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  • 1.
    Dahlin, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    De dog för att vi skulle leva: Rysslands patriotiska fostran och de levandes plikter mot de döda2014In: Nordisk Østforum, ISSN 0801-7220, E-ISSN 1891-1773, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 25-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses military-patriotic education in Russia, focusing on the example of the nationwide search movement. This civil movement of volunteers is searching for the remains of fallen soldiers left on the battlefields from the Second World War all over Russia. The movement has young people as a main target group, and explicitly wants to make a contribution to the patriotic upbringing of Russia's young. In this work, the movement relates to the official government plans for patriotic education. As the prefix ‘military’ often is used, patriotic education can be seen as one aspect of civil-military relations. In both the government plans and within the search movement, a distinction tends to be made between ‘good’ patriotism and ‘bad’ nationalism, and the article discusses both these notions in the Soviet/Russian context. A number of obligations are central to the notion of patriotism: for the search movement, an obligation to the past, to remember, is the most important.

  • 2.
    Dahlin, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kriget är inte över förrän den sista soldaten är begraven: Minnesarbete och gemenskap kring andra världskriget i S:t Petersburg med omnejd2012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this dissertation commemorative practices in St Petersburg and Leningrad oblast relating to the Second World War are investigated. The city of Leningrad was besieged by the Germans for more than two years 1941–44 and on the fronts around the city raged fierce battles. The woods and bogs here are still full of traces from the war, and the ground hides the remains of fallen soldiers. The empirical focus of the dissertation is the Russian voluntary movement working to find, bury, and if possible identify these soldiers.

    Different aspects of the activity are investigated: the importance of a name, the funerals, community building, the place, and the traces of war in the landscape. The search for fallen soldiers is related to a wider societal context. The war is an important source of national pride in Russia, and Victory Day May 9th is a holiday with high official status as well as popular enthusiasm. The suffering and sacrifice from the war contributes to making it sacred, both then and now. There is a widespread idea that the now living have obligations to the past – a duty to remember. The search activity is a complex struggle between identification with and critique of national myths. The dissertation explores the tension between memory and forgetting, and investigates how the memory of the Second World War is imbued with lasting and ritualised meaning, and how meaning is changed over time and in different contexts.

  • 3.
    Dahlin, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    'No one is Forgotten, Nothing is Forgotten': Duty, Patriotism, and the Russian Search Movement2017In: Europe-Asia Studies, ISSN 0966-8136, E-ISSN 1465-3427, Vol. 69, no 7, p. 1070-1089Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses duty in relation to the past, focusing on Russia’s nationwide Search Movement (Poiskovoe dvizhenie). This civil movement of volunteers searches for the remains of fallen soldiers left on the battlefields of World War II all over Russia and has young people as its main target group. Despite in many ways being critical of the state, the Search Movement explicitly wants to make a contribution to the patriotic upbringing of Russian youth. In its work, the movement relates to the official government plans for patriotic education. Several obligations are central to the notion of patriotism: for the Search Movement, an obligation to the past, to remember, is the most important. In this article I will examine how the malleable concept of duty allows the Search Movement to carry out work implicitly critical of state failings in the name of patriotism.

  • 4.
    Dahlin, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    "Now you have visited the war": the search for fallen soldiers in Russia2018In: Heritage of death: landscapes of emotion, memory and practice / [ed] Mattias Frihammar, Helaine Silverman, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 131-144Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Millions of soldiers are still lying unburied on the Russian battlefields from the Second World War. Voluntary search units are trying to find and bury the remains of these soldiers and, if possible, identify them. Speaking about the war in the present tense when referring to the battlefields, this movement attempts to bring closure to the war seventy years after its end. The prime means to achieve this end is a proper burial. The search units spend extended amounts of time on the battlefields and build intimate knowledge of the area. The search units acts as both visitors and hosts of the battlefields, inviting others to come and see for themselves. The visitors they hosts fall into two major categories, relatives of fallen soldiers and tour participants. The act of visiting and spending time on the battlefields is part of connecting past and present, but the unfished business of unburied remains also makes the movement consider the past as present. All types of visits have a strong emphasis on commemoration and a ritual dimension, which links this practice to other practices termed pilgrimage.

  • 5.
    Dahlin, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Voices from the war: An ethnohistorical study of letter dialogues between front soldiers and their families in 1941-19442016In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 136, no 2, p. 349-351Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 6.
    Dahlin, Johanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, ToveTove Form och Illustration, Norrköping.
    I rörelse / On the Move: Acsis Conference 2013, Norrköping 11-13 June2013Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We are proud to welcome you to the conference On the Move. It is arranged by the Advanced Cultural Studies Institute of Sweden (ACSIS) which is a national center for interdisciplinary and international networking in cultural research. This is the fifth biannual ACSIS conference. All the conferences have had different themes connected to various aspects of cultural research. On the Move explores the “mobility turn,” starting within the social sciences, and it explores the evolution in media studies, cultural studies, sociology, ethnology, anthropology, tourism studies, literature studies and several other areas of cultural research.

    Papers explore movement and/or immobilization across a broad spectrum and within many contexts, from the micro-movements of streptococci to the mobile, or not so mobile, lives of artists and artistic productions, cosmopolitans, refugees and tourists. They address social, cultural and political movements as well as practices embodied in sports, dance and everyday life.

    In addition to the exploration of the spatial mobility of humans, organisms and objects, the circulation across time and space of representations and the vehicles for movement – topics at the heart of the mobility turn – this conference also presents plenary panels and sessions dealing with the transformation of cultural and social norms. The speakers will discuss and debate the changing values with regard to gender and normativity; motion and emotion; the prerequisites and practices of critical research and teaching; the historiography of Europe; and cultural production and consumption.

    In the spirit of internationalization we have decided to alternate between two English, whereas all session slots have English as well as Swedish alternatives. This mixture of languages is a reality for many non-English natives and an inevitable aspect of doing cultural research – on the move – today.

    The conference is supported by Linköping University’s Faculty of Arts and Science, the Swedish universities which co-fund ACSIS, the Bank of Sweden Tercentenary Foundation and the city of Norrköping. We are also enormously grateful for and impressed by the non-salaried efforts from all invited speakers, panelists, moderators, session organizers and paper presenters.

    We invite you to discover the conference’s rich and varied content. Finally, we wish to stress that conferences are not only work; they are also a great opportunity to meet old friends and make new ones. In addition to the discussions at the sessions, there will be plenty of time to socialize at the reception hosted by the city of Norrköping on Tuesday evening and the conference dinner on Wednesday night.

    Bodil Axelsson, Director of ACSIS

    Orvar Löfgren, Chair of the ACSIS board

    Johanna Dahlin, ACSIS coordinator and conference organizer

  • 7.
    Dahlin, Johanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, ToveTove Form och Illustration, Norrköping.
    In the Flow: People, Media, Materialities2015Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We are proud to welcome you to the conference ‘In the Flow: People, Media, Materialities’. It is arranged by the Advanced Cultural Studies Institute of Sweden (ACSIS), a national centre for interdisciplinary and international networking in cultural research. This is the sixth biennial ACSIS conference. All the conferences have had different themes connected to various aspects of cultural research. ‘In the Flow: People, Media, Materialities’ is a continuation of the fifth conference, ‘On the Move’, which explored the ‘mobility turns’ various extensions in cultural research. This conference also emphasizes spatial, cultural and social flows, but the focus is on mediatization and how new and old media interact with bodies, institutions and various industries to produce social, cultural and material effects.

    We are especially proud to welcome our two keynote speakers, Anna Reading, Professor of Culture and Creative Industries at Kings College, London, and Mike Crang, Professor of Geography at Durham University, two scholars who in recent years have set out to rework the borders of, on the one hand, the cultural and the symbolical and, on the other hand, the material and the physical. The borderlands between the representational and the corporeal are explored by the plenary panel led by André Jansson, Professor of Media and Communication Studies at Karlstad University, discussing what body-monitoring technologies do to our experiences of being human.

    The keynotes and the plenary panel set the tone for sessions and individual papers presented by cultural researchers from many different countries. There are, for example, a number of presentations on digital technology. Similar to the plenary panel, some look at the nexus of mediatization and material embodied in everyday life actions and habits, examining the interplay between physical movement and affective engagement regarding wearable devices. Others approach the overarching theme of flows and slowdowns by discussing various aspects of understanding and tracking the circulation of images, music, texts and materialities, such as the mundane practices tied to online searches, methodologies to analyze online data, the curbing of the contemporary abundance of documents in institutions or how patents and copyrights regulate the distribution of on-screen immaterialities as well as material objects.

    The conference suggests that the ways in which digital media saturate contemporary everyday life have energized and renewed classic cultural studies fields, such as the study of identities, music consumption and television viewing. Theoretical redirections such as new materialism and ANT have directed attention to the agency of non-human actors such as computers in cultural processes at the same time as scholars have kept their eyes open for the everyday life agency of, for example, children and young people.

    Digital media are a very significant theme running through the conference. Another is the flows of objects and ideas through space as well as the effect of flows on people and places, investigating, for example, two-way flows between colonized lands and the metropole itself, flowbacks of labour and capital, urban transformations and the reconfiguration of resort cities. A third theme is heritage flows. A series of sessions discuss how new technologies, globalization, policies and changing classification systems set heritage values, exhibitions and institutions in motion. Additional themes such as cultural sociology, feminist culture studies and the future of gender and sexualities remind cultural researchers of the importance of keeping their eyes open for power relations, inequalities, identities and politics.

    We are also very pleased to present our series of spotlight sessions. Here we have invited researchers to discuss time, media history, heritage institutions, the impact of digital media on fan and celebrity cultures, and feminist culture studies. Thanks to an initiative from the master’s students on the Linköping University Programme for Culture, Society and Media Production, we have a spotlight session on education and research.

    The conference is supported by Linköping University’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences, the Swedish universities which co-fund ACSIS, and the Bank of Sweden Tercentenary Foundation. We are also enormously grateful for and impressed by the unpaid efforts of all invited speakers, panellists, moderators, session organizers and paper presenters. We invite you to discover the conference’s rich and varied content, which encourages interdisciplinary exchanges as well as conversaions across empirical fields. Finally, we wish to stress that conferences are a great opportunity to meet old friends and make new ones. In addition to the discussions at the sessions, there will be plenty of time to socialize at the reception on Monday evening at the art gallery Verkstad and at the conference dinner on Tuesday night.

    Bodil Axelsson,

    director of ACSIS

  • 8.
    Dahlin, Johanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fredriksson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Extracting the Commons2017In: Cultural Studies, ISSN 0950-2386, E-ISSN 1466-4348, Vol. 31, no 2-3, p. 253-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates how resources that are perceived as common are turned into property through different interventions of extractivism, and how this provokes counter-activism from groups and actors who see their rights and living conditions threatened by the practices of extraction. The article looks at how extraction is enacted through three distinct practices: prospecting, enclosure and unbundling, studied through three different cases. The cases involve resources that are material and immaterial, renewable as well as non-renewable, ‘natural’ as well as man-made. Prospecting is exemplified by patenting of genetic resources and traditional knowledge, enclosure is exemplified by debates over copyright expansionism and information commons, and unbundling through conflicts over mining and gas extraction. The article draws on fieldwork involving interviews and participant observation with protesters at contested mining sites in Australia and with digital rights activists from across the world who protest against how the expansion of copyright limits public access to culture and information. The article departs from an understanding of ‘commons’ not as an open access resource, but as a resource shared by a group of people, often subjected to particular social norms that regulate how it can be used. Enclosure and extraction are both social processes, dependent on recognising some and downplaying or misrecognising other social relations when it comes to resources and processes of property creation. These processes are always, regardless of the particular resources at stake, cultural in the sense that the uses of the commons are regulated through cultural norms and contracts, but also that they carry profound cultural and social meanings for those who use them. Finally, the commonalities and heterogeneities of these protest movements are analysed as ‘working in common’, where the resistance to extraction in itself represents a process of commoning.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-09-17 14:36
  • 9.
    Dahlin, Johanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Källstrand, Gustav
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Eriksson, Bengt Erik
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bokbyggare: Carlsson Bokförlag under trettio år2013 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Läsandets, författarnas och bokens kulturella betydelser är kontinuerligt föremål för diskussion. Betydligt mindre uppmärksamhet har ägnats den verksamhet som är förutsättningen för en god bokutgivning, bokförlagen. Kanske till och med att kunskapen om vad ett bokförlag, med sina förläggare, redaktörer och formgivare, egentligen gör inte är så spridd. I den här boken beskrivs ett svenskt bokförlag och dess verksamhet under en trettioårsperiod. Vi får inblickar i hur manuskript tas emot, vad det är som formar en inriktning på utgivningen, hur det vardagliga arbetet på förlaget ser ut, vad som väntar böckerna när de publiceras och hur ett bokförlag kan resonera kring sin roll som kulturellt projekt. Ett drygt tjugotal författare redovisar dessutom sina erfarenheter av bokförlag och vad dessa kan betyda för det egna författarskapet. 

  • 10.
    Dahlin, Johanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Möller, Per
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kamrater, det är vi2012In: Kulturaliseringens samhälle: Kulturaliseringens samhälle : problemorienterad kulturvetenskaplig forskning vid Tema Q 2002-2012 / [ed] Svante Beckman, Linköping University Electronic Press, 2012, p. 134-137Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Lärkner, Johanna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies.
    Den stora segern fyller 602006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den stora segern fyller 60: Segerdag, symbolåtervinning och ett förlorat fosterland handlar om firandet av 60-årsjubileet av andra världskrigets slut i Ryssland våren 2005. Den så kallade segerdagen som firas den 9 maj är en av landets största högtider. Uppsatsens huvudintresse är hur bilden av andra världskriget och den sovjetiska segern finns i offentligheten i dag och används i en konstruktion av dagens Ryssland. Uppsatsen bygger på material insamlat under fältarbete i S:t Petersburg våren 2005, samt en analys av artiklar i några av Rysslands största dagstidningar. Uppsatsen fokuserar på hur man firar, men också på vad som sägs om firandet och kriget. Hur identitetsfrågor, historia och nutid presenteras i vad som kan kallas en offentlig diskurs undersöks. I firandet har Sovjetunionen, som en av segrarmakterna i andra världskriget, en viktig roll, trots att landet sedan 15 år inte längre existerar. I uppsatsen undersöks vilken roll Sovjetunionen och sovjetiska symboler har i dagens ryska nationsbyggnadsprocess, med avseende på hur andra världskriget används. Militärparader, segertåg med veteraner och storslagna fyrverkerier hörde till firandet 2005. Firandet är till största delen offentligt till sin karaktär, även om det är en dag som också firas privat. Offentligheten i firandet tar sig uttryck på flera olika sätt. Mängder av affischer och banderoller sätts upp på strategiska ställen i staden, det är i stadsrummet som själva firandet äger rum. Dessutom finns en massiv medierapportering. Delar av firandet direktsänds i tv, och alla nyhetsmedier rapporterar. Bilden av kriget är enhetlig som den uttrycks i firandet och genom de artiklar som undersöks i uppsatsen. Dock är vissa delar av historien omtvistad, och det finns hot mot Den stora berättelsen om kriget. Detta tas upp i rapporteringen, men beskrivs som kommande utifrån. Den största delen av tidningsartiklarna utgörs av veteraners berättelser från kriget. Dessa ger trots enskildheter i detaljer, en mycket samstämmig bild av kriget och stödjer Den stora berättelsen om kriget som är den samma nu som under sovjettiden.

  • 12.
    Lärkner, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Glädje med tårar i ögonen: 60-årsjubileet av andra världskrigets slut i Ryssland2010In: Historisk Tidskrift för Finland, ISSN 0046-7596, E-ISSN 2343-2888, no 1, p. 148-173Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Lärkner, Johanna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies.
    Återvunna symboler - den stora sovjetiska segern i en ny tid2006In: Nordisk Østforum, ISSN 0801-7220, E-ISSN 1891-1773, no 4, p. 405-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    The article focuses on Russian celebrations of the 60th anniversary of the Soviet victory in the Second World War in May 2005. It is based on material collected druing fieldwork in St Petersburg at the time of the celebrations as well as Russian newspaper articles from the same period. In the celebrations, a prominent role was accorded to the Soviet Union, even though it had ceased to exist 15 years earlier. The article discusses the role of the Soviet Union - Soviet symbols in particular - in the contemporary celebrations of Victory Day. Recycled and used in a new context, such symbols change their meaning. War veterans also play an important role in the celebrations, as evident in the victory procession on St Petersburg's main street on Victory Day. Newspaper coverage leading up to the anniversary prominently featured stories about war veterans. The view of the war as expressed in these articles is quite uniform: any contrasting views of history are presented as external threats, and the main lines of history remain the same as they were during Soviet times.

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