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  • 1.
    Baranzahi, Amir
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, B.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gas sensitive field effect devices for high temperature1995In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 26, no 1-3, 165-169 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Field effect sensors based on metal-oxide-silicon carbide (MOSiC) devices are used as high temperature gas sensors. They are sensitive to, for example, saturated hydrocarbons and hydrogen and can be operated up to at least 800 degrees C, which make them suitable for several types of combustion control. A metal gate with two layer platinum and a buffer layer of tantalum silicide in between gave a large increase in the long term stability of the sensors. At temperatures below 600 degrees C, the response to ethane in oxygen was shown to have a threshold at a ratio of about 0.38 for the ethane-to-oxygen concentrations. Below this ratio, the surface can be considered as mainly oxygen covered and the response is small. Above this ratio the metal surface is probably mainly hydrogen covered and the response is considerably larger.

  • 2.
    Baranzahi, Amir
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Glavmo, M
    Mecel AB, Åmål, Sweden; AB Volvo Technol Dev, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Carlsson, C
    Mecel AB, Åmål, Sweden; AB Volvo Technol Dev, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nytomt, J
    Mecel AB, Åmål, Sweden; AB Volvo Technol Dev, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Salomonsson, P
    Mecel AB, Åmål, Sweden; AB Volvo Technol Dev, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jobson, E
    Mecel AB, Åmål, Sweden; AB Volvo Technol Dev, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Haggendal, B
    Mecel AB, Åmål, Sweden; AB Volvo Technol Dev, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Martensson, P
    Mecel AB, Åmål, Sweden; AB Volvo Technol Dev, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Response of metal-oxide-silicon carbide sensors to simulated and real exhaust gases1997In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 43, no 1-3, 52-59 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Field effect devices based on catalytic metal-oxide-silicon carbide (MOSiC) structures can be used as high temperature gas sensors. The devices are sensitive to hydrocarbons and hydrogen and can be operated up to at least 900 degrees C, which make them suitable for several combustion applications, Simulated and real exhaust gases from a car engine have been studied at sensor temperatures from 200 to 650 degrees C, and it was round that the sensor signal is high for excess hydrocarbon and low for excess oxygen. The response time is less than 100 ms and only a small degradation of the devices was observed after several days of operation. The devices also react to changes of the gas composition In the fuel-rich and fuel-lean region. The devices show an interesting temperature dependence in the fuel rich region.

  • 3.
    Baranzahi, Amir
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Reversible hydrogen annealing of metal‐oxide‐silicon carbide devices at high temperatures1995In: Applied Physics Letters, ISSN 0003-6951, E-ISSN 1077-3118, Vol. 67, no 21, 3203-3205 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on a reversible hydrogen annealing effect observed in platinum-silicon dioxide-silicon carbide structures at temperatures above about 650 degrees C. It appears as a decrease of the inversion capacitance in the presence of hydrogen. This phenomenon is shown to depend on hydrogen atoms, created on the catalytic metal, that pass through the oxide and interact with charge generation sites at the oxide-silicon carbide interface. The consequence of the observation for chemical sensors based on silicon carbide is discussed. The results are phenomenological, since no details of the annealing chemistry could be developed from the present experiments. We find, however, that the annealing process and its reversal have activation energies of about 0.9 eV and 2.9 eV/site,respectively.

  • 4.
    Baranzahi, Amir
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tobias, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mårtensson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekedahl, Lars Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Chemical sensors with catalytic metal gates - Switching behavior and kinetic phase transitions1998In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 145, no 10, 3401-3406 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid transitions in the response of platinum-based chemical sensors occurring at given hydrogen-oxygen concentration ratios are explained by kinetic phase transitions or switching phenomena on the catalytic metal surface. Below the transition point the response of platinum-insulator silicon carbide devices is small and above the transition it is large. It is found that the critical ratio depends on the operation temperature and the properties of the device. Three different cases are identified, namely, injection-, diffusion-, and reaction-rate-determined transitions. At sufficiently large temperatures the transition is injection limited and occurs at the stoichiometric ratio of hydrogen and oxygen in the gas mixture. The implications of the experimental observations on the applications of chemical sensors with catalytic sensing layers are discussed.

  • 5.
    Baranzahi, Amir
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tobias, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mårtensson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekedahl, Lars-Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kinectic phase transitions and chemical sensors with catalytic metal gates1997In: Chemical & Biological Sensors & Analytical Electrochemical Methods, 1997, Electrochemical Society , 1997, Vol. 97, no 19, 1-15 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid transitions in the response of platinum based chemical sensors occurring at given hydrogen-oxygen concentration ratios are explained by kinetic phase transitions or switching phenomena on the catalytic metal surface. Below the transition point the response of platinum-insulator silicon carbide devices is small and above the transition large and almost saturated. It is found that the critical ratio depends on the operation temperature and the properties of the device. Three different cases are identified, namely injection-, diffusion- and reaction rate determined transitions. At sufficiently large temperatures the transition is injection limited and occurs at the stoichiometric ratio of hydrogen and oxygen in the gas mixture. The implications of the experimental observations on the applications of chemical sensors with catalytic sensing layers are discussed.

  • 6.
    Kanciurzewska, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    Dobruchowska, E.
    Baranzahi, Amir
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    Carlegrim, Elin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry .
    Girtu, M. A.
    Study on Poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene)-Poly(styrenesulfonate) as a plastic counter electrode in dye sensitized solar cells2007In: Journal of Optoelectronics and Advanced Materials, ISSN 1454-4164, E-ISSN 1841-7132, Vol. 9, no 4, 1052-1059 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dye sensitized solar cells with PEDOT-PSS coated directly on flexible polyester substrate as counter electrode have been fabricated. The behavior of such plastic counter electrode in the presence of I/I-3 redox electrolyte has been investigated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We have found that some of iodine species are "trapped" within the PEDOT-PSS layer. The presence of I-3, I-2 and PEDOT charge transfer complexes with iodine species may block the surface of the electrode. Furthermore, the PEDOT may be further oxidized (p-doped) during cell operation, which in turn may cause overoxidation and loss of conductivity in the PEDOT-PSS film. Additionally, the interactions between PEDOT and iodine species may be enlarged because of the partial loss of PSS protective counter ion. That has resulted in decrease of PEDOT-PSS catalytic activity for reduction of I-3 to I in the redox electrolyte and has caused worse cell performance than in case of DSSC with Pt counter electrode.

  • 7.
    Kanciurzewska, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dobruchowska, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baranzahi, Amir
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Carlegrim, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fahlman, Ana
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Girtu, Mihai A.
    Dye sensitized solar cells with a plastic counter electrode of poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) - art. no. 6656112007In: Proceedings of SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering, ISSN 0277-786X, E-ISSN 1996-756X, Vol. 6656, 65611-65611 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 8.
    Karlsteen, M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baranzahi, Amir
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Electrical properties of inhomogeneous SiC MIS structures1995In: Journal of Electronic Materials, ISSN 0361-5235, E-ISSN 1543-186X, Vol. 24, no 7, 853-861 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current-voltage characteristics of metal contacts on 6H-SiC with a thin (5-20 Angstrom) oxide layer have been measured in the temperature range 300 to 1000K. The contacts were investigated in both H-2 and O-2-atmospheres. As the SiC surface was nonideal due to pin holes and other defects generated during the growth process, it was necessary to treat the Schottky contacts as inhomogeneous contacts. The inhomogeneity explains the nonideal current-voltage behavior of the contacts such as ideality factors much larger than unity and voltage dependent ideality factors. It was found that some metals gave Schottky contacts in the entire temperature range, while other metals were ohmic at higher temperatures. Several different contact metals were investigated: Al, Ti, TaSix, and Pd were found to be ohmic at high temperatures, while Pt, Pt+Cr, Ni, Cr and another TaSix contact were found to behave like Schottky contacts in the entire temperature range. This is a preliminary investigation of the electrical characteristics of different metals that could be useful for high temperature gas sensor purposes.

  • 9.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baranzahi, Amir
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tobias, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    High temperature sensors based on metal-insulator-silicon carbide devices1997In: Physica status solidi. A, Applied research, ISSN 0031-8965, E-ISSN 1521-396X, Vol. 162, no 1, 493-511 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High temperature gas sensors based on catalytic metal-insulator-silicon carbide (MISiC) devices are developed both as capacitors and Schottky diodes. A maximum operation temperature of 1000 degrees C is obtained for capacitors based on 4H-SiC, and all sensors work routinely for several weeks at 600 degrees C. Reducing gases like hydrocarbons and hydrogen lower the flat band voltage of the capacitor and the barrier height of the diode. The time constants for the gas response are in the order of milliseconds and because of this good performance the sensors are tested for combustion engine control. For temperatures around 600 degrees C total combustion occurs on the sensor surface and the signal is high for fuel in excess and low for air in excess. At temperatures around 400 degrees C the response is more linear. The high temperature operation causes interdiffusion of the metal and insulator layers in these devices; and this interdiffusion has been studied. At sufficiently high temperatures the inversion capacitance shows different levels for hydrogen free and hydrogen containing ambients, which is suggested to be due to a reversible hydrogen annealing effect at the insulator-silicon carbide interface.

  • 10.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Schmeisser, D.
    Technische Universitaet Cottbus, Germany.
    Baranzahi, Amir
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wälivaara, B.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Göpel, W.
    Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Tübingen, Germany.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    X-ray photoemission and Auger electron spectroscopy analysis of fast responding activated metal oxide silicon carbide gas sensors1997In: Thin Solid Films, ISSN 0040-6090, E-ISSN 1879-2731, Vol. 299, no 1-2, 183-189 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Platinum-silicon dioxide-silicon carbide, MOSiC, sensors are possible to operate at high temperatures and show a gas sensitivity pattern which is of interest for many applications including exhaust gases from car engines. The introduction of a buffer layer of tantalum silicide between the metal and the silicon dioxide resulted, after an annealing step, in a very good adhesion of the gate contact and fast responding sensors with improved signal stability. Depth profiling using X-ray photoemission and Auger electron spectroscopy showed that the annealing step converts the tantalum silicide to a mixed phase predominantly containing tantalum pentoxide. Tantalum silicide as well as platinum silicide are also present in the metal-oxide interface region.

  • 11.
    Nakagomi, Shinji
    et al.
    School of Science and Engineering, Ishinomaki Senshu University, Ishinomaki, Japan.
    Tobias, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Univ, S SENCE, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden; Linkoping Univ, Appl Phys Lab, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden; Ishinomaki Senshu Univ, Sch Sci and Engn, Ishinomaki 98680, Japan; .
    Baranzahi, Amir
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mårtensson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Influence of carbon monoxide, water and oxygen on high temperature catalytic metal-oxide-silicon carbide structures1997In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 45, no 3, 183-191 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High temperature sensors, Schottky diodes and capacitors, based on catalytic metal-oxide-silicon carbide devices are investigated. Reducing gases like hydrogen and other hydrogen containing gases, decrease the barrier height and the flat band voltage, respectively, which is used as the sensor signal. The sensitivity of the devices at 600 degrees C to mixtures of carbon monoxide and oxygen with and without water vapour is studied in this paper. A large binary response of the sensors to carbon monoxide similar to the sensor response to hydrogen gas is observed. Close to the stoichiometric ratio of carbon monoxide and oxygen, the signal changes from a high to a low value corresponding to an excess of carbon monoxide and an excess of oxygen, respectively. When hydrogen is added to a mixture of carbon monoxide and oxygen, the signal changes from a high to a low value at a higher oxygen concentration. Since the response of these devices to hydrogen and hydrogen containing gases is supposed to emanate from hydrogen atoms, the mechanism of the response to carbon monoxide is discussed. The signal to carbon monoxide as well as to hydrogen decreases in the presence of water vapour and the reason for this is discussed.

  • 12.
    Tobias, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baranzahi, Amir
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kordina, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Janzén, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fast chemical sensing with metal-insulator silicon carbide structures1997In: IEEE Electron Device Letters, ISSN 0741-3106, E-ISSN 1558-0563, Vol. 18, no 6, 287-289 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is demonstrated that the current-voltage characteristics of platinum-thin insulator silicon carbide diodes react rapidly to changes of the concentration of oxygen and hydrocarbons in the ambient already at temperatures around 500 degrees C-600 degrees C, In this letter, we use moving gas outlets to, for the first time, estimate time constants of the response in the order of a few milliseconds. The short time constants of these sensors make them suitable for applications in combustion monitoring. The new method to modulate gas concentrations rapidly at surfaces has the potential to be a valuable tool for evaluation of device structures for fast chemical sensing.

  • 13.
    Tobias, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baranzahi, Amir
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Schoner, A.
    IMC, Kista, Sweden .
    Rottner, K.
    IMC, Kista, Sweden .
    Karlsson, Susanne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mårtensson, P.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Studies of the ambient dependent inversion capacitance of catalytic metal oxide silicon carbide devices based on 6H- and 4H-SiC material1998In: Silicon Carbide, III-Nitrides and Related Materials, Part 1-2, Trans Tech Publications , 1998, Vol. 264-2, 1089-1092 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Platinum-oxide-silicon carbide structures change their capacitance upon gas exposure and are used as gas sensors. The decrease of the inversion capacitance within 750 to 900 degrees C due to hydrogen exposure is studied for 4H- and 6H-SiC,:both n- and p-type. A mechanism for the capacitance decrease is suggested which explains also the large change in the conductance of the structures.

  • 14.
    Tobias, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mårtensson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baranzahi, Amir
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Göras, Anders
    MECEL AB, Åmål, Sweden.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Moving gas outlets for the evaluation of fast gas sensors1998In: EUROSENSORS XII, VOLS 1 AND 2, IOP PUBLISHING LTD , 1998, 761-764 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is shown that platinum thin-insula :or-silicon carbide Schottky diodes operated at about 600 degrees C are fast enough to monitor the air fuel ratio in the individual cylinders in the exhaust from a petrol engine. These chemical sensors have time constants of the order of 1 ms. We describe a simple laboratory technique, which can be used to change the gas composition at a chemical sensor within milliseconds. It is based on mechanically oscillating gas outlets placed close to the sensor surface. The properties of and possibilities with such "moving gas outlets" are described.

  • 15.
    Tobias, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mårtensson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baranzahi, Amir
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Salomonsson, Per
    AB Volvo Technological Development, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Åbom, Lisa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Response of metal-insulator-silicon carbide sensors to different components in exhaust gases1998In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 47, no 1-3, 125-130 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of different components in simulated car exhaust gases on silicon carbide based field effect sensors are studied using a two-level factorial design. Strong effects are observed for H-2, hydrocarbons, and CO. The effects vary with temperature and can possibly be used for a multi-component analysis of exhaust gases.

  • 16.
    Tobias, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nakagomi, S.
    Ishinomaki Senshu University, Japan.
    Baranzahi, Amir
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zhu, R.
    Ishinomaki Senshu University, Japan.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mårtensson, P.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Electrical characterization of chemical sensors based on catalytic metal gate - Silicon carbide Schottky diodes1998In: Silicon Carbide, III-Nitrides and Related Materials, Part 1-2, Trans Tech Publications , 1998, Vol. 264-2, 1097-1100 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The IV-characteristics of platinum gate Schottky diodes with an interfacial layer of TaSix or Ta depends on gas ambient and they are therefore used as gas sensors, e.g. for combustion engine monitoring. Ideality factors and barrier heights depend on interfacial layers and temperature and are further investigated here. Gas sensitive Schottky diodes on both p-and n-type SIC are shown.

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