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  • 1.
    Clinchy, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery.
    Fransson, Annelie
    Druvefors, Pelle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Hellsten, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery.
    Håkansson, Annika
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Gustafsson, Bertil
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Håkansson, Leif
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Preoperative interleukin-6 production by mononuclear blood cells predicts survival after radical surgery for colorectal carcinoma2007In: Cancer, ISSN 0008-543X, E-ISSN 1097-0142, Vol. 109, no 9, p. 1742-1749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND. Colorectal cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer in the Western world. Staging based on histopathology is currently the most accurate predictor of outcome after surgery. Colorectal cancer is curable if treated at an early stage (stage I-III). However, for tumors in stages II and III there is a great need for tests giving more accurate prognostic information defining the patient population in need of closer follow-up and/or adjuvant therapy. Furthermore, tests that provide prognostic information preoperatively could provide a guide both for preoperative oncologic treatment and the surgical procedure. METHODS. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated preoperatively, within a week before primary surgery, from 39 patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. The PBMCs were cultured in vitro for 24 hours in the presence of autologous serum and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Interleukin-6 (IL-6) production was measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Staging based on histopathology was performed in all patients. Patients were followed for at least 54 months. RESULTS. A production of >5000 pg/mL of IL-6 identified colorectal cancer patients with a poor prognosis. Eight out of 13 patients with >5000 pg/mL IL-6 died from cancer within the follow-up period, whereas no cancer-related deaths were recorded among 21 patients with 5000 pg/mL IL-6 or less. A multivariate Cox regression analysis, stratified for T- and N-stage, identified IL-6 production as an independent prognostic factor. CONCLUSIONS. IL-6 production in vitro by PBMC can predict survival after radical surgery for colorectal cancer. © 2007 American Cancer Society.

  • 2.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Clinchy, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Abdominal Obesity and low grade Systemic Inflammation as Markers for Subclinical Organ Damage in type 2 diabetes2014In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 76-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore associations between abdominal obesity, inflammatory markers, and subclinical organ damage in 740 patients with type 2 diabetes. Waist circumference (WC) and sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) was measured. Blood samples were analyzed for; C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL) -1β and IL-6. Carotid intimamedia thickness (IMT) was evaluated by ultrasonography. Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with applanation tonometry.

    Abdominal obesity were significantly correlated with; IL-6, CRP (both p= <0.001, WC and SAD, respectively), IMT (WC p=0.012, SAD p=0.003) and PWV (p<0.001, for WC and SAD, respectively). In multiple linear regressions with IMT as dependent variable and age, sex, statins, systolic blood pressure (SBP), Body Mass Index (BMI), CRP and HbA1c, as independent variables, SAD (p=0.047) but not WC, remained associated with IMT. In stepwise linear regression, entering both SAD and WC, the association between SAD and PWV was stronger than the association between WC and PWV.

    We conclude that SAD and WC are feasible measures of obesity that provides information on inflammation, atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness in type 2 diabetes. However, SAD was slightly more robustly associated to subclinical organ damage, compared with WC.

  • 3.
    Sörenson, Sverre
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pulmonary Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Fohlin, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Lindgren, Andrea
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Lindskog, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Bergman, Bengt
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Sederholm, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pulmonary Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Ek, Lars
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden .
    Lamberg, Kristina
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Clinchy, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Predictive role of plasma vascular endothelial growth factor for the effect of celecoxib in advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with chemotherapy2013In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 115-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim of the study: The primary purpose of this study is to investigate if pretreatment plasma levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are predictive of the effect of celecoxib on survival in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with palliative chemotherapy. A secondary objective is to describe the course of plasma VEGF levels during and after treatment with cytotoxic chemotherapy combined with celecoxib or placebo. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: In a previously published double-blind multicenter phase III trial, 316 patients with NSCLC stage IIIB or IV and World Health Organisation (WHO) performance status 0-2 were randomised to receive celecoxib 400 mg b.i.d. or placebo in combination with two-drug platinum-based chemotherapy. Chemotherapy cycle length was three weeks and planned duration of chemotherapy was four cycles. Celecoxib was given for a maximum of one year but was stopped earlier in case of disease progression or prohibitive toxicity. In a subset of patients, plasma VEGF levels were examined at onset of treatment and at 6, 12 and 20 weeks. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: VEGF levels at start of treatment were obtained in 107 patients at four study sites. The median value was 70 pg/ml. Mean values declined during the first 12 weeks and then increased at 20 weeks. A subpopulation treatment effect pattern plot (STEPP) analysis showed an inverse relationship between initial plasma VEGF and the impact of celecoxib on survival with zero effect at 200 pg/ml. The effect on survival by celecoxib in the whole subset of patients was positive (hazard ratio (HR)=0.64 [confidence interval (CI) 0.43-0.95], p=0.028). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: Low pretreatment plasma levels of VEGF appear to be predictive of a positive effect of celecoxib on survival.

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