liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Jonsson, C.
    et al.
    Jönsson, C., Åmic AB, Uppsala, Sweden, Biomedical Diagnostics Institute, NCSR Building, Dublin City University, Glasnevin Dublin 9, Ireland.
    Aronsson, M.
    Åmic AB, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rundstrom, G.
    Rundström, G., Åmic AB, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pettersson, C.
    Åmic AB, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mendel-Hartvig, I.
    Åmic AB, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bakker, J.
    Åmic AB, Uppsala, Sweden, Biomedical Diagnostics Institute, NCSR Building, Dublin City University, Glasnevin Dublin 9, Ireland.
    Martinsson, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    MacCraith, B.
    Biomedical Diagnostics Institute, NCSR Building, Dublin City University, Glasnevin Dublin 9, Ireland.
    Ohman, O.
    Öhman, O., Åmic AB, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Melin, J.
    Åmic AB, Uppsala, Sweden, Biomedical Diagnostics Institute, NCSR Building, Dublin City University, Glasnevin Dublin 9, Ireland.
    Silane-dextran chemistry on lateral flow polymer chips for immunoassays2008In: Lab on a Chip, ISSN 1473-0197, E-ISSN 1473-0189, Vol. 8, no 7, p. 1191-1197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prognosis for patients suffering from cardiovascular and many other diseases can be substantially improved if diagnosed at an early stage. High performance diagnostic testing using disposable microfluidic chips can provide a platform for realizing this vision. Åmic AB (Uppsala, Sweden) has developed a new microfluidic test chip for sandwich immunoassays fabricated by injection molding of the cycloolefin-copolymer Zeonor™. A highly ordered array of micropillars within the fluidic chip distributes the sample solution by capillary action. Since wetting of the pillar array surface is the only driving force for liquid distribution precise control of the surface chemistry is crucial. In this work we demonstrate a novel protocol for surface hydrophilization and antibody immobilization on cycloolefin-copolymer test chips, based on direct silanisation of the thermoplastic substrate. Dextran is subsequently covalently coupled to amino groups, thus providing a coating with a low contact angle suitable for antibody immobilization. The contact angle of dextran coated chips is stable for at least two months, which enables production of large batches that can be stored for extended periods of time. We demonstrate the utility of the presented platform and surface chemistry in a C-reactive protein assay with a detection limit of 2.6 ng ml-1, a dynamic range of 102 and a coefficient of variance of 15%. © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  • 2.
    Martinsson, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nanoplasmonic Sensing using Metal Nanoparticles2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In our modern society, we are surrounded by numerous sensors, constantly feeding us information about our physical environment. From small, wearable sensors that monitor our physiological status to large satellites orbiting around the earth, detecting global changes. Although, the performance of these sensors have been significantly improved during the last decades there is still a demand for faster and more reliable sensing systems with improved sensitivity and selectivity. The rapid progress in nanofabrication techniques has made a profound impact for the development of small, novel sensors that enables miniaturization and integration. A specific area where nanostructures are especially attractive is biochemical sensing, where the exceptional properties of nanomaterials can be utilized in order to detect and analyze biomolecular interactions. 

    The focus of this thesis is to investigate plasmonic nanoparticles composed of gold or silver and optimize their performance as signal transducers in optical biosensors. Metal nanoparticles exhibit unique optical properties due to excitation of localized surface plasmons, which makes them highly sensitive probes for detecting small, local changes in their surrounding environment, for instance the binding of a biomolecule to the nanoparticle surface. This is the basic principle behind nanoplasmonic sensing based on refractometric detection, a sensing scheme that offers real-time and label-free detection of molecular interactions. 

    This thesis shows that the sensitivity for detecting local refractive index changes is highly dependent on the geometry of the metal nanoparticles, their interaction with neighboring particles and their chemical composition and functionalization. An increased knowledge about how these parameters affects the sensitivity is essential when developing nanoplasmonic sensing devices with high performance based on metal nanoparticles. 

    List of papers
    1. Local Refractive Index Sensing Based on Edge Gold-Coated Silver Nanoprisms
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Local Refractive Index Sensing Based on Edge Gold-Coated Silver Nanoprisms
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 117, no 44, p. 23148-23154Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Bulk and surface refractive index sensitivity for localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensing based on edge gold-coated silver nanoprisms (GSNPs) and gold nanospheres was investigated and compared with conventional surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing based on propagating surface plasmons. The hybrid GSNPs benefit from an improved stability since the gold frame protecting the unstable silver facets located at the silver nanoprisms (SNPs) edges and tips prevents truncation or rounding of their sharp tips or edges, maintaining a high refractive index sensitivity even under harsh conditions. By using layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolytes and protein adsorption, we found that GSNPs exhibit 4-fold higher local refractive index sensitivity in close proximity (andlt;10 nm) to the surface compared to a flat gold film in the conventional SPR setup. Moreover, the sensitivity was 8-fold higher with GSNPs than with gold nanospheres. This shows that relatively simple plasmonic nanostructures for LSPR-based sensing can be engineered to outperform conventional SPR, which is particularly interesting in the context of detecting low molecular weight compounds where a small sensing volume, reducing bulk signals, is desired.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Chemical Society, 2013
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102498 (URN)10.1021/jp408187e (DOI)000326845400076 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research (SSF)||Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation (KAW)||Centre in Nano science and technology (CeNano)||Singapore MOE|RG 44/11M0E2012-T2-2-041ARC 5/13|CRP program from NRF Singapore|NRF-CRP5-2009-04|Science & Engineering Research Council (SERC) of Agency for Science Technology and Research (A*STAR)|102 152 0015|Swedish Research Council (VR)||

    Available from: 2013-12-12 Created: 2013-12-12 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    2. Optimizing the Refractive Index Sensitivity of Plasmonically Coupled Gold Nanoparticles
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Optimizing the Refractive Index Sensitivity of Plasmonically Coupled Gold Nanoparticles
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: PLASMONICS, ISSN 1557-1955, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 773-780Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The possibility to enhance the local refractive index sensitivity using plasmonic coupling between spherical gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) has been investigated. A strong and distinct optical coupling between Au-NPs of various sizes was achieved by controlling the interparticle separation using a layer-by-layer assembly of polyelectrolytes. The frequency of the coupled plasmon peak could be tuned by varying either the particle size or the interparticle separation, shown both experimentally and by theoretical simulations. The bulk refractive index (RI) sensitivity for the plasmonic coupling modes was investigated and compared to the RI sensitivity of monolayers of well-separated Au-NPs, and the results clearly demonstrates that the RI sensitivity can be significantly enhanced in plasmonically coupled Au-NPs. The proposed approach is simple and scalable and improves the rather modest RI sensitivity of spherical gold nanoparticles with a factor of 3, providing a new route for fabrication of inexpensive sensors based on plasmonic nanostructures.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer Verlag (Germany), 2014
    Keywords
    Metal nanoparticles; Localized surface plasmon resonance ( LSPR); Plasmonic coupling; Polyelectrolytes; Layer-by-layer
    National Category
    Physical Sciences Biological Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111291 (URN)10.1007/s11468-013-9659-y (DOI)000341423800007 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Link ping University; Swedish Research Council (VR); Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research (SSF); Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation (KAW); Center in Nano science and technology (CeNano); MINECO, Explora Project [MAT2011-12645-E]

    Available from: 2014-10-14 Created: 2014-10-14 Last updated: 2014-11-06
    3. Substrate Effect on the Refractive Index Sensitivity of Silver Nanoparticles
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Substrate Effect on the Refractive Index Sensitivity of Silver Nanoparticles
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 118, no 42, p. 24680-24687Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The bulk refractive index (RI) sensitivity of dispersed and immobilized silver nanoparticles of three different shapes (spheres, cubes, and plates) is investigated. We demonstrate, both experimentally and theoretically, that the influence of immobilization on the RI sensitivity is highly dependent on the shape of the nanoparticles. A strong correlation is seen between the fraction of the particle surface area in direct contact with the substrate and the decrease in RI sensitivity when the particles are immobilized on a glass substrate. The largest decrease (−36%) is seen for the most sensitive nanoparticles (plates), drastically reducing their advantage over other nanoparticle shapes. The shape-dependent substrate effect is thus an important factor to consider when designing nanoplasmonic sensors based on colloidal noble-metal nanoparticles.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Chemical Society (ACS), 2014
    National Category
    Nano Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111838 (URN)10.1021/jp5084086 (DOI)000343740300051 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research Swedish Research Council
    Available from: 2014-11-05 Created: 2014-11-05 Last updated: 2017-12-05
    4. Influence of Surfactant Bilayers on the Refractive Index Sensitivity and Catalytic Properties of Anisotropic Gold Nanoparticles
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of Surfactant Bilayers on the Refractive Index Sensitivity and Catalytic Properties of Anisotropic Gold Nanoparticles
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 330-342Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Shape-controlled synthesis of gold nanoparticles generally involves the use of surfactants, typically cetyltrimethylammonium (CTAX, X = Cl-, Br-), to regulate the nucleation growth process and to obtain colloidally stable nanoparticles. The surfactants adsorb on the nanoparticle surface making further functionalization difficult and therefore limit their use in many applications. Herein, the influence of CTAX on nanoparticle sensitivity to local dielectric environment changes is reported. It is shown, both experimentally and theoretically, that the CTAX bilayer significantly reduces the refractive index (RI) sensitivity of anisotropic gold nanoparticles such as nanocubes and concave nanocubes, nanorods, and nanoprisms. The RI sensitivity can be increased by up to 40% by removing the surfactant layer from nanoparticles immobilized on a solid substrate using oxygen plasma treatment. This increase compensates for the otherwise problematic decrease in RI sensitivity caused by the substrate effect. Moreover, the removal of the surfactants both facilitates nanoparticle biofunctionalization and significantly improves their catalytic properties. The strategy presented herein is a simple yet effective universal method for enhancing the RI sensitivity of CTAX-stabilized gold nanoparticles and increasing their potential as transducers in nanoplasmonic sensors, as well as in catalytic and biomedical applications.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    WILEY-V C H VERLAG GMBH, 2016
    National Category
    Physical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125149 (URN)10.1002/smll.201502449 (DOI)000368707800006 ()26583756 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council (VR); Stockholm Brain Institute (SBI); AFOSR [FA9550-12-1-0280]; NSFs MRSEC program at the Materials Research Center of Northwestern University [DMR-1121262]; Singapore Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR); Nanyang Technological University Postdoctoral Fellowship by Institute of Nano-System Interface Science & Technology (INSIST).

    The previous status of this article was Manuscript.

    Available from: 2016-02-15 Created: 2016-02-15 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
  • 3.
    Martinsson, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mehdi Shahjamali, Mohammad
    Nanyang Technology University, Singapore .
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Boey, Freddy
    Nanyang Technology University, Singapore .
    Xue, Can
    Nanyang Technology University, Singapore .
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Local Refractive Index Sensing Based on Edge Gold-Coated Silver Nanoprisms2013In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 117, no 44, p. 23148-23154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bulk and surface refractive index sensitivity for localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensing based on edge gold-coated silver nanoprisms (GSNPs) and gold nanospheres was investigated and compared with conventional surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing based on propagating surface plasmons. The hybrid GSNPs benefit from an improved stability since the gold frame protecting the unstable silver facets located at the silver nanoprisms (SNPs) edges and tips prevents truncation or rounding of their sharp tips or edges, maintaining a high refractive index sensitivity even under harsh conditions. By using layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolytes and protein adsorption, we found that GSNPs exhibit 4-fold higher local refractive index sensitivity in close proximity (andlt;10 nm) to the surface compared to a flat gold film in the conventional SPR setup. Moreover, the sensitivity was 8-fold higher with GSNPs than with gold nanospheres. This shows that relatively simple plasmonic nanostructures for LSPR-based sensing can be engineered to outperform conventional SPR, which is particularly interesting in the context of detecting low molecular weight compounds where a small sensing volume, reducing bulk signals, is desired.

  • 4.
    Martinsson, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Otte, Marinus A.
    Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia (ICN2), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC) & CIBER-BBN, Campus UAB, Bellaterra, Barcelona, Spain.
    Shahjamali, Mohammad M.
    Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, USA.
    Sepulveda, Borja
    Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia (ICN2), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC) & CIBER-BBN, Campus UAB, Bellaterra, Barcelona, Spain.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Substrate Effect on the Refractive Index Sensitivity of Silver Nanoparticles2014In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 118, no 42, p. 24680-24687Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The bulk refractive index (RI) sensitivity of dispersed and immobilized silver nanoparticles of three different shapes (spheres, cubes, and plates) is investigated. We demonstrate, both experimentally and theoretically, that the influence of immobilization on the RI sensitivity is highly dependent on the shape of the nanoparticles. A strong correlation is seen between the fraction of the particle surface area in direct contact with the substrate and the decrease in RI sensitivity when the particles are immobilized on a glass substrate. The largest decrease (−36%) is seen for the most sensitive nanoparticles (plates), drastically reducing their advantage over other nanoparticle shapes. The shape-dependent substrate effect is thus an important factor to consider when designing nanoplasmonic sensors based on colloidal noble-metal nanoparticles.

  • 5.
    Martinsson, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sepulveda, Borja
    ICN2 Institute Catala Nanociencia and Nanotecnol, Spain; CSIC Consejo Super Invest Cient, Spain.
    Chen, Peng
    Nanyang Technology University, Singapore.
    Elfwing, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Nanyang Technology University, Singapore.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Optimizing the Refractive Index Sensitivity of Plasmonically Coupled Gold Nanoparticles2014In: PLASMONICS, ISSN 1557-1955, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 773-780Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possibility to enhance the local refractive index sensitivity using plasmonic coupling between spherical gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) has been investigated. A strong and distinct optical coupling between Au-NPs of various sizes was achieved by controlling the interparticle separation using a layer-by-layer assembly of polyelectrolytes. The frequency of the coupled plasmon peak could be tuned by varying either the particle size or the interparticle separation, shown both experimentally and by theoretical simulations. The bulk refractive index (RI) sensitivity for the plasmonic coupling modes was investigated and compared to the RI sensitivity of monolayers of well-separated Au-NPs, and the results clearly demonstrates that the RI sensitivity can be significantly enhanced in plasmonically coupled Au-NPs. The proposed approach is simple and scalable and improves the rather modest RI sensitivity of spherical gold nanoparticles with a factor of 3, providing a new route for fabrication of inexpensive sensors based on plasmonic nanostructures.

  • 6.
    Martinsson, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Northwestern University, IL 60208 USA.
    Shahjamali, Mohammad M.
    Nanyang Technology University, Singapore.
    Large, Nicolas
    Northwestern University, IL 60208 USA.
    Zaraee, Negin
    Northwestern University, IL 60208 USA.
    Zhou, Yu
    Northwestern University, IL 60208 USA.
    Schatz, George C.
    Northwestern University, IL 60208 USA.
    Mirkin, Chad A.
    Northwestern University, IL 60208 USA.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Influence of Surfactant Bilayers on the Refractive Index Sensitivity and Catalytic Properties of Anisotropic Gold Nanoparticles2016In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 330-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shape-controlled synthesis of gold nanoparticles generally involves the use of surfactants, typically cetyltrimethylammonium (CTAX, X = Cl-, Br-), to regulate the nucleation growth process and to obtain colloidally stable nanoparticles. The surfactants adsorb on the nanoparticle surface making further functionalization difficult and therefore limit their use in many applications. Herein, the influence of CTAX on nanoparticle sensitivity to local dielectric environment changes is reported. It is shown, both experimentally and theoretically, that the CTAX bilayer significantly reduces the refractive index (RI) sensitivity of anisotropic gold nanoparticles such as nanocubes and concave nanocubes, nanorods, and nanoprisms. The RI sensitivity can be increased by up to 40% by removing the surfactant layer from nanoparticles immobilized on a solid substrate using oxygen plasma treatment. This increase compensates for the otherwise problematic decrease in RI sensitivity caused by the substrate effect. Moreover, the removal of the surfactants both facilitates nanoparticle biofunctionalization and significantly improves their catalytic properties. The strategy presented herein is a simple yet effective universal method for enhancing the RI sensitivity of CTAX-stabilized gold nanoparticles and increasing their potential as transducers in nanoplasmonic sensors, as well as in catalytic and biomedical applications.

  • 7.
    Mehdi Shahjamali, Mohammad
    et al.
    Nanyang Technology University.
    Bosman, Michel
    ASTAR.
    Cao, Shaowen
    Nanyang Technology University.
    Huang, Xiao
    Nanyang Technology University.
    Saadat, Somaye
    Nanyang Technology University.
    Martinsson, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Yan Tay, Yee
    Nanyang Technology University.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Chye Joachim Loo, Say
    Nanyang Technology University.
    Zhang, Hua
    Nanyang Technology University.
    Boey, Freddy
    Nanyang Technology University.
    Xue, Can
    Nanyang Technology University.
    Gold Coating of Silver Nanoprisms2012In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 849-854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coreshell Ag@Au nanoprisms are prepared through a surfactant-free seed-mediated approach by taking advantage of the anisotropic structure of silver nanoprisms as seeds. The gold coating on the silver nanoprism surface is achieved by using hydroxylamine as a mild reducing agent, and the final fully gold-coated prism structures are confirmed by microscopic and spectroscopic characterization. The resulting Ag@Au coreshell structure preserves the optical signatures of nanoprisms and offers versatile functionality and particularly better stability against oxidation than the bare silver nanoprism. The surface plasmon resonances of the coreshell Ag@Au nanoprisms can be tuned throughout the visible and near-IR range as a function of the Au shell thickness. Such tailorable optical features and surfactant-free gold shells have great potential applications in biosensing and bioimaging.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf