and observe arm, back and head postures and movements among forklift truck operators (FLTOs) during a working day, analyzing differences between types of forklift trucks and to assess reported workload and health. Twenty-five male FLTOs in a high-level warehouse were randomly included. The data collected comprised technical measurements, video analyses of postures and movements, and a questionnaire measuring health, pain and workload. On average, the FLTOs rotated their head more than 45 degrees, in total, 232 times/h. Video analysis revealed that FLTOs periodically drive the forklift truck sideways with the head rotated in the direction of travel, and in periods look upwards, in which the head is highly rotated and extended. Inclinometry and observations during the working day has the potential to be a valuable part of risk assessment promoting occupational safety and health.

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  • 22.
    Rolander, Bo
    et al.
    Jonköping County Council, Sweden; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Johnston, Venerina
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Changes in division of labour and tasks within public dentistry: relationship to employees work demands, health and work ability2016In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 74, no 6, p. 471-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: By 2023, fewer dentists are expected in Sweden, at the same time as the demand for dental care is expected to increase. Older people, in particular, are expected to require more dental health than previous generations. To meet this demand, the public sector dentistry in Sweden is moving towards changes in division of labour among dental professionals, including dentists, dental hygienists and dental nurses. However, the impact of this reallocation on the physical and psychosocial wellbeing of employees is unknown. The aim of this study was to compare workplaces with an equal or larger proportion of dental hygienists than dentists (HDH) with workplaces with a larger proportion of dentists than dental hygienists (HD) on the physical and psychosocial work load, musculoskeletal and psychosomatic disorders and sickness presence.Material: A total of 298 persons employed in the Public Dental Service in a Swedish County Council participated in this study.Conclusion: The medium large clinics HDH reported 85% of employees with considerably more high psychosocial demands compared to employees in medium HD (53%) and large HD (57%). Employees in medium large clinics HDH also reported sleep problems due to work (25%) compared with employees in medium large clinics HD (6%), large clinics HD (11%) and small clinics HDH (3%). Clinic size does not seem to influence the outcome of the HD and HD clinics to any great extent. Of all employees, about 94-100% reported high precision demands and 78-91% poor work postures.

  • 23.
    Skamagki, Glykeria
    et al.
    Univ Birmingham, England.
    Carpenter, Christine
    Univ British Columbia, Canada.
    King, Andrew
    Coventry Univ, England.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    How do Employees with Chronic Musculoskeletal Disorders Experience the Management of Their Condition in the Workplace? A Metasynthesis2023In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This metasynthesis contributes to an understanding of the experiences, perceptions, and attitudes of employees on managing chronic musculoskeletal disorders (CMSDs) at work. Many studies in this field are concerned with prevention or return-to-work (RTW) programmes. However, the purpose of this review was to synthesise evidence that only focuses on the employees management of their CMSDs at work. The SPIDER framework was used to structure the question "How do employees with CMSDs experience the management of their condition in the workplace"? The literature search focused on articles published between 2011 and 2021, and the search was conducted using the following databases: MEDLINE, SCOPUS, CINAHL, AMED, PsycINFO. The review identified nine articles that explored employees experiences of managing CMSDs at work. Thematic synthesis was used to create analytic themes which provided a more in-depth discussion of these experiences. The identified themes were: employees actively seek ways to manage their conditions, influence of work environment on employees with CMSDs and optimising the relationship between employees and managers. This metasynthesis suggests that the ability to negotiate workplace support and manage CMSDs at work is influenced by the cultural and social environment of the organisation. Effective communication, care and trust between the employee is needed. The review also illustrated the need for healthcare professionals to provide support to employees at work.

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  • 24.
    Skamagki, Glykeria
    et al.
    School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences, Department of Physiotherapy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
    Carpenter, Christine
    Department of Occupational Sciences and Occupational Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    King, Andrew
    School of Nursing, Midwifery and Health, Department of Physiotherapy, Coventry University, Coventry, UK.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Management of Chronic Musculoskeletal Disorders in the Workplace from the Perspective of Older Employees: A Mixed Methods Research Study2022In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 15, article id 9348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    (1) Background: This mixed methods research (MMR) study explored older employees’ experiences of chronic musculoskeletal disorders (CMSDs) in relation to their employment, their perspectives on managing these conditions in the workplace and the strategies used to facilitate and maintain their roles and responsibilities. The services offered to them were also identified. (2) Methods: A mixed methods exploratory sequential design was implemented. In the first qualitative phase, 16 semi-structured interviews gathered in-depth information from older employees. The findings informed the development of an online questionnaire in the survey phase, which was administered to older employees (N = 107). Both sets of findings were then integrated using a narrative joint display. (3) Results: The phenomena of presenteeism and leaveism were important components of employees’ strategies for managing their condition. The integrated findings highlighted the roles of employers, managers and social support in encouraging disclosure and supporting the management of CMSDs. The results also emphasised how self-management and professional health services are crucial for sustaining employability. (4) Conclusions: Current challenges call for employers to identify effective ways to support the ageing workforce and invest in training opportunities for managers and collaborative opportunities with healthcare professionals and other stakeholders. A flexible, empathetic and resourceful work environment is optimal for supporting sustained employability for an ageing workforce.

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  • 25.
    Skamagki, Glykeria
    et al.
    Univ Birmingham, England.
    King, Andrew
    Coventry Univ, England.
    Carpenter, Christine
    Univ British Columbia, Canada.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    The concept of integration in mixed methods research: a step-by-step guide using an example study in physiotherapy2022In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Integration is a unique attribute of Mixed Methods Research (MMR). However, some MMR studies, published in the field of physiotherapy and other allied health professions, have illustrated a lack of understanding of the concept of integration. Aims The purpose of this paper is to provide guidance for integrating elements of mixed methods research in order to effectively support evidence-based practice in health. Methods The concept of integration of findings is explained with reference to the authors recent PhD study, which used a mixed methods exploratory sequential design. This article describes how the author used a narrative joint display to integrate findings from both the qualitative and survey phases of the study. Then, a step-by-step approach is introduced to guide the interpretation and integration of the findings. Results This four-step approach demonstrates integration of the two different datasets: Creating a joint display, linking activity, establishing relationships, and interpreting and reporting. Tables and Figures are used to support detailed description and illustration of the integration process. Discussion A joint display provides a visual representation of how the qualitative and quantitative findings in a MMR study can be integrated. In this way, interpretation of the data drawn from this process extend beyond the individual findings of each study component to facilitate a greater understanding of complex health care issues.

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  • 26.
    Skamagki, Glykeria
    et al.
    Department of Physiotherapy, Coventry University, Coventry, UK.
    King, Andrew
    Department of Physiotherapy, Coventry University, Coventry, UK.
    Duncan, Michael
    School of Life Sciences, Coventry University, Coventry, UK.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research Institute for Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    A systematic review on workplace interventions to manage chronic musculoskeletal conditions2018In: Physiotherapy Research International, ISSN 1358-2267, E-ISSN 1471-2865, Vol. 23, no 4, article id e1738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: A review to investigate whether there are effective workplace interventions that manage chronic musculoskeletal disorders.

    METHODS: The literature search included published articles between 2008 and 2017. The databases used in this search were MEDLINE, Scopus, CINAHL, AMED, PsycINFO, Academic Search Complete, Cochrane, and PEDro. A limited search on websites for relevant grey literature was also conducted.

    RESULTS: The review included 12 studies that investigated effectiveness of a specific strength exercise programme or interventions provided by health professionals at the workplace when compared with controls or interventions not at the workplace. Seven studies were classified as high quality (>85% of criteria met) and five studies were classified as acceptable. Studies were heterogeneous preventing a meta-analysis. No intervention was clearly superior to another.

    DISCUSSION: There was some consistency in the results of the selected studies, suggesting that workplace interventions such as high-intensity strength exercises and/or integrated health care can decrease pain and symptoms for employees who experience long-term musculoskeletal disorders. However, the current research is limited.

  • 27.
    Toropova, Anna
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Björklund, Christina
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bergström, Gunnar
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Univ Gavle, Sweden.
    Elinder, Liselotte Schäfer
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Region Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stigmar, Kjerstin
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Jensen, Irene
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kwak, Lydia
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Effectiveness of a multifaceted implementation strategy for improving adherence to the guideline for prevention of mental ill-health among school personnel in Sweden: a cluster randomized trial2022In: Implementation Science, E-ISSN 1748-5908, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is limited research on prevention of mental ill-health of school personnel and the systematic management of school work environments. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of implementing the guideline recommendations for the prevention of mental ill-health in schools, in particular, whether there was a difference in adherence to guideline recommendations between a multifaceted (group 1) and single implementation strategy (group 2) from baseline to 6 and to 12 months. Method: We conducted a cluster-randomized controlled trial with a 6- and 12-month follow-up. Data was collected from nearly 700 participants in 19 Swedish schools. Participants were school personnel working under the management of a school principal. The single implementation strategy consisted of one educational meeting, while the multifaceted implementation strategy comprised an educational meeting, an ongoing training in the form of workshops, implementation teams and Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles. Adherence was measured with a self-reported questionnaire. Generalized Linear Mixed Models were used to assess the difference between groups in adherence to the guideline between baseline, 6-, and 12-months follow-up. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in improvements in adherence to the guideline between baseline, 6-, and 12-months follow-up. However, among those schools that did not undergo any organizational changes during the 12 months of the study significant differences between groups were observed at 12 months for one of the indicators. Conclusions: The multifaceted strategy was no more effective than the single strategy in improving guideline adherence. There are some limitations to the study, such as the measurement of the implementation outcome measure of adherence. The outcome measure was developed in a systematic manner by the research team, assessing specific target behaviors relevant to the guideline recommendations, however not psychometrically tested, which warrants a careful interpretation of the results.

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  • 28.
    Wagman, Petra
    et al.
    School of Health and Welfare , Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Futurum, Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping County Council , Jönköping, Sweden.
    Rolander, Bo
    School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University , Jönköping , Futurum, Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping County Council, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Håkansson, Carita
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Occupational balance in health professionals in Sweden.2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 24, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Health care employees are often women, a group that has high degrees of sick leave and perhaps problems attaining occupational balance. However, people think differently about their everyday activities and it is therefore important to take their perceptions into account but occupational balance has not yet been measured in health professionals. The aim was to describe occupational balance in three different samples of health professionals in Sweden. A further aim was to investigate whether occupational therapists (OTs) rate their occupational balance differently from other health professionals.

    MATERIAL AND METHOD: Four hundred and eighty-two health professionals, employees in public dentistry, mental health care and OTs, aged 21-70 years participated. The participants' occupational balance was measured using the occupational balance questionnaire (OBQ).

    RESULTS: The ratings of occupational balance were similar to earlier studies and did not differ significantly between the samples. The OTs' occupational balance was also similar to that of the other health professionals.

    CONCLUSION: The similarities in occupational balance indicate the same difficulties in attaining it.

    SIGNIFICANCE: The result highlights the possibility that working people face similar difficulties in achieving occupational balance. Further research is warranted about how to attain it.

  • 29. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The Rehabilitation Process for Individuals with Musculoskeletal and Mental Disorders: Evaluation of Health, Functioning, Work Ability and Return to Work2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) and mental disorders (MD) are common among working-age individuals, and reduced work ability is often a problem that influences functioning in working life. Having MSD and MD is also a common cause of seeking health care and these conditions account for the majority of sick leave in most western countries. The overall aims of the thesis were to increase knowledge about biopsychosocial assessment of health, functioning and work ability for individuals with MSD and MD seeking care. A further aim was to gain better understanding of praxis behaviour in the rehabilitation process for sick-listed patients by evaluating patient-reported work ability, type of interventions given, usefulness of interventions, and return to work.

    This thesis comprises four studies based on two different cohorts. A cross-sectional design was used for studies I and II, which included 210 individuals diagnosed with MSD and MD seeking occupational health services. Data collection consisted of questionnaires to patients on self-reported health, functioning, work conditions, work ability and reports of professional assessment of diagnosis, main clinical problem, recommended intervention and sick leave. Studies III (n=699) and IV (n=810) were based on a longitudinal cohort study, ReWESS, with a 3-month follow-up comprising individuals who sought primary health care or occupational health services for MSD or MD and were sick-listed. The data collection included repeated questionnaires to the patients on self-reported health, functioning, work conditions, work ability, type and usefulness of intervention and return to work.

    There was an association between the professional biopsychosocial assessment and patients’ self-reported measures of health, functioning and work ability in clinical reasoning. Self-reported health and work measures can complement the expert-based diagnosis. Patients who had MSD and MD with co-morbid conditions reported more problems with mental functioning, had higher psychological demands at work and reported poorer work ability compared with those with MSD only. Patients with co-morbid conditions also had worse outcome compared to having mental disorders only. Psychosocial problems and activity limitations concerning social interaction skills were a frequent problem. This can be identified in clinical screening by physiotherapists in dialogue with the patient using the Patient-Specific Functional Scale. Three-quarters of sick-listed individuals with MSD or MD returned to work within 90 days. The treatment approach to sick-listed persons is still very medical and clinically oriented. Access to work-related interventions seems to be limited in the early rehabilitation process and may not be equal in practice. Those who were younger, had higher educational level and reported stronger health resources were favoured. There is a need to strive for access to work-related interventions.

    Return to work was associated with receiving combined clinical- and work-related interventions for patients with MD, and with better health-related quality of life, positive return to work expectations and better work ability for patients with MSD. Factors associated with return to work can be identified using self-reported measures. Patients with MD who received a combination of work-related and clinical interventions perceived best usefulness and best effect of health care contacts on work ability. Patients with MSD did not report as good usefulness. There seems to be a gap between scientific evidence and praxis behaviour in the early rehabilitation process; unimodal rehabilitation was widely applied, use of a multimodal treatment approach was limited and only one-third received work-related interventions. For patients with MSD, behavioural treatment seems to be underutilized in clinical practice considering the effect it may have on developing coping strategies and reducing symptoms. In order to meet recommendations in guidelines, physical activity needs to increase as a treatment strategy for patients with MD. A clinical implication is that the rehabilitation process needs to adopt a broader perspective for patients with MSD and MD to include patients’ individual health-related needs, aspects of employment and work conditions. Still, it remains a challenge to understand who needs what type of intervention.

    List of papers
    1. Is an expert diagnosis enough for assessment of sick leave for employees with musculoskeletal and mental disorders?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is an expert diagnosis enough for assessment of sick leave for employees with musculoskeletal and mental disorders?
    2011 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 33, no 13-14, p. 1147-1156Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. The aim of this study is to determine differences in self-reported work ability, work conditions, health and function between ICD-10 groups with musculoskeletal disorders (MSD), mental disorders (MDs) and MSD+MD and to determine which variables are associated with sick leave.

    Method. A cross-sectional study of 210 employees was conducted at an occupational health service unit. Physiotherapists and physicians classified the employees’ health problems according to ICD-10 and the employees answered a questionnaire with questions on demographic variables, health, functioning, work ability and work conditions.

    Results. Forty-four per cent of the employees had MSD, 22% had MD and 34% had a MSD+MD. The group on sick leave had worse results for all health and work measures. Belonging to the MD group, belonging to the MSD+MD group, having poor work ability and functioning were associated with being on sick leave. The value for the model explaining being on sick leave was 0.63 (Nagelkerke R2).

    Conclusions. Having a diagnosis of MD based on a professional opinion and having poor work ability and functioning based on self-reports are associated with being on sick leave. The results suggest that self-reported data could be used to complement the expert-based diagnosis.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Informat Health Care, 2011
    Keywords
    Work ability, musculoskeletal disorders, mental disorders, sick leave, ICD-10, work ability index
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-65843 (URN)10.3109/09638288.2010.523509 (DOI)000290950400008 ()
    Funder
    FAS, Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research, 2004-0582
    Note

    Original Publication: Charlotte Wåhlin Norgren, Kerstin Ekberg and Birgitta Öberg, Is an expert diagnosis enough for assessment of sick leave for employees with musculoskeletal and mental disorders?, 2010, Disability and Rehabilitation. http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/09638288.2010.523509 Copyright: Informa Healthcare http://informahealthcare.com/

    Available from: 2011-02-22 Created: 2011-02-22 Last updated: 2023-12-28
    2. Clinical reasoning in occupational health services for individuals with musculoskeletal and mental disorders
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical reasoning in occupational health services for individuals with musculoskeletal and mental disorders
    2012 (English)In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 155-165Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To investigate whether there are associations between the professional assessment of a patient's main clinical problem and the patient's self-reported health among patients with musculoskeletal disorders and/or mental disorders. To investigate differences in self-reported health and work-related measures in patients who were recommended clinical versus work-related interventions. Method: A cross-sectional study, including a convenience sample of 210 patients, visiting occupational health service. Patients answered a questionnaire on demographic variables, dimensions of health, functioning, work ability and working conditions. Patients’ main clinical problem and type of intervention was classified by physiotherapists. Activity limitations were identified using the Patient-Specific Functional Scale. Findings: The main clinical problems were: medical/organic problems (39%), psychosocial problems (46%) and physical work-related problems (15%). The psychosocial group reported more problems in mental functioning and the medical/organic group had worse physical functioning. There were significant differences for the main clinical problem, educational level, work ability, social interaction skills and mobility in patients who were recommended clinical versus work-related interventions. Conclusions: There are associations between the professional biopsychosocial classification and the patient's self-reported health and functioning. Clinical reasoning may be improved by including systematic biopsychosocial assessment of specific health and working conditions, and activity limitations according to Patient-Specific Functional Scale.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London, UK: Informa Healthcare, 2012
    Keywords
    Musculoskeletal disorders, mental disorders, biopsychosocial model, occupational health services, professional assessment, self-report, work ability, Patient-Specific Functional Scale, intervention.
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-76145 (URN)10.3109/14038196.2012.729609 (DOI)
    Funder
    Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2004-0582
    Available from: 2012-03-29 Created: 2012-03-29 Last updated: 2023-12-28Bibliographically approved
    3. Association between clinical and work-related interventions and return to work for patients with musculoskeletal or mental disorders
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between clinical and work-related interventions and return to work for patients with musculoskeletal or mental disorders
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 355-362Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to explore what characterizes patients receiving clinical interventions vs combined clinical and work-related interventions in a cohort of sick-listed subjects with musculoskeletal or mental disorders. Factors associated with return-to-work were also analysed.

    Design: A prospective cohort study.

    Methods: A total of 699 newly sick-listed patients responded to a questionnaire on sociodemographics, measures of health, functioning, work ability, self-efficacy, social support, work conditions, and expectations. The 3-month follow-up questionnaire included patients' self-reported measures of return-to-work, work ability and type of interventions. The most frequent International Classification of Diseases-10 diagnoses for patients' musculoskeletal disorders were dorsopathies (M50-54) and soft tissue disorders (M70-79), and for patients with mental disorders, depression (F32-39) and stress reactions (F43).

    Results: Patients with mental disorders who received combined interventions returned to work to a higher degree than those who received only clinical intervention. The prevalence of work-related interventions was higher for those who were younger and more highly educated. For patients with musculoskeletal disorders better health, work ability and positive expectations of return-to-work were associated with return-to-work. However, combined interventions did not affect return-to-work in this group.

    Conclusion: Receiving combined interventions increased the probability of return-to-work for patients with mental disorders, but not for patients with musculoskeletal disorders. Better health, positive expectations of return-to-work and better work ability were associated with return-to-work for patients with musculoskeletal disorders.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-73425 (URN)10.2340/16501977-0951 (DOI)000303850800010 ()
    Funder
    FAS, Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research, 2004-0582
    Note

    funding agencies|FAS (Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research)||

    Available from: 2012-01-03 Created: 2012-01-03 Last updated: 2023-12-28Bibliographically approved
    4. Evaluation of self-reported work ability and usefulness of interventions among sick-listed patients
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of self-reported work ability and usefulness of interventions among sick-listed patients
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 32-43Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To describe the types of intervention offered, to investigate the relationship between the type of intervention given, patient-reported usefulness of interventions and the effect on self-reported work ability in a cohort of sick-listed patients with musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) or mental disorders (MD).

    Methods A prospective cohort study was performed including 810 newly sick-listed patients (MSD 62 % and MD 38 %). The baseline questionnaire included sociodemographic characteristics and measures of work ability. The 3-month follow-up questionnaire included measures of work ability, type of intervention received, and judgment of usefulness.

    Results Twenty-five percent received medical intervention modalities (MI) only, 45 % received a combination of medical and rehabilitative intervention modalities (CRI) and 31 % received work-related interventions combined with medical or rehabilitative intervention modalities (WI). Behavioural treatments were more common for patients with MD compared with MSD and exercise therapy were more common for patients with MSD. The most prevalent workplace interventions were adjustment of work tasks or the work environment. Among patients with MD, WI was found to be useful and improved work ability significantly more compared with only MI or CRI. For patients with MSD, no significant differences in improved work ability were found between interventions.

    Conclusions Patients with MD who received a combination of work-related and clinical interventions reported best usefulness and best improvement in work ability. There was no difference in improvements in work ability between rehabilitation methods in the MSD group. There seems to be a gap between scientific evidence and praxis behaviour in the rehabilitation process. Unimodal rehabilitation was widely applied in the early rehabilitation process, a multimodal treatment approach was rare and only one-third received work-related interventions. It remains a challenge to understand who needs what type of intervention.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer Verlag (Germany), 2013
    Keywords
    Musculoskeletal disorders; Mental disorders; Sick leave; Self-reported; Work ability; Usefulness; Interventions, Sweden
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-76147 (URN)10.1007/s10926-012-9376-y (DOI)000314505200004 ()22760957 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    FAS, Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research, 2004-0582
    Available from: 2012-03-29 Created: 2012-03-29 Last updated: 2023-12-28Bibliographically approved
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    The Rehabilitation Process for Individuals with Musculoskeletal and Mental Disorders: Evaluation of Health, Functioning, Work Ability and Return to Work
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  • 30.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Institute for Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Using social media to connect, facilitate communication, and practice knowledge translation2018In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 65-66Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Buck, Sebastian
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Sandqvist, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fock, Jenni
    Region Östergötland.
    Andreassen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strid, Emma Nilsing
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Evaluation of the implementation and effectiveness of a multifactorial intervention strategy for safe patient handling and movement in the healthcare sector: a study protocol of a cluster randomised controlled trial2023In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 2, article id e067693Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Healthcare workers with physically demanding work tasks, such as patient handling and movement (PHM), are at high risk of musculoskeletal disorders. To facilitate safe PHM and prevent musculoskeletal disorders, a combination of workplace interventions, including risk assessments, is needed. The aim of this study is to implement and evaluate a multifactorial intervention strategy for safe PHM and compare it with a single intervention strategy.Methods and analysis This cluster randomised controlled trial will compare a multifactorial intervention strategy with a single intervention strategy for safe PHM in workplaces in the Swedish regional and municipal healthcare systems. At least twelve healthcare units will be recruited. Care units belonging to arm A will receive: (1) guidelines for PHM, (2) training modules, (3) risk assessment with TilThermometer, (4) risk assessment with Downtown Fall Risk Index and (5) work environment mapping. Care units belonging to Arm B will receive interventions (1) and (5). The two strategies will be evaluated with regards to (1) the primary outcome of the applied strategies intervention effectiveness (safety climate in relation to aspects of PHM) and (2) the primary implementation outcome (acceptability, appropriateness and feasibility). This study will also explore the implementation process and intervention fidelity, examine the influence of contextual factors and investigate participants experiences of working with strategies for safe PHM. A mix of quantitative and qualitative methods will be used. The data collection is based on questionnaires, interviews and field notes of contextual factors.Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the Swedish national ethical board (Dnr 2021-00578). Study results will be published in peer-reviewed journals, presented at conferences and distributed on social media. A lay summary and dissemination strategy will be codesigned with a reference group and participating healthcare units.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 32.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Association between clinical and work-related interventions and return to work for patients with musculoskeletal or mental disorders2012In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 355-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to explore what characterizes patients receiving clinical interventions vs combined clinical and work-related interventions in a cohort of sick-listed subjects with musculoskeletal or mental disorders. Factors associated with return-to-work were also analysed.

    Design: A prospective cohort study.

    Methods: A total of 699 newly sick-listed patients responded to a questionnaire on sociodemographics, measures of health, functioning, work ability, self-efficacy, social support, work conditions, and expectations. The 3-month follow-up questionnaire included patients' self-reported measures of return-to-work, work ability and type of interventions. The most frequent International Classification of Diseases-10 diagnoses for patients' musculoskeletal disorders were dorsopathies (M50-54) and soft tissue disorders (M70-79), and for patients with mental disorders, depression (F32-39) and stress reactions (F43).

    Results: Patients with mental disorders who received combined interventions returned to work to a higher degree than those who received only clinical intervention. The prevalence of work-related interventions was higher for those who were younger and more highly educated. For patients with musculoskeletal disorders better health, work ability and positive expectations of return-to-work were associated with return-to-work. However, combined interventions did not affect return-to-work in this group.

    Conclusion: Receiving combined interventions increased the probability of return-to-work for patients with mental disorders, but not for patients with musculoskeletal disorders. Better health, positive expectations of return-to-work and better work ability were associated with return-to-work for patients with musculoskeletal disorders.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 33.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evaluation of self-reported work ability and usefulness of interventions among sick-listed patients2013In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 32-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To describe the types of intervention offered, to investigate the relationship between the type of intervention given, patient-reported usefulness of interventions and the effect on self-reported work ability in a cohort of sick-listed patients with musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) or mental disorders (MD).

    Methods A prospective cohort study was performed including 810 newly sick-listed patients (MSD 62 % and MD 38 %). The baseline questionnaire included sociodemographic characteristics and measures of work ability. The 3-month follow-up questionnaire included measures of work ability, type of intervention received, and judgment of usefulness.

    Results Twenty-five percent received medical intervention modalities (MI) only, 45 % received a combination of medical and rehabilitative intervention modalities (CRI) and 31 % received work-related interventions combined with medical or rehabilitative intervention modalities (WI). Behavioural treatments were more common for patients with MD compared with MSD and exercise therapy were more common for patients with MSD. The most prevalent workplace interventions were adjustment of work tasks or the work environment. Among patients with MD, WI was found to be useful and improved work ability significantly more compared with only MI or CRI. For patients with MSD, no significant differences in improved work ability were found between interventions.

    Conclusions Patients with MD who received a combination of work-related and clinical interventions reported best usefulness and best improvement in work ability. There was no difference in improvements in work ability between rehabilitation methods in the MSD group. There seems to be a gap between scientific evidence and praxis behaviour in the rehabilitation process. Unimodal rehabilitation was widely applied in the early rehabilitation process, a multimodal treatment approach was rare and only one-third received work-related interventions. It remains a challenge to understand who needs what type of intervention.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 34.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Clinical reasoning in occupational health services for individuals with musculoskeletal and mental disorders2012In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 155-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To investigate whether there are associations between the professional assessment of a patient's main clinical problem and the patient's self-reported health among patients with musculoskeletal disorders and/or mental disorders. To investigate differences in self-reported health and work-related measures in patients who were recommended clinical versus work-related interventions. Method: A cross-sectional study, including a convenience sample of 210 patients, visiting occupational health service. Patients answered a questionnaire on demographic variables, dimensions of health, functioning, work ability and working conditions. Patients’ main clinical problem and type of intervention was classified by physiotherapists. Activity limitations were identified using the Patient-Specific Functional Scale. Findings: The main clinical problems were: medical/organic problems (39%), psychosocial problems (46%) and physical work-related problems (15%). The psychosocial group reported more problems in mental functioning and the medical/organic group had worse physical functioning. There were significant differences for the main clinical problem, educational level, work ability, social interaction skills and mobility in patients who were recommended clinical versus work-related interventions. Conclusions: There are associations between the professional biopsychosocial classification and the patient's self-reported health and functioning. Clinical reasoning may be improved by including systematic biopsychosocial assessment of specific health and working conditions, and activity limitations according to Patient-Specific Functional Scale.

  • 35.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Institute for Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Kvarnström, Susanne
    Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Övr Regionledningskontoret.
    Öhrn, Annica
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Övr Regionledningskontoret.
    Nilsing Strid, Emma
    University Healthcare Research Centre, Region Örebro County and School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Patient and healthcare worker safety risks and injuries. Learning from incident reporting2020In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 44-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Learning from incident reporting systems is one core strategy to develop a culture of safety for healthcare workers and patients. The aim of this retrospective study was to explore patient injuries focussing on falls. Furthermore, on healthcare workers incidents, injuries and the situations they occurred.

    Method: A total of 65,749 patient risks and incidents were registered in the incident reporting system between 2011 and 2014. Of these, 11,006 were classified as an injury to a patient. Risks and incidents were registered and analysed for 1702 healthcare workers.

    Results: Fifteen percent of the patient injuries required treatment. Falls were reported in 17% of the cases. Patients fell mainly in unassisted situations. Healthcare workers’ incidents and injuries were registered mainly by nurses and assistant nurses. Sixteen percent of the injuries required treatment. Prevalence of incidents was on an average 3.5% each year. Common injuries were: needle stick, workplace violence, injuries during patient manual handling. The patient was present in 74% of all incidents.

    Conclusion: Patient and healthcare workers injuries are still prevalent in Swedish healthcare and a substantial part of the incidents involved a patient situation. Collaboration between employers, employees and patient representatives is needed to increase awareness of safety in healthcare.

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  • 36.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Karlstad Univ, Sweden; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Johnston, Venerina
    Univ Queensland, Australia.
    Rolander, Bo
    Futurum, Sweden; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Work and health characteristics of oral health providers who stay healthy at work: a prospective study in public dentistry2022In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 349-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Research into work-related factors that positively influence Oral Health Providers (OHPs) health is scarce. This study aimed to analyse which OHPs in dental services remain healthy over time in relation to work- and health-related factors. Methods: OHPs took part in this prospective cohort study (n = 168). In 2012 and 2014 they answered a questionnaire featuring questions about demographics, health indicators, work and organisational factors. Results: OHPs were classified into three subgroups; healthy group (n = 66), semi-healthy group (n = 45) and unhealthy group (n = 57). The healthy group reported no sick leave or sickness presence in 2012 or 2014. Factors that explained a greater likelihood of belonging to the healthy group were: good work ability, not having neck pain, perceived low exertion at the end of the working day, not having sleeping problems. They scored higher on health indicators than OHPs in the unhealthy group. Conclusions: OHPs with no sick leave or sickness presence report much better salutogenic health, better physical work ability and lower perceived exertion at the end of their workday compared with unhealthy group of OHPs. Understanding the relationship between working conditions and well-being is crucial to target interventions for OHPs which improve work conditions and health.

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  • 37.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Stigmar, Kjerstin
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Nilsing Strid, Emma
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    A systematic review of work interventions to promote safe patient handling and movement in the healthcare sector2022In: International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, ISSN 1080-3548, E-ISSN 2376-9130, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 2520-2532Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. The aim of this systematic review was to describe interventions which promote safe patient handling and movement (PHM) among workers in healthcare by reviewing the literature on their effectiveness for work and health-related outcomes. Methods. Databases were searched for studies published during 1997-2018. Measures were operationalized broadly, capturing outcomes of work and health. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and cohort studies with a control group were included. Quality was assessed using evidence-based checklists by the Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment of Social Services. Results. The systematic review included 10 RCTs and 19 cohort studies. Providing work equipment and training workers is effective: it can increase usage. Training workers to be peer coaches is associated with fewer injuries. Other effective strategies are participatory ergonomics and management engagement in collaboration with workers, facilitating safe PHM. Conclusions. This systematic review suggests that interventions for safe PHM with an impact of health-related outcomes should include access to work equipment, training as well as employer and employee engagement. The additional impact of multifaceted interventions is inconclusive.

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  • 38.
    Wåhlin Norgren, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Return to work interventions for patients with musculoskeletal and mental disorders – The gap between best and clinical practice.2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Wåhlin Norgren, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    Do patients with Musculoskeletal and Mental disorders receive recommended interventions to promote RTW? - How do they perceive what they get?2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Wåhlin Norgren, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Is an expert diagnosis enough for assessment of sick leave for employees with musculoskeletal and mental disorders?2011In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 33, no 13-14, p. 1147-1156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. The aim of this study is to determine differences in self-reported work ability, work conditions, health and function between ICD-10 groups with musculoskeletal disorders (MSD), mental disorders (MDs) and MSD+MD and to determine which variables are associated with sick leave.

    Method. A cross-sectional study of 210 employees was conducted at an occupational health service unit. Physiotherapists and physicians classified the employees’ health problems according to ICD-10 and the employees answered a questionnaire with questions on demographic variables, health, functioning, work ability and work conditions.

    Results. Forty-four per cent of the employees had MSD, 22% had MD and 34% had a MSD+MD. The group on sick leave had worse results for all health and work measures. Belonging to the MD group, belonging to the MSD+MD group, having poor work ability and functioning were associated with being on sick leave. The value for the model explaining being on sick leave was 0.63 (Nagelkerke R2).

    Conclusions. Having a diagnosis of MD based on a professional opinion and having poor work ability and functioning based on self-reports are associated with being on sick leave. The results suggest that self-reported data could be used to complement the expert-based diagnosis.

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  • 41.
    Wåhlin Norgren, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Professional based classification versus self reported measures as a basis for choice of intervention - patients’ with musculoskeletal and mental disorders2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Wåhlin-Norgren, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    Health an functioning of employees with musculoskeletal or mental stress disorders - analysis of subgroups based on ICD-10 and work ability.2007In: International Scientific Conference on Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders., 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a great need in clinical practise and within the social insurance system in Sweden to learn more about classification of health and functioning and how to understand what influences work ability. This study provides evidence that sub grouping can be done from a medical approach by using ICD-10 or by using the Workability Index, but the pattern of health and functioning differs depending on which tool is used for categorization. Work- ability Index appears to provide a more distinct discrimination in terms of health and functioning than ICD-10.    

  • 43.
    Yiu, Xin Yi
    et al.
    Univ Queensland, Australia; Ng Teng Fong Gen Hosp, Singapore.
    Maguire, Andrea
    Queensland Dept Hlth, Australia.
    Johnson, Marcelle
    Univ Queensland, Australia.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Johnston, Venerina
    Univ Queensland, Australia.
    A 10-week exercise intervention can improve work posture but not neck/shoulder symptoms in dental health students: A pilot cohort study2020In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 239-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Dental workers including dental health students experience a high incidence of neck/shoulder symptoms. However, research into interventions has been scarce and largely focused on tools and technological modifications. OBJECTIVE: This study investigates the feasibility and benefits of a neck/shoulder exercise intervention on work posture and local symptoms in dental health students. METHODS: Twenty-three students participated in a 10-week resistance exercise program for 2 minutes daily, 5 days per week. Work posture (evaluated with the Rapid Upper Limb Assessment tool, RULA), muscle strength measures, self-rated symptom severity and function were collected. Feasibility of the intervention was determined with six items scored on a 5-point Likert scale. RESULTS: The exercise intervention improved: work posture score by 1.88 (95%CI 1.05-2.70, p &lt; 0.01) points on the RULA; isometric maximal strength of neck flexor and extensor muscles by 17.2% (95%CI 6.9-27.6%, p &lt; 0.01) and 23.2% (95%CI 10.2-36.3%, p &lt; 0.01) respectively; and clinical performance (77%). Isometric strength of the shoulder muscles, and symptom severity at the neck/shoulder showed no improvement. Adherence to training was 77%. CONCLUSION: Ten weeks of exercise was feasible for dental health students, and likely beneficial with improvements in work posture and neck muscle strength.

  • 44.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A prospective cohort study on newly sick-listed patients with musculoskeletal disorders and sustainable return to work2013Conference paper (Other academic)
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